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James Rush.

The philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita online

. (page 33 of 59)
Online LibraryJames RushThe philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita → online text (page 33 of 59)
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bination, and in this last case, it is still heard only on a single
elementj the sucesive constituent impulses of that tremor must
each consist of an abrupt radical, and of a rapid concrete thru
some one interval of the scale. Let us, for brief and more pre-
cise description, call these impulses, or iterations, the Tittles : and
the spaces on the tremulous scale, between the tittlesj here asumed
to be equal, for so they seem to mej we will call the Minute Tit-
telar Skip or interval. Whether these skips here asumed as equal,
are of the same extent, under all circumstances, and in every voice,
it is not now necesary to inquire. The tremulous scale is then
made-up of a sucesion of tittles, each of which, like the comon
sylabic impulse, has its rapid radical and concrete pitch. Taking
the concrete of the tittle, as a designation, there may be a tremor
of the semitone, second, third, filth and octave ; the concrete pitch
of each sucesive tittle rapidly rising or faling thru those intervals
respectively. In this case the tittelar ski])s are suposed to be on
the same line of radical pitch; still it is easy to perceve, that while
the rapid concrete of these tittles is moving in its interval, the
tittles themselves may, in their chatering radical skips, be caried
upward or downward, thru a ])art or the whole of the compas of
the voice. These tittelar skips with tiie rapid concretes, are madi;
in two ways, as in the folowing diagramj



356 THE TREMOR OF THE VOICE.

12 3 4 5




where a given number of these skips are continued on one line of
radical pitch : as in the first and second bars ; the former, having
the rapid concrete of a second ; the latter, that of a fifth. The
third bar represents a line of skips, with a change by comon radi-
cal pitch, thru a second or tone ; and by iterations on a line, with
a radical change, by proximate, and it may be by remote degrees,
the voice in one manner, ascends the whole compas, of the dia-
tonic scale.

In another maner, the ascent of the tremulous scale is made,
by taking the radical of each tittle, sucesively, a minute interval
above the last, as in the fourth and fifth bars ; the rapid concrete
in the former being a third, and in the latter, a fifth. In this
manner, without the last described linear step by proximate or
other deg-rees on the diatonic scale, but with a direct rise or fall bv
tittelar skips the whole extent of the voice is travei-sed. We have
no means for measuring the space between the tittles, in this direct
manner of ascent. It cannot be a semitone. If it were, the
tittelar intervals being all equal, the tittelar skips would in all
cases, be plaintive ; whereas, it is so only when the concrete of the
tittle is a semitone. And it may be infered, that it is not greater
than this interval : for if we make the tremulous movement of a
major third, the number of tittelar skips will cxcede five ; which
is the number of semitones included within the third. How much
less than a semitone, the tittelar interval may be, we leave others
experimentally to decide.*

* Some one, it seems, has gone far boj'ond comon perception in distinguish-
ing such minute intervals: as I find the lolowing statement under a Note, on
the nine Inindred and twentieth page of an American edition of Dr. Carj)en-
ter's recent extended compihition on Physiology. ' It is said that the cele-
brated Mme. Mara was able to sound one hundred diferent intervals between
[ivithin the limits of) each tone. The compns of her voice was at least three
octaves, or twenty-one tones; [notes;) so that the total number of [minute)



THE TREMOR OF THE VOICE. 357

Wliat has been said of tlie a,'



Online LibraryJames RushThe philosophy of the human voice : embracing its physiological history; together with a system of principles, by which criticism in the art of elocution may be rendered inteligible [i.e. intelligible], and instruction, definite and comprehensive to which is added a brief analysis of song and recita → online text (page 33 of 59)