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James Rush.

The philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita online

. (page 26 of 59)
Online LibraryJames RushThe philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita → online text (page 26 of 59)
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crete of these final sylables : these sylables at their elevated pitch,
being caried on in the phrase of the monotone, or of the rising
ditone. For the interogative expresion always implying a contin-
uation of the voice, as distinguished from the. close of the Triadj
the above named phrases do add their peculiar character to that of
the rapid concrete, and thus efect the required continuation, at the
end of the sentence. This species of close is here exemplified.

He said you were in com pa ra — ble ?



^F=i—y—4—J-= ^I^



~^ J



In the Second ; the same thoro expresion being still suposed j if
the antepenult sylable is emphatic, and of indefinite quantity, it
asumes the slow concrete, and the last two take on the radical
change and the rapid concretej shown by the notation of the word
ancestors in a preceding example.

In the Third ; if the penult is a long quantity, it will rise by
the slow concrete ; and the last will have the rapid concrete with
the radical change. This form of intonation may be obvious
without a diagram ; and from what has been already shown, it
will be unecesary to give an ilustration by the staff, to all the
suceding descriptions within the present subject.

In the Fourth ; if the last sylable of a sentence requiring the
thoro expresion, is emphatic and capable of bearing the slow con-
crete, it asumes that form of intonation. Under this condition,
the radical pitch of the three sylables may go thru the downward
tritone, as here represented.

Give Fiib ills a tri umph for his dc — lat/?



^^^^^S




OF INTERROGATrV^E SENTENCES. 277

III this instance, the concrete rises of the octave, iifth, or third,
i\s tlie c^>



Online LibraryJames RushThe philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita → online text (page 26 of 59)