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James Newell Arnold.

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Vital Record of Rhode Island.

1636=18^0.

KIRST SERIES.

BIRTHS MARRIAGES AND DEATHS.



A Family Register for the People,



By James N. Arnold,

Editor of the Narkagansett Historical Register.



' Is Nly Name Written in the Book of Life?



Vol. 6. BRISTOL COUNTY.



Published under the Auspices of the General Assembly.



/;



PROVIDENCE, R. 1 ;

Nakragansktt Historical Tublishing Company.

1894.







COPYRIGHTED IN THE OFFICE OF THE LIBRABIAN OF CONORESS, AT
WASHIJSTGTON, 1894.



Printed by the Providknoe Journal Co.,
Providence, R. I.



INTRODUCTION.



RISTOL COUNTY, formerly a pnvt of Massachusetts, presents several
sharp contrasts with Khode Island when we examine into tlieir mode
of keeping the local records. The two original towns of the county
(Bristol and Warren) bear out the same plan that appears on those
of tht' three other towns (Cumberland, Tiverton and Little Compton), re-
ceived from Massachusetts at the same time as these were, viz.:
That they kept their genealogical matter in a far superior condition than our
earliest colonists did theirs. Had the Rhode Island towns been as faithful,
then this work would have been double its present size. While the compiler
has been saved all this worry to decipher it, he regrets that it was so badly
neglected, as it leaves open spaces and confusion where they apparently
should not occur, and has made this work very incomplete and in many re-
spects unsatisfactory. The compiler offers the same excuse he has given in
the earlier volumes^that he realizes the great dificiency— but yet believing
that half a loaf is better than none, and knowing that even this might be
lo.st, he has in his own humble way done what he could to preserve even this
much from becoming lost.

He feels a keener pride than ever that his work (rather his labor of love)
has been so well received by the public at large. He appreciates the compli-
ments paid to it by those able to .iudge of its merits, and thanks the authors
for the interest manifest!^ in the enterprise.

With this county we cover the enti'-e State, and end so far as the official
record goes the Vital Record of the St^te. There remains now to be pub-
lished the "semi-official record, if it may be so termed, consisting of news-
paper, church and individui\l items, which would make, in our opinion, as fine
a volume as any that has yet appeared in this serial. While it would neces-
sitate many repetitions, it would add many new points and strengthen ma-
terially the matter found in thcso pages. In our opinion this is very desirable,
and should lie done to add as much completeness as possible to our work.

The Honorable General Assembly has been very liberal towards us, and,
if they will again look with favor upon us, we shall publish in the future a
supplement to this work, containing tho matter above mentioned.

It is a matter of regret with the compiler that a State so historic as
ours and a city the second in New England, with a record second to none,
has not historical and genealogical societies worthy of them. We trust that
in the future the State will be blessed by such an institution. No more far-
reaching, moralizing, better educating and enobling entei-prise can be founded,
and the compiler trusts that there may yet a Dexter or a Butler arise that will
found for his native State a society of this nature, that will be a blessing for-
ever to our people. May such an institution come based upon broad and lib-
eral principles, and controlled by men of brains and a.bility, with a liberalty
enough to reward merit, to encourage historical enterprise, wherever it may
crop out, resolving to recognize genius wherever it may be found, in the palace
or the hovel, or in whatever condition of life or circumstances it may be placed



4 INTRODUCTION.

— is the earnest and sincere wish of the writer, and he realizes this want fully
in his own labors in these fields.

CONDITION OF THE RECORDS.

Bristol's first book is in poor condition, but has been copied into two books,
which are now called No. 1 andNo. 2, and which have been very carefully com-
pared with the original. No. 3, a book of deaths, has been copied. The origi-
nal in poor condition. No. 4 needs binding.

The compiler published the Bristol intentions and marriages and the births
in the Bristol Phenix, in the current issue of that paper, from Jan. 31, 1885,
to Sept. 10, 1887, both inclusive.

Right here we must congi-atulate Bristol upon being so fortunate in the
selection of its Town Clerk (Hon. Herbert F. Bennett). This gentleman has
done and is doing a most creditable ns well as a most desirable work of put-
ting the records into first-class condition. He has indexed the Vital Records
thoroughly, and has now nearly completed an index of real estate, under one
alphabet, an immense labor. The honorable gentleman has got something to
work for. He has a town which is intelligent and can appreciate the import-
ance and value of his labors. We wish, decidedly, evei-y other town in our
State had just such ofiicers and just such enterprise behind them to encou-
rage and push on the work so much needed and yet so universally neglected.

Warren has four books, three of which are in need of binding. No. 4 has
only marriages. Warren is a small town in regard to acres, and we think
the only town that has a Town Hall larger in area than the town. We ad-
mire the enterprise of the town in providing a building large enough to hold
all Warren, and trust they will next be liberal enough to provide for the re-
binding of their volumes of towa evidence. There is nothing more neglected in
our towns than the case of the Record Books. I believe the Town Clerk has
a right to order his books to be rebound when, in his judgment, they need it,
and I believe such a bill would be sustained by every court in the State. We
do not wish the good people of Warren to think we believe their Town Re-
cords are in worse condition than otber towns, but the same fact that will ap-
ply to other towns will apple here— that the books should be rebound. The
wonder is, to me, a. people so intelligent and enterprising as those of Warren
■ have not looked into this affair before.

Barrington has two square books of Vital Record, in one of which several
pages have been abstracted, either for a purpose or removed by the Clerk for
errors committed on them. In the Ancient Town Meeting we find a few
items. We were pleased to learn that means would soon be taken to rebind
the Town Records. The town is to be congratulated on its very admirable
hall. If a stranger will be but a little observing he can guage a. township very
accurately. A look at the Town Hall and its school houses is a clear index
to the sterling worth of the town. Where every school house and the Town
Hall floats the national flag every day the loyalty of these people can be re-
lied on in time of dread. Barrington is such a town.

THE NAMES OF THE TOWNS.

Bristol, one of the Massachusetts towns acquired Jan. 27, 1746-7. Named
from Bristol, England. A part annexed to Warren May 30, 1873. Indian
name Montaup.

Warren, another Massachusetts town, acquired the same date as Bristol.
Named from Sir Peter Warren, Admiral in the British navy. Indian name
Sowoms.

Barrington, incorporated June 16, 1770. Taken from Warren. First in-
corporated in 1718 by Massachusetts, but afterwards merged into Warren.



INTRODUCTION. 5

Named, it is supposed, from an English town of that name. Indian name
Popanomscut.

ACKNOWLEUCJEiMENTS.

The General Assembly of the State has again been liberal and has be-
stowed on the work a liberal subscription, for which we thank them; and
also the Honorable Committee, who favorable reported upon so desirable a
matter to us, and so vital to the success of this euten^rise.

We also thank the public for the favor in which they received our previous
volumes, and for their good wishes towards us in the future.

PLEASE OBSERVE.

I. That the marriages are given in duplicate, but that nothing beyond the
book and page of the original town record, the names and date are given where
the bride is placed first. That under the groom the notes are so extended as
to include all the items of the record from whence it was taken. The reader
will consider the bride being placed first, therefore, as merely an index for
him to consult the other entry in its proper place. Should they disagree,
give the groom the preference, if possible. That the births and death>s are
grouped so as to better enable the reader to see at a glance the names and
dates in their natural order of the members of the family.

II. That the figure.s at the left of the name is the book and page of the
original town record, the hyphen separating the two apart.

III. That the indexes for all the towns treated in this work are placed in
the fore part of the book. No one need look farther than the index to dis-
cover whether the matter he is in search of is to be found within the covers.
These indexes are so constructed as to show:

(a) The names occurring in their natural order.

(b) The names occurring promiscuously, and

(c) The places mentioned in the text.

TV. That each town is separate and distinct in itself, and the indexes are
confined strictly to each town, but all are placed in the fore part of the work
for the more handy reference of the reader. Should the reader want his copy
rebound, he can do so, and the indexes can be differently placed with no in-
jury to the others.

V. The spelling of the given names are as they stand on the Record in
many instances, and when they are not far wrong. This accounts for the
variety of spelling in this work.

VI. The acts incorporating the several towns of the county are placed be-
fore the matter itself in that particular town.

Vn. Every convenience that would aid the reader, and everything that
would naturally perplex him, has been carefully studied. While not claiming
perfection for our work, we would say that we have spared no pains in order
to make it as simple as possible, and yet be comprehensive. How well we
have succeeded in this must be left, however, to the reader himself to say.

VIII. We have not changed dates here given, but we give it just as it
stands on the Record itself. We have observed, however, that the Scotch year
is more general in this county than in any other that has come to our
notice

A REQUEST.

It would be a great favor to the compiler of this work if every reader
who consults these pages would copy out and send to him at Providence, R.
I., copies from his family record in the Bible, or where else the same may be
recorded, or any other information he may be possessed of, in order to make
these records in the future as complete as possible. It makes no difference



iNTRODUCtlOJf.



whether the party resides iu the State of Rhode Island or not. If they can
connect with Rhode Island ancestry it is sufficient. While these matters may
seem trifling, yet they may become of incalculable value in the future, and
therefore we urgently desire that the Vital Records of Rhode Island may be
made complete and that errors, wherever found, may be pointed out and cor-
rected as soon as possible.

OUR NEW SERIAL.

The compiler of this work begs leave to announce that he has in prepara-
tion a new serial, which he flatters himself will prove of great value and in-
terest to the historian of the State. He has entitled the serial, "RHODE ISL-
AND COLONIAL GLEANINGS."

Vol. I. of this serial will be "The Records of the Proprietors of the Nar-
ragansett, otherwise called the Fones Record." This volume is beyond all
doubt the most historic volume of land evidence in New England. The early
history of Washington county cannot be intelligently written until
the historian has consulted this volume, and no scholar of that county to-
day, who has any love for local history, will be without it. It will be pub-
lished at a price that all can afford one, which will be most probably .f;l.50.
Other volumes will follow this if pati-onage will merit publishment. None of
the volumes are intended to be printed at a fancy price, but at a pric^ that
no intelligent person can take exception to as unreasonable or unjust. The
compiler wishes a liberal patronage and as he intends to be liberal on his
part, he therefore can expect to receive it from his friends and patrons.

The compiler's long experience in reading old manuscript, and his long
and close study of our State history, places him in a position to do an able
work. When it is taken into account the many perplexities and difficulties
that have on every side beset his path, and of such nature that no other man
in the State would have had the courage to face it, and then to see the
noble work he has already done. The Vital Record alone is a monument to
his industry. The grand work the city of Providence is now doing was put
into successful operation by him, seconded by several thoughtful and intelli-
gent gentlemen.

If the good people of our State will stand by us and our lamp of life
holds out, we pledge ourself Rhode Island will have no need to blush for one
of her sons.

The compiler of these Vital Records means business, and he proposes to
be as persistent and as untiring in the future as he has been iu the past, and
he does not propose and will not be put down, but means to be heard. "Hew
to the line" is the motto on his banner, and the preservation in print of our
historical treasures shall be his object, and he asks the endorsement and good
feelings of every intelligent citizen of Rhode Island in his behalf, and he asks
them to see to it that he has a fair and square show.

All he asks for himself he is willing to concede to others, and stands
ready to record every courtesy to others that he expects others to grant him.
The field is broad enough for all, and he only demands that those who enter
it shall enter us scholars should enter and conduct themselves as gentlemen
should towards each other, and be willing to learn of each other and assist
when occasion demands. All that enter the field with these sentiments will
find every day iu the week and Sundays in the compiler a friend, adviser,
sympathizer and man.



I IsT ID E X:



TOWN OF BRISTOL.



1.



Names Occurring in Their Natural Order.
Marriages commence page 5; births page 01; deaths page lU



Abel, 5 114.
Abgail, 5. ^ ^ _
Adams, 5 Gl 114.
Adee, 61 114.
Adey, 114.
Adewitte, 01.
Adouis, 114.
Ady, 5 61.
Ajuba, 61 114.
Alden, 114.
Aldridge, 5.
Alfrey, 114.
Alger, 61 114.
Allen, 5 61 114.
Almy, ll-~>.

Anderson, 6 61.

Andrews, 6 61.

Anthony, 6 62 115.

Antill, 6.

Antonio, 115.

A(iua«, 115.

Archer, 6 62 115.

Ai-msti-ong, 115.

Arnold, 6 115.

Ashworth, 6.

Atherton, 62.

Attwood, 115.

Andinith, 6.

Audinet, 6.

Austin, 6.



Baars, 6 62.
Balibitt, 115.
Babcock, 11-5.
Baker, 6 62 11a.
Bailey, 6 115.
Bainbi-idge, 6.
Ballett, 115.
Ballon, 6.
Ball, 6 62^ 115.
Barclay, 6.
Barker, 6 115.



Barlow, 6.
Barnard, 6 115.
Barnes, 6 115.
Barney, 6 62 115.
Barns, 6.
Barrett, 115.
Barrows, 7 62 116.
Barrns, 7 116.
Barton, 7 116.
Bates, 7.
Batty, 62 116.
Batrap, 7.
Bagley, 7 62 116.
Baylies, 116.
Bearcroft, 7.
Beard, 116.
Bears, 7 62.
Bebee, 7.
Bedford, 7 62.
Belcher, 7.
Benard, 7.
Bennett, 7 116.
Benson, 116.

Bettey, 116.

Bicknell, 7.

Billington, 116.

Billings, 7.

Birch, 62.

Birge, 7 62 116.

Bisha, 62 116.

Bishers, 116.

Bishop, 7 116.

Black, 116.

Bla grove, 7 116.

Blake, 7 62 116.

Blanding, 7.

Blewat. 7.

Bliss, 7.

Bliven, 63 116.

Blossom, 7.

Blye, 7 63.

Bly, 7 116.

Bogert, 7.
Bonney, 117.
Booth, 7 117.
Borden, 8 117.
Borland, 8.
Boston, 117.



Boss, 8.
Bos worth, 8 63 117.-
Bonrne, 9 64 118.
Bowen, 9 65 120.
Bowerman, 9 65 120.
Bowers, 9.
Bowler, 9 120.
Bovce, 9.
Boyle, 9.

Bradford, 9 65 119.
Bradley, 10.
Bragg, 10 66 119.
Brayley, 10.
Brenton, 66 119.
Bretland, 10.
Brewer, 10 66.
Brewster, 10 119.
Briggs, 10 66 119.
Brigham, 10.
Bristol, 10 119.
Bristow, 10 66 120.
Bi-ow^er, 10.
Bro^v^lell, 10 120.
Browningson. 120.
Browning, 11 66.
Brownson, 11 120.
Brown, 11 66 120.
Bnrant, 11.
Bucklin, 11.
Bullock, 11 66 120.
Bumpus, 66.
Bunn, 11 67 120.
Borden, 11.
Burdick, 120.
Burgess, 11 67 120.
Burnham, 11.
Burrell, 67.
BiuToughs, 67.
Burry, 67.
Biu-r, 11 67 121.
Burton, 11 67 121.
Burt, 11 121. _^
Bushee, 12 67 121.
Bush, 12 67 121.
Buthford, 121.
Buttei-worth, 12.
Butt, 12 62 121.
B , 12.



Vlll



VITAL RECORD OF RHODE ISLAND.



Calioone, 67.
Caldwell, 12 07.
Canada, 12.
('ard, G7 121.
Carey, 12.

Carpenter, 13 G* 121.
Carroll, 13.
Carr, 13 121.
Oartee, 13.
Carter, 13 67.
Gary, 67 121.
Casey, 68.
Case, 13.
Cashman, 121.
Cfess, 121.
Castle, 13.
Catalogue, 68.
Cato, 122.
Ceazer, 122.
Chadwell, 122.
Chadwick, 13.
Chaffee, 13 69 122.
Chamberlain, 13 122.
Champlain, 13 69 122.
Chandler, 13 122.
Chappell, 13;
Chase, 13 69 122.
Cheauveteaux, 69.
Child, 13 122.
Christopher, 123.
Chnrchill, 123.
Church, 13 69 123.
Clarke, 14 70 124. - ^
Cleveland, 14.
Clifton, 14.
Clinton, 14 124.
Cobbett, 124.
Cockram, 14 70 124.
Coddington, 14 124.
Coffin, 14.

Coggeshall, 15 70 124.
Coit, l.j 70 125.
Coleman, 125.
Cole, 15 71 125.
Collimore, 125.
Coillins, 15 71 125.
(Jollye, 16.
Colwell, 10 125.
(3ongdou, 16.
('ooke, 1(5 125.
(Jook, 16.

Coomer, 16 71 125.
Corbett, 16 70 125.
Corey, 125.
(3oi-nell, l(j 125.
Cornett, 16 71.
Corps, 71 125.
('ortis, 71 125.
( 'osins, 16.
(%)tton, l(i 71 12.5.
Cuttrell, 16.
Covington, 16.
Cowcl'l, 16.
Co.x, 16 71 125.
Coy, 16 71 126.
Cozzcus, 126.
Cniigg, 1().
Crandall, 16.
Crane, 16 12(>.
Cranston, l(i 71 12(i.
Crocker, 16.
Crooker, 16.



Grossman, 126.
Crowell, 16.
Cud worth, 126.
Cullen, 126.
Cummings, 16 71 126.
Cunliff, 16.
Curtis, 71.
Cushington, 16.



D

Dadey. 17 72.
Daggett, 17 72.
Dailey, 126.
Dalton, 72 126.
Darling, 17 72 126.
Davenport, 72.
Davison, 17.
Davis, 17 72 126.
Davol, 127.
Dawertz, 72.
Dawley, 17 127.
Dawson, 126.
Dayton, 127.
Day, 17.
Deaue, 17 127.
Dearth, 72 127.
Deaur, 17.
De Costa, 127.
De Lizena, 127.
Denmark, 17 127.
Deui.son, 127.
Dennis, 17 127.
Devol, 72.
Dewev, 127.
De Witt, 17.
De Wolf, 17 72 127.
Dexter, 18.
Dimon. 18 73 128.
Donnelly, 73.
Donnels, 18.
Dorman, 129.
Dorrance, 129.
Doty, 18 73 129.
Douglass, 18 129.
Dowling, IS.
Downs, 73.
Dowset, 18.
Drew, 18.
Drowne, 18 73 129.
Drury, 74 129.
Dubois, 18.
Duen, 129.
Dufail, 19.
Dunl»ar, 19 129
Dunham. 19 129.
Durfee, 19 74 129.
Durs, 19.
Dutch, 74.
Dwver, 74 129.
Dyer, 19 74 130.



E

Ecrl, 130.

Easterbrooks, 19 74 130
Easton, 19.
Eddy, 19 74 130.
Edgell, 20 74 130.
Edson, 20.
Edwards, 20 130.
Eldredge, 20.



Ellery, 20 74.
Elliott, 75 130.
Ellis, 20.
EUsbree, 75.
Emmerson, 13(J.
Eiipingcr, 75.
lOsI.M-k, 20 75 130.
Estes, 130.
Everett, 20 75 130.



Fairbanks, 20 75 130.
Fales, 20 75 131.
Fanning, 76.
Faulkner, 132.
Faunce, 21.
Felix, 132.
Feuner, 21 76 132.
Fenton, 76.
Ferris, 21 132.
Ferry, 132.
Field, 21.
Findlev, 21 132.
Finnev, 21 76 132.
Fisher, 21 132.
Fish, 21 77 132.
Fitch, 21 132.
Fletcher, 133.
Forbes, 133.
Ford, 21 77.
Fortune, 133.
Foster, 21 133.
Fowler, 21 133.
Francis, 77.
Franklin, 21 77 133.
Frazier, 21 133.
Frederic, 21.
Freeborn, 21 77 133.
Freeman, 22 133.
French, 22 77 133.
Friend, 22.
Frisbee, 133.
Fry, 22 77 133.
Fuller, 22 133.
Fulton. 133.



G

Gage. 22.
Gaindet, 22 133.
Gains, 22 77 133.
Gallagher, 133.
Gallup, 22 77 133.
Gardiner, 22 133.
Garrett, 22.
Gaven, 133.
Gayton, 22.
Geers, 134.
George, 22.
Gereardv, 77.
Gibbs, 22 77 134.
Giddins, 23 77 134.
Gifford, 23 78 134.
Giles, 23 134.
Gill, 23.
Gilma.n. 77.
(iilot, 23.
(4ins, 23.
(Jla.cking, 134.
Gladding, 23 78 134.
Clashing, 135,



INDEX BRISTOL.



IX



Glover, 24 79 135.
Goff, 24 79 135.
Gooding, 24 80 135.
Goodwin, 24 136.
Goof, 24 SO.
Goonerson, 24 136.
Gorliam. 24 80 136.
Gorton, 25.
Gould, 136.
Grant, 25 80 136.
Graves, 136.
Gray, 25 80 136.
Greene, 25 80 136.
Greenhill, 137.
Greenwood, 25.
Greer, 25 81.
Gridley, 25 137.
Griffen, 81 137.
Grimes, 25 80 137.
Grinnell, 25.
Griswold, 137.
Gross, 81.
Guild, 26.
Guy, 26.
Gwin, 137.

H

Hadley, 26 137.
Hailey, 137.
Haile, 26 81 137.
Hall, 26 81 137.
Hammond, 26 81 137.
Hamton, 81.
Handy, 26 81 137.
Hannah, 137.
Harding, 26 81 137.
Hargraves, 81.
Haruey, 26.
Harris, 26 81 138.
Hartshorn, 26 81.
Hart, 26 81 138.
Haskill, 26 81 138.
Hatch, 26 81 138.
Hathaway, 26.
Haugh, 138.
Havens, 26.
Havier, 26.
Hawes, 26.
Hawley, 2(5.
Hay man, 26 81 138.
Haynes, 82.
Hayward, 27.
Hay, 138.
Ha.zard, 27 82 138.
Hearson, 27.
Hedge, 82 138.
Heiferlaud, 82 138.
Heirlehy, 82 139.
Herle, 138.
Heath, 27 138.
Hicks, 27 139.
Hill, 27 82 139.
Hilton. 139.
Hiuton, 27 82 139.
Hixon, 27.
Hoar, 27 82 139.
Hogins, 27 82 139.
Holbrook, 27.
Holdridge, 27.
Holmes, 27 82 131).
Homan, 27.
Honfleur, 139.



Hooper, 27.
H6rswell, 139.
Horton, 27 139.
Howard, 27.
Howell, 139.
Howe, 27 82 139.
Howland, 27 82 139.
Hubbard, 28 140.
Hull, 28.
Hummery, 28.
Hiunphrey, 28 S3 140.
Huntington, 28.
Husband, 28.
Hyde, 28 83.
Hymes, 140.



Ide, 140.
IncUan, 140.
Ingalls, 28.
Ingraham, 28 83 140.
Inman, 141.
I reus, 141.



J

.Tackman, 29.
Jacobs, 29 84 141.^.
James, 29.
Jarvis, 29.
Jenkins, 29 85 141.
Jennings, 85 141,
.Tenuisou, 29.
.feriiis, 29.
Jethro, 29 141.
Jolls, 29 85 141.
Jones, 29 85 142.
Joslin, 30.
Joy, 30 85 142.
Judson, 142.
July, 142.



K

Kaull, 30 142.
Keen, 30 85.
Kelley, 30 86 142.
Kempton, 30 142.
Keudrick, 142.
Kennedy, 142.
Kenney, 142.
Kenton, 30.
Kent, 30 86 142.
Kenyon, 142.
Kershaw, 142.
Kezzer, 30.
Kidder, 30.
Kimball, 30.
Kinder, 86.
Kinn, 30.
Kingsley, 30 142.
King, 142.

Kinnecutt, 30 85 142.
Kins, 142.
Kipp, 30 86 142.
Knight, 30 142.
Knowles, 143.
Knox, 31.



Ladd, 31.
Lader, 86.
Traduce, 143.
Lakeman, 148.
Lake, 31 86 143.
Lambert, 143.
Lamb, 143.
Laudon, 86.
Lane, 31.
Lansing, 31 143.
Lawless, 31 86 143.
Lawrence, 31 86 143.
Lawson, 31 86 143.
Laws, 143.
Lawton, 31 86 143.
Leach, 31.
Lebaron. 31 143.
Leeman, 143.
Lee, 31 143.
Lefavour. 31 86 143.
Letlingwell, 32.
Lentharus, 144.
Lenthorn, 86.
Leonard, 32.
Lesaven, 144.
Lewis, 32 87 144.
Lincoln, 32 87 144.
Lindsey, 32 87 144.-
Linsey, 144.
Ling, 33.

Liscomb, 33 87 145.
Littlefield, SS 145.^
Little, 33 88 145. ^
Livesey, 33 145.
Longround, 33.
Loring, 33.
Lowder. 33.
Low, 33.
Lucas, 33.
Luce, 33 145.
Lumber, 33.
Luther, 34 88 145.
Lyon, 34.
Lyseum, 34.

M

Macey, 34.
Mackarty, 34 88 145.
Mackinson, 145.
Maclijitoch, 146.
Maemau, 146.
Macomber, 34 146.
Ma kirn, 89 146.
Manchester, 34 89 146.
Mansfield, 146.
Mann, 84 89 146.
Marchant, 146.
Marcy, 34.
Makeleaner, 35.
Markes, 35 89.
.ALirshall, 35 89 146.
Marsh, 35.
Marston, 146.
Martha. 146.
^Iathe\>son, 147.
Mathews, 147.
Mariindale, 35 89 146.
Martin, 35 89 146.
Mason, 35 90 147.
Matteson, 35.



VITAL RECORD OF RHODE ISLAND.



Maxfield, 35 90 147.
Maxwell, 36.
iMavIiew, 36.
May, 36 90 147.
McOanu, 147.
McCartney, 147.
McCartee, 36.
McCarte, 36 147.
McConnick, 36.
McDonald, 36.
MeGeii>hy, 36.
Mclntire, 90.
Mcintosh. 36 90.
McMillon, 36.
Meade, 90.
Meigs, 36 147.
]Mellis, 147.
Mi CO, 36.
Midget, 36.
Mike, 147.
Miles, 36.
Miller, 36 90 147.
Mills, 36.
Mingo, 36 148.
Minpelieur, 148.
Mitchell, 36 90.
Moorev, 37 148.
Moore, 37 90 148.
Morrice, 148.
Morrison, 148.
Morris, 37 148.
Morse, 37.
Mosher, 148.
Moshier, 37 90 148.
Mott, 37 148.
Mowry, 37 90.
Mulchahy, 37.
Mumford, 37.
Muuday, 37 148.
Munro, 37 90 148.
Murray, 39 151.
Mutton, 39 94 151.



N

Nash, 39 151.
Navy, 151.
Ned, 39.
Negras, 151.
Negus, 39.
Nelson, 39.
Newby, 152.
Newdegate, 94.
Newauan, 39 94 152.
Newton, 40 94 152.
Nibs, 4(J 95 152.
Nickerson, 152.
Nicholson, 4().
Nichols, 40 152.
Nigars, 40.
Nooning, 40 95 152.
Norris, 40 95 152.
Northup, 40 152.
Norton, 40 95 152.
Nye, 152.
Nyles, 40.



o

Oatley, 152.
Ocqua, 95.
Oldridge, 40 95 152.



Olney, 153.
Olstra, 40.
Ornisby, 40 95.
Osborne, 40 95 153.
Osgood, 40.
Osque, 40.
Otterson, 40 153.
Oxx, 40 96 153.



Paddock, 41.
Page, 4l.
Paine, 41 96 153.
Palmer, 41 154.
Palmenter, 41.
I'apillon, 41 96 154.
I'arker, 41 90 154.
I'atrage, 41.
Patricke, 41.
Patridge, 41 154.
Patterson, 1.54.



Online LibraryJames Newell ArnoldBristol County [records of births, marriages and deaths] → online text (page 1 of 41)