James Talboys Wheeler.

Early records of British India; a history of the English settlements in India, as told in the government records, the works of old travellers, and other contemporary documents, from the earliest perio online

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Online LibraryJames Talboys WheelerEarly records of British India; a history of the English settlements in India, as told in the government records, the works of old travellers, and other contemporary documents, from the earliest perio → online text (page 33 of 33)
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exempted, ib. ; submission of Tipperab, Cooch Behar, and Assam, 166;
administration of justice, ib. ; despotic powers, 167; Rajas refused



386 INDEX.

seats, ib. ; zeiuiiidars proLibitod pal.'inquiiis, ib. ; reasons for employing
only Bengallis, ib. ; English embassy in 1715 from Calcutta to Delhi,
170 ; Captain Hamilton's account of the English settlements in Ben-
gal, 18G ; ruin of Piply by the removal to Hughli and Calcutta, ib. ;
Coxe's and Sagor Islands, 187; anchorage at Rogue's River, ib. ; Danish
hou.se, 188; Calcutta, Juanpardoa, and Radnagur, ib. ; Ponjelly, ib. ;
Tanna Fort, ib. ; Governapore, ib. ; settlement at Calcutta by Job
Channock, 1G90, 189 ; despotic i)ower of Mr. Channock, ib. ; story of
Mr. Channock's native wife, ib. ; Fort WUliam and English houses,
190 ; stoi-y of Sir Edward Littleton, ib. ; Mr. Weldon, ib. ; scandals
about bribes, 191 ; divine service, ib. ; Governor's house, ib. ; hospital,
garden, an 1 fish-ponds, ib. ; docks on the opposite bank, 192; social
life of the English in Bengal, ib. ; English soldiers, ib. ; transit duties
levied by petty Rajas, 193 ; different religions, ib. ; injustice of the
English Governors, ib. ; story of Captain Perrin and Governor Sheldon,
ih. ; H amilton's interference, 194; story of the Persian wine, 195;
territory and population of the Company's settlement, ib. ; Barnagul, lb.;
Danish colony, ib. ; Danish and French Companies, 196 ; Dutch fac-
tory at Chmsura, ib. ; Hughli, ib. ; Cossimbazar, 197 ; Murshedabad,
ib. ; Malda, ib. ; Patna, ib. ; Benares, 198; Dacca, ib. ; Chittagong,
199 ; Sundiva, ib. ; a hundred pagans to one Mussulman, ib. ; lightness
of Moghul taxation, 200 ; Hamilton's imperfect information, ib. ; death
of Murshed Kuli Khan, ib. ; rise of Aliverdi Khan, ib. ; Raja of the
Chukwars, 201 ; independence of the old Raja : submission of the
young Raja, ik ; treachery of Aliverdi Khan, ib. ; Persian invasion
under Nadir Shah, 202 ; Afghan conquest of Persia : rise of Nadir
Shah, 203 ; causes of the Persian invasion of India, ib. ; incapacity,
corruption, and treachery, 204 ; massacre, outrage, and spoliation, 205 ;
breaking up of the Moghul Empire, ib. ; state of Bengal, 206 ; the
Seits or Hindu bankers, ib. ; lawlessness of the Nawab, 207 ; con-
spiracy, ib. ; rebellion of Aliverdi Khan, ib. ; usurpation of Aliverdi
Khan, 208 ; Mahrattas invade Bengal, ib. ; war between England
and France, ib. ; peace between English and French in India, 209.

Black Hole, Holwell's narrative of the tragedy, 227 ; later notices of the
building, 251 ; list of the sufferers, 252.

Bombay, early English settlement at, 36; subordination to Surat,
ib. ; the town of, 37 ; fresh-water springs scarce, ib. ; woods of
cocoes, ib. ; Parell, 38 ; salt-pans, ib. ; Maijm, ib. ; Salvasong, ib. ;
Malabar-hill, Ib. ; bigness of the island, 39 ; mixt people, ib. ; English
Government, ib. ; power and state of the President, ib. ; unhealthiness
of Bombay, 40 ; English women, ib. ; longevity of natives and Por-
tuguese, ib. ; misery and mortality of the English, 41 ; visit of Khali
Khan, 109.

Buxar, decisive battle at, -327.



INDEX.



387



t'lilcutta, fonndaiion of, 1G2; fori i lication of, 103; Cliannook's Rctllomont
at, 189; slate of, about 1750, and general ajjpearancc, 212; Malnatta
ditch, ib. ; population, 213 ; Cakutta of 1752 and 1876 compared, ib. ;
European element at Calcutta, 214; trade at Ciilcutta, 215; social life,
216; native life, Hindu and Muhammadan, 217; English supreme
within the Company's bouads, 218; administration of justice amongst
the English, ib. ; administration of justice amongst the natives, 219 ;
revenue of the English at Calcutta, 220 ; total revenue, 222 ; general
use of cowries, 223 ; the Kotwal or head of police, ib. ; subordinate
factories, 221; changes in the transaction of business : abolition of
contractors like Oniichund, ib. ; accession of Nawab Suraj-u-daula,
225 ; capture of Calcutta, 226 ; Holwell's narrative of the tragedy of the
Black Hole, 227 ; city recovered by Clive, 351 ; victory at Plassey,
260 ; universal joy, 261 ; Vansittart Governor, 272 ; disputes about
private trade, 298.

Cai-natic, first Nawab of, 99 ; second Nawab, 102 ; — see Arcot.

Chandernagore, French at, 163; difficulties with Clive, 256 ; capture, 257.

Channock, Job, flight fi'om Bengal to Madras, 89, 161 ; settlement
at Calcutta, 189 ; his despotic power, ib. ; story of his native wife, ib.

Child, Josiah, 79.

Chinsura, Dutch factory at, 196.

Chunda Sahib, the French Nawab of Arcot, 141.

Clive, Kobert, relieves Arcot, 144; his fame, 145; recovers Calcutta
after the Black Hole tragedy, 254 ; defeats the Nawab, 255 ; diffi-
culties with the French at Chanderaagore, 256 ; afraid of Bussy, ib. ;
captures Chandernagore, 257 ; victory at Plassey, 260 ; makes Meer
Jaffir Nawab of Bengal, ib. ; his wealth, 261 ; difhculties, 263 ; exer-
cises the authority of the Nawab, ib. ; courted by Moghuls and Mah-
rattas, 264 ; threatened by the Shahzada and the Nawab Vizier, 265 ;
victory, ib. ; war with the Dutch, 266 ; returns to England, 267 ;
his letter to Pitt, ib. ; reasons for refusing the post of Dewan, 268 ;
previous scheme of Colonel Mill, ib. ; ideas of conquest, 270 ; Pitt's
objection, ib. ; second administration of Bengal, 329 ; his wrath at
the measures of his predecessor, 331 ; settlement of Oudh, 333 ; set-
tlement of Bengal, ib. ; exposition of his policy, 335 ; mutiny of the
civil servants, 340 ; mutiny of Bengal military officers, 342 ; exposition
of future policy, 343 ; its imperfections, 351.

Cooch Behar, ravages of the Raja, 152 ; submission to the Nawab of
Bengal, 166.

Cossimbazar described by Hamilton, 196.

Daud Khan, second Nawab of the Carnatic, 102; entertained at Madras

by Governor Pitt, 104; besieges Madras, 113.
Delhi, English embassy to, 170; contemporary state of affairs at, ib.



388 INDEX.

Directors of East India Company, their desjiatches as regards policy,

private trade, &c., 271—317.
Dupleix, French Governor of PondlcheiTy, his political schemes, 140 ; liis

glory, 143.

English settlements in India, 1 ; at Surat, 18 ; at Bombay, 36 ; at
Madras, 48 ; in Bengal, 147.

FarruTih Siyar, Moghul Emperor at Delhi, Lis history, 171 ; receives an
embassy from the English at Calcutta, ib. ; murdered, 185.

Fort St. David, English settlement at, 99.

Fryer, visit to Surat, 28 ; to Bombay, 36 ; to Madras, 54 •, to St. Thome,
60.

Fullerton, Dr., his journal of the massacre at Patna, 324.

Golkonda, subordination of Madras, 62 ; conquered by Aurengzeb, 88.
Gyfford, Mr. William, 79.

Holwell, bis nan-ative of the Black Hole tragedy, 227.

Hugbli, destruction of the English factory at, 88 ; revenge of Shah

Jehan, 148 ; English factory at, 1 50 ; described by Hamilton, 196.
Hyderabad, — see Nizam.
Hamilton, Captain, his description of Madras, 124; bis description of

the English settlements in Bengal, 186.
Hamilton, Dr., his troubles at Delhi, 183 ; his tomb at Calcutta, 184.

India in the seventeenth century, 1 ; division of India — Hindustan,
Dekhan, and Peninsula, ib. ; Mogbul empire, 3 ; breaking up of the
empire, 205.

Jehangir, reign of, 12.

Khafi Khan, his visit to Bombaj', 109.

Langhorn, Sir William, Agent at Madras, 56 ; his government, 62,

Madras, English settlement at, 47 ; territory and island, 48 ; White Town,
49 ; Black Town, ib. ; early perils, 50 ; European establishment, 51 ;
consultations and general letters, ib.; Merchants, Factors, Writers, and
Apprentices, 52 ; private trade and presents, ib. ; Chaplain and School-
master, ib.; administration of justice, 63 ; Native police, ib. ; morals,
54 ; Fryer's visit about 1674, ib. ; Madras under Golkonda, 62 ; pro-
posed abandonment of Madras, 64 ; moral rules, 65 ; Ioav state of morals



INDEX. 389

GO ; Reverend Patrick "Warner, 08 ; letter to tlie Directors, ib, ; visit ol"
Sivaji, 72 ; innndation at Madras, ib. ; Directors insist on local tax-
ation, 81 ; petition of natives, ib.; slave trade at Madras, 83; final
probibition of tbe slave trade, 85 ; bistory of Madras under tbe ]\Iof,'buls,
88; municipal t,'overnment, 92; entertainment of Nawab Daiid Klian,
104: besieged by Daud Khan, 113 ; trade in 1712, 116; described by
Captain Hamilton, 124 ; war of tbe Carnatic, 135.

Mabrattas, rise of, 14 ; wars of Aurungzeb, IG ; ravages near Madras, 95 ;
besiege Pondicbeiry, 98 ; at Tricbinopoly, 136 ; invade Bengal, 208.

Malabar bill, 38.

Mandelslo, visit tp Sural, 19 ; to Abmedabad, 22.

Mayor's Court, original form at Madras, 92 ; reorganisation of, 133.

Meer Cossim, installed Nawab, 272 ; bis designs, 273 ; attitude towards
Sbab Alam, 277 ; efforts of Governor Vansittart to conciliate bira, 279 ;
disputes about private trade, 298 ; massacre at Patna, 318 ; Fullerton's
diaiy, 324 ; bis ruin, 327.

Meer Jaffir, made Nawab of Bengal by Clive, 260 ; drives tbe Hindus
into rebellion, 262 ; alarmed at Clive's defeat of tbe Dutcb expedition,
266 ; deposed, 272 ; restored to the throne, 328.

Mill, Colonel, his scheme for the conquest of Bengal long anterior to
Clive, 268.

Moghul empire in India, 2 ; inherent weakness of Moghul rule, 5 ;
Moghul despotism, ib.; land tenures, 6 ; renter and husbandman, ib. ;
proprietary right of the Sovereign, 7 ; rights of inheritance refused to
office-holders, ib. ; life in public, 8 ; government in the provinces, ib. ;
revenue system, 9 ; presents, 10 ; Moghul Couri, ib. ; rebellions, 11 ;
breaking up of the Moghul empire, 205,

Muhammad Ali, the English Nawab of Arcot, 141.

Municipal government at Madras, natives mixed with Europeans, 92 ; —
see Mayor's Court.

Murshed Kuli Khan, Nawab of Bengal, his oppressive administration,
164.

Mm-shedabad founded by Murshed Kuli Khan, 164 ; described by Cap-
tain Hamilton, 196.

Mysore in the seventeenth century, 73.

Nadir Shah, his invasion of India, 202.

Nizam of Iljderabad, growing indej^endence, 135 ; wars for the succes-
sion, 140 ; the English and French Nizam.s, 142 ; French at Hyderabad
under Bussy, 143.

Patna, English saltpetre factory at, 150; loss of the trade, 162; massacre
of the English by Meer Cossim, 318 ; diaries of the siege and massacre,
320.



390 INDF.X.

Piply, English at, 149 ; ruined by the removal to Hughli jiud Calcutta,

186.
Pitt, Governor of Madras, resists the demands of Dafid Khan, 103 ;

entertains the Nawab, 104; besieged by the Nawab, 113.
Pitt, William, his objections to Clive's policy, 270.
Plassey, Clive's victory at, 260.
Pondicherry besieged by the Malirattas, 98.
Portuguese hostility to the English, 18 ; Moghul complaints against, 147 ;

revenge of Shah Jehan on Hughli, 148 ; suppression of the Portuguese

pirates, 153.

Eajputana, Aurungzeb's persecuting wars in, 17.

St. Thome, Portuguese settlement at, 6 ; captured by the Muhammadans
50; description of, by Fryer, 60; description of, by Caj)tain Hamilton,
131.

Seits or Hindu bankers, 206.

Shah Alam proclaimed Emperor, 274; proposals for conducting him to
Delhi, 275 ; designs of Nawab Cossim and the English, 277.

Shah Jehan, reign of, 12 ; revenge on Hughli, 148 ; war between his
sons, 150.

Shuja-u-daula, Nawab of Oude, threatens Bengal, 262; defeated at
Buxar, 327 ; settlement of Lord Clive, 333.

Sikhs, massacre of, at Delhi described by the English embassy, 180.

Silver, drain of, its causes, 373.

Siva.ji, the Mahratta, 15 ; war against him, ib. ; goes to Delhi, ib. ; death
of, 16 ; plunders Surat, 34 ; English embassy to, 42 ; audience, 43 ;
coronation, 45 ; visits the neighbourhood of Madras, 73.

Slave trade at Madras, 83.

Supravisors, appointment of, in Bengal, 363 ; failure of the scheme, 384.

Suraj-u-daula becomes Nawab of Bengal, 225 ; captures Calcutta, 226 ;
narrative of the Black Hole tragedy, 227 ; defeated by Clive, 255 ; his
lavish promises, 256 ; intrigues with the French, 257 ; conspiracy
against him at Murshedabad, 259 ; defeated at Plassey, 260.

Surat, early English settlement at, 18 ; hostility of the Portuguese, ib. ;
pomp of the President, ib. ; visit of Mandelslo, 19 ; Surat Custom
House, ib. ; entertainment at the English house, 20 ; order of the
English factory, 21 ; tea, 22 ; English garden, ib. ; amusements at, ib. ;
visit of Fryer, 28; attacked by Sivaji, 34; subordination of Bombay,
36.

Tavemier, his journey from Agra to Hughli, 154 ; Agra, ib. ; Bengal
revenue, ib. ; rhinoceros, ib, ; Aurungabad, 155 ; Eiver Ganges, ib. ;
Allahabad, ib. ; crossing a river, 156 ; Benares, ib. ; Patua, 157 ;



INDEX. 39X

Rajinalial, ib. ; parting from Beruier, ib. ; crocodiles, ib. ; D:u.'ca, 158 ;
visits tbe Nawab, 159; Lospitalitius, 100; lluglili, ib. ; Tavcniicr's
grievances, ib.

Vansittart, Governor of Calcutta, 272 ; history of his administration, 273
et scq.

Verelst, Governor of Bengal, 351 ; his advanced policy, 352 ; his plans,
357 ; appointment of supravisors, 363 ; permanent value of his observa-
tions, 365.

Warner, Reverend Patrick, his letter to the Court of Directors on im-
morality at Madras, 68.

Zemindars, Bengal, oppressed by the Nawab Murshed Kuli Khan, 164.
Zultikar Khan, first Nawab of the Carnatic, 99.



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Online LibraryJames Talboys WheelerEarly records of British India; a history of the English settlements in India, as told in the government records, the works of old travellers, and other contemporary documents, from the earliest perio → online text (page 33 of 33)