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I




ARRAGON:



IN FIVE ACTS.



AS PERFORMED AT THE THEATRE-ROYAL, HAYMARKET.



JAMES SHERIDAN KNOWLES.



LONDON:
EDWARD MOXON, DOVER STREET.

MDCCCXLII.



LONDON :
BRADBURY AND EVANS, PRINTERS, WHITEFRIARS.



NEALE THOMSON, ESQ.,

OF CAMPHILL, GLASGOW.



MY DEAR NEALE THOMSON,

Accept this Humble, but Sincere Testimony of Affection
and Gratitude, from your faithful Friend and Servant,

JAMES SHERIDAN KNOWLES.



29, Alfred-place,
Bedford-square, London,
30th May, 1842.



2076781



ADVERTISEMENT.

To my staunch friend, "W. A. Dow, Esq. King's Bench
Walk, Temple, I return my thanks for superintending this Play
in the course of the press ; but this is not the whole of my
debt. By pertinaciously urging a course of the action, materially
different from what I originally intended, he has enabled me to
enhance the general interest in a degree which has had the effect
of rendering it infinitely superior to what it would otherwise
have been.



CHARACTERS.



THE KING OF ARRAGON . . . Mr. Howe.

ALONZO (his Son, married to OLIVIA) . . Mr. H. Holl.

ANDREAS \ ..... Mr. Wilsons.

CARLOS > (Courtiers) . . . Mr. Worrell.

GOMEZ ) ..... Mr. Williams.

PEDRO (an Executioner) . . . . Mr. Gough.

RUPHINO (a Peasant) .... Mr. Stuart.

ALASCO (his Son) . . . . Mr. C. Kean.

ALMAGRO (ALASCo's/Hend, m love with OLIVIA) Mr. Phelps.

VELASQUEZ ...... Mr. F. Vining.

CORTEZ ....... Mr. Caulfield.

NUNEZ . . Mr. T. F. Matthews.



OLIVIA (RUPHINO'S Daughter)
THERESA (an Attendant)



Mrs. C. Kean.



Officers, Jailer, Peasants, Guards,



THE ROSE OF ARRAGON.



ACT i.

SCENE I.
A Room in the Citadel.



Enter CARLOS and ANDREAS.

ANDREAS.

The Prince not yet set out !

CARLOS.

Not yet : he cleaves

To home with doating on his peasant wife.
His journey towards the frontier thrice has he
From day to day deferr'd already ; but
The King, impatient of his weak delay,
Brooks it no longer, lie departs at noon.

ANDREAS.

Guess you, my lord, the motive of the King
In banishing, as 'twere, at such a time,
The Prince from Sarragossa ? Hard exchange,
The bridal chamber for the warrior's tent !
The murmurs and the dalliance of love,

B



2 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT

For the trump's braying and the clang of steel !
Methinks, the nuptials, he so interrupts,
Can scarce be to his mind !

CARLOS.
'Tis certain, sir,

They are not, and no wonder. The fair Prince
Had bent full low, to choose, for mate, a bride
Of pure Hidalgo blood ; how then, the child
Of a peasant grant her pattern of her sex,
And never match'd throughout the lengthy line
Of Eve's angelic daughters ?

ANDREAS.

Such she is !

A noteless maid, that from all note, howe'er

Surpassing, doth divert observance, so

Her perfect beauty and consorting form

Bewilder rivalry itself, and turn

The infidel into a worshipper !

CARLOS.

Certain she has no peer ; yet, not a match
For the King's son. So thinks the King, and hence
The Prince hath honourable banishment.
The army needs no prince, the soldier who
Commands it, prince of leaders ! do you think
The King stops here ? Will he remain content
With banishment of the enamour'd Prince ?
Will that remove the cause of banishment
The knot the Prince has tied will that undo it ?
'Tis but the opening of a drama, sir,
Of which the master-action is to come !



SCENK i.] THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. 3

ANDREAS.

I trust the King, if more he meditates,
Will act advisedly Our peasant princess
Amongst her class ranks highest ; royal pastures,
For their extent and stock, her father hath,
Is more beloved than envied; hath a son
Of parts that look with scorn upon his station,
And fiery soul, more prompt to move than rest ;
The peasantry speak things that mock content
Complain of wasting levies, grievous imposts
And with their thoughts our citizens chime in ;
The Cortez have been calmer too. Behoves
The king be wary how he acts ! A straw
Has struck the sceptre from as firm a grasp,
And may do so with his. Withdraw, my lord ;
Here come the Prince and Princess, taking leave.
Whate'er we wish, upon an hour so tender
'Twere pity to intrude.

CARLOS.
Have with you, sir. [They go out.

Enter AI.ONZO and OLIVIA (weeping on his shoulder}.

ALONZO.

Hold up, my sweet ! help me to play my part

The hardest one ! to go ! O stiffly move

The limbs that thwart the bidding of the heart,

And mine would root me here ! Olivia !

Help me, sweet love ! thy looks dissuade enough

Without thy tears, where no dissuasion needs,

And all must nought avail ! Each tear you shed

Adds weight to weight, where strength departs from strength

Already overtasked ! My tender love !

B2



4 THE ROSE OF A.RRAGON. [ACT i.

O'erlook thine own loss in the thought of mine ;

And, that again o'erlooking, glance beyond,

And find enhanced joys, for friends restored ;

Who now could bless the chance they once repined at,

Seeing that happiness awhile foregone

Is riches well laid out at usury

Doubled, when coming back.

OLIVIA.
Will it come back ?

Will it not fare with us as T have heard

It oft-times does, where men with coffers trade

Already full enough ? who, when they think

Their treasures will run o^er, find all run out

For overgrown affluence, stark beggary !

Oh, no, my love ! this parting brings no gain,

Or if it does, no gain that can repair,

Far less repay, this loss !

ALONZO.

Farewell !

OLIVIA.
O Heaven !

You are not going ! sooner would I think

My arm were from my body falling off,

Far better could endure ! my soul's best life,

Why art thou aught than what I deemM thee once

The peasant that I loved !

ALONZO.
Lamentest thou

My royal birth ?

OLIVIA.

Is 't not mine enemy.
Enforcing absence, enemy to love ?



SCENE i.] THE ROSE OF ARRAGON.

Oh, on a peasant's breast I were content

To lean my cheek that peasant being thou !

Unheeded had the gorgeous world pass'd by,

Or if I raised it thence to take a look,

It had been, only, with more rapt content,

To lay it down again ! O love, forego

Thy regal heritance ! doff name and all

For love, that 's more than all, I would for thee !

ALONZO.

For thee I keep them, as attire, sweet love !
Befitting him to wear, who weareth thee.

OLIVIA.

Leave such attire for those who covet it ;
Desert, contented in thyself remain !
In thy fair self thou hast attire enough !
Thou rank'st in heaven why care to rank on earth ?
Where thou shalt see demerit rank as high
More high, most often winning thy just seat.
Why have not those, alas ! who have one heart
In love, one heart in every other thing ?
Then it would be cleaving all ! No rending ? No
Dividing ! severing so wide apart,
Hope sickens at the thought to meet again !

ALONZO.
Once more, farewell !

OLIVIA.

Oh, no ! my lord ; oh, no !

I feel it is impossible to part !

Oh that it pleased thee, Heaven, to close my eyes

While yet I hold him here I were content

The seal were never broke ! 'Twere happier



6 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT i.

Than open them again, and find him gone !
My lord ! my love ! my husband !

ALONZO.
Oh, remissness !

That to o'erlook which lay so near my care !
List and in this regard, on comfort feast,
As freely as thou wilt ! There is a heart
That will be near thee, on whose steadfast love
And faith we both may count. Its owner, one
Whose rank is warranty against suspicion
Shunn'd for his office of a nature such
As I forbear, even to thee, to name.
By him shall I be straightly advertis'd
Of all that passes here ; so, should occasion
Demand my very presence, I am near thee
Unknown to any, save that man ! This secret
Lodge in thy heart, with an entire belief,
As trust that cannot fail thee.

Enter the KING, CARLOS, and ANDREAS.

KING.

More delay ! [OLIVIA, faints, on seeing the KING.

Hence, sir ! The rank you should adorn, you shame
Too worthy for the wearer ! Am I heard ?

ALONZO.

Too well, at least for one. It was enough
To part with me, the hard necessity
Required not such rebuke, to make it harder !
Her senses all are lapsed, will you not take her,
My father ? Should she go to other arms
When 'tis thy son's she leaves ?

{Places her in the KING'S arms.



SCENK ii.] THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. 7

For that son's sake,

As thou hold'st dear his weal, health, being, honour,

Protect and cherish her. O Heaven ! Farewell !

[Rushes out.
KING.

Don Carlos, take her give her to the care
Of those who wait upon her, watch by her
Till to herself she comes then break at once
My will, as I just now possessed you of it.
Her native air will better minister
Restoratives, than our close palace can !
You, Andreas, my council summon, straight.
A peasant share the throne of Arragon !
Better the throne of Arragon overturn !

[ They go out.

SCENE II.

A Cottage. In the distance a mountainous country.

Enter RUPHINO and ALASCO.

RUPH1NO.

How sayest now, Alasco? Art content?
Thy overbearing pride is conqueror !
His private nuptials with thy sister hath
The Prince Alonzo own'd, in presence of
His royal father, and convention full
Of all the noble blood in Arragon ;
And thou, the peasant-heir unto a stool,
By proclamation under royal seal
For 'tis the same as such, as clear implied



8 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT i.

Art kinsman to a race whose seats are thrones !
Art now content?

ALASCO.
I am.

RUPHINO.
So am not I !

It was coercing where the will was free

To do all needful right, and such had done !

By the rare beauty of your sister won.

And more by her rare virtue, which repell'd

The approach of love till honour came with it,

Its most ingenuous voucher that 'twas such

As chariest virgin free might entertain ;

The Prince at once besought her heart and hand

Assured by holy rite.

ALASCO.

The Prince was wise.
He knew a virtuous woman, and the way
She could alone be won ; and took that way.
Thereby receiving to his arms a maid
Whose worth is challenger of Arragon
To find another maid her moiety !
Good sooth, I thank the Prince, for honestly
Affecting my rare sister ! taking care
Of his health ! By Our Lady, had he breathed to her,
That's pure as heaven, one wish or thought of hell,
And with my cognizance

RUPHINO.
Alasco, peace !

Supposing wrongs to be by those committed
Who never gave us ground to think they meant them,



SCENE ii.] THE ROSE OF ARRAGON.

But proofs, instead, of holiest intents,

Is to commit, ourselves, a grievous wrong,

And surfeit virtue of its bootless deeds,

That cannot earn it credit ! So oft-times

Uncharitableness defaulters makes

Of those who else were solvent. Think, my son,

If this were told the Prince, how it might change

His aspect towards thy sister, without cloud

And summer brightness now !

ALASCO.
If it were told ?

'Tis told !

RUPHINO.

By whom ?

ALASCO.

By me ! nor stintingly.
Think you I went a-begging when I went
To claim admission of my sister's rights,
As loud and broad as though she had a king
To father her, being a prince's wife ?

RUPHINO.

I was content to know she was his wife
Her honour so assured, it needed not
Be bruited through the realm disparaging
To his rank !

ALASCO (greatly indignant).
Disparaging !

RUPHINO.
Well boy, how now ?

ALASCO (recollecting himself).
You are her father and you have a right
To speak of your own child.



10 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT i.

RUPHINO.

I hope I have.

ALASCO.

Disparaging ! the Prince beheld her first
At a tournament, among the common gazers,
No state to point her out, and yet the mark
Attracted every eye ! he heard the buzz
Of wonder, heraFding her matchless beauty,
And, far and near, the concourse summoning
Before the humble seat allotted her !
With but her peasant brother for a page,
With but a peasant's fillet for a crown,
With robes no other than a peasant's tire,
There sat my sister, on that common bench,
Converting it into a radiant throne
Before which ribbons, stars, and coronets
Did press to stand and render homage to her
Disparaging !

RUPHINO.
I meant to his rank !

ALASCO.
His rank?

Rank 's but an eminence whereon we see
Sometimes a tower, sometimes a hovel makes
Alike conspicuous the dignity
Or meanness of the thing that 's built upon it !

RUPHINO.

My son, these thoughts

ALASCO.

Nay, father, hear me on !
I honour rank, when he, who owns, becomes it !



SCENE ii.J THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. 11

For, here, our stations differ from our clothes

That these are to our measure made ; those, not

Whence marvellous misfitting. Tell me not

Of the Prince's rank, but tell me of his deeds ;

Of which I know but little, save that once

He used a peasant's daughter honestly

That, of its grace diminish'd, when the thing

He felt no shame to do, he fear'd to own !

A private marriage not to be divulged

'Till he saw time ! I saw that time was now,

And made him see it, too !

RUPHINO.
""Twas breach of faith !

ALASCO.

No, father ! what I was no party to
I no observance owed. My sister's marriage
Did accident alone reveal to me.
I found that she had won the Prince's love
Who well deserved a prince he thought she did,
And married her ! If good enough to wed,
I thought my sister good enough to own
And told him so. What instances I used,
And what dissuasion he, it matters not ;
The Prince has own'd her, and I am content ;
Though I had wish'd her otherwise bestowed !

RUPHINO.

What ! on Almagro? must I tell thee, son,
The thousandth time, I do not like that man ;
Whose God is not the one he prayeth to,
But the worst idol that a man can serve
Self ! find the friend he does not profit by,



12 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT i.

In pride, or vanity, or avarice,

And I will grant him single in his loves !

Find me the friend he would not sacrifice,

When profit kept not pace with cherishing ;

And I will show you him who made Almagro,

Help'd him with brain and heart, and, when in need,

Was left there for a doit.

ALASCO.
Velasquez ?

RUPHINO.
Yes!

ALASCO.

Velasquez doats !

RUPHINO.

He doats who loves Almagro !
Thou, boy ! perceiv'st not he is arrogant ?
Whom does he not o'erbear that is too weak
From gentleness or place, to throw him off?
Of all pernicious things, the very worst
Is large ambition with a narrow soul,
Because it strives for power which, when obtain'd
'Tis certain to abuse.

ALASCO.

He is generous !

RUPHINO.

And you do hear of it. Boy, there are men

Who coin by charities, and he is one !

Say what he gives, I '11 tell you what he gets

By what he gives, which makes his bounties mites ;

His modest bounties, that do never seek

To shun the light. He is ungrateful, son !

And he that is ungrateful can't be generous !



SCENE h.] THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. 13

ALASCO.

He is my friend ! I love him : he loves me !

RUPHINO.

Not thee he loves, boy, but thy properties,

That much avail him in the game he plays

To raise himself to popularity.

For, through thy reverend uncle's loving care,

Thy mind, in youth, was plough'd by diligence,

And with the seeds of knowledge amply sown,

That found a kindly soil ! Wherein he lacks,

Thou makest up to him with such a zeal,

Privation doth enrich him! his small worth

For he has worth, as every man hath some

Thy magnifying love doth heave for him

Into a mountain ! make it pass for such

That, with the crowd, he grows enormously .'

But he hath vanity voracious as

The hunger that 's disease which, though 'tis gorg'd

Full to the throat, cannot stop craving on !

Wait till thou stint'st him there! he'll fail thee yea,

Though he could save thee from a jail or starving !

Besides, he has the temper of a wolf.

He has been known to use a woman roughly !

Hurt her to vent his choler ! Such a man

To get thy sister's hand !

ALASCO.

It were bestow'd
Better than on the Prince, disparity



14 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT

Of rank, in those that wed, is dangerous.
In such relation there should be no debts,
Save those that are reciprocal, and which
Jars cannot call to mind ! Will the great Prince
Forget the peasant in the Prince's wife ?
Will life be all one honeymoon ? Believe
The temper is the sweetest pain will turn it.
And that is of the body, or the mind ;
And sometimes is so sharp, it won't abide
A comforter, but flouts the care would lull it !
So, for love's pains, gives love itself repulse ;
So, is its dulcet tongue harsh accents taught,
The least of which breaks its entrancing spell,
And wakens moods, to love, as clouds to sun !
Ah then the heart of woman, when she finds
The force her modest nature underwent
To make allow'd surrender of her charms,
Forgotten ! for the host of suing wishes
That won her slow consent, repugnance now,
Rebuke, reproach ! her lack of wealth or state
Cast into her teeth by him, who swore to her
A month ago her value beggared kingdoms !
So should it fare with my dear sister, gods !
How she would blanch and freeze to find a churl
In him she loved so dear, she quitted brother
Arid father for him ! I have had my humours,
Which her content has paid for, for a moment;
And when she has reproach'd me, lovingly.
And found it only chafed me, she has wept
But the first tear has thrown me on her neck.
Would it be so with him ?



SCENE ii.] THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. 15

RUPHINO.

'Twould not be so

With him thou lov'st, Almagro.

ALASCO.
No, by my troth,

Because it could not be Almagro is

Her equal. But behoves the Prince beware

He sports not with her tears, or drops may fall,

Lie nearer to the heart, from those he cherishes !

Let him beware ! If there are towns and cities

In Arragon, so are there villages,

Which men inhabit, by the fresh breath of heaven

Nurtured more hardily than those who live

In streets and lanes, like convicts pent in mines,

Wasted with sweltering. Her first complaint

Would raise a cry for vengeance that would shake

His father from his throne !

RUPHINO.
Beware, my son ;

The man who ever runs into extremes

Nine times in ten o'erlooks both right and reason,

That mostly lie between. This is again

Almagro ! who would make thee common foe,

While, for himself, the greatest foe thou hast,

He nourishes the friend. Boy ! boy ! that man

Will bring thee into straits ! For his own ends

He heaps up discontents 'gainst all above him,

To crush them with the weight not for the hatred

He bears oppression, but for envy of it !

He blames the grievance he himself inflicts not ;

But, let him have the power, you will see worse



16 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT i.

Begot of his own pride and heartlessness !
I say no more, my son ! beware of him !
Where loiter'd you upon your journey home?
Six weeks you have been gone ; ere one was past,
Your sister was proclaim'd the Princess wife.

ALASCO.

I took a circuit home to see my friends,
And tell what I had done.

RUPHINO.
You're a great man

In Arragon !

ALASCO.

I number many friends !
No word yet from my sister?

EUPHINO.
I expect

Word by Velasquez who is he comes yonder ?
I see but dimly ! I am very old
Is it Velasquez?

ALASCO.
Yes, Velasquez 'tis,

And looks like one who has a tale to tell.

[ VELASQU EZ enters hastily stops short on
seeing ALASCO.]

How now, Velasquez ?

VELASQUEZ.

Are you there, Alasco ?

ALASCO.
Yes, I am here the matter ?

VELASQUEZ.

Nothing !



SCENE it.] THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. 17

ALASCO.
Something !

Your steps were hasty, did you speed for nothing ?

Your breath is scanty, was it spent for nothing ?

Your looks imply concern, concern for nothing?

Your road lay to my father, seeing me

You stopped as bound to any other door !

Was that for nothing ? Ay and now you stand

Like one that's baulk'd about to take a leap

Which he felt sure to make with bated crest,

With vigour chill'd, wann'd cheek, and sparkless eye !

Do all these things mean nothing ? if they do,

Then mean? commotion nothing !

VELASQUEZ.

I would be

Alone with your father.

ALASCO.
So I told you ! well,

You are alone with him. [Goes out.

RUPHINO.
What is 't, Velasquez ?

Thou comest from the capital, and thence,
Or I mistake, thou bringest news for me.

VELASQUEZ.

I do ; and therefore wish'd thy son away ;
For he is rash ; and, gal I'd, will take no road,
Save that his fury likes.

RUPHINO.
Bring'st thou me news

Would rouse the fury of my son, Velasquez ?
Thou mak'st me tremble I am very old ;

c



18 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT i.

Too old to hear bad news ! Don't tell it yet

And yet I know what it is. O Heaven ! my daughter !

I knew no good could come of this avowal !

The Prince has used her ill ! and if he has,

Let him look to it ! Let him ! Three score years and ten,

'Gainst youth, are but a straw against a staff;

But, with no better, will I beard the man

That wrongs my daughter !- I grow strong, Velasquez ;

Am waxing young again, as in my prime !

As I do live I am ! I thank thee, Nature !

To have left me strength ! I yet am worth a blow !

[Staggers.
I reel, Velasquez, let me lean upon thee.

VELASQUEZ.

The Prince has done no wrong.

RUPHINO.

God bless the Prince !
And pardon me that I did wrong to him
In thinking that he had ! the gracious Prince
That ever honourably lov'd my child !
How could I think that he could do her wrong !
Doift say I did so. What 's amiss, Velasquez ?
I see 'tis nothing that affects my child :
Nought can go wrong, while the good Prince is near her.

VELASQUEZ.

He is no longer near her.

RUPHINO.
No ! not near her ?

My dark surmises are at work again !

And yet thou say'st he has not wrong'd my child.



SCKNE ii.] THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. 19

VELASQUEZ.

Thy child and he are wrong'd.

RUPHINO.

We'll right them, then !
Who did it? -well?

VELASQUEZ.

The King !

RUPHINO.

How ? How ?

VELASQUEZ.

Despatch'd

The Prince to head his armies in the north,

And, when his back was turned, convoked his council,

And made them pass a formal act, declaring

The marriage of thy daughter null and void.

RUPHINO.

His right to his throne is void, if he breaks through
Religion and the laws that fence my child !
There are men in Arragon ! Alasco ! I
Have found my strength again ! Alasco ! Ay,
I am a peasant, he is a king ! Great odds !
But greater have grown even ! Why, Alasco !

Enter ALASCO.

ALASCO.
Here, father.

RUPHINO (recollecting himself at sight of Ms son).
O I called you, did I ?

ALASCO.

Yes.

RUPHINO.

I did it without thinking well, Alasco ?

c2



20 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT i.

ALASCO.

Well, father?

You call'd me, and I know you wanted me.

Speak out, and do not fear my rashness, father :

Though there be cause for heat, I can be cool.

How pale you are ! How you are quivering,

And how you gasp for breath ! and your eyes look

As, would you let them, they could drown your cheeks !

Oh, my poor father !

RUPHINO.
Your poor sister, boy !

[Bursts into tears, and falls on ALASCO'S neck.

ALASCO.

What of my sister? Say, Velasquez, for
My father can't, or won't.

Enter ALMAGRO, and a number of other Peasants.

ALMAGRO.

Alasco news !

ALASCO.

Ay, now I'll hear it.

RUPHINO.

Tell it you, Velasquez !

Let it not come from him ! He will heap fire

On fire.

VELASQUEZ.

Your sister is divorced, Alasco,

By edict of the men who guard the laws.

ALMAGRO.

Who break the laws ! Yes, the fair Prince Alonzo,
Royal Alonzo ! weary of his wife
Though but the waning of the honeymoon,



SCENE ii.] THE ROSE OF ARRA.GON. 21

Only the waning he were made of ice

Could think it more on pretext of command

From the King to lead his armies 'Twas contrived

A piece of villany at the first sight ; left her,

To cast her honourably from his bed !

UUPH1NO.

Thou liest !

ALMAGRO.

(Furiously) Liest !

ALASCO.

Peace, Almagro ! Nay,

Scowl not upon my father ! if you are angry

Brow me !

ALMAGRO.

My dear Alasco !

HUPHINO.
Dear ! how long ?

The Prince did never yet a double deed !
I would that I could say as much for thee !

ALMAGRO.

For me ! (furiously.}

ALASCO.

Again ? May not an old man say

What he likes ?

RUPHINO.

I would all young men spoke as true !

ALASCO.

Father ! your child is sham'd ! That horrid word
Written on her brow, thou'dst wish her dead ere read there :
Her! me! thyself! all kith and kin thou hast !
And can thy breast find room for other cause



22 THE ROSE OF ARRAGON. [ACT i.

Of hate, reviling, or revenge ? If it can,
Mine can't.

ALMAGRO.

No more can mine. I have no foes

Save those who wrong thy sister ! none will have !

Give me thy hand, Velasquez, and be friends.

VELASQUEZ.

I could be friends with him bespoke me foul ;

I could be friends with him that gave me blow ;

But with the friend who fail'd me in the need


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