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John Austin Williams.

The Oranges and their leading business men, embracing those of Ornage, Brick Church, East Orange, West Orange, South Orange and Orange valley .. online

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Corner Lincoln and Highland Avenues.



ORANGE AND ITS POINTS OF INTEREST.



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appreciation of the value and importance of the ediu ation of the young. The pro])ortion of those
whose sij;natures on early town records appear liy their mark, is small, and this fact, taken in
consideration with the circumstance that learning in those days was not as general and as widely
diffused as it is to-day, indicates an intelligent community. One of the earliest schools in Orange was a
classical school for hoys, tauglit by the Rev. Caleb Smith, v.ho was the second pastor of the Mountain, now
First I'resbyterian Church. Kxactly how long this school was conducted the records do not clearly indi-
cate, but it is known that he was



pastor of the church from Novem-
ber 30, 1 748, to October 22, 1 762 —
nearly fourteen years. The school
was held in his study. Mr. .Smith
was a graduate of Yale College,
and previous to his settlement in
Orange, had assisted his father-in-
law, the Rev. Mr. Dickinson, in
teaching a class in Latin at Eliza-
beth, then called Elizabethtown.
lOvidence of the e.xistence of Mr.
Smith's school in Orange is found
in an old account book kept by
him with his parishioners. In it are
accounts with six young gentlemen,
who are charged with the price
of tuition, with Latin and Greek
(irammars, and with several clas-
sical books, as well as with
the price of board. The Rev.
Jedediah Chapman, also a grad-
uate of Vale College, succeeded Mr. Smith as pastor, and held the pastorate from 1766 to iSoo—
thirty-four year.s. .\ portion of this pastorate included the stormy period of the Revolutionary
war, when in all probability educational matters were overshadowed and neglected in the excitement of
political interests. But it was only for a brief period that the proper instruction of the young was suffered
to remain in abeyance. Peace had no sooner come than measures were taken to found the Orange Acad-
emy. A substantial stone building two stories high was erected on Main Street in 1786. The building
was only torn down a few years ago, although for many years before that it had been used for business,
and not for school purposes. From early records it appears that the Acadainy was intended to bea pub-
lic school, for the use of all the inhabitants of Orange. The association which built the Academy, was at
first purely voluntary, as the earliest statute for incorporating institutions of learning, was passed in
1 794, and the trustees soon after availed themselves of it and became an incorporated body. It had a high
reputation as a classical school, and its fame drew patronage from abroad, .\mong its pupils was John
McPherson Berrien, afterwards a prominent citizen of (Georgia, who served his State in the United States
Senate for fifteen years, and was also Attorney-General of the United States.

Joseph C. Hornblower, afterwards Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey, and one of the
most eminent jurists that New Jersey has ever produced, was also a graduate of this Academy. Among
other schools of prominence in the early history of Orange, were the old white school house, near where the
present Brick Church stands in East Orange, and that of .\unt Polly Condit, which was started on Main
Street, near Day. The latter was started about 1812.

In the early part of the present century a public school was opened in that part of Orange known as
'lory Corner, now included in the limits of West Orange. The first teacher was a Scotchman named
Simon Simpson. He remained there but a few years, when lie resigned and returned to his native coun-
try, but subsetpiently came back to Orange, where his daughters established a young ladies seminary.



CORNKK Ck.\1K.\I, .XVENI'K ANi3 CEX IKR STREET.



ORANGE AND ITS POINTS OF INTEREST. 9

The school established at Tory Corner, by Mr. Simpson, was afterwards taught by Mr. Shaler J.
Hillyer, and under his management it became one of the most noted institutions of learning in the coun-
ty. Among the most prominent schools of later days were those of Miss Julia A. Dobridge and the
Rev. Joshua D. Berry, both of them .schools for boys and girls; Mr. TenBroeck's school for boys, the Rev.
C. S. Stocking's boarding school for boys, the Misses Bradshaw's Young Ladies' Seminary, the Young Ladies'
Seminary at Brick Church, founded b> Rev. F. A. Adams, D. D., who afterwards had one of the leading





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Online LibraryJohn Austin WilliamsThe Oranges and their leading business men, embracing those of Ornage, Brick Church, East Orange, West Orange, South Orange and Orange valley .. → online text (page 1 of 18)