James Stuart.

A history of the Zulu Rebellion, 1906 : and of Dinuzulu's arrest, trial, and expatriation online

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Apr. 4


Mpanza.


Dangerous


"


Tpr.


Sells, A. J.


May 3


White
Umfolozi.




R.H.


,,


Bamet, H. D. M.


Jime 3


Manzipambana.




,,


Capt.


Clerk, E. G.


„ 3


,,


Severe.


»»


Tpr.


Flynn, F.


„ 3


,,




»»


,,


Holmes, W. C.


„ 3


,,


Severe.


»>


,,


Hopkins, W. H. E


„ 3


,,


Severe.


>>


Lieut.


Male, P.


„ 3


,,




*i


Tpr.


Mann, J.


„ 3






if


Lieut.


Oswald.


„ 3


,,




»»


Tpr.


Swart, D. C.


„ 3


,,


Severe.




Corpl.


Woolnough.


„ 3


,,




T.M.R.


,,


Carlick, F.


June 10


Mome.




5>


5>


Hosford, F.


„ 10


,,




,,


Lce.-Corp.


Leigh, A. E. T.


„ 10


,,




>>


»>


McEvoy, P.


„ 10


,,




»>


Tpr.


McLean, R.


„ 10


,,




»»


Capt.


Mitchell, J. T.


July 3


Ponjwana.







Tpr.


Simcox.


July 2


Insuze, Xatal.




,,


Act. Q.M.-S.


Tobin.


„ 2


»j




U.D.R.


Tpr.


Braithwaite, P.


May 28


Mpukunyoni




,,


,,


Mackenzie, S.


„ 28


»»




New Han.





Freese, F.


July 4


Near Ponjwana




Reserves












Krantzkop


Leader.


van Rooyen, T. J.


May 28


Mpukunyoni


Severe.


Reserves













iV^ofe— Among Nongqai, N.N.H., and Native Levies, there were about thirty wounded.



APPENDIX 11 543



II. HONOURS.

Officers.

K.CM.G.

Col. (now Brigadier-General) Duncan McKenzie, C.B., C.M.G..
V.D.

D.S.O.

Col. H. T. Bru-de-Wold, C.M.G., V.D.
„ G. Leuchars, C.M.G.

Hon. Lieut.-Col. in the Army.
Lieut.-Col. J. R. Royston, C.M.G., D.S.O.

C.M.G.
Lieut.-Col. W. F. Barker, D.S.O.

Distinguished Conduct in the Field.

{Natal Government Gazette, 26th June, 1906.)

Capt. E. G. Clerk, R.H., 3rd June, Manzipambana.
Lieut. A. H. G. Blarney, N.M.R., 5th May, Bobe.

{N.G. Gazette, 3rd July, 1906.)
Inspr. 0. Dimmick, N.P., 4th April, Mpanza.

Meritorious Service.

Col. Sir A. Woolls-Sampson, K.C.B.
Lieut.-Col. J. Hyslop, D.S.O., V.D.

,, T. McCubbin, C.M.G., Supernumerary List.
M. C. Rowland, Staff Officer, Transvaal.
J. S. WyUe, D.L.I.
Major R. A. Buntine, N.M.C.
„ S. G. Campbell, D.L.I.
„ S. Carter, U.M.R.
„ W. Murray-Smith, N.M.R.
„ W. H. Smith, N.M.R.
„ W. A. Vanderplank, Z.M.R.
„ S. B. Woollatt, N.V.C.



544



APPENDIX n



Capt. C. V. Hosken, Transport.

„ G. A. Labistour, N.R.R.

„ M. G. Pearson, N.M.C.

„ A. Prior, N.S.C.
Lieut. J. S. Hedges, Z.M.R.
Chief Leader J. A. Nel, U.D.R.



WARRANT OFFICERS, NON-COMMISSIONED
OFFICERS, AND MEN.

Distinguished Conduct Medal.
[N.G. Gazette, 10th September, 1907.)



Squad. Sergt.-Maj. W. Cal-

verley, Z.M.R.
Sergt. S. Titlestad, Z.M.R.
Farrier-Sergt. C. B. Mitchell,

T.M.R.



Sergt. C. W. Guest, N.P.
Tpr. W. Deeley, Z.M.R.

„ W. Johnson, Z.M.R.

„ G. W. Oliver, Z.M.R.

„ O. L. M. Folker, N.P.



Meritorious Service Medal.
{N.G. Gazette, 10th September, 1907.)

Sergt. E. B. Brand, T.M.R.

F. L. Malan, T.M.R.

G. P. Bamall, N.M.C.



Reg. Sergt.-Maj. J. Webber,

R.H.
Sergt. T. P. Catchpole, N.C.

„ E. I. Dicks, N.C.

„ H. G. Le Mesurier,
N.M.R.

„ I. E. Sjoblom, N.M.R.

„ S. J. Wadman, N.M.R.



J. A. Butcher, N.S.C.
J. F. Crawford, N.T.C.
J. F. Pemberton,
N.T.C.



Distinguished Conduct in the Field.

{N.G. Gazette, 26th June, 1906.)

Tpr. W. C. Holmes, R.H.



Good Service.
{N.G. Gazette, 10th September, 1907.)



Sergt. Maj. P. J. Higgins, N.C.
Reg. Sergt.-Maj. G. W. Garn-

ham, T.M.R.
Sergt.-Maj. T. C. Ogden,
N.R.R.
„ O. E. Powell,
N.M.C.



Reg. Q.-M.-Sergt. W. C.

Savage, T.M.R.
Squad. Sergt.-Maj. A. Swan,
N.C.
H. Eraser, R.H.
S. L. Neville,
T.M.R.



APPENDIX II



545



Col. Sergt. W. K. Edwards,
N.R.
,, G. C. Mulcaster,

N.R.
C. H. Smith, N.R.
H. N. Smith, N.R.
Staff-Sergt. E. W. Marshall,

N.S.C.
First-Class P.O., C. S. Kkk,

N.N.C.
Sergt. J. Humphries, N.C.
„ C. L. Mulcahy, N.C.
„ G. L. Thompson, N.C.
„ B. Wray, N.C.
„ C. H. Holder, T.M.R.
„ C. R. Coombes, N.R.
„ R. E. Cross, N.R.
„ J. Doherty, N.R.
,, C. Domone, N.R.
„ J. Fletcher, N.R.
„ C. A. B. de Lasalle,

N.R.
„ W. R. Lewis, N.R.
„ J. McCami, N.R.
„ D. H. Nelson, N.R.
„ F. H. Worby, N.R.
,, J. A. A. Davidson,

N.S.C.
„ D. Davis, N.S.C.
„ J. A. Niblett, N.S.C.
„ T. Pittam, N.S.C.
„ T. B. WiUoughby,
N.S.C.
J. Winter, N.S.C.
Second-Class P.O., R. C.

Dickinson, N.N.C.
Cpl. J. W. Peebles, T.M.R.
„ P. Allen, N.R.
„ D. Band, N.R.
,, J. Cunninghame, N.R.
„ C. L. GiUham, N.R.
,, W. Johnson, N.R.
„ J. Keith, N.R.



Cpl. J. Lawson, N.R.

„ D. J. McCarthy, N.R.

„ P. Murrow, N.R.

„ E. D. Rex, N.R.

„ S. StoUard, N.R.

„ J. Utterton, N.R.
Lee. -Cpl. D. Stevenson, N.R.
Tpr. H. Brown, N.C.

„ C. P. Francis, N.C.

„ G. Leathern, N.C.

„ H. A. Taylor, N.C.

„ A. O. Zunckel, N.C.

„ E. W. Larkan, N.M.R.

„ T. J. Bentlev, N.D.M.R.

„ R. W. Sharpe,
N.D.M.R.

„ J. P. du Plessis, R.H.

„ L. Rudland, R.H.

„ E. F. Gatland, T.M.R.

„ H. A. Oxenham, T.M.R.
Signaller J. Ball, N.R.

„ W. Hay, N.R.
Pte. W. E. Adams, N.R.

„ J. Boylan, N.R.

„ T. J. Cellarius, N.R.

„ H. J. Coulter, N.R.

,, T. Cunningham, N.R.

„ L. Guttenberg, N.R.

„ J. Hanson, N.R.

„ W. Hay, N.R.

„ W. Heath, N.R.

„ N. Kedian, N.R.

„ T. McCall, N.R.

„ J. McCook, N.R.

„ D. Mitchell, N.R.

,, J. H. Morrison, N.R.

„ V. Pennefather, N.R.

„ G. Pothecary, N.R.

„ J. Scott, N.R.

„ L. H. Smith, N.R.

„ J. Whittick, N.R.

„ H. Wiles, N.R.

„ F. Wood, N.R.



2 m



546



APPENDIX ni



III.— STRENGTH OF FORCES IN THE FIELD,
7th May, 1906.



Regiment.


Number in
the Field.


Number

still
available.


Natal Naval Corps - - . _ .


100





Natal Carbineers


596


82


Natal Mounted Rifles


287





Border Mounted Rifles - . - .





254


Umvoti Mounted Rifles - . _ .


260





Northern District Mounted Rifles


120





Zululand Mounted Rifles - - - -


120


_


Natal Field Artillery


229I


1342


Natal Royal Regiment - - - -


154


22


Durban Light Infantry - . - .


444


60


Natal Medical Corps


63


33


Natal Veterinary Corps - - - -


7


10


Natal Telegraph Corps - - _ .


34


7


Natal Service Corps - - - . ,


78


14


Transport - -


28





Natal Police


210





Zululand Native Police - - . .


90





Royston's Horse


548


_


Transvaal Mounted Rifles - . . -


481







3,849


616


Newcastle Reserves


78


_


Estcourt „


101





Dundee ,,


68





Umsinga „


50





Umvoti „


88





Krantzkop „


82







467





^ With ten guns. 2 And eigl


it guns.





Note. — Conductors, drivers, leaders, scouts and servants are not
included herein. With exception of scouts and servants, their numbers
will be found in Appendix V.



APPENDIX IV 547

IV. DISPOSITION OF FORCES ON MAY 7, 1906.



Place.


Regiment.


Num.

BER.


Guns


COMMAND.


Babanango {en
route to
Nkandhla) -
(Colonel D.
McKenzie).


Transvaal Mounted Rifles
Royston's Horse -
Durban Light Infantry -
Natal Field Artillery
Departmental


481

548

58

32

32


2*


V


Fort Yolland
(Lieutenant-
Colonel G.
Mansel).


Natal Police -
Natal Naval Corps.
Natal Field Artillery
Zululand Native Police -
, Departmental Corps


210

100

31

90

8


2


Colonel D.
McKenzie.


ESHOWE /










(Lieutenant- J
Colonel J. S. )
Wylie). \


Natal Mounted Rifles -
Durban Light Infantry -
Departmental Corps


30

251

12







Gingindhlovu r
(Lieutenant -
T.McCubbin).


Durban Light Infantry -
Departmental Corps


70

8







Greytown C
(Captain J. ,'
Eraser). [


Natal Royal Regiment -
Departmental Corps
Reserves


50
6

88







Krantzkop j
(Major H. G. J
Plant).


Natal Royal Regiment -
Umvoti Mounted Rifles -
Reserves
Departmental Corps


50

7
70

8







Mayouguate f
Kop

(Colonel G. \
Leuchars). [


Umvoti Mounted Rifles -
Natal Field Artillery -
Departmental Corps


223

49
25


2


Colonel G.
Leuchars.


Keate's Drift (
(Lieutenant J
J.H.C.Nuss). [










Umvoti Mounted Rifles -


30







Mapumulo r
(Lieutenant-
Colonel H. j
Sparks). [


Natal Mounted Rifles -
Durban Light Infantry -
Departmental Corps


105

65

9


~ 1






Carry forward, i


J,746


6





548 APPENDICES IV AND V

IV. DISPOSITION OF FORCES ON MAY 7, 1906— Contimied,



Plack.



■ 1



Nkandhla
(Lieutenant
Colonel D. W
Mackay).

Ntingwe

(Major W. A.
Vanderplank)



Helpmakaak
(Major W.
Murray-
Smith).



Regiment.



Brought forwardy
Natal Carbineers -
Natal Field Artillery
Departmental Corps

Zuliiland Mounted Rifles
Northern District Mounted

Rifles -
Departmental Corps

Natal Carbineers -
Natal Mounted Rifles
Natal Field Artillery
Natal Royal Regiment
Departmental Corps
Newcastle Reserves
Estcourt ,,

Dundee „



Num-
ber.



Guns.



V


Umsmga


" '


Supply Depots.






Maritzburg


Natal Servi


ce Corps


Durban






Ladysmith






Dundee






Stanger






Vryheid







2746

381

32

40

120

120

9

215
152
85
54
30
78
101
68
50



Command.



Lieutenant-
Colonel D. W.
Mackay.



4,316



12



Major W.
Murray-
Smith.



• Pompoms.
V. STATE OF GENERAL TRANSPORT ON 7th MAY, 1906.



DiSTKIBUTION.


Mules.


Ox

Waggons.


Oxen.


Con-
ductors.


Drivers

and
Leaders,


Zululand Field Force
Helpmakaar Field Force -
Mackay's Force
Umvoti Field Force
Gigindhlovu, Eshowe, and

FortYoUand
Northern Dist. M. Rifles -
Mapumulo Force
Dundee Base - -


16
24
11
39

12
4

8


121
51
36
23

19
17

8
3


1,948
850
612
364

358

268

128

48


9
4
4
3

2

2
1
1


252
110

84
56

49
57
16

8


Total


114


278


4,576


26


632



jffote.—Theie were also 2 mule waggons, 12 ambulances, 4 water-carts, and 1 trolley.



APPENDICES VI AND VII



549



VI. STRENGTH (ALL RANKS) OF ACTIVE MILITIA CALLED
OUT IN CONNECTION WITH THE DINUZULU EXPEDI-
TION, DECEMBER, 1907.



Unit.



Natal Carbineers ^ -

Natal Mounted Rifles ^ -

Umvoti Moimted Rifles ^

Border Mounted Rifles i

Northern District Mounted Rifles -

Zululand Mounted Rifles

1st Brigade Natal Field Artillery i

" C " Battery, Natal Field Artillery

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve ^ -

Natal Royal Regiment ^

Durban Light Infantry i

Natal Medical Corps ^ - - .

Natal Veterinary Corps ^

Natal Service Corps ^ - - .

Natal Telegraph Corps, i-

Searchlight Detachment

Total



First

Mobilization,

Nov. 30.



491
209
202
200

2

177
77
95
184
349
55
18
25
34



On
Dec. 11.



2,116



795

264

221

204

215

140

85

34

150

319

400

43

11

58

31



On
Dec. 22.



581 3

184 »
1943



2,978



43
11
58
31



1,102



aSlH^'f^^K"*^-^ ''^ ^^^ November to recruit up to war strength

^ Ordered to be m readiness to mobilize on short notice. 3 Approximate.

VII. STRENGTH OF RESERVES ACTUALLY IN THE FIELD
DURING DINUZULU EXPEDITION, DECEMBER, 1907.



District.


On Dec. 11.


On Dec. 22.


Dundee, 1st


-


-


39




Umsinga


-


-


16




Weenen


-


.


46


d.f{


Umvoti -


-


-


90




Ixopo -


-


-


30




Louwsberg


-


- _ _


40




Newcastle


-


- - _


50




Estcourt


-


. _ _


50


60


Lion's River


-


-


45.




City, 1st


-


-


58




Umgeni


-


-


26




Newcastle, Town -


-


26




Ladysmith, Town


_


9




Utrecht -


-


-


150




Newcastle Division


-


46




Vryheid -


-


-


50





Krantzkop




Total





50




771


156



550 APPENDIX VIII

VIII. EXPENDITURE INCURRED BY THE NATAL
GOVERNMENT ON ACCOUNT OF THE REBELLION
AND DINUZULU EXPEDITION.

The manner in which monies were raised for covering the cost
of the Rebellion was set forth briefly at the conclusion of
Chapter XVIII. From the beginning of the RebelHon (Feb-
ruary, 1906) to the 31st May, 1910, the total net expenditure
amounted to £883,576 7s. 2d. The following is a detailed
account thereof :

Militia Staff, Travelling Expenses, Clerical

Assistance, etc. £2,726 6 11

Pay, Allowances, Messengers, etc. - - - 319,980 4 3

Rations, Men and Horses 107,946 14 5

Remounts 50,159 2 4

Transport- ..-. - - 108,737 4 6

Equipment of men and horses - - - 89,466 9

Medical Supplies, Hospital and other Expenses - 4,1761910
Compensation —

Injuries ...-..- 222 19 9

Horses - - - 7,790 1 10

Property - - - - 5,822 17

Rebellion Losses Claims . . - - 42,611 7 9

Veterinary 2,827 9 1

Stationery, Printing, etc. 3,282 3 9

Arms and Ammunition 51,482 8 3

Lagers - - 1,787 6 11

Miscellaneous - - 3,129 1 10

Prisons . - 1,972 6 1

Uniform Allowance - - - 11,309 18

Upkeep of Rebel Prisoners . - - - 85,524 17 1

Construction of Rebel Prisons - - - - 7,456 7 2

£908,411 17 6
Less Revenue Received for Hire of Rebel

Prisoners 23,196 15 8

£885,215 1 10
^dd Outstanding Liabilities . . - 122 17 10

£885,337 19 8
Deduct Transport and Remoimts utilized by

transfer to Transport Service - - - 1,761 12 6

£883,576 7 2

In addition to lump sum gratuities paid in respect of injuries
received, annual allowances amounting to £5,912 4s. are paid
from ordinary revenue to disabled militiamen and to widows
and children of militiamen who died or were killed during the
Rebelhon.



APPENDICES IX AND X 551

Revenue benefited to the extent of approximately £38,000
on account of fines imposed on certain rebels and sale of stock
captured by the troops during the operations.



IX. ZULU SONGS SUNG AT USUTU KRAAL BEFORE
THE REBELLION.

I.

Ubani o za ukufel' esilungwini ?

Mana, Nkosi !
U ngezwa be bubula,

Ba ya sola.

II.

Si kulu les' isizwe, e si twal' imiqiqingo,

Si hamba ne mpahla, si teng' izinkomo ngo lembu.

Ngi ya ku yi raya bo !

I za ku li qed' izwe.

I lu zwambuzwambu,

I suka pansi, ya qond' izulu.

I njenge nyoka e yadhl' isia:abu sa ba mhlope.

Ba yi cupa, ya bajwa.

Ba yi dons' amalang' amabili, 'matatu ;

Ba yi nquma ngo mese.

Kwa gqabuk' ilangab' esizibeni,

La ba rangula.

Kwa gqabuk' izintutu,

Za qond' izwe lonke, la vuta !

Na seMbilane,

Lapa kade beti i ya puma,

Beti i gcwel' iziziba zonke, nya !

Translations of the above appear on p. 116.



X. THE CAUSES, SUPERSTITIONS AND OTHER

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MATABELE

REBELLION, 1896.

The Matabele War of 1893 came to an end owing to the King,
Lobengula, fleeing from the country after his capital, Bula-
wayo, had been seized and burnt by the British South Africa
Company's forces. He died in January, 1894. No one, of
course, was appointed to succeed him. As many of the
Natives desired to continue the war — a number of the regi-
ments not having fought at all — it is not surprising that,
although a settlement was arrived at, the people did not



$52 APPENDIX X

regard themselves as having been really conquered. Still
less did they look on the Company as entitled to appropriate
their cattle as they proceeded to do. These, indeed, all
belonged to the King in theory. The Company held that,
having conquered the country and expelled the King, right
of possession had reverted to themselves. The cattle there-
upon began to be confiscated by way of indemnity. A large
number was taken, whilst the remainder, about 90,000, were
branded with the Company's brand and allowed to remain
with the Natives for the time beiug. Seizure of smaller lots
took place periodically during 1894 and 1895. Had con-
fiscation been made immediately and universally on the
conclusion of the War, far less irritation would have been
caused than actually occurred. As it was, it was believed
the Company intended to so impoverish the people as to
reduce them to a position of slaves and paupers.

There was in Matabeleland another class of Natives known
as amaHole. These were found living there by the Matabele
on arrival from the south with Mzilikazi (Moselekatze) about
1836. After conquering them, the latter proceeded to make
slaves of them, and this was the position when the Chartered
Company, taking advantage of concessions previously acquired,
entered the country in considerable numbers in 1890 to
prospect and mine for gold, etc. After the war, the Company
recruited some 400 Natives, chiefly from the amaHole, and
formed them into a police force. The latter, remembering
their former subjection, were not slow to avenge themselves
on the Matabele as opportunity offered. " In days gone by
you had your turn," they jeeringly said to the Matabele,
"it is ours now." And opportunities presented themselves
in two principal ways. First in regard to the cattle question,
by the poHce hunting about in all directions to see who
possessed any. On secretly obtaining information, they
conveyed it to the authorities, showing cause why the stock
should be seized. Confiscation usually followed. Secondly,
in regard to the labour regulations. The Company required
each Chief to furnish periodically a certain number of labourers
to work on the mines, etc. The police were employed on this
duty by the Native Commissioners ; the manner in which
they dealt with the people was frequently exasperating.

Although, towards the end of 1895, the Company waived
all further right to the cattle after receipt of two-fifths of the
whole (70,000), much strong dissatisfaction continued to
prevail on account of the tactics that had been employed.
And this was accentuated by the disease rinderpest breaking



APPENDIX X 553

out in 1895 and sweeping off many of the cattle still
possessed by Natives. A plague of locusts and a long-
continued drought added still further to their troubles.
Underlying the whole was the deep resentment felt by men
who, under their own regime, had held high rank, but were
now condemned to inferior status, with, corresponding loss
of influence, material perquisites and opportunities for advance-
ment. The feeHng, moreover, was still latent that the nation
had never been realty conquered.

It being characteristic of all Bantu races, and particularly
so of those of Matabeleland, e.g. Makalanga and Matabele,
to resort to diviners (izangoma) to ascertain the causes of
troubles as well as the remedies, it is not surprising something
of the kind should have taken place at the present juncture.
Perhaps the most famous of the oracles was one reputed to
inhabit a cave in the well-known Matoppo Hills. To this
cave many had repaired from time to time, in connection with
their private troubles, such as cases of illness or other mis-
fortune, mysterious loss of property, and so forth. So great
was the reputation that had been acquired by this particular
oracle and, under so weird circumstances and in so peculiar
a manner did it impart the knowledge obtained, as believed,
direct from the departed spirits (knowTi by Matabeles as
amadhlozi), that it was commonly referred to as Umlimo,
that is, the Deity himself. Such Umhmo — really the god
of the oldest residents of the country, the Makalangas — is
said "to be able to speak all languages, as well as to be
possessed of a faculty of roaring Kke a lion, crowing like a
cock, barking like a dog, etc." The truth of the matter,
however, is that the oracle was an isangoma, that is, an
ordinary person who, whenever it was known anyone had
come to seek advice, would stealthily proceed to the cave and
there, on being consulted, communicate the reply to the
inquirer. This reply was given by means of ventriloquism
and, as the speaker was inside the cave and invisible, the
voice appeared to the inquirer (who was outside) to issue
from the very bowels of the earth. The extreme ingenuity
of the device will be better appreciated when it is known that
the spirits of the departed are universally believed by Natives
to dwell in an underworld. For a ventriloquist to practise
his calling as diviner in the foregoing manner is probably
not unworthy of that oracle which Socrates himself felt it
necessar}^ to consult at Delphi.

On being appealed to by Mlugulu, one of the principal
men in the country, and others, as to the troubles that were



564 APPENDIX X

afflicting the people in general, the Umlimo directly attributed
them to Europeans. It was they who were the sorcerers that
had caused the disasters. But for their presence, neither
locusts nor rinderpest would have invaded the country. The
aborigines were thereupon exhorted to rise and deliver them-
selves from their thraldom. A recent total eclipse of the
moon was said to portend that the white man's blood was
to be spilt ; Lobengula himself was not dead, but about to
return from the north at the head of a huge army, whilst
other armies were advancing to his assistance against the
Europeans from the west and east. The tremendous potency
of such a ' voice ' at such a time can hardly be over-estimated.
The reason why most obvious precautions, e.g. blocking the
main road to Mangwe (50 miles south-west of Bulawayo)
were not adopted by the rebels was said to be due to the
Umlimo's explicit instruction " to give the white man an
opportunity of escaping from the country." Possibly this
also explains why the telegraph wire between Bulawayo and
Maf eking was not cut. " It certainly seems very strange,"
says Selous,^ " that no attempt has ever been made to stop
waggons and coaches on this road, . . . nor was Government
House (less than three miles from the centre of Bulawayo)
burnt, the reason for this being, it is said, because the Umlimo
told the people that when Bulawayo had been destroyed, and
aU the white men in the country killed, they would find
Lobengula sitting there, ready to rule them once more ; for,
be it said. Government House has been built in the centre
of the old kraal of Bulawaj^o, just where the King's house
once stood."

Another man, who claimed to be a prophet of the Umlimo,
so influenced people through swallowing stones, dancing on
ashes, putting burning coals into his mouth, etc., as to induce
an impi to take up their quarters where they were subse-
quently found by the troops " and there wait for the white
men to attack them. They were on no account to endeavour
to prevent their enemies from crossing the Umguza [a river
some twelve miles north of Bulawayo] but were to offer them
every encouragement to do so, ' for,' said the stone-swallower,
' once they have crossed to the east of the river, the Umlimo
wiU strike them all blind ; you will then be able to kill them
without trouble, and go on and murder all the women and
children in Bulawayo.' "

The rising in Mashonaland, which began in the middle of
June, 1896, was probably " brought about by the leaders of
^ Storm and Sunshine in Rhodesia. Rowland Ward. 1896.



APPENDIX X 555

the Matabele insurrection through the instrumentality of
the Umhmos or prophets . . . North-west of Salisbury there
hves a prophetess," between whom and the leaders of the
Matabele or agents of the Umlimo messages passed during
the Rebellion.

In these circumstances, one can understand the observation
commonly made as to the inscrutability of the Native mind.
That it is a closed book to the vast majority of Europeans
is proved by the fact that no adequate preparation was made
by the Government to meet a possible rising, and that only
one of the colonists had predicted that a rebelhon would occur.

When, with the country seething with discontent, the
people learned that the great majority of the European poUce
had been withdrawn to assist Dr. Jameson in his raid from
Mafeking towards Johannesburg, and that Dr. Jameson
himself, who claimed to have conquered them in 1893, as
well as his entire force, had been captured by the Boers, they
felt that a unique occasion had arisen, and one of which
immediate advantage should be taken.

The population of Matabeleland in 1896 was : Europeans,
about 4,000 ; Natives, about 120,000. About nineteen-
twentieths of the latter rebelled, their fighting strength
(independently of Mashonaland) being nearly 20,000.

The RebeUion started on the 20th March with the murder
of a Native policeman. This, though evidently premature,
became the signal for a simultaneous rising. European men,
women and children were forthmth murdered in many
outljdng parts. A number of Native servants took part in
the murders. It is computed that 205 persons were massacred
during the rising, the great majority being killed before the



Online LibraryJames StuartA history of the Zulu Rebellion, 1906 : and of Dinuzulu's arrest, trial, and expatriation → online text (page 48 of 52)