Copyright
James Rush.

The philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita online

. (page 15 of 59)
Online LibraryJames RushThe philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita → online text (page 15 of 59)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


other maters of theory, has become doctrinal and divided ; and
the inquirer has here not only to strive at reaching the secrecy of
nature, but harder still, has to encounter the obstinacy of sectaries-
whose opinions have grown into pride, by their unyielding con-
tentions with each other.

When the observative Reader has finished this volume, he will
perceve that in part of this fifth section, and ocasionaly elsewhere,
I was sometimes ocupied with the contestable opinions of men ••
but generaly, with an aim to extend our views of the human voice,.
by consulting and recording the Oracular voice of Nature: a con-
trast that may well induce a lover of truth and brevity to exclainij
Happy is he, who desiring to enlarge the circle of knowledge,
comes to a subject which the fictional finger of the school has^
never touched.



156 THE EXPRESIOX OF SPEECH.

SECTION YI.

Oj the Expresion of Speech.

In the preceding sections we have explained the terms of the *
five modes of speech, with many of their forms and varieties;
have described these modes and forms, as they apear in the radical
and vanish, the alphabetic elements, and in the construction of
sylables; and far as acurately ascertained, have shown how the
Organs of the Voice mechanicaly produce the phenomena of these
modes and forms. These explanations and descriptions give a
preparatory view of the functions of speech ; and embrace all the
generalities required by an inteligent and atentive Reader, in
pursuing the subsequent details of this Work.

Speech is employed to declare the States and Purposes of the
mind. These are first known to us as Perceptions ; and Percep-
tions may be divided into Thots, and Pasions. Acording to this
view, the design of speech is to declare our thots and pasions. If
we acknowledge this distinction in the states of mindj the voice
must, by a like ordination, have distinct means or signs for de-
claring them. It is therefore of great importance to ascertain, what
are the diferent means in the voice, for declaring in one case, the
plain and simple condition of thot ; and in the other, the excited
mental condition of pasion : for these will form the leading divi-
sions of our present subject.

Schoolmen make a. vague dLstinction between thots and pasions,
and comon usage has adopted their language. This is not a place
for controversy ; nor Ls it necesary to inquire deliberately, whether
the above distinction refers to the esential character of the states
of mind, or to their degres. Some may be disposed to consider
thot and pasion as varied degres only, of intensity of perceptions;
^ since the function, noted as a plain unexcited thot in one, has in
another, from its urgency, and without aparent specific diference,
tlie active ])ower of a ])asis between the
mind and the voice. And were we describing Nature, to those
only who can throw-aside the habit of an old, limited, and dis-
tmcting nomenclature, for one more recent and precise, ^^•e Mould
not at this time, encumber her simplicity. But the atempts of
the meta])hysical schools to discriminate the states of the miiul,
and the vo



Online LibraryJames RushThe philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita → online text (page 15 of 59)