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Joel Dyer.

The Architect & engineer of California and the Pacific Coast (Volume v.36 (Feb.-Apr. 1914)) online

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molecules would have no molecules from
which to rebound on that one side and
would all rush down the empty lane.

This is what happens in a steam pipe:
\t some portion of the pipe there is
water, cold relatively to the steam.
Steam is admitted to the pipe and soine
of it condenses on the surface ot the
water, heating up the surface layer,
which ceases to condense further steam.
\ valve is then opened in the course of
the pipe: it is a valve against which. let
us =ay, the water is lodging. The open-
ing of the valve, allowing some water to
pass, causes a disturbance ot the surface,
admits steam to the cold water, which
promptly condenses so much steam as to
produce a vacuum, into which steam
ru'hes so violently that it piles up the
water before it. and the wall of water is
violently thrust forward by the steam
and becomes a traveling plug of such
energy that it is possible for great shocks
to be set up which will readily burst or




Pacific Gas &
Electric Co.'s
Spaulding
Dam



This photo shows one view
of the immense dam near
Emigrant Gap built by the
Pacific Gas & Electric Co.
The PRATT BUILDING
MATERIAL CO. furnished
hundreds of tons of their
Marys\-ille sand for this job
and the Pacific Gas & Electric
Co.'s engineers say it is by
far the best concrete sand in
the State. Phone PRATT
BUILDING MATERIAL
CO., Hearst Building, for a
sample.



122



The Architect and Eni^inccr



BURGLAR ALARM SYSTEMS and
VAULT PROTECTION SYSTEMS

For Banks

He are now installing a very complete electric
Burglar Alarm System in the Liiited States Mint.

BUTTE ENGINEERING AND ELECTRIC CO, 683-7 Howard St., S. f




A. e. OVERPACK



fURNACE CO.

Agents for

TORRID ZONE
fURNACtS



Phones:

Rtsldence. Sunset I94S

Office. Park 549



116-18 Church St.



SAN FRANCISCO



W.W.BREITE,C.E.

Structural Engineer

Designs and Details of

ALL CLASSES OF
METALLIC STRUCTURES



FOURTH FLOOR, CLUNIE BLDQ.
California and Montgomery St5.



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA



PETERSEN-JAMES GO.



PLUMBING
HEATING

CONTRACTORS



710 Larkin St., San Francisco
Telephones, Franklin 3540—0 2443



fracture cast-iron valves and other junc-
tion pieces.

The sequence of events above outlined
is merely illustrative of what may hap-
pen, for the variations are as numerous
as the ways of putting up steam pipes
wrongly. One error formerly very com-
mon w'as to place a stop valve close to
the boiler, taking off the steam by a ver-
tical pipe to several feet high, when the
pipe proceeded horizontally. This ver-
tical pipe would be liable to become full
of water if any steam could leak up into
it from the boiler or condense into it
from other boilers on the main. The
correct position of the stop valve is at
the top of the vertical pipe, and from it
the main ought to slope all the way to
engine separator. If there must be dips
in between the terminals they must be
drained, and the drain must act. Expan-
sion bends, unless they project horizon-
tally from a steam pipe, will block the
flow of v.'ater and provide water to form
a flying plug.

In designing any line of pipes or a
system, all the possible combinations of
opening, shut and leaking valves should
be thought out to find if it is possible for
water to collect. It is particularly desir-
able that the number of valves be a
minimum. Numerous valves and ring
mains are productive of danger points.

Where both air and water are present
in a pipe it is possible for the air to be
compressed at one end of the pipe, and
for the compressing water to be flung
back by the air into the steam end and
do damage. Thus in a faulty arrange-
ment the steam valve might first be
opened slightly and promptly shut upon
indication of trouble. And this very clos-
ing might produce a water-hammer by air
rebound. Probably one of the more fre-
quent hammer-causing faults is a slight
slope of a pipe towards an obstruction
with the formation of a long surface of
water in a half-full pipe. This condition
is one which might happen in a pipe
which had been particularly vacuous and
nearly full of water. On admitting steam



vriting to Adverti;



pie



this magazine.



The Architect aud Engineer



123



the! traps would begin to lower the
water and produce tire above conditions
of a long surface to be broken into waves
lo set up rapid condensation. — Domesti<"-
Engineer.



Causes of Steam Plaint Troubles

One reason why some purchasers of
power plant machinery are always in
trouble, says Power, is that they assume
that they know more about the operation
of the machine than do the manufactur-
ers. Because of this assumption, impos-
sible operating conditions are imposed
upon the machine, and economical results
are then expected.

A defective engine may be an instru-
ment of danger because of the absence
of effective safety stop, or having none
at all. Hundreds of patched engine
frames now in use are more fit for the
scrap pile than for withstanding the
strains produced bj' the power strokes
of the piston. The owners take a chance
that the engine will hold together for a
few days, weeks or months longer, and
ihe chance turns against them.

The most dangerous thing, however, is
the second-hand boiler, which has been
subjected to ignorant abuse for years, or
the boiler that is carrying a higher steam
pressure than safety warrants. In case
of accident the owner of such apparatus
has no excuse behind which to hide. If
machinery is operated in defiance of the
advice of men who know their business,
the blame for resulting troubles must
rest on the unwise owner. Advice freely
given is seldom heeded. If paid for it is
taken at a greater value: but it is useless
and silly to pay for advice if it is not to
be followed in putting in the work con-
templated, or in operating the equipment
after it has been installed.



Need for the Consulting Engineer

The constantly increasing cost of fuel
is the main cause for the growing dispo-
sition of managers of office buildings and
owners of power plants to subject their
properties to scientific examination by



specialists to discover if it is possible to
effect economy and increase efficiency.
The fact that the operating engineer has
been able to make tests, compile figures
and originate some improvements him-
self will not, in many instances, prevent
the inspection of the plant by a consult-
ing engineer. If the operating engineer
is up to date he will welcome the expert
investigation, because it will vindicate
him and strengthen him in his position.
For this reason, if he is wise, he will
assume the most friendly and helpful
attitude toward the consultng engineer
and aid him in every way possible in his
work. The interloper is in no sense a
rival to the operator, but a colleague
with superior advantages that will help
10 make successful the efforts to remove
weaknesses in the plant and add strength
and efficiency to it. and the operator wlio
best serves his own interests and those
of his employer, says Power, will take
the greatest possible advantage of this
co-operation. Meeting the outsider half
way will result in benefit to the operator
and probably render the examination of
the plant more successful than it would
be without his cordial assistance. Log-
ically the services of the two engineers
are not competitive, but complimentary.



Heating and Ventilating Costs

THE following costs of plants for heat-
ing and ventilating have been fig-
ured out by keeping an accurate account
of the costs of the various items of
plants, most of which are installed in
N'ew England. .\llowances, of course,
should be made for other localities, based
on the difference in cost of labor and
material.

The estimated cost of radiators is
classified under five headings. Cast-iron
radiators cost from 19 to 27 cents per
square foot of surface. Cast-iron indirect
radiators of the type for gravity work
cost from 16 to 18 cents per square foot,
and for fan systems 25 cents. Pipe coils
for direct radiation cost 30 cents, and
pipe heaters for fan systems 45 to 50



DIECKMANN HARDWOOD CO.

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.

350 to 398 BEACH STREET, COR. TAYLOR
CARRY A LARGE WELL ASSORTED STOCK OF

HARDWOODS

AND SOLICIT YOUR INQUIRIES.



When writing to Adv



mention this magazine.



The Archilcct and Ein/iitccr



,\f*^^.




ELEVATING, CONVEYING, SCREENING

AND MECHANICAL POWER

TRANSMITTING MACHINERY

is the product of years o( experience hacked
by modern manufacturing facilities.

^ This class of machinery built by
^ $C (B vi'ill be found at many important
undertakings along the Pacific Coast for
engineers know they take no chances when
m $c (^ designs the equipment and
furnishes machinery to do the work.



(Eompang

ENGINEERS AND MANUFACTURERS

(Send for 500 page catalogs

SAN FRANCISCO

LOS ANGELES PORTLAND SEATTLE

VANCOUVER, B. C.




The Architect and Engineer 125



HEATING Automatic Sprinkler Systems plumbing

VENTILATION pLOOR AND WALL TILING ^""^ ""*•- "'""'^

SCOTT CO., Inc.

Successor to JOHN G. SUTTON CO.
24.3 MINNA STREET SAN FRANCISCO



AMERICAN CONCRETE CO.

Joseph P.^sijl'aletti, iManatit-r

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

1704 HUMBOLDT BANK BUILDING 785 Market Street, SAN FRANCISCO

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT

FIDELITY AND DEPOSIT COMPANY OF MARYLAND

Bonds and Casualty Insurance for Contractors



Insurance Exchange Bldg.



C 1472



SAN FRAMCISCO ' Kearny 1453

ATLAS HEATING AND VENTILATING CO., Inc.

ENGINEERS and CONTRACTORS

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING. FANS. BLOWERS,

FURNACES, POWER PLANTS-SHEET METAL WORK

FOURTH AND FREELON STS. PHONES DOUGLAS 378. HOME J 1 009

SET. BRYANT AND BRANNAN SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.



Electrical Specialties in San Francisco Stock

Dayton Electrical Mfg. Co., E. H. Freeman Electric Co., Grabler Manufactur-
ing Co., M. & M. Electrical Mfg. Co., Pittsburgh High Voltage Insulator
Co., V. V. Fittings Co., Western Conduit Co. "Buckeye." Represented by

ELECTRIC AGENCIES COMPANY 247 Minna Street, S. F

WITTMAN, LYMAN & CO.

CONTRACTORS FOR

PLUMBING, STEAM and HOT WATER HEATING



LIGHTING HEATING PLUMBING

We Guarantee Good Work and Prompt Service. ^No Job too small — none too big. We Employ
Experts in all Three Departments and the> are always at your service. Get Our Figure.

CENTRAL ELECTRIC PLUMBING & HEATING CO.



STEVENSON STREET



PLUMBING
and

HEATING
CONTRACTOR



Telephone Park 234 Res. Phone, Sunset 2342

ANTON E LETTICH

365 FELL STREET



SAN FRANCISCO



When wriling lo Advertisers please mention this magazine.



By the Way

Some Industrial Information Worth the While



Infringement of Patent — Bed Manufac-
turers in Various Parts of Country
Must Render an Accounting

Judge Wc-llhorn of the United States
District Court, in tlie action brouglit by
the Alurphy Wall Bed Company of San
Francisco, and the Hughes Manufactur-
ing Company of Los Angeles, licensees
under the Alurphy patent, against John
G. Gushing, doing business as the Pacific
Wall Bed Company of Los Angeles, has
found for the plaintififs.

It was alleged that the bed being man-
ufactured by the defendant corporation
was an infringement of the patent grant-
ed Murphy, and an injunction and an ac-
counting was sought. The Hughes Man-
ufacturing Company is paying a royalty
to the Murphy Wall Bed Company for
the right to manufacture and sell beds
under this patent.

The validity of the Murphy patent was
proven to the satisfaction of the court.
Other alleged infringing concerns are the
American Disappearing Bed Company nf
Los Angeles, Pacific Spring Bed Com-
pany and the Pacific Wall Bed Company
of San Francisco, Robert H. Anderson
of San Diego and a number of others, nt-
cluding dealers and manufacturers in
Salt Lake, Utah, and various eastern
points. It is claimed that the opinion of
Judge Wellborn means the collection of
about $70,000 in accounting from the
various firms who, under the opinion of
the court, have infringed the Murphy
patent.

Experimenting with Creosoted Piles

In an effort to determine the results
which may be obtained from using creo-
soted piles for fenders, instead of the
green wood, the Board of State Harbor
Commissioners have decided to place the
creosoted timbers at one or two wharves
in the immediate future. The experiment
will be conducted by Jerome Newman,
chief engineer of the board.

It is believed that, unless the creosoted
pile is smashed through accident, it will
last from ten to twelve years. The green
pile lasts on an average about twelve
months. The average cost to the state of
the regulation green fender pile is about
$14. This includes the work of placing.
The cost of a creosoted pile will be
about $32. If the experiment proves .i
.success, the saving to the state will be
500 per cent. Xewman hopes to show a
big saving, even if the creosoted pile lasts
but five years.



Sheet Metal in Architectural Design

Tlie architect and designer are ever
on the alert to discover that which is
new, artistic, quaint or even foreign in
appearance. Even now the exteriors of
buildings, both business and residential,
including apartment houses for city
erection, are taking on new and im-
proved forms. The moment any archi-
tectural feature becomes hackneyed, even
though it has in former years been
surrounded by an atmosphere of ro-
mance and elegance, an active and fer-
tile brain is already seeking something
new or yet untried. Houses of the
Mexican or Spanish type, having wire
cornices, tile roofs and ornamental bal-
conies, have been built in California and
other sunny climates, and are now find-
ing their way into the East. Roofing
tile of quaint design can be made of
copper as well as of terra cotta; small
detail for exterior work can be beauti-
fully rendered in either copper or zinc,
and crestings and finials of copper look
as well as if of tile or solid bronze.
Much copper is being used now. says
Sheet Metal. It oxidizes beautifully and
the color desired can be attained by
chemical means. Of course, when a
new structure of any character is to be
erected, the architect is looked to in the
matter of design, but in many cases the
architect does not always know the pos-
sibilities of sheet metal or keep them in
mind.

It is not without reason to say that
it is within the field of the sheet metal
contractor, not only to note the trend
of things in building matters, but to
make it his business to see that the
architect is kept posted on the utility
and beauty of sheet metal, not alone by
si'ggestio"s, bm by keeping his show-
room well supplied with the most recent
creations and seeing that it is visited
frequently by architects.



Credit for the Journal of Electricity,
Power & (jas

Tile short article l)y Roniaiiie W. My-
ers on "School Room Lighting," in the
March issue of the Architect and Engi-
neer should have been credited to the
Journal of Electricity, Power & Gas.
I'^iilure to give credit was an oversight
and the publishers of this magazine wish
it made plain that they are quite as anx-
ious to extend to other journals the same
courtesy as they expect to receive from
them



The Architect and Eiiisinci



U7



MacKenzie Roof Co.



425 15tH St., OaKland

PHone OaKland S-^-Ol



Phone Fran/ilin 1006



Alex. Coleman

CONTRACTING
PLUMBER



706 Ellis Street, San Francisco, Cat.



Union to Fight Concrete Construction

Members of the International Bricklay-
ers' and Stonemasons' .Union of Amer-
ica declare that many hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars will be spent by the
union to promote brick construction in-
stead of concrete masonry where either
type would answer the purpose. A large
■fund is said to have been set aside for
this use. Part of the plan of the cam-
paign proposed is to help finance clay
product manufacturing plants wherever
there is a strong tendency toward the
use of concrete instead. It is proposed
to erect the first plant of this kind at El
Paso, Tex. It is claimed that $250,000
has already been voted by the interna-
tional union for this purpose. — Engineer-
ing Record.



Another Kawneer 'Victory

The Kawneer Manufacturing Co., mak-
ers of store fronts, has been given a de-
cision in their suit against the Cook-
Van 'Waters Co. of Portland, Ore., agents
for the Hester system. This last-named
concern forthwith retires from the field.
The Kawneer Manufacturing Co. cele-
brate their success by announcing that
they will erect a $200,000 factory build-
ing and plant in San Francisco or vi-
cinity for the supplying of the Pacific
coast market. The Kawneer Co. is under
the able management here of W. D. Fair-
haven.



Still Another New Ferry Boat

In preparation for handling the great
volume of traffic in 1915, when the Pan-
ama-Pacific International Exposition is
to be held in San Francisco, the South-
ern Pacific has decided to construct a
new ferry steamer; the "San Mateo." for
service between San Francisco and Oak-
land. This vessel will be a sister ship to
the new ferry steamers "."Mameda" and
"Santa Clara," and will cost appro.ximate-
ly $500,000.



McCRAY
REFRIGERATORS

BUILT TO ORDER

FOR

Home, Restaurant, Hotel or Club

We Carry a Full Line of Stock Si?es

NATHAN DOHRMANN CO.

Selline Agents
Qeary and Stockton Sts., San Francisco




O. S. S A R S I

ArcHitectural Sculptor

<| High Class Ornamental Plaster. Ornainental Concrete
Stone tor Front of Buildings, Makers of Garden Furni-
ture in Pompeiian Stone. Urns. Vases, Seats. Monuments,
Caen Stone Mantel Pieces. Telephone Maiket 2970.

123 OAK STREET, SAN FRANCISCO



FREDERICK J. AMWEG

CIVIL ENGINEER

Member American Sec. Civil Eng.



Advisory Engineer and Manager of Building
Operations.



700-705 Marsdon BlOg.



Sin Francisco, Cil.



riling to Adve



128



The Architect and fuis'inecr




a, to
■o



The Architect and Engineer



129



Robert w. Hunt



JNO. J. Cone



JAS. C. hallsted



O. W. MCNAUGHER



ROBERT W. HUNT & CO., Engineers

BUREAU OF INSPECTION TESTS AND CONSULTATION

251 KEARNY ST., SAN FRANCISCO



New York Lono



CEMENT INSPECTION

INSPECTION OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL

REPORTS AND ESTIMATES ON PROPERTIES AND PROCESSES

CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL TESTING LABORATORIES



Something About Boise Sandstone



By HARRY K. FRITCHMaNN



IT WILL be good news for San Fran-
cisco and Los Angeles architects to
learn that Boise sandstone is to be
shipped into the local market and that
arrangements have been made with the
leading stone contractors in every large
city on the coast to handle the material.
Some of the stone that has been used on
San Francisco buildings in the past is
positively a disgrace to the men who
quarried it and an injury to the architect
who specified it. In several instances
this stone has changed color, while in
other instances — at the time of the fire
— it cracked and crumbled so badly that
it had to be entirely replaced.

Boise sandstone will not crack or
crumble, neither will it change color. It
is everlasting, fast-cutting, fireproof and
inexpensive. In Boise are to be found
many beautiful structures built of this
stone. The Federal building, which was
erected twelve years ago, is a splendid
illustration. So is the Idaho state capi-
tol. a picture of which accompanies
this article. The color of this stone is
a soft, delicate bufif. According to sculp-
tors, Boise sandstone carves as well as
the best quality of the celebrated Bed-
ford limestone, and it is a much faster
stone to carve.

As proof of its fireproof qualities, the
Soldiers' Home near Boise was destroyed
by fire, but every piece of stone in the
building remained intact and was used
without any additional pieces when the
Home was rebuilt. Everything burned
up but the stone, and that is still just as
good as the day it was erected.

Special reference is made to the Boise
City National Bank building. One sec-
tion of this building was erected twenty-
two years ago, and to this an addition
was built fifteen years later. The fact
that it now requires the closest observa-
tion to locate the point of contact be-
tween the two sections demonstrates the
permanency of the color of the stone.

The quality of sandstone when used as
a building material must have in addi-



tion to a color that is satisfactory, dura-
bility. This depends largely upon its ca-
pacity to resist the action of the weather.
Hence corrosion, freezing and impact
tests tend to show what may be expect-
ed from stone treated in this way, but
observations of the behavior of stone
under conditions of actual use are of
infinitely more value than the determina-
tion of its crushing strength in a testing
machine, as the strength of a stone pier
is ordinarily only about one-fourth of
that of the stone itself on account of the
failure of the mortar joints, as the one-
to-three cement mortar made under
usual conditions will not exceed a crush-
ing strength of about 1350 pounds.

Boise stone became recognized as
among the best building materials in the
west years ago, but only recently has it
been possible to put it into active com-
petition with the output of other states.

Although having but fairly started its
operations the company has shipped
stones to all parts of the Pacific coast,
and the market for it is constantly grow-
ing. The stone has gone to Spokane, to
Los Angeles, to Portland, to Vancouver,
B. C, and to other outside points.

Possessing the three qualities essential
in the view of architects and builders,
texture, color and firmness, while yet
easily and cheaply cut and trimmed, it
has taken the lead wherever it has been
exhibited.

The company now has an order for 30
cars for a new college building at Pull-
man. Wash.

The company's holdings consist of an
immense quarry on Table Rock moun-
tain, two miles east of the city of Boise,
together with ample ground below and
adjoining the railroad for shipping and
treatment purposes. It is claimed to be
the finest quarry in point of quality,
Quantity and accessibility in the west.
Even if shipments should reach a much
higher figure than expected, it is esti-
mated it would require 50 years to work
out the quarry.



130 The Architect and Eiii^inccr



RANSOME CONCRETE COMPANY

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

1012-1014 eighth street, 1218 broadway,

Sacramento, Cal. Oakland, Cal.



BAY DEVELOPMENT COMPANY

GRAVEL - SAND - ROCK

Telephones, K 5313 — J 3535 153 BERRY ST., SAN FRANCISCO



Phone Douglas 3224

HUINTER & HUDSOIN, Engineers

Designers of Heating, Ventilating and Wiring Systems.

Mechanical and Electrical Equipment of Buildings.
739 Rialto Bldg. San Rrancisco, Cal.



PAUL C. JONES. President CHAS. J. GREENWALT. Secretary

ATLANTIC FIREPROOFING CO.

METAL FURRING AND LATHING

Mahoning Expanded Metal Lath. 'Tri-Angle** Comer Bead, Light Steel Channel.

"Atlantic" Comer Bead Steel Studs

Telephone Keamy 2539 661-63 PACIFIC BUILDING. SAN FRANCISCO



G. ClVALE. Manager


Telephone FrankUn S672


FLORENTINE ART STUDIO


Modeling, Marble Carving,


Statuary, Monuments


Show Rooms. 932 VALLEJO STREET
Workshop, 1644 STOCKTON STREET


SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.



The Granite Work on Eldorado County Courthouse; National Bank of D. O. Mills. Sacramento;—
and Sen. Nixon Mausoleum. Reno, WAS FURNISHED BY

CALIFORNIA GRANITE COMPANY

Phone Sutter 2646 STONE CONTRACTORS

San Francisco Office. 518 Sharon Bldg. Mam Office. Rocklin, Placer Co., Cal.

Quarries. Rocklin and Porterville Telephone Main 82



SAA^SOIN SPOT SASH CORD



Trade Mark Keg. U. S Pat. Oriice

I luaranteed free from all imperfections of braid or finish. Can always be distinguished by our trade
mark th.' spots on the cnrd Send for samples, t.-sts, etc SAMSON CORDAGE WORKS. BOSTON. MASS
I'acitic Coast Afent, JOHN I. ROWMRfE. 875 Mtnadnock BI1I4.. San franclsto. Cal.. and 70! Hiajlni BMa.. Im Anjelts. Cal.



Massachusetts Bonding and Insurance Company

021 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO TELEPHONE SUTTER 27S0



Satisfaction Guaranteed ROBERTSON & HALL, Managers No Red Tape



Tlic Architect and Eni^inccr



131



THE FLOOR QUESTION

The Office Floor




Gi:nirai. Oh I' i- Ln i- -;i os? & Co.. San Fr.anxisco

Ward & Blohme. Architects

Nonpareil Cork Tiling is used in these offices primarily because of its silence to the. tread and its

permanent elasticity. The floor has been treated architecturally to correspond with the artistic character

of the balance of the work. As each tile is laid separately and individually, the construction of the floor



Online LibraryJoel DyerThe Architect & engineer of California and the Pacific Coast (Volume v.36 (Feb.-Apr. 1914)) → online text (page 41 of 44)