John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 1 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 531)
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1 822.33-c

OARTLETT, JOHN,
A VEW ANn COV PLRTF
I CONCORDANCE, OR VERBAL*

I PART 2



The Newark
Public Library




Drama Collection

1 1 1 Amsterdam Avenue

New York, N.Y



NO RENEWALS ARE ALLOWED

FINES FOR OVERDUE MATERIAL PER

CALENDAR DAY:

Adult books lOtf Juvenile books 5d
Recordings 10^

Form #0569



A NEW AND

COMPLETE CONCORDANCE



OK



VERBAL INDEX TO WORDS, PHRASES, & PASSAGES



IN Tin:



DRAMATIC WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE



A SUPPLEMENTARY CONCORDANCE TO THE POEMS



BY JOHN BARTLI-TT, A.M.

FELLOW 01- THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF A UTS AND SCIKNCliS



JJonboit

M ACM I LLAN AN D CO.

AN' I) NKW YORK



1894

V 4 '



rm: TOV



COPYRIGHT

1889
By JOHN BAKTLETT



MAB



958



MAD



M



Mab. O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with yon . Horn, and Jul. i
Which oft the angry Mub with blisters plagues, Because thoir breaths

with S'.MH-I HUM! % tainttxl are ........ i

This ia that vury Mab That plut-i the manes of horses in tlio night . i
Macbeth. Upon the heath. There to meet with Macbeth . Mticletk i

Brave Macbeth well he deserves that name 1

Dismay 'd not this Our captains, Macbeth and Banquo? i

Go pronounce his present death, And with his former title greet Macbuth i

What he hath lost noble Macbeth hath won i

A drum, a drum 1 Macbeth doth come i

All hail, Macbeth ! hail to thee, thane of Glamis ! i

All hail, Macbeth 1 hail to thee, thano of Cnwdor I i

All hull, Macboth, that fllialt bo king hereafter I i

Lennor than Macbuth, and Creator. Not HO happy, ynt much happier . 1
Ho alt liafl, MA. I. rlh .in.i Uainjuo ! liamuio and Macbeth, all hull 1 . i
The king hath happily received, Macbeth, Tho news of thy uucuesu . 1
Worthy Macbuth, wo stay upon your leisure. Give me your favour
I hoard a voice cry ' Sleep no more I Macbeth does murder sleep '
Cawdor Shall sleep no more ; Macbeth shall sleep no more .
Who did this more than bloody deed'? Those that Macbeth hath slain
Most like The sovereignty will fall u]>on Macbeth. lie is already named il
If there come truth from thorn As upon theo, Macbuth, thoir speeches

shino iii

But who did bid theo join with us? Macbeth. IIo needs not our

iui.ttru.it I!)

How did you dare To tnuto and tinlllo with Macboth In riddled and

affairs of death?

The gracious Duncan Was pitied of Macbeth : marry, he was dead
Damned fact 1 How it did grieve Macbeth 1 did he not straight In pious

rage the two delinquents tear?

Macbeth! Macbeth 1 Macbeth 1 beware MacdufF; Beware the thane of

Fife

Macbeth ! Macbeth t Macbeth ! Had I three ears, I 'Id hear thee .

For none of woman born Shall harm Macbeth iv

Macbetli shall never vunquish'd be until Great Birnam wood to hiyh

Dtinsinaue hill Shall come against him iv

Our high-placed Macbt-lh Shall live the lease of nature . , , . iv
Why Stands Macbeth thus amazodly ? Come, siMU:is, cheer wo up his

sprites

I am not treacherous. But Macbeth is



Hi 5
iii



iii



iv



iv



When they shall be open'd, black Macbeth Will seem as pure as snow . iv
Not in the legions Of horrid hell can come a devil more Uamn'd In evils

to top Macbeth ........... iv

Better Macboth Than such an one to reign ...... iv

Devilish Macbeth By many of these trains hath sought to wiu mo Into

liia power ............ iv

Macbeth Is ripe for shaking, nml the- powers above Put on their

instruments ............ iv

Fear nut, Macbeth; no man that's born of woman Shall o'er ha vo power

uiKtn thru ........ .... v

My name's Macboth. The devil himself could not pronounce a title

Moro liatofnl to mine ear ......... v

Either thon, Macbeth, Or else my sword with an unbatter'd edge I

sheathe again undeoded ......... v

Macoabraus. This gallant gentleman, Jndas Maccah;i-ns . . /.. I.. Lost v



, . . .. ..

-Indus I am, yclipod Maccalurus. liulas Moccabnuis clipt Is plain Jndas
Alas, poor UttCCabmiU, how huth ho been Iwiited ! .....

acdonwald. The merciless Macdonwald Worthy to be a rebel Macbet
acduff. Here comes the good Hacdnff. How goes the world, sir, now?
How say'st thou, that Macduff denies his person At our great bidding? iii
From broad words and 'cause ho fail'd His presence at the tyrant's



, , .....

Macdonwald. The merciless Macdonwald Worthy to be a rebel Macbeth i
Macduff. Here comes the good Hacdnff. How goes the world, sir, now? ii
H '

From broad words and 'cause ho fail'd His p

feast, I hear Macduff lives in disgrace ...... iii

Macrtntf Is gone to pray the holy king, upon his aid .... iii

Sent he to Macduff? He did : and with an absolute 'Sir, not I,' Tho
cloudy messenger turns me his back ....... iii

Macbeth! Macbeth I Macbeth 1 beware Macdull"; Beware thu tlianu of
Fife ............. Iv

Nono of woman liorn Shall harm Macbeth. Then live, Macdull . . iv
"I'is two or three, my lord, that bring you word Macdull' is fled to
England ............. iv

Tho castle of Macduff I will surprise ; Seize upon Fife ; give to the edge
o' the sword His wife, his babes ........ iv

Macdulf, this noble passion, Child of integrity, hath from my soul
Wiped the black scruples ......... iv

Sinful Macduff, They were all struck for thee ! naught tliat I am . . iv
The English power is near, led on by Malcolm, His uncle Siward and
the good Macduir ........... v

Worthy Macdull and \ve Hliall take upon's what else remains to do . v
Macdull' was from his mother's womb Untimely ripp'd v

Ijiy (in, Mncdiilf, And damn'd be him that llrst Cries 'Hold enough !' . v
Macdull' is missing, nnd yonr nolilo son ....... V

Mace. To do more exploits with his mace than a morris-pike

L'otil. of Errors iv

I must have saffron to colour the warden pies ; innce ; dates ? W. Tale iv
The sceptre and the ball, The sword, the maco . . . Hen. V. iv
With these borne before ns, instead of maces, will we ride 2 lien. VI. iv
O murderous slumber, Lay'st thou thy leudeu maco upon my boy? J. C. iv
Macedon. I think Alexander tho Great was born in Macedon : his father
was called Philip of Macedon ...... llen.t'.iv

F think it is in Macedon where Alexander is porn ..... iv

You sail lind, in tho comparisons between Macedon and Monmouth,
that tho situations, look you, is both alike ..... iv

A river in Macedon ; and there is also moreover a river at Monmouth . iv
Who is the second that presents himself /A prince of Macodon 1'crirles ii
Machlavel. Am I politic? am I subtle? am I a Machiavel / Mcr. Wives iii
Aloiiron I that notorious Mnchlavel I ..... i HIM. VI. v

And set thn muritorons Machlave] to school . . 3 JIcii VI iii

Machinations, hollowuess, treachery ....... Icir j

Your business of the world hath so an end, And machination ceases . v
Machine. Adieu. ' Thine evermore, most dear lady, whilst this machine

is to him, HAMLKT' ........ Hamlet ii

Mackerel. You may buy land now as cheap as stinking mackerel

1 lien. IV. ii



too
137



66
209

58
99
69

> 154

4

98

60
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Macmorris. Captain M.icmorris, is it not? I think it be, . Hen. I', iii 2
How now, Captain Macmorris ! have you quit the mines? . . . ill 2
Captain Macmorris, I beseech you now, will you voutsafo me, look you,

a few disputations? . . . . . . . . , . iii 2

If you take the matter otherwise than la meant, Captain Macmorris . iii 2
Maculate. Immaculate white and red. Most maeujatu thoughts,

master, are masked under such colours . . . . L, L. Lost i 2
Maoulation. I will throw my glove to Death himself, That there's no

maculation in thy heart Troi, and Cres. iv 4

Mad. Not a soul But felt a fever of the mad .... Tempest i
I have made you mad ; And even with auch-like valour men hang and

drown Their proper selves iii

The fuols [women] aro mail, if left alone . . . T. G. of Vcr. iii

Ay urn, hn'll Hud the young man tlioro, and be mad I , . Aler. ll'irw i
It 1 huvu horns to make one mad, let the proverb go with mo . . iii
lie ia vury courageous mad about Ins throwing into the water . . iv
It was a mad fantastical trick ofliiia .... Ateas, for Afaia. iii
If she be mad, as I believe no other, Her madness hath the oddest

frame of sense, Such a dependency of thing on thing . . . v
Many that aro not mad Have, sure, some lack of reason . , . v

Hut, suro, ho is stark mad Com. of Errors ii

Wast thou mad, That thus HO madly thou didst answer mo? . . . ii 2 i i
Am I lu earth ... V Sleeping or waking? mad or well-advised?. . ii 2 215
It, would nmko a iiiun mad as it buck, to be HO bought and sold . . iii 1 72
What,, are you mud, Unit you do reason HO? Not mad, bid. niatml . Iii 2 j
.Anllpholus lu nmd, ICI.su wuiild ho novel 1 no domuau luiu-,. Ii . . . Iv B 82
The reason that I gather he is mad, Besides this present instanco of

his rage, Is a mad tale he told to-day at dinner . . . . iv 3
Is not yonr husband mad ? His incivility confirms no less . . . iv 4
I am not mad. O, that thou wert not, poor distressed soul 1 . . . iv 4
Wherefore dost thou mad me? Will you be bound for nothing? bemad iv 4

Hold, hurt him not, for God's sake ! he is mad v 1

Still did I tell him it was vile and bad. And thereof came it that the

man was mad v 1

To be disturb'd, would mad or man or beast v 1

Ha hurried through the street, With him liis bondman, all as mad

as ho v 1

Provoked with raging iro, Albeit my wrongs might maku one wiser nmd v 1

If ho wero mad, he would not plead no coldly v 1

I think you aro all mated or stark mad v 1

Ho is sooner caught than the pestilence, and the laker runs presently

mad Much Ado i 1

You will never run mad, niece. No, not till a hot January . . . i 1
If they wero but a week married, they would talk themselves mad . ii 1
By the Lord, this love is as mad as Ajax ; it kills sheep . . L. L. Lost iv 3
Cnpid is a knavish lad, Thus to make poor females mad . M. N. Dr&tm iii 2
Homo, that are mad if they behold a cat .... Mer. of Venice iv 1

An 'twero to me, I should bo mad at it v 1

One . . . lamed with reasons and thu other mud without any AnY.J^Iti 8

What, would you maku mo madV T. o/.V/t/'c/c Ind. 2

Tlmt wench is stark mad or wonderful froward i 1

llnlp, masters, holpl my master Is mad 12

Bo mad and merry, or go hang yourselves iii 2

That, being mad herself, she's madly mated iii 2

And thus I'll curb her mad ami headstrong humour . . . . iv 1
A' will make tho limn nmd, to mjiko a woman uf him . . . . iv fi

Why, how now, Kalo] I hope thou art nub mud iv ft

As mad in fully, lack'd the sonso to know .... All's Wdl v 3

He loved her : for indeed lie was mad for her v 3

One draught above heat makes him a fool ; tho second mads him T. Night \ 6
He is but mad yet, madonna ; and the fool shall look to the madman . 6
If you bo not mad, be gone ; if you have reason, be brief ... 5
My masters, are you mad ? or what are you? Have you no wit? . . i 3
Such a dream, that when the image of it leaves him he must run mad . i 5
I am as mad as he, If sad and merry madness equal be . . . .
Why, we shall make him mad indued. -The house- will be tho quieter .

My niece is already in tho belief that he's mad

The man grows mad : away with him ! Comu, come, sir

Why, there's for thee, and there, and there. Are all the people mad? .

Or I am mad, or else this is a dream

Do not think I am mad : they have laid mo here iu hideous darkness .

I am not mad, Sir Topas : I say to you, this house is dark

I am no more mad than you arc : make the trial of it .

Then you are mad indeed, if you be no better in your wits than a fool . v 2

But tell me true, are you not mad indeed ? or do you but counterfeit? . iv 2

I am ready to distrust mino eyes And wrangle with my reason that

persuades mo To any other trust but thut I am mad Or ulso tho

lady's mad iv 8

How now I art thou mad? No, madam, 1 do but read nmdufiNS . . v 1
Now I do bethink mo, it was sho First told mo thou wast mad , . v 1
Hut that's nil ono. Ily thu Lord, fool, I am nnt nmd . . . . . v 1
I am ... no less honest Than you are mud ; which is enough W. /'.-'- ii 3
O, think what they have dune And then run mad indeed, stark mad t . iii 2

I am not mad : this hair I tear is mine K. John iii 4

I nm not mad: I would to heaven I were 1 iii 4

I'jrarh some philosophy to make me mad, And thou shalt be canonized iii 4
Being not mad but sensible of grief, My reasonable part produces

reason iii 4

If I wero mad, I should forget my son, Or madly think a babe of clouts

wero ho : I am not mad iii 4

This music mads mo ; lot it sound no muro ; For though it have holp

madmen to their wits, In me it seems it will make wise men mad

Kichimt If. v

IIo made mo mad To see him shine so brisk and smell so sweet 1 Ilt-n. 11'. I
Brother, the king hath made your nephew mad ..... i
Nono of thi!no mad mustachiu purple-lined malt-worms . . . , ii
What, art thou mad? art thou mad? is not the truth tho truth? . . 11

Thou art essentially mad, without seeming so ii

Peace, cousin Percy ; you will make him mad iii



87
48
61
129
33

68

84

141
217

272
281

88

93

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I 7 6



18

69

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228

246

212

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260

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MS

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IS

146
150
405
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65
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97

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357
382

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184

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cy ; you will make him mad iii

I am afraid my daughter will run mad, So much she doteth . . . iii

Nay, if yon melt, then will she run mad iii

He talks at random ; sure, the man is mad . . . .1 lien. VI. v
From thy sight, I should be raging mad 2 Hen. VI. iii



53
57

61

53
138

82
=54
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51
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394



MAD



050



MADE



Mad. To IMIani with him ! Is thn man grown nmd ?



. 2 Urn. VI. v 1 131



Why nit thou patient, man? thou shouldst be mad ; And I, to mako

thee mad, do mock thee thus 3 Hen. VI. \ 4

Begin again, and stop again, As if thou wort distraught and mad with

terror Richard III. iii 5 4

And bo thy wifo if any bo so mad As miserable by the life of thee As

thou hast made me by my dear lord's death I iv 1 75

Kngland hath long been mad, and scarr'd herself v 6 23

Was he mad, sir? O, very mad, exceeding mad, in love too . Hen. VIII. i 4 27

Which so grieved him, That ho ran mad and died ii 2 130

I tell thee. I am mad In Cressid's love .... Troi. and Cres. i 1 51

Nor once deject the courage of our minds, Because Cassandra's mad . ii 2 122

The young prince will go mad : a plaguo upon An tenor 1 . . . iv 2 78

With too much blood and too little brain, those two may nm mad . v 1 54

Who hath done to-day Mad and fantastic execution . . . . v 6 38

Let's not meet her. Why? They say she's mad . . Coriofanus iv 2 g

Why, are ye mad? or know ye not? T. Andron. ii 1 75

Any mortal body hearing it Should straight fall mad, or else die

suddenly ii 8 104

If tho winds rage, doth not tho sea wax mad. Threatening the welkin?, iii 1 223
When my heart, all mad with misery, Beats in this hollow prison of my

flesh . iii 2 9

Why, Marcus, no man should bo mad but I iii 2 24

I liavo hoard my grandsire say full oft, Extremity of griefs would make

men mad iv 1 19

And I have read that Hecuba of Troy Ran mad for sorrow . . . iv 1 21

I am not mad ; I know theo well enough v 2 21

But wo worldly men Have miserable, mad, mistaking eyes . . . v 2 66

I know them all, though they suppose mo nmd, And will o'erreach thorn v 2 142
You know your mother means to feast .with mo, And calls herself

Revenge, and thinks mo mad v 2 186

Why, Romeo, art thou mad? Not mad, but bound more Ram. and Jvl. i 2 54

That Rosaline Torments him BO, that he will sure run mad . . . ii 4 5

Out, yon baggage I You tallow-face ! Fio, del what, are you mad? , iii 6 158

You nio too hot. God's bread ! it makes mo nmd iii 5 177

That living mortals, hearing them, run nmd Iv 8 48

You lovo your child HO 111, That you run nmd, seeing that sho is wH . iv 6 76

K-ild ho not flo? or did I dream it so? Or am I mad? . . . . v 8 80

I'm worso than mad : I have kept back their foes , . T. nf Athens Hi 5 106

Lot's mako no stay. Lord Timon's mad. I feel't upon my bones . iii G 129

Delay not, Cipsar ; read it instantly. What, is tho fellow mad? J. C. iii 1 10

Hearing tho will of Ca-sar, Ifc will inflame you, it will make you mad . iii 2 149

The king comes here to-night. Thou'rt mad to say it . . Ufacbeth i 5 32
These deeds must not be thought After these ways ; so, it will make us

mad ii 2 34

Some say bo's mad; others that lesser hate him Do call it valiant fury v 2 13

Mad for thy love? My lord, I do not know ; But truly, I do fear it Ham. ii 1 85



90



ii 1



il 2
ii 2



And denied His access to me. That hath made him mad

Your noble son is mad: Mad call I. it; for, to define truo madness,

What is't but to bo nothing else but mad? .....
That ho is mad, 'tis truo : 'tis tnie 'tis pity ; And pity 'tis 'tis true
I am but mad north-north-west: when the wind is southerly I know a

hawk from a handsaw .......... ii 2 396

Mako mad tho guilty and appal the free, Confound the ignorant . . ii 2 590
It hath made me mad. I say, we will have no more marriages . . iii 1 153
What woidd your gracious figure? Alas, he's mad I . . . . iii 4 105

That I essentially am not in madness, But mad in craft . . . . iii 4 188

Mad as the sea and wind, wJien both contend Which is the mightier . iv 1 7
He that is mad, and sent into England . . . . . . v 1 161

Why was he sent into England? Why, because he was mad . . . v 1 165
'Twill not be seen in him there ; there the men arc as mad as he . . v 1 170
How came he mad? Very strangely, they say. How strangely?

Faith, n'nn with losing hln wits ........ v 1 171

O, 1m IH nmd J>aertnfl, l-'nr lovu of flod, forbear him . . . . v 1 a-js

Ho Kent ntniUliliinrly, \Vtnm l^ar IH mad ...... Jsar [ I i-jB

O, lot me not hn mail, mil mad, Hwnet hnavnn I Knnn mo In tflmpor:

would not hn mad 1



What, art Umu nmd, old fellow? How full you out? say that .
I prltlmo, daughter, do not mako me mad : I will nob troubln thee



I 5 50

Ii 2 91
. 11 4 221
Thin hf.ii t Hluill break into R hundred thousand Haws, Or ore I'll weep.

O fool, I shall go nmd ! t ........ II 4 289

The king grows mad ; I '11 (fill thee, friend, I am almost mad myself . ii! 4 170
He's mad that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a horse's health . . iii 6 19
Alack, sir, he is mad. Tis the times' plague, when madmen lead tho

blind ............. )v 1 47

He was met oven now As mad as the vex'd sea . . . . . iv 4 2

What, art mad ? A man may see how this world goes with no eyes . iv 6 153
The king is mad : how stiff is my vile sense, That I stand up ! . . iv 6 286
To take the widow Exasperates, makes mad her sister Gonerii . . v 1 60
Poor lady, she'll nm mad When she shall lack it . . . Othello ill 8 317
Horo ho cnnics: As ho shall smilo, Othollo shall go mad . . , Iv 1 101
1 am glad to soo you marl. Why, swcot Othello, Dovil ! . . . iv 1 250
She was in love, and he sho loved proved mad And did forsake her . iv 3 27
It is tho very error of the moon ; She comes more nearer earth than she

was wont, And makes men mad ........ v 2 m

villany, villany ! What, are you mad ? I charge you, get you home v 2 194
Call tho slave again : Though I am mad, I will not bite him Ant. andCleo. ii 5 80

1 think thou 'rt mad. The matter? ........ ii 7 62

O, he is tnore mad Than Telamon for his shield ..... iv 13 i

Patience is sottish, and impatience does Become a dog that's mad . iv 15 80
What, art thou mad ? Almost, sir : heaven restore me ! . Cymbdinc 1 1 147
What, are men mad? Hath nature given them eyes To see this vaulted

ftrch? ............. I 6 32

Foola ato not nmd folks. Do you call me fool? As I am mad, I do . fi 3 105
If you'll be patient, I'll no more be mad; That cures us both . . ii 3 108
Is Cadwal mad? Look, here he comes ....... iv 2 195

I return'd with simular proof enough To make the noble Leonatns mad v 5 201



T. nf Shrew v 1 87

Com. of Errors v 1 150

T. of Shrew iii 2 126

Rf>m. and Jut. Hi 1 4

Mrr. of Venice, v 1 73

T. of Shrew 111 2 10



Mad ass. Away, away, mad ass I

Mad attendant. His mad attendant and himself .

Mad attire. Ho hath some meaning in his mad attire

Mad blood. Those hot days, is the mad blood stirring

Mad bounds. Unhandled colts. Fetching mad bounds

Mad-brain. A mad-brain rndesby full of spleen

Mad-brained. This mad-brain'd bridegroom took him such ft cuff . . iii 2 165
Kenminoth none but mad-brnin'd Salisbury . . . .1 Urn, 1*7. i 2 15
To tho Htain Of contumelious, beastly, mad-brain'd war . T. of A thru* v 1 177

Mad-bred. Tho fury of this mad-broil flaw ... 2 Hen, VI. iii 1 354

Mad Brutus. 'Twaa I That the mad Brutus ended . . Ant. and Clco, iii 11 38

Mad composition. Mad kings 1 mad composition ! . . . K.Johnii 1 561

Mad compound. Thou whoreson mad compound of majesty . 2 Hen. IV. ii 4 319



Mad days. Tho mad days that I liavn spent 1 ... 2 Hen. IV. iii 2 37

Mad devil. The finest mad devil of jealousy in him . . Mer. Wives v 1 19

Mad dog. Why, this is lunatics ! this is nmd as a mad dog ! . . . iv 2 131

A jealous woman Poisons more deadly than a mad dog's tooth Com. ofEr. v 1 70

Mad fellow. That same mad fellow of the north, Percy . . 1 Hen. IV. ii 4 369

A mad fellow met me on the way and told me I had unloaded all the

gibbets iv

A whoreson mad fellow's it was : whoso do you think it was? Hamlet v
Mad flesh. But for the mountain of mad flosh that claims marriage of

me, I could llud in my heart to stay here . . . Com. of Errors iv

Mad folks. Fools aro not mad folks Cymbeline ii

Mad grandfather. He hath some message to deliver us. Ay, some nmd

messago from his mad grandfather T. Andron. iv

Mad-headed. Out, you mad-headed apo ! 1 Hen. IV. ii

Mad host. Trust mo, a mad host . Mer. Wives iii

Mad humour. I drave my suitor from his mad humour of love to a living

humour of madness As Y. Like It iii

Mad idolatry. 'Tis mad idolatry To make the service greater than the god

Troi. and Cres. ii

Mad Ire and wrathful fury makes me weop ... 1 Hen. VI. iv
Mad jealousy. How many fond fools serve mad jealousy ! Com. of Errors ii
Mad kings. Mad world ! mad kings ! mad composition i . . K. John ii
Mad knave. Carry this mad knavo to tho gaol. . . T. of Shrew v
Mad lad. Like a mad lad, Pare thy nails, dad . . . . T. Night iv
Mad lord. A mad lord, and nought but humour sways him 7'. of Athens iii
Mad man. Thou fond mad man, hear me but speak a word Rom. andJul. iii
Mad marriage. Such a mad marriage never was before . T. of Shrew iii
Mad masters. Fio, flo on all tired jades, on all nmd masters . . ; Jv
Mad matches. Of all nmd matches never was tho like . . . .Ill
Mad message. Ho hath some message to deliver us. Ay, some mail

message from his mad grandfather . . . T. Andron. tv

Mad misleader of thy brain-sick son I . . . . . 2 Hen. VI. v
Mad mistaking. I perceive thou art a reverend father; Pardon, I pray

thor>, for my mad mistaking ... . T. nf Shrew iv

Mad mothers. Whiles tho nmd mothers with their howls confused Do

break tlio clouds , . . . JIrn, V. iii

Mad Petruchlo. There is mail Fntruclito'n wlfn . . T. of fibre w iii
Mad rogue. A pestilence on him for a mad rogno I . . . Ilmnht v
Mad Shallow. I wan once of Clement's Inn, whore I think they will talk

of mad Shallow yet 2 lien. IV. iii

Mad sister, What shriek is this? 'Tis our mad sistor . Troi. and Cres. ii
Mad soul. My lord, this is a poor mad soul . . . .2 Hen. IV. ii
Mad spirit. How now, nmd spirit 1 What night-rule now? M. N. Dream iii
Mad tale. A mad tale he told to-day at dinner. . . Coin, of Errors iv
Mad thought. Being credulous in this mad thought . T. Andron. v
Mad Tom. I am worso than o'er I was. 'Tis poor mad Tom . . Lear iv
Mad wag. How now. mad wag 1 what, in thy quips ? . .1 Hen. IV. \
How now, mad wag 1 what a devil dost thou in Warwickshire? . . iv
Mad wenches. Do you hear, my mad wenches? No . . L. L. Lost ii

Farewell, mad wenches ; you have simple wits V

Mad woman. If your wifo bo not a mad-woman, . . . Sho would not

hold out enemy for ever Mer. of Venice- iv

Thou fond mad woman, Wilt thou conceal this dark conspiracy? Rich. II. v

They dance I they are mad women T. of Athens i

Mad world ! mad kings 1 mad composition I . . . . K. John ii
Mad yeoman. For he's a mad yeoman that sees his son a gentleman

before him Lear iii

Mad young man. Whose providence Should have kept short, restrained,

and out of haunt, This mad young man .... Hamlet iv

Madam, and pretty mistresses, give ear L. L. Lost v

All hail, sweet madam, and fair time of day ! v

Teach us, sweet madam, for our rude transgression .Some fair excnso . v
What nuiHt- I call her? Miulnm. Al'cn madam, or Joan madam?
' Madiini,' nti'l nothing U!HO ; HO lord* rul I ladlnH. Mndiim wifo. they

Ray thiil I huvo ilroam'd T. o/Kkftno Ind.


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 531)