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John Adair.

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BROAD




REPRINTED FROM THE



-EASTERN DAILY PRESS."



PRICE SIXPENCE.



X T :\VS (VOMI'AXY, LTD.. MUSEUM COURT.
1893.



Ex Libris
C. K. OGDEN






BROAD NORFOLK.



CONTRIBUTORS.



PAGB


PAGE


A.B.C 65
A.D 63


George 71
Giles' Trip, Author of 4


A.G.D 38, 41




A.J.G 41




Alpha 63
Andrews, Herbert ...72,86
Arch Labourer, An ... 81
Ayers, E. T 73, 84


H.B 16
HetVarke ... 30,78,87
Hewett, E 69
Holland, J 72




Hotson,W.A. ... 88


Baker, 8. E 75




Barker, W. 8. ... 36




B.B 66


J.C.S. .. 60


Bird, M. C. H., 19, 34, 48, 73,


J.H 71


83,94


J.L 92


B.O.P 18


Joskin 28


Bor 14


J.E.B 22, 32


Bussey, Chas 23




Bussey, L. A 85






Kendall, E 73


C. ... 95




C.C 16
C-H 4, 13
Clarke, S. T 40


Lawk-a-daisy-me ... 60
Literary World ... 102


Clemence, J. L. ... 26, 80
Clericus 89, 99


L.J 72




Mollie 95


Daisy Dimple 85, 88
Da vies, Christopher ... 78
Davison D 70


Norfolk East ... 67


Doweii, E. w."/. ;;; 49


Norfolk Dumpling, A. 15, 94
Norfolk Farmer, A. 23, 25
Norfolk, A Lover of 18


E 60 92


Norfolk, North ...39,92


E.E.M. '.'.'. '.'.. '.'.'. 71
E.s 99


Norfolk, Old ... 39,90
Norfolk Swimmer, A 74


E.S.B. ... '... 97


Norfolk, West ... 24


Ex-Under-Sheriff ... 65


Norfolk Woman, A... 54




N.S 15


F.G.S. ... .. 86




Forster, F. R.... 27, 34, 41


Octionary 5


F.W.B 36


One Interested ... 24



CONTRIBUTORS.





PACE




PAGE


Patterson, A. ...
P.E.D.


49, 52, 100
90


T.C.B
T.G.S


70

J4, 100


Perkins, J. P.
Pharaoh


21
62


Tew Chaps
T.Licec


97


Pitcher, J.


5J


T.P.S. ...


56


Pomeroy, E. B.


59


T.T


63






Tucker, R. G. W. ..
Tuxford, E. R.


25,61
18


Rambler


59






Rector


... 65, 88






R.L


... 67, 71


Verdant Green


31


R.W.C.


13










"Watson, "W


92


8.


37


"W.C.8.


55


8.E.A.


98


W.F


91


Shaw Leest, \V.




"W.H.C. 17, 20, 27,


57,67


S.J.-W.


'.'.'. 88


W.L


40,86


Skinner, E. ...
Southwell, T.


84
51


"W.N

\v.s


61
20


Suffling, E. R.


32,101


w.w


85



PREFACE.



The articles and letters in this pamphlet
have been re-printed almost literatim et
verbatim as they originally appeared in the
columns of the Eastern Daily Press. " Broad
Norfolk " as a subject for discussion was first
broached in that journal on the last day of
1892. Throughout January of the present
year a peculiarly animated correspondence was
maintained from day to day, and when the
topic had practically spent itself there remained
perhaps the most remarkable accumulation of
provincialisms ever collected in any county in
the kingdom. A complete index has been
compiled of every curious word and phrase
occurring in these pages. Hence it must not be
imagined that the tabulated lists represent
terms in common use in Norfolk alone, or even
in East Anglia alone. Still, it can be said of
them with safety that the words they contain
form part of the colloquial dialect quite
recently, if not at present, in use in the



Eastern Counties. To determine to what
extent these usages are peculiar to Norfolk
must be left to the philologist upon whom
the mantle of Forby may fall. For myself,
I need only express the pleasure it gives me
to have been the indirect means of preserving
in this form the scores of little ''natives"
which in all human probability the Board
Schools will have killed in a generation.



COZEXS-HAEDY.



Eastern Daily Press,

Norwich.




BROAD NORFOLK



BEIXQ A SEEIES OF



ARTICLES AND LETTERS



Reprinted from the "Eastern Daily Press.



EDITED BY C-H.



NORWICH :
NORFOLK NEWS COMPANY, LIMITED, MUSEUM COURT,





PAGE




PAGE


Napping or Knap-




Quackled


27


ping


53


Quaggled


68


Nation


9,74


Quant


. 77,82


Neesen


7


Quicks


12


Next-day-morn


60


Quick-set


84


Nicely


24,61






Nip along


40






Nipper
Noah's Ark


2


Rafe-boards ...
Rands


84
.. 15,77


Nointer


35


Ranny


.. 35


Non-plush


64


Rare


25


Nowt


60


Rattick...


.. 25,28


Numm-chance


41,99


Ratticker


28






Rear, In the ...


41


Olf
Olland


29
37,54


Refuge
Respectable . . .
Ridiculous


27
99
98


Ollust


11


Riddle


99


Other some


99


Riffle ...




Out abroad


27


Ritr





O ut for, who is the bell


60


Right consistent
Rightsides


o

88
.. 25,68


Pakenose


27,58


Ringe


61


Pakin'


14


Rise ...


61


Pample


5


Roaches


72


Par-yard


27


Rocked


25


Parts, To put on his ...
Pawk


18,64
26,58


Rockstaff
Rodger or Sir Roger


99

12,33,


Pax-wax


35




'7, 82, 95


Ped


90


Roky ..


.. 2,63


Pelanders
Pensey


85
99


Rely-poly
Rootling


... 19,21
... 100


Perk


61


Rouding-time ...


77


Perse wance


85


Rum


40


Pickcheesin'


14


Rumbustious ...


90


Piece


28


Bun


.. 27,84


Pightle


27,58


Runty


5


Pilcochia


94






Pinglin'


41






Pip-patches


35


Sadly ...


21


Pishmires
Pit


64
96


late, :v. :;


26, 33, 59
90


Plancher


39 82


Sally


84


Plantain


69


Sammucking ..


24


Pogram 11
Pollard


,33,61
84


Sammy, play ..


35
... 54,62


Popple


92


Sarshen


... 54,65


Popples ,


92


Sars o' mine ...


35


Posset


84


Sawney


68


Pudden-poke
Pulk-hole


7
2,58


Scald
Scalps


28

93


Pulks


77


Scamel 74,


78, 93, 94


Push


22


Schwad


55


Putty


77


Scocker


61



adv.





PAGE ,


PAGE


Scrog ..


84


Snatchet


84


Scu?


2


Sneck


... 52, 90


Scuppet..


6


8new 4.


52, 59, 61


Sea-pig


99


Snob


40


To see to


60


Solid ..


68


Sele of the day

fiofo


... 29,98


Sorzles
Soshinir


6


Bets
Settle


'.'.'. 84


Sowse ...


... 22, 66
5


Several


25


Spink


37


Shack


30


Splarr


27


Shacking


61


Spline


90


Shackled


14


Sploddin


40


Shail


59


Spoat


39


Shammock


92


Spore


25


Shanks' pony ...


84


Spoult


... 40,53


Shanny


25


Springy


62


Sharm


... 23, 59


Spuffling


30


Shepherd's flock


... 84


Squackle


90


Shiffinhisself ...




Squeezened


27


Shornt


40


Squinder


25


Shortening 22
Shrubs, herbs, &c., a
list of 101


Squit
Staithe
Stammed ... 7,


55
30

23, 70, 79


Shug or Shig . . .
Shuloe


27
22


Stand up
Stannicle


... 13, 16
35


Shy
Shvwannicking


21
74


Stingy or Stingey
Stitch


... 14,25
3


Sib'bits ...11,17,


18, 19, 26, 73


Stove


63


Sidewiper


94


Strappen


... 5, 29


Sidus ... x ...


... 22,59


Stroke, Some ...


65


Siserara


5, 59, 87


Stub


99


Skeins
Skeps


87
37


Stukey Blues ...
Suffin'


86
24


Skinker


... 66,90


Sumpy


37


Skive


49


Sunk


56


Skran
Skruke


55

70


Snnkets, Stmketing
Swack


40

35


Skruzzle


35


Kwacken


5


Skutes


12, 38, 59


Swad


92


Slackbaked ...


... 34


Swag


49


Slammakin ...


35


Scaling .. ..


... 59,66


Slaver


... 55,97


Swang


91


Slew


.. 56


Swap-tub


35


Slight


90


S wared...


35


Slippy
Slobber


91
35


Swidge ...

Swimmers


... e, 39

12


Slov


92


Swiping


77


Slus


... 40,59


Swish


25


Slussy hound ...


... 94


Switched


31


Smeaa


70


S wiving


37


Smoultin'


... 80, 94


Swop


26


Snaast '.'.'. ".'.


... "' 6


Take-on


... 41,74


Snasty


12,32,38 Tang


84





I'AOE


PAGE


IWy


3 Hackering


88


Foumart


99


Hake


17,20


Fourses


... 8,14


Half -rock


58


Frails


77, 81


Hallo largess ...


8.33


Frame


32


Hampered to get hold


Frenched


22


of


88


Fresher or Froschy
Fribbling


7, 30, 38
60


Hample ".'.
Hank


37
3


Fiammicating ...
Frowey ... ...


92

27


Hansell
Happened


71
63


Frummety


6


Harnser


. i3, 57


Full-flopper ...
Fungered


84
74


Harwich, Ketched
all up at


me
41


Funked...


87


Hasel ...


... 3,25


Funky


65


Hawky


... 61,77


Furrin


25


Haze


12


Fursickin'


14, 19, 41


Heater


88


Furfy


58


Heel


62


Fve 3,17,87,98
Fysty 27,58


Heign
Hen's polly ...


3, 15, 22
27






Hick-up, snick up


13


Gaddy-wentin'


94


Hidlond


22


Gatfer


24,58


Hid-se-rapf


34


Gaggles


87


Highlows


... 7,30


Gaily


24


Hike ...


65


Gain and Ungaia
Gainer
Game


61
40
12


Hild

Himpin'
Hind .


72
12, 25, 33


Gan (for given)
Gathered
Gatless


81
62
5


Hinder
Hingles
Hobby


9, 23, 70
66
40


Gavvel


40


Hobby-lantern


99


Gawky


5,29


Hod


84


Gay


27, 37, 54


Hodmandod ...


... 7.30


Gloat
Goaf


77,81
39,82


Holger-boy 33
Holl 2.17.19.22


Gobs
Golder
Goms


6
27, 35, 73
... y,74


Hoppen-toad ...
Hotch-potch ...
Hough


... 7, 29

84
53


Good


27


Housen


7,30


Good-steward


40


Hove


81


Good-tidy
Gooseberry-fool


24,64


Hovelled ' .'."
Hovers


.'.. 14
... 19,77


Gonned
Gorn sim your body
Gotch


9
25
3, 6, 15


Howsomever ...
Hub-ma-grub
Huddren


41
81
5


Go-tu-meetin clothe


s 56


Hulk


72


Grained


63


Hulkin'"' ".'


.'.. 5,29


Greened


6


HuU


5


Grubbing


60


Hulvers


... 24,58


Grup


... 28, 3li


Hutkin


... 12,53


Gruttling


IH


Huush


85


Gukher


56


Hyke


32


Gum-ticklers ...


84


Hyvers


17



xii.





PAGE


PAGH


If so being you can' t go
inconvenient


68

25


Loaders
Lock


77
40


Imitate


22,25


Loke .


... 3,53


Ingen


6


Lollup


5


I'onthet


68


Lork-a-mercy


40






Lower


90






Lucum


84


Jack up


55


Lug


72


Jammuck


53


Lummock


5


Jangle


72






Jannick


55,59






Jiffey ...
Jiffle or Jidgett
Jill
Jimpsener


55
55
84

62


Main
Main, in the ...
Mala-hacked ...
Malkin


70
41
53

68


Jot
Jowl
Jumble


84, 86
27
54,61


Malt
Mardle

Mastrous


... 74,93
11
37






Mauled


25


Kane
Keeler 22
Keeping-room
Kichell-cakes
Kiderer
Kidgy
Kindling
Kind'o
King Harry
Kinsann


26,33
35,58
31
78
66,92
32
22
16
7
64


Maund
Mawkin
Mawther
Mavish
Meetiners
Mendin
Mentle
Mew-heart
Miel-banks ...
Mifflin ...
Miltz


... 100
14, 19, 58
... 5, 16
7, 29, 57, 62
56
9
58

'.'.'. ' 70
56


Kipper ...


100


Might


61


Knacker
Knickled
Know
Krinkle


72
66
14
61,96
35


Ming
Mittens
Mocking-church
Moderate
Moise


7
7
98
25
... 76,84






Molt


35


Lamming 77
Lamper-along ... 34
Larrup 27
Lash 61,68
Layer 37,54
Lay forrard 34
Lay Over Meddlers 9, 28, 33
Lether 63
Lief 24


Morfrey 56
Mort 39
Mouse-hunter 99
Mother 53
Moultry 25
Mow, old sea 60,93
Muck-crome 3
Muck- wash 97
Mucky ...17,18,21,25,30,78
Muddle 21,92


Liggers


BI

77


Mung


17


Like-to-be


88






Lim


3






Limpsy


86


Nab


... 19,68


Lit


3


Nab-the-rust ...


65


Living upright


90


Nag


99



i nsr ID IE



Aainter


PAGE

35


Bright


PAGE

78


Abroad


88


Brumble..


83


Acabo, that would




Bufflc, hull him in a ..


86


puzzle


68


Bulls


66


Act


64


Bullverin


100


Alder


75


Bunker


92


Applejacks


12


Bunny 7,


29,85


Arms and legs . . .


72, 83


Buskin


18


Arradeen




Buttress


56


Averdupois


98


Buzzle-head


68


Babbing


77


Caddow ..


57


Back-stalk


27,87


Call


5,59


Balaams-smite


54


Call, no


64


Bannock


85


Carneyirg


34


Barksel


25


Carnser


16,17


Barleycorn, Ho John. . .


83


Carpenter's Soda


63


Barm


83


Carwoo


72


Bauley-boats


77


Carre


77


Baulks


83


Catched him a rum'un


68


Beck


28, 75


Cedar Pencil


78


Beetle




Chance


88


Baing
Being one's share
Betsv


16
29


Chapman
Chaiiev, play the
Cherubidin .


86,87
35
64


Betty Martin, That's




Chife


41


all me eye and . . .
Bever


66,71

8


Chitterlings
Cholder


6,29
55


Bighes
Bile


12
83


Christmas
Chummy


25
83


Bing


22


Chump


30


Birds, East Anglian 41 to 52
Bish-a-barneybees... 35,82


Church-hole
Clates


83
83


Bishimer


62


Click


62


Bloodulfs


37


Clink


23


Boiler


22


Clip


5


Boke


99


Closes


26


Bor 5,


38, 77


Clout


23


Botty


97


Clung 41


53,99


Brawn


7


Clutch


61


Breakin'abit


63


Cobble


83


Breck


87


Colder ... 28,73,77,79





PAUE


PAGE


Comeback


8


Do ... 25,


27, 37, 52, 63


Contain


57


Doatedtree ...


92


Comforter


27


Dodman


... 7,30


Cooshies


22


Doke


... 24,29


Cop


.. 5,22


Donkey-legs ...


36


Corder


A 73, 77


Don't ... ...


... 25,27


Corker ...


60


Don't ought


... 53,63


CoquiUes


78


Doss


.. 84,85


Cosh


83


Dotts


56


Cosset


... 8,57


Uouse-a-bit


... 40,68


Cranky


30


Dow


... 23,58


Crick


66


Down-pin


... 41


Grimalkin


58


Dowshie


28


Crinkley-crankley
Crock


55

98


Drant
Draw-latchin' ...


r iO
41


Crome


29


Dreep, on the ...


fc6


Crowd


... 5,21


Driftway


i.9


Crow-keepers ...
Crumb


72
27


Drug
Drum


84
65


Crumplin'


20


Dudder


16, 18, 19, 21


Crush


98


Dudman


... 58


Cubbaw


67


Dullor


3, 15, 20, 63


Culch


6


Dump


... 84


Cum-harley ...


,. 12,22


Dumplindust ...


84


Cirm-hether ...


... 8,12


Dutna


3


Cup-bear


12,28,57




27


Cussey


85


Duzzy


... 14,29






Dwil3 !.. '.'.'.


... 22,29






Dydling


... 77


Dabster


99


D'youdut


88


Daft


84






Dag


... 2,74






Daices-headed ...


... 85,94


Ear


72


Dams


77


Ecclester


70


Dang


8,29,57


Euow


... 24,58


Danns


54






Dannies


88






Dauuock


18,60,85


Fang


... 27, 99


Dardle dum due


94


Fare


... 14,25


Darn


8,29,57


Fatagued




Da' say


67


Fawny


'.'.'. 27


Dead-a-Bird ...


... 2,90


Feeten


85


Deceit


63


Fence


61


Deen


... 6,21


Ferry-fake .


56


Deficiency


58


Few


60


Deke 2, 10,15, 17,


19,20,22,


Finnickin'


60


24, 31, 35, 36, 39,
Denesquittin' ...


67, 75, 94
14


Fishimer
Flare-up


62
94


Dibbling
Dickey


84
... 8,20


Flat
Fleet


61
... 62,77


Dickey-shud ...
Dike


88
.. 36,53


Fleeten
Fliglit-of-bees..


73

84


Ding
Dingle


32
27


Flopped
Forgive


55
25



PAGE PAGE


Tangle-leg


83


Unsensed


62


Tantrums


6,29






Tarnation


9


Vardle


86


T'do


27






Tempest
Terrify
Thape-pie
Thew


21
59
86
4


Wadges 55
Wake 33,94
Walentin' Good Mor-


Thongy
Thow
Timbered
Time


2

'87
27


rer
Wamp
Wank
Wanklin'
"Want


t>i

M
93

6t


Ting
Tissicking
Titchy


84
26
71


Wanten"" ".'
"Wap


61

M


Titty
Titty totty
Titter-ma-torter
Toad in the hole
Together
Tom and Jerry shop


20
56
56,81
84
2,9
67
39


^Varp
Water-delf
Water-eynd
Water-shutin'
Wednesday, Won't get
further than
Welt


2

77
86

25
61


Top sawyer
Toward
Towney
Trape
Trapen
Traunce
Tremble


84
8,22
40
27
PO
92


Whasking
Wheatsel
Wheesh 12,38,57
Whopper
Wimple-trees ...
Wind-jammers
Winnock


40
3
,91

60
37
84
6


Triculate ..'.' '.'.
Troll
Tumbler
Tupe
Tupp


12
25

'2?
84


Without 27
Wittery 94
Woorree 8
Woosh 22,23,52
Wort, over 22


Tussock


3






Twilt
T winters


85
86,87


Yard of Plum Pudding


41
13


Twizzling
T'year


27


Tipper
Yows


60
23



BROAD NORFOLK.



OUR English language, in virtue of its being
a living language, is periodically importing
fresh words into its vocabulary as they become
fashionable, and is gradually getting rid of
useless and cumbersome terms. Illustrations
of the latter process will occur to everybody.
Examples of terms of recent importation now
generally adopted as good English are such as
embarrass, chagrin, grimace, repartee, all of
which, according to one of Dryden's plays,
were considered affected in the latter half of
the seventeenth century. Provincial English is
often treated with the most unmerited contempt,
and no one seems disposed to go to its rescue.
Yet after all, what are commonly sat down as
vulgarisms, are to a great extent, only terms
used in more or less remote part? of the country
by people who have not kept abreast with the
advance of the language. The man who speaks
broad Norfolk, for instance, is at once stamped
as below the mark in intelligence ; but the
genuine Norfolk countryman is justly entitled
to boast that he is never guilty of the un-
speakable vulgarism of the townsfolk, who are
seldom so happy as when they are running
amuck amongst the h's. Oar own county of
Norfolk can boast of a prolific vocabulary of
provincialisms ; types, for the most part, as
philologists tell us, not of bad but merely of



BROAD NORFOLK.



antiquated English. Several illustrations
suggest themselves to me ; scores of others no
doubt will readily occur to readers who have
seen the inside of a farmyard or come across a
typical agricultural labourer.

The words dag, smur, and scud, employed to
mean a driving drizzle of rain, are all provincial,
if they are not peculiar to Norfolk. Dag, it is
worthy of note, once signified a dew, whilst
scud, in its legitimate sense, refers solely to the
actual clouds. To speak of roky weather implies
thick, foggy weather. The word evidently is
connected with reek (to steam), but its use,
though common enough in this county, is
not confined to Norfolk. Again, thongy, a
thoroughly Norfolk term, describes the oppres-
sive heat which often occurs between two
summer showers. Noah's Ark is a singular
name given to three lines of cloud stretching
overhead from the S.W., and supposed to indi-
cate fine weather.

Pulk-hole denotes an open cess-pool. Water-
del/ is used of an ordinary drainage
hole by the roadside, the suffix obviously being
from the root delve, to dig. Hull is a popular
word, meaning a wide ditch of water. Possibly
it is a contraction of hollow, used by Addison
to indicate a channel or canal. Deke a bank,
and has nothing to do with ditch (cf. the Dutch
dike] ; it is one of the commonest of Norfolk
terms, but its origin is obscure.

Bird, in sporting parlance is a partridge. It
is interesting to note that deer in the same way
once meant any animal ('* Rats and mice, and
such small deer "). However, I don't suggest
that bird is ever likely to have so exclusive a
meaning as- deer now possesses. What is the
force of together in " spreed yarselves out
together," a direction I have heard given to



BROAD NORFOLK.



beaters by a head gamekeeper ? And what,
too, is the history of the word duller in
" Howld yew yar duller,' 1 '' addressed to a noisy
" dorg?"

Wheatsel is a pretty word, meaning " Wheat
drilling." Thus, " We've finished wheatsel "
" all our wheat is in." Here the idea is " seed-
time," but in haysel, for instance, the notion
conveyed is that of harvest.

Pn't/, stitch are both used to describe the space
between two double furrows.

Didfin a halter. " Fetch a dutfin and show
the animal off " is a common expression.

Tussock is an excellent 'Old English term for
a tuft or a sod of grass. It is obsolete so far as
the national vocabulary is concerned, and is
obsolescent even in remote rural districts.

Heiyn (heighten) to raise wages.

Gotch jug.

Loke a " blind " lane.

To hank up a gate to sneck or fasten it.

Fosey over-ripe.

Lim to suck. E.g., of a bifcoh, the pups
wil Urn her to deed cause her death by sucking.

Tumbler, for tumbrel. Since the word is
used of a cart made so as to tip up, " tumbler"
is more logical than "tumbrel." Yet " tumbler "
is hardly considered respectable.

Muck-crome is a capital word, but is entirely
local.

Lit stain. This occurs in an old saying,
" There's not a blot but will lit" The word
or the proverb is said to be early Danish. I
don't know whether anybody has met with it
outside this county ; at any rate, it is a note-
worthy survival.

Fye to dress corn. Thus, to go a-fyin,
might mean to run wheat through the dressing
machine.



BROAD NORFOLK.



An odd vowel change may often be observed.
As, for instance,

e for o in sneiv for snow^

i for e in /ma-bird for hen-bird.

o and even eu for au in thow or tlieiv for
thaw.

for a in fond for land, sond for sand, and
grovel-hole for gravel hole.

1 think it is Trench who has pointed out how
much richer, at least in rural terms, the
English language would be if it adopted freely
from its country dialects. C-H.



(BY THE AUTHOR OF "GILES'S TRIP TO
LONDON, " (fee.)

The first half of iny life was passed in
the southern parts of Suffolk, and the
latter half has been passed in Norfolk. So far
as the provincialisms made use of in the two
counties are concerned, I think there is not
much difference. There is, however, a great
contrast in the style of speech. Suffolk
speaks in a kind of sing-song ; Norfolk in a
more broad and sustained tone. There is
nothing in Suffolk to answer to the way in
which the a in certain words is pronounced in
Norfolk. Here we say pauper and baaker, the a
being drawn out at extraordinary length. This
peculiarity does not exist in the sister county.
Neither d the people in Suffolk say rume for
room, or glumy for gloomy, as we do here.
Neither do they drop the h, as the inhabitants
of many parts of Norfolk do in some words. A
Mid-Norfolk man will say, and even
write, for instance, trow for throw, tree
for three, troat for throat, and so on.
Many of the provincialisms are, as I have said,



BROAD XORFOLK.



commoii to both counties. I will run over a
few of them, merely premising that I shall
give none which I have not myself heard in
the cottages of the peasantry and in the roads
and fields.

The terms applied by men and women to
each other are interesting. A gi~l is
called a mawther, which, in addressing her,
becomes maw. " "Where have you been,
maw ? " But she is also called a
fine strappen mawther. A lad is
addressed as " bor," and he is said
to be a great huddren fellow, or a loose hufkin*
rascal. If boys or girls are large or jolly they
are said to be $ivac\~en ; if they are awkward
they are called gawky; when out of temper
they are runty ; and when they are half-witted
and shiftless they are described as gutless.
There are many terms to express their doings.
They lollop or lummuclc aoout, or they sarnter
in the lanes. In the winter time girls and boys
pample in the mud, and at all times
clamber up walls or trees. The girls
cop balls, the boys cail stones, and both of them
hull all sorts of things about. A man will
hull on his coat, and a women will hull on her
bonnet. A man will give directions to hull a
scuppet into the barrow and crowd it up the hill.
The scuppet, of course, is a shovel, and to
"crowd" is to drive or push. I have even
heard of a man who went into a chemist's shop
in North Norfolk and asked for " a punno' o'
pills to hull a wummen into a sweat." One boy
will give another a clip o' the head or a soivse o'
the skull, and I once heard a fellow say he had
given another a sisserara.

There are a good many terms used inside the
cottage which are expressive and peculiar. If
you go in when the baby is sleeping, the



IRQ An NORFOLK.



mother will probably hold up her finger and
say, " Don't make a deen," which means
don't utter a sound. The wick of the candles
which at one time were burned in every cottage
was called a snaast, which the snuffers were used
to trim, but if they should not be at hand,
the finger and thumb of the father or of one of
the boys would do the work. The girl would
be sent with a gotch to the well, and if she
should spill any of the water on the floor, she
would be ordered to clean up the sividge. If
she was disagreeable and put herself into
tantrums, or begun to winnock (i.e., cry), she
would perhaps be cut off with only a hunch
of bread, with maybe an ingen (onion),
for her dinner. If the mother happened
to be ill she would perhaps tell you that she
was tired of sorzhs, the slops which the doctor
ordered her, and add that they were nothing
but culch. Sometimes she would tie a hand-


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