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John B Gorman.

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-THE-

-JOHN -FRYER-
CHINESE- LIBRARY






/




'.'A,



*

It






i TOUR AROUND THE WORLD

IN 1884,



OR SKETCHES OP TRAYEL IN TIE EASTERN
AND WESTERN HEMISPHERES.



EMBRACING



AN ACCOUNT OF EUROPE, EGYPT, PALESTINE, INDIA/CEYLON,
STRAITS SETTLEMENT, CHINA, JAPAN, AND AMERICA.



BY J. B. GORMAN.



WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY PROF. H. A. SCOMP,

Emory College, Oxford, Ga.



"1 have no wife nor children, good or bad, to provide for. A mere spec-
tator of other men's fortunes and "adventures, and how they play their parts,
which, methinks, are diversely presented unto me, as from'a common theater
or scene." Burtoti.



ILLUSTRATED EDITION;



NASHVILLE, TENX. :
SOUTHERN METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE.

1886.



&






Lib.
JOHN FRYER
CHINESE LIBRARY



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1886,

BY J. B. GORMAN,
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



TO

SIR JOHN R, fc, SIMLilft,

CAITHNESS, SCOTLAND,

EIGHTH BARONET OF DUNBEATH, BARROCK HOUSE,

A YOUNG NOBLEMAN OF KARE GOOD 'QUALITIES OF HEART

AND MIND, WHOSE DELIGHTFUL COMPANIONSHIP LENT A NEW

CHARM TO MY VOYAGE AROUND THE WORLD

THESE PAGES,

AS A SLIGHT TESTIMONIAL OF THE AUTHOR'S HIGH REGARDS,

Are Most Respectfully Dedicated*



747711



PREFATORY NOTE.

FROM my boyhood I had dreamed of a voyage around the world.
I had stood on the sea-shore and looked upon the waves as they dashed
at my feet in restless fury. I loved the grandeur and magnitude of
the ocean ; I loved to watch the ships from Savannah and New York
come and go. I made my first sea voyage when a boy, and since that
happy period my restless desire and love of adventure, the study of
nature and an insatiable thirst for knowledge, have carried me to
many distant shores. Europe three times in twelve years, the West
Indies, Canada, and States of America, but increased my rambling pro-
pensities. My own country was youthful, but grand in the physic-
al aspects of nature. Europe, with the accumulated knowledge of
ages, its treasures of art and historic associations, added to my grat-
ification and charmed me with its study. I desired to see even more
of the world, to gain a more comprehensive idea of man in the va-
rious forms and stages of his civilization, to increase my knowledge
and general information.

God in his wisdom called me to sustain the irreparable loss of my
beloved and devoted mother. I lingered in the shadow of her la-
mented death for nearly one year; my deep affliction, that found
only support in prayer, was the occasion of my final decision. I
was about to realize the fond hopes of my boyish anticipation. I
cherished another desire, I had longed to be gratified with this love of
travel, added to the occasion that prompted me to make a voyage
around the world. It was, while living, to do some good. "We
live in the deeds of life, and not in its years." We long to leave
some monument of our faith and work behind. I want these sketches
to commemorate these sentiments. Fame, or worldly honor, is not
my aim. A loftier desire prompts me to submit these sketches, im-
perfect as they are, or may appear to a critical or exacting public
opinion.

To be always accurate in impressions, knowledge, or ideas, formed
while traveling rapidly often through foreign countries with Ian-

(5)



C Prrfalnnj Not*:.



.HIM i-niiivly dill, n MI from your .\\n || ini|><, il,|.-,
I ;i|.|.n li.-ii'l. I >i!l i< nl |M-I ..'.n .. ; I In- :;mir ohjrrtM with (lillm-nt
Mii|>n-!iHioHH, wliil<- lln- l.i'-l in.-iv l.t- lli- ::inic.

I iiiin ;tl clone htlldy :nnl |.i.i<li,:i| ()I)HUrVatlol1, uillia vii-\\ t
in.n v in ; Lit mi-ill ;, l.rli.-viii" lli:il :ill U I ID |D||D\V ln<- in my \
\\ill h;i\. :i l.iillilnl :IIH! pl..i :uil :n-r,,iiiil \ il. I li:m- ;-.:il IH-I r.l
up in. in, I.IM lul :iii'l QUriOOi Ililliv::. I Int. I NDII \\ill M-|
,,!,:, iiriMtllll I'K'lil "ill ..I lln ,-, :i I Ii:ivi-ilni-. I r:iuiU)l :nl\ i

one how he ought to look at thee '.i,j,-,-i i beyond di tantieaa. 1 pi-i-

Mat Ili'-in i v \\.iv, .-mil yOU iDrin yOUr OWn ini|>i<- [OB ,

;i|,.,|i.vii- . l ..II. T. I nii-;lil .-\|.i.- :i (It-hire tluit Ihi . r.lilii.n

i><- IKTC.-.I.-.I hy jnaiiy othoi , i . iciii jive :i per cent, of <
i,,,,,i. i ...rii to the million work and schools in China, \ ii i ii"

pi ,\ i|, ..,- ,,| I, ul i.-u t. . in:iki- iii-li I mi I il ni;.\ I..- ll.i-

i,i.-.i in.- .if niMiiy i<i read.

'il,,- uui-ii I ii "i..\\ in ' i M h. i iii knowledge .-uni IM-II.T in lift- every
.| : ,v. \ ii ,,,,,,.. .-loser together by the cultivation of the ai
peace and the growth of a ChrUtlan civilization, it inn.-.t ;. it;. in to
n highe i development, '- i ; -

, QA Ootobei '. IHBO.



INTRODUCTION.

"I'll put it girdle round about the earth in forty minutes." Puck, in "1//J-
summer flight's Dream. 1 '

A TOUR around the globe, in this age of steam and well-ordered
arrangements for travel, is no extraordinary undertaking. It can-
not now afinrd tl u - field for gross exaggeration and blood-curdling
stories as in the days of Magellan, or even so late as the voyages of
Captain Cook. It would be a Munchausen who would attempt to
impose upon the public any tales of giants or pigmies, griffins or
jrenii; of the crocotta, which could imitate the human cry and lure
men to destruction; of the great Indian ants, which chased travelers
with incredible swiftness; or of eight-toed races, toothed and gray-
liaired from birth. He finds no fountains whose red waters compel
the drinker to reveal all the secrets of his past life; nor trees which,
like ina.irnets, attract animal or vegetable substances; nor does Ue
meet enormous sea-serpents floating in the deep. He dares not, how-
ever desirous, follow in the steps of the old chroniclers. He will
never vi>it the realm of Prester John, nor look upon the lovely face
of the beautiful Angelica.

Yet, in spite of all this complete collapse of the marvelous, the
real world allbrds attractions quite as great. No matter how often
the story has been told, it is ever new. The skies of Italy are as
blue, the isles of the Levant as bright, the Pyramids as grand, Jeru-
salem as sacred, and the desert as desolate now as to the wyageur
of a thousand years ago. There is no monopoly of Ceylon's "soft,
spicy breezes," nor of Australia's "hot December blast." Nor Briton
nor Tartar can ever rob the Ganges of its wonderful history. The
and story of the Orient the "moving finger once has writ," and
n.-ver can be lured back to "cancel half a line." In all the ch;
of this strange era of revolution and evolution, the past at least is
. Its history, its monuments, its consecrated places, are beyond
the power of even this iconoclastic age to destroy; and more and more
will the mind, weary with modern theories and subleties, turn with
U-esh delight to the past to find "some solid ground to rest upon."

( Hher departments of literature and science have had their special

(7)



8 Introduction.



eras their rise, their glory, and their decline but the records of his-
tory and travel attract the attention of every age and of every peo-
ple; they touch upon human life at every point.

It is, then, with perfect confidence that the writer commends to
an indulgent public this latest contribution to the great library of
travel, believing that the reader will find a rich repast of- entertain-
ment and instruction in its pages.

The author, Col. John B. Gorman, is one of the most companion-
able of men ; a real Southerner in every fiber, frank and open-hearted ;
a newspaper man by profession, a gentleman by nature, and a bachelor
from choice (?). His endless fund of anecdote, his hearty laugh, his
original ideas, and his quaint way of putting even the most common
things, render him the conspicuous figure in every company to which
he may belong. Indeed, his fluency and inveteracy as a talker seem
to justify the remark of a lady friend, who upon receiving Colonel
Gorman's picture declared it perfect in every feature except " the
mouth, which she had never seen closed before."

Having thrice before made the tour of Europe, the Colonel is by
no means a novice at traveling. He is much attached to the mis-
sionary work in China, and proposes to devote a share of the proceeds
of his book to the missionary schools in that country. A large por-
tion of the people of Georgia, as well as many from other States, have
a direct personal interest in these missionaries and their work; and
the information furnished concerning them will add another attrac-
tion to the book.

But after all, Colonel Gorman returns to his Southern home more
thoroughly American than ever before, and believing "fifty years
of Georgia better than a cycle of Cathay" a verdict in which all
true sons of Columbia will heartily agree.

As a warm personal friend, who has enjoyed many an hour of
Colonel Gorman's rich experiences, the writer wishes an abundant
success to this his first book venture; and he doubts not that the
reader will be amply repaid for his time in the perusal of "A Tour
Around the World in 1884." H. A. SCOMP.

EMORT COLLEGE, September 1, 1885.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I. From New York to Liv-
erpool 13

CHAPTER II. Liverpool Stratford
Trinity Church 21

CHAPTER III. Sight-seeing in and
About London 31

CHAPTER IV. London English
Channel Paris 45

CHAPTER V. Sights and Scenes in
Paris 57

CHAPTER VI. Excursion Through
Italy 65

CHAPTER VII. Art Treasures of
Rome 79

CHAPTER VIII. Naples Vesuvius
Pompeii 90

CHAPTER IX. From Naples to Mes-
sina, Sicily 109

CHAPTER X. In Egypt Alexandria
and Cairo 127

CHAPTER XI. Cairo Citadel Pyr-
amids Museum 132

CHAPTER XII. The Great Pyramids
at Gheezeh 145

CHAPTER XIII. The Mohammedan
Religion and Christianity 155

CHAPTER XIV. From Cairo to Jop-
pa Ismailia and Port Said 158

CHAPTER XV. Landing at Jaffa-
Through the City 164

CHAPTER XVI. From Jaffa to Jeru-
salem Orange Culture Ancient
and Modern Times Contrasted
Habits, Customs, etc., of the
People 173

CHAPTER XVII. Jerusalem from
the Tower of Hippicus., 192



CIIAPTEB XVIII. In and Near Je-
rusalem 200

CHAPTER XIX. Mount Moriah
The Mosque of Omar The
Wonderful Rock Mohammed's
Dream 205

CHAPTER XX. Around the Walls of
Jerusalem The Virgin's Fount-
ain Pools of Siloam Down the
Kidron, or Valley of Jehosha-
phat Return Below the City of
Siloam By Absalom's Tomb
Recross the Valley Near Geth-
semane 210

CHAPTER XXI. Ascent of Mount
Olivet View from its Summit
Sights, Scenes, and Holy Places. 218

CHAPTER XXII. By Bethany to the
Dead Sea and River Jordan 225

CHAPTER XXIII. Bethlehem The
Pools of Solomon and Mar Sa-
ba 239

CHAPTER XXIV. India Voyage to
Bombay 249

CHAPTER XXV. Bombay Curious
People Sights and Scenes
Towers of Silence A Hindoo
Hospital American Street Rail-
way Off to Delhi 260

CHAPTER XXVI. British India-
Population Railroads Influ-
ence on Development Schools
Zenana Mission, etc 277

CHAPTER XXVII. The Hindoos:
Their History, Literature, and
Philosophy The Hindoo Bible,
etc 284

(9)



10



Contents.



CHAPTER XXVIII. Delhi-Its P;u-
aces and Monuments Scenes
in the Old Mogul Capital A
Drive Through Seven Cities in
Ruins Kootub Minar 288

CHAPTES XXIX. From Delhi to
Cashmere, Simla, and Return 304

CHAPTER XXX. From Delhi to
Benares by Agra, Cawnpore,
and Allahabad 307

CHAPTER XXXI. Farming in India
Cotton, Wheat, Barley, Gram-
Price of Labor, etc 318

CHAPTER XXXII. Cawupore and
Lucknow 325

CHAPTER XXXIII. Benares, its
Shrines and Temples 334

CHAPTER XXXIV. Down the Gan-
ges 350

CHAPTER XXXV. Arrival m Cal-
cuttaThe Great Eastern Hotel
and My Morning's Paper De-
scriptionSudden Departure 360

CHAPTER XXXVI. Leaving Calcut-
ta for Colombo, Ceylon Meeting
Sir John Sinclair We Become
Companions The Marriage and
Celebration of His Birthday in
Scotland 370

CHAPTER XXXVII. Incidents of the
Voyage to Ceylon Madras 384

CHAPTER XXXVIII. Colombo-Its
Charms Arabi Pasha Visit to
Kandy Sail for China by the
" Hydaspes," of the Peninsular
and Oriental Line 593

CHAPTER XXXIX. Observations in
and About Colombo 39G

CHAPTER XL. Kandy Tea and Co-
coa Culture 405

CHAPTER XLI. Planting on the Isl-
and of Ceylon Its Vicissitudes
Coffee, Cinchona, Cocoa, and
Tea Sugar and Cotton 413



CHAPTER XLII. Christian Progress
and the American Mission in
Ceylon , 427

CHAPTER XLI 1 1. On the Indian
Ocean Straits of Malacca Pe-
nang, Singapoi'e, etc 430

CHAPTKU XL1V. From Singapore to
Hong Kong 451

CHAPTER XLV. Some Account of
China Chronological, Historic-
al, and Geogaprhicai 465

CHAPTER XLVI. From Hong Kong
to Canton Boat Life and Sight-
seeing in Canton 471

CHAPTER XLVII. Temple of the
Five Hundred Sages Execution
Grounds, Examination Hall, etc.. 483

CHAPTER XLVIII. Returning rom
Canton Amusements of the Chi-
nese J7p the Coast to Shanghai.. 493

CHAPTER XLIX. In the City of
Shanghai 500

CHAPTER L. Rambles Sight-see-
ing and Fung Shuey 518

CHAPTER LI. Mission Work An-
glo-Chinese College 530

CHAPTER LIT. Cultivation of Tea
and its Preparation for Market
Learning the Language 541

CHAPTER LIU. Pigeon English Po-
etryThings Worth Knowing... 552

CHAPTER LIV. Last Days in Shang-
haiDeparture for Japan 557

CHAPTER LV. Description of the
People, Houses, etc 565

CHAPTER LVI. From Nagasaki to
Yokohama 579

CHAPTER LVII. Leaving Yokoha-
ma, Japan, for San Francisco
Homeward Bound The "City
of Pekin "Incidents on the
Voyage, etc 598

CHAPTER LVIII. From San Fran-
cisco to Yosemite Then Home. 604



ILLUSTRATIONS.

J. B. Gorman (Frontispiece) | St. Paul's Cathedral, London

Westminster Abbey



33 Windsor Castle and Park...



Contents.



11



Right Hon. W. E. Gladstone...

The City of Lyons, from the Park

of the Tete D'or

The Leaning Tower at Pisa

The Colosseum

Naples, the Bay, and Vesuvius

View of the Exhumed City of

Pompeii

Petrified Bodies

View of Messina and i's Harbor....

The Island of Crete.

Scene on the Nile in Egypt

Mother and Child

A Water-carrier

View of the City of Cairo

An Egyptian Temple in the City

of Cairo

Ruins on the Xile

Camel Kneeling to Shield His

Riders

Slave-boat on the Nile -

Pyramid ot Cheops, near Cairo

A Water-wheel

Jaffa, or Joppa

Arabian Bazar

Jews' Wailing Place :

Pool of Hezekiah

Jerusalem

The Mount of Olives

The River Jordan

Mouth of Suez Canal

Bound for Mecca

Natives of Aden

Rather Warm

Going Home

Ornaments and Jewels

Pagoda in Bombay

At Full Speed

The Monkey in His Native Jungle.
Entrapping Wolves in North-west

India

A State Procession in India

Hard Work

House in India

Delhi Women at the Mill

Scene in Delhi

The Kootub Minar

Praying by Hand

Stirring up a Hindoo



47



C8



., 100
110
.. 126
.. 130
.. 135
.. 136
.. 137



Getting Under Way

Taking a Drink

Washing Up



Studying Phrenology.
I Won't Go

The Sacred Stream....
The Dying Brahman.
Do n't Look....



325
326
329
VA
333
335
337



Scene at Monkey Temple in Ben-



ares

Contested Ground
Wedding Procession



Midnight Festival

Mountains in India

Camel-riding in India

Afraid of Sun-stroke

_ 140 Working the Punka Standing Up..
- 142 Mothers in Full Costume

Scene in Ceylon, near Colombo

147 Fan-palm

151 We Do n't Mind It

153 Malay Boy

162 No Got Eye no can See".

165 Malay House

168 Malayan Lady

203 Avenue to Whampoa's Gardens

212 Fruits of Singapore

219 Chop-sticks..

223 Opium-smokers

235 Chin-chin

254 A View Among the Hills near Ma-

256 coa, China

257 Chinese Eccentricities

260 Duck Boat

261 How We Ride in Canton

264 Oys-ters"

2G4 Here We Come!

269 Transmigration"

272 We Do Our Work Thoroughly

A Buddhist Temple

274 Intimate Relations

276 Flower Boat

281 Landing at Shanghai

285 Chinese Coach, or Wheelbarrow...

295 On the Wusung, near Shanghai

297 A Coolie in His Bamboo Overcoat

30-2 Wet Weather ~

305 Sole of a Chinese Shoe

310 | Gen. Charles George Gordon



341
342
348
349
352
358
359
361
400
402
411
432
433
435
442
443
446
450
454
456
464

472
475

477
479

481
482
485



489
492
499
504
50G

512
513
517



12



Contents.



PACK

The Orchestra 521

FungShuey 525

Remembering Departed Friends... 528

Anglo-Chinese University 538

The Young Plant 542

Transplanting 542

Firing Tea 543

Pile-king 541

One of the Aristocracy 547

Chinese Servant 558

I am the Captain of this Boat.

Thereby Hangs a Tail 559

Jinrikisha The Way We Travel

in Japan 5G5

Temple to the Goddess of the Sun. 5C6

Only My Husband 5G8

Japanese House 570

A Natural Gate-way 571



Peasant Girls 574

Buddha 586

Fire Engine 587

Picture of a Pleasure Party, After

Having Seen the Colic God 590

Will Take a Smoke 591

The Way I Like It 594

The Cango Mountain Travel 597

The "City of Pekin" Crossing the

Pacific Ocean GOO

Natives of Hawaii Leaping into the

Sea 602

South Dome Five Thousand Feet 610

El Capitan 612

Nevada Fall 614

One of the Big Trees 615

The Tabernacle 618

Yosemite Falls.... .... 610



MAPS.

Overland Route East 251 . The Eastern Shore...

India 279 Yosemite Valley

From India to China ... 386



580




AROUND THETOLD IN 1884

CHAPTER I.

FROM NEW YORK TO LIVERPOOL.

ON the afternoon of February 3, 1884, I occupied a seat
in a palace-car of that splendidly equipped road the
"Air Line," for a pleasure tour around the world. I left
Atlanta, whirling rapidly around lofty mountains and across
the charming glens of North Georgia toward the State of
North Carolina, casting, it may be, a last fond look on the
land that gave me birth. Darkness soon enveloped the
earth, and I fell asleep to awake next morning in that histor-
ic land so endeared to every Southern heart by sacred mem-
ories. Many a brave Southron, fighting for his manhood,
the rights of his State and home, had fallen here in a mighty
struggle. Here thousands sleep, after the hush of battle,
under the green sod on dear old Virginia's breast.

Leaving Danville, we had for a companion to Washing-
ton Col. Clark, who pointed out the home of Madison, and
other charming spots down the Piedmont region. But
it filled me with sadness, though twenty years have gone
since the struggle of the father against his son, and the
North against the South, drenched this lovely land in
blood and mourning. Grand old Virginia, the mother of
States and statesmen ! the South will ever hold thee in grate-
ful remembrance. We love the names of Washington, Lee,
Jackson, Madison, and Jefferson warriors, statesmen, and
soldiers. The city of Washington greeted us in the early
twilight. The lofty dome of her splendid Capitc 1 glistened

(13)



14 Around the World in 1884.

in. 1 the morning suxi. Though twenty-four years had gone
since I. \vas a student here at .Columbian College, Washing-
top, :wjt'h litis.broad .ayenues, with its labyrinth of streets,
its palatial residences and glorious parks, appeared more
beautiful than ever.

We pass Baltimore, the city of monuments, Philadelphia,
the city of brotherly love, and arrive at New York. One of
the most marvelous railway stations in the world, with mov-
able or adjustable tracks,* belonging to the Pennsylvania
Central, may be seen at the Quaker City. A bridal party
from Baltimore was one of the attractive features on the
crowded train, and an inexhaustible amount of gossip and
speculation in regard to their future happiness seems to
have been indulged in. Baltimore is famous for the beauty
of its women, and this trusting, loving bride proved no ex-
ception.

I have been several days in the great metropolis prepar-
ing for the ocean voyage. The weather in February is
often very inhospitable in this northern clime, being cold,
bleak, and stormy for many days at a time. The lowest
thermometer for many years has been reported this winter in
Northern and North-western States, ranging twenty to forty
degrees below zero. What a contrast to the climate of our
beloved Southland! Days might be spent in sight-seeing,
rambles and pleasant jaunts indulged in, for there are
many objects and places of interest to be studied in this
wonderful metropolis. Whether we view its rapid growth
in population, commerce, and wealth, or contemplate its ex-
tensive domestic and foreign trade, there are but few great
cities on the globe that rival its magnificence. New York,
Jersey City, and Brooklyn, connected by ferry-boats and
bridges, boast of nearly two million inhabitants. There are
many streets in New York whose stately palaces of her
princely merchants, bankers, and railroad magnates rival in

*One man, with different colored lamps, moves half a dozen trains.



From New York to Liverpool. 15

grandeur the most fashionable quarters of London and Paris.
The post-office building, city hall, hotels, and exchanges,
are constructed on the grandest scale. I have visited the
Bourse in Paris and the Exchange in Liverpool, but I have
seen nothing that rivals the Stock Exchange of New York.
Through the courtesy of my cousin, William Euclid Young,
a member and banker on Broadway, I enjoyed a most in-
teresting visit. A seat costs twenty-five to fifty thousand
dollars, and some of the most exciting scenes are sometimes
witnessed on its floors during a sudden rise of stocks or de-
cline in prices. Each member's name, when called, ap-
pears on an electrical indicator, and he rushes in from the
lobbies or adjoining rooms, often amidst the greatest confu-
sion. When stocks are rising you will observe the bears
begin to climb; but if they are declining they growl, and
make the place hideous by yelling.

I have met many kind friends of former days and pleas-
ant memories, but none I esteem more than the old house
of William Bryce. It has been the firm, trusting friend
of the Southern merchant through the most eventful peri-
ods of our history. This grand man has grown venerable
in years, a prince among merchants, but the noblest and
best of friends. His employes appear to have served him
during a life-time in their different capacities. I observed
my old friend Dickerson, whom I used to meet here twenty
years ago, still faithful as ever. It was through Mr. B/s
kindness I was introduced to the house of Brown Brothers,
whose letter of credit I was to travel on around the world.
Perhaps an explanation would prove interesting, as most
of my readers will be exercised to know what kind of
money I used in different foreign countries. The letter of
credit is simply a letter of introduction, addressed in French
and English to the correspondents of Brown Brothers, New
York, or Brown, Shiply & Co. London, in all important



16 Around the World in 1884.

towns and cities around the globe. These correspondents,
or bankers, are authorized to advance you, as needed, En-
glish gold, or its equivalent, according to the rate of ex-
change in money current in different countries to the amount
of pounds sterling indicated on the first page of the letter.
As you draw 5, 10, or 20, the amount is charged by
each bank, or correspondent, on the second page of your
letter, and bills of exchange drawn against the house in
London for the amounts advanced, which you sign. You
purchase this letter of credit in New York, say for five
hundred pounds, at the rate of $4.84 on London this is
equal to about five dollars commercial value of American
currency or twenty-five hundred dollars. Should this let-
ter be lost, by establishing the amounts drawn and deduct-
ing same, a new circular letter will be issued for the re-
mainder. It costs from two to three thousand dollars to
make a first-class voyage around the world. Divide this
amount by $4.84, or five dollars, and you have the amount
in pounds sterling.

Having made our financial arrangements, we make our
wardrobe with a view to the climatic changes incident to
the voyage. With sufficient underwear, one suit of heavy
woolen and a light suit of serge, for cold and warm lati-
tudes, brush, comb, tooth-brush, and soap, snugly packed
in a valise, constitutes the outfit for the long voyage. A
good library is found on all first-class steamers. Some trav-
elers provide opera -glasses, goggles, green umbrellas, for
mountain views and desert traveling. I find as little bag-
gage as possible, with plenty of soap for Italy and Egypt,
the most advisable. All over fifty or sixty pounds weight
is charged extra on the English and Continental railways.
Besides, the cabmen and commissionaires are a perfect nui-
sance. You want to carry every thing on your back and



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