Japan. Monbushō.

Annual report of the Minister of State for Education online

. (page 9 of 19)
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102 >."••.'■■

Tokyo Academy of ,Music'S— The academic course is divided into
preparatory, main, ppstrgraduate, normal, and elective courses. The main
course is subdivided into three sections of vocal music, instrumental
music, andrmusical composition. The normal course is also divided into
two seetjoids' A. and B., the former being designed to offer the instruct-
^o^„ ipr normal schools, middle schools and higher schools for females,
.anjfl the latter to give the teachers in elementary schools, such branches
of study as are appropriate to instruction in music. The course of
study extends over one year in the preparatory, three years in the main,
two years in the post-graduate, three years in the normal cx)urse A.,
and one year in the normal course B., while the elective course has no
definite term. In the present year, pupils at government expense were
admitted to the normal course A.

To show the attainments of pupils and at the same time to
encourage music, concerts were held in autumn, as in the previous year.
Further in order to show the parents or sureties of elective pupils
attending the branch department of the Academy the actual state of
instruction in music, two exhibitions were given during the present
year.

The number of instructors included 8 professors, 8 assistant,
professors, 24 persons specially appointed or temporarily emyloyed, and
5 foreigners (including 2 Grerman, and one each of American, Bussian
and French), the total being 45. The number of pupils included 43 in
the main, 26 in the preparatory, 14 in the post-graduate course, 68 in
the normal course A., 20 in the normal course B., and 252 in the
elective course (including one Russian, 2 Americans and one German),
the total number being 423. The number of graduates was 2 in the
old main course, one in the elective course, 6 in the normal course A.,
and 14 in the normal course B., the total being 20. Compared witn
the previgus year, this shows an increase of 2 professors, 3 assistant
professors and of 92 pupils, while the number of those specially
appointed or temporarily employed decreased by 2 and of graduates by
6. Of 24 pupils who had completed the preparatory course, 20 passed
on to the main course. As regards the careers of those who had
graduated in the old main course, one entered the teaching service in
a normal school, and the other was admitted to the post-graduate
course. The number of applicants for admission was 598, of whom
223 were enrolled. The number of those who left before graduation
was 103, of whom 90 left either on account of sickness or of family



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108



concerns, and 13 were Ktruck out :of the school roister, while one
died.

The following table shows the number of instructors, pupils and
graduates, together with the annual comparative statistics relating to
the same.

Statistical Table relating to the Tokyo Academy (f
Music far 1902-3.



No. of Ihstmctors.



I



II

is



2 a

^ a



^



t



I

I



<



\1



d « { Vocal Musio

*J I j Instrumental Music •

^_o (Musical Composition

^ Total

Preparatory Course

Normal Course jgj^^;;;;;
Total

ElectiTe Course •

Post-graduate Course

Grand Total

1901-2

1900-1

1899

1898



\



y 8!



/



24 5i 45



13

29

1

i3

26
68
20
88

252
14



6

14
20



8

62
128

78
206

319
3



24
29
21
50

146
2



24



45



423



598



223



26
27



42
41
38
31



331

242
215
169



415
262
215
163



249
2U
183
153



Among the special schools both public and private, there were 9
of medicine, 2 of dentistry, 5 of pharmacy, 15 of politics, law, or
political economy, 6 of literature, 3 of science, and 10 of other subjects
of study, the total being 50. The number of instructors was 1,203, of;
pupils 16,960 and of graduates 2,^21. Compared with the previous
year, this shows an increase of one school, 229 instructors, 2,386 pupils
and 250 graduates. As regards the localities where the above schools
were estabUshed, it may be mentioned that there were 3 medical schools
in the Fu of Osaka, 2 each in the Fu of T5kyo and Ky5to, one each
in the Ken of Aichi and Kumamoto. As to schools of dentistry, there
was one each in the Fu of T5kyo and the Ken of Aichi. Schools of



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101

pharmacy were established one each in the F% di Tokyo, Kyoto and
Osaka, and the Kea of Aichi and Toyama. There were 9 schools of
politics, law, or political economy in the Fu of Tokyo, 2 in the Fu of
Kyoto, and one each in the Hokkaido, the Fu of Osaka and the £en
of Miyagi and Fukusaima. There were 5 schools of literature in the
Fu of Tokyo and one in the Fu of Kyoto. As to the schools of
science there were 2 in the Fu of Kyoto, and one . in the Fu of
Osaka. Besides there were 6 in the Fu of Ky5to and 2 each in the
Fu of Osaka and the Km of Miye, in which subjects of study other
than those above mentioned are taught. Of the medical schools above
mentioned, one each of those established in the Fu of Ky5to and
Osaka belongs to the class of the Fu establishments, and one in the
Kea of Aichi to the class of the Ken establishments. Of the schools of
pharmacy, one in the Ken of Toyama belongs to the class of the city
establishments, while all other schools are of private establishments.

The following table shows the number of special schools both public
and private and of insructors, pupils and graduates, together with the
annual comparative statistics relating to the same.



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106

TECHNICAL SCHOOLS.

The number of technical schools included 9 government, 795 public
and 51 private establishments, besides three institutes established by
the government for training technical teachers.

By the nine government establishments are meant the Sapporo
Agricultural Schcjol, the Morioka Higher School of Agriculture and
Forestry, the Tokyo Higher Commercial School, the Kobe Higher
Commercial School, the T5kyo Higher Technical School, the Osaka
Higher Technical School, the Kyoto Higher Technical School, the
Apprentices' School attached to the Tokyo Higher Technical School
and the Supplementary School for Industry attached to the Institute
for the Training of Teachers of Industry. The working chracter of
these schools as well as of three institutes above mentioned may be
described as follows :

Sapporo Agricultural School:— The plan of the institution includes
the main and preparatory courses, besides those of agriculture, civil
engineering, and forestry. The main course is designed to give superior
instruction relating to agriculture both theoretical and practical and
plantation, with a course of study extending over four years, and the
preparatory course to give instruction in general subjects necessary for
admission to the main course, with a course of study extending over
two yeai"s. The course of agriculture is designed to give -secondary
education relating to agriculture, and that of civil engineeripg to give
higher education relating to this subject, while the colirse of forestry is
intended to aflford higher education relating to forestry; the course of
study extending over three years in each. For the benefit of those
desiring to pursue practical farming, a course for practical students has
been organized.

• During the present year, the course of Eoglish imposed on pupils
of forestry was superseded by German, Regulations relating to the
grant of aid were abolished and new ones for the grant of study expense
or scholarships were issued, together with those for the school museum,
at ihe same time prescribing the detailed rules relating to the same.
These are the principal changes introduced into the regulations during
the present year.

. As regards the school accommodation, it may be mentioned that
additional buildings commenced siixce April 1899, have been almost
completed at the end of the present year. It was therefore determined



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107

that the main and preparatory departments should be i-emoved to the
new builduigs from the beginnings of the ensuing year.

The number of instructors included 13 professors, 10 assistant
professors, and 9 persons specially appointed, the total being 32. The
number of pupils was 69 in the main, 84 in the preparatory, 84 in the
agricultural course, 54, in the course of civil engineering, and 45 in
the course of forestry, the total being 336. Tne number of graduates
was 13 in the agricultural course, 10 in the engineering course, and 4
in the course of forestry, the total being 27. The above figures show
if conipared with the previous year, an increase of 3 professors and
51 pupils, while the numl)er of assistant professors decreased by 2, of
those specially appointed by 3 and of graduates by 20. Besides there .
were 23 pupils who completed the preparatory course and passed on to
the main course. Of the graduates of civil engineering, 5 have entered
the government service as technologists, 4 as technologists in private
companies, and one has entered the military service. Of those wha
graduated in forestry, 2 have entered the government service as
technolcgists and one has engaged in the military service, besides one
of whom no exact information has yet been received. Of the graduates
of the agricultural course, one has entered the government service as
technologist, 7 have engaged in practical pursuits, 3 have joined the
army, and 2 went abroad for study, etc. No pupils have graduated in
the main course during the present year. The number of applicants
for admission during the year was 476, of whom 140 were enrolled.
The number of those who left before graduation was 39, of whom 4
went on account of sickness and the others of family concerns. The
number of those whose names were struck out of the school register on
accoimt of non-attendance was 18, while one died.

The following table shows the number of instructora, pupils, and
graduates, together with the annual comparative statistics relating to
the same.



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108



StatUtiad TdUe rdating to the Sapporo Agriculture^
School far 1902-3.



No. of Instaractora.



£



I



Main CJonrse-

Agricultural Conrse of Secondary
Grade

Civil EngineeriDg

Porestry

Preparatory Course

Fost-Gradnate Course

Total

1901-2

1900-1

1899

1898



- 13



10



32



69

84
54
45
84



13

10

4



76

72

64

195

1



32
28
32
47
1



13



10



32



336



27



408 140



10

10

8

6



12

12

13

9



12
9
8

10



34
31

29
25



285
258
230
185



47
43
40
34



276
185
115

70



148

128

100

52



The Morioha Higher ScJwol of AgricuUure and Forestry : — The plan
of the institution includes the three courses of agriculture, forestry and
veterinary science, and is designed to afford higher education necessary
for these subjects. Each course extends over three years. Besides
the main course, a post-graduate course and an elective course are
estalished.

This institution was organized at the end of the previous year but
it is expected that the formal opening of the school should take place
in the beginning of the ensuing year. Most of the school buildings
are now in course of construction. Books and apparatus are not yet
in a complete arrangement.

The number of instructors includes 3 professors, one assistant
professor, and one specially appointed, the total being 5.

The Tokyo Higher Commercial School : — The school plan is divided
into a main and a preparatory course, extending over three years in the
former and one year in the latter. Besides the regular courses above



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109

mentioned, a professional department of two years is established to give
msbmction in snoh sublets as may be necessary for graduates of the
school who may desire to pursae their studies further in any one
particular branch bearing on commerce, or for those intending to enter
the consular service. During the present year, the Institute for the
Training of Commercial Teachers was annexed to this institution.

Among the revisions introduced into the school regulations may be
mentioned those relating to examinations, promotion, as well as gradua-
tion, and the course of study for the professional department. New
regulations were also prescribed for the Institute for the Training of
Commercial Teachers.

The number of instructors included 19 professors, 6 assistant
professors, 28 persons '.specially appointed and 8 foreigners (including 3
English, one each of Belgian, Chinese, French, Spanish, and German), the
total being 61. The number of pupils was 957 of whom 592 belonged
to the main, 303 to the preparatory course, and 62 to the professional
department, the number of graduates in the main course, being 71.
Compared with the previous year, this shows an increase of 5 professora,
one each of assistant professors and those specially appointed, of 2
foreign professors, and 118 pupils, while the number of graduates
decreased by 18. Besides, 233 pupils completed the preparatory course
and passed on to the main course* Of the graduates of the main course,
6 were appointed directors or instructors in schools, 2 entered the naval
service as accountants, 6 have been engaged by banking institutions,
17 by commercial companies; one by mercantile firm, one has entered
the military service, one went abroad for study, 26 were admitted to
the professional department, and 12 were still undecided as to their
occupation. There were also 17 graduates turned out from the professional
department ; and 2 each of them were appointed officials in the Foreign
Office, or directors of or instructors in schools, or engaged by banking
institutions or by a commercial company; while 2 have entered the
military service besides 7 who were still unemployed. The number
of applicants for admission to the main course was 3 and to the
preparatory course 1,235, of whom 3 were admitted to the main and
260 to the preparatory course, 3 in the former course being Chinese,
and one in the latter Corean. The number of those who left before
graduation was 89, of whom 9 were ordered to leave or had their
name struck out of the school register. The number of those who died
was 3, of whom one belonged to the professionals department, and 2



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110



to the preparatory course.

The following table shows the " number of instructors, pupils, and
graduates, together with the annual comparatiye statistics relating to
the same.



Statistical ToBe relating to the Tokyo EigJier Commercial
School for 1902-3.



Mam Course

Preparatory Course

Professional Department

Total

1901-2

1900-1

1899



No. of Instructors.



19



§1



i



28



^1



I



16



•t



592

303

62



-2



71



&



251

44:



19



28



61



957



71



1,283



27
31
23
17



52
53
46
42



839
666
569
497



81
64
69



1,364
981
691

507



298



317
223
184
172



Kobe Higher Commercial School : — The school is provided with the
main and preparatory courses and designed to give higher education in
commerce. The course of study extends over one year in the preparatory
and three years in the main course. This institution was established
at the end of the previous year and its regulations prescribed at the end
of the present year. The regulations were framed in accordance with
those of the Tokyo Higher Commercial School; but some departure was
made in this case in the division of the course of study as well as in
other details. The preparatory course was divided into two sections,
the first section being intended for the, admission of graduates of middle
schools, and the second section for those of commercial schools of middle
grade. The school year begins on the lot May, and ends on the 30th



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HI

April of the following year. As regards equipments^ most of the
building work still remain untouched, only a few buildings having been
completed at the end of the present year.

The number of instructors included 3 professors and one assistant-
professor. There are no important facts worthy to be mentioned
here.

Tokyo Higher Technical School:— The school plan is divided into
six sections, viz., dyeing and weaving, furnace work, applied chemistry,
mechanics, electricity and industrial designing. The section of dyeing
and weaving is subdivided into two courses of dyeing and weaving,
while the section of electricity has two separate courses for electrical
mechanics and electrical chemistry. The course of instruction in each
section is divided into three courses, each being completed in one
school year. There is an apprentices' school in connection with this
institution. The Institute for the Training of Technical Teachers was
also annexed to this institution during the present year.

In the present year, the amoimt of tuitions fees was increased to
Yen 20. For the benefit of those who may devote themselves to the
practical pursjtiits, accordig to the regulations of the supplementary
schools for technical instruction, such special subjects as weaving, dyeing,
architecture, industrial chemistry, industrial designing, etc., were
prescribed as optional subjects, in addition to the regular ones, with
a course of not less shorter than four weeks and not longer than one
school term. Foreigners may be admitted as elective pupils. As
regards the Institute for the Training of Technical Teachers, the
regulations of the main school were to be applied as far as possible.

As regards the equipments of the school, it may be mentioned
that the buildings of various workshops had already been completed,
and the main school buildings as well as the workshops for dyeing
and weaving and for mechanics were also completed during the present
year.

The number of instructors included 19 professors, 22 assistant
professors, 22 persons specially appointed or temporarily employed, and
3 foreigners, the total being 66. The number of pupils was 416, of
whom 418 belonged to the main, 24 to the elective, 2 to the post-
graduate course, and 2 were special attendants at lectures, the total
being 446. ITie number of graduates was 101, ' of whom 92 belonged
to the main and 9 to the elective course. The above figures show an
increase of 4 professors, 3 assistant professors, and of one foreign



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112

professor, while those specially appointed and temporarily employed
decreased by 2. Of foreign professors, one was a citizen of the United
States of America and engaged as mechanic in the section of mechanics,
and the other also of the United States as instructor of English, while
the third, being a subject of Great Britain, was engaged as finisher
in the section of dyeing and weaving. The number of pupils and
graduates also shows an increase of 53 and one respectiyely. Of those
who had graduated in ^ the main and elective courses, 25 have entered
the government service as technologists, 6 were engaged as instructors,
44 as technologists in companies, 11 have settled in business on their
own account, 2 were admitted to the post-graduate [course, 5 entered
the military service, 3 went abroad, and 5 were still undecidsd as to
their occupations The number of applicants for admission during the
year was 741, of whom 187 were enrolled. The actual [number of
foreign pupils was 15, of whom 7 were Chinese and 8 East Indians.
The number of those who left before graduation was 35, of whom 22
left on account of family concerns, 11 in consequence of illness, and 2
had their names struck off the school register, while 4 died.

The following table shows the number of instructors, pupils and
graduates, togeter with the annual comparative statistics relating to the
same.



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118



StaiisHad Table rdatmg to the Toi^o Higher Technical
School for 1902-3.



No. of InstmotoiH.



Is






I



£



I
I



a I






Dept. of Dyeing (Dyeing

and Weaving / Wearing

Total

Coiamics

Applied Chemistry

Machanics

Dept. of (Electrical Mechanics

Electridiy ( Eleotrical Ghemistiy

Total

Industrial Designs

Elective Course

Post-gradnate Course

Special Students

Grand Total

1901-2

1900-1

1899

1898



19 22



22



66



20

35

55

17

59

190

64

16

80

17

24

2

2



4

6

10

2

16

44

9

5

14

6

9



33

61

94

21

114

312

126

32

158

23

14

3

2



19 22



22



66



'446



101



741



9
15
24/

9
24
67
25

9
34
10
14

3

2



187



19
18
17
16



24
20
16
15



60
52
48
44



393


100


361


93


347


104


371


50



562
453
398



158

132

141

95



The Apprentices* School connected with the Tokyo Higher Technical
School: — The school plan is divided into two sections, viz., wood work
and metal work. The wood work is subdivided into three courses of
carpentry, joinery and wood modelling and the metal work into the
four courses of casting, forging, finishing, and metal-plating (including
work in lead). The course of study extends over three years. After
completing the prescribed course, all pupils are bound to carry on
practical work, under the supervision of the main institutions, either in
factories or by apprenticeship to practically qualified persons for a
period of two years.

The number of instructors included 5 assistant instructors and 8
persons temporarily employed, the total being 14. The number of
pupils was 34 in the wood work, and 94 in the metal work section, the
total being 128. The number of those who completed the prescribed
course was 12 in the wood work and 22 in the metal work section, the
total being 34. Compared with the previous year, this shows an



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114

increase of one each in the number of instractors and assistant
instructors, while the number of pupils and graduates decreased by 6
and 4 respectively. As regards the careers of those who had completed
the prescribed course in the previous year, 27 have been engaged as
workmen in private companies, 3 have settled in business of their own,
3 have entered other schools and one is* still imdecided as to his
occupation, besides 4 of whom no exact information has yet been
received. The number of applicants for admission was 121, of whom
62 were enrolled. The number of those who left before graduation was
30, of whom 6 left on 'account of illness, 15 of domestic concerns or
other reasons and 9 had their names struck off the school register on
account of non-attendance; while 3 died.

Osaka Higher TechniccH School: — The school plan is divided into
three departments, viz., mechanical technonology, chemical technolc^y,
and naval architecture, a mechanical course being established in the
first ; the five courses of applied chemistry, dyeing, lumacQ work,
brewing, and metallurgy in the second ; and one course for the
construction of bulls and the other for engines in the third department ;
the course of study to extend over three years each.

As to equipments, chief attention was paid to the purchase of
machines and models. With this object in view, 10 sorts of macliines
and models were purchased for the use of the workshops common to
the courses of mechanics, hulls, and engines ; 7 for the use of the work-
shop of applied chemistry, 4 of dyeing, one of furnace work, and 14 of
metallurgy, the total being 36.

The number of instructors included 14 professors, 15 assistant
professors, and 13 persons specially appointed, the total being 42. The
number of pupils was 353, of whom 123 belonged to the department
of mechanical technology, 132 to the department of chemical technology,
and 93 to the department of naval architecture. The number of


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Online LibraryJapan. MonbushōAnnual report of the Minister of State for Education → online text (page 9 of 19)