John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 126 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 126 of 531)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


I would not, in plain terms, from this lime forth, Have you so slander

any moment leisure llamlct i 3 132

Plain truth. You are a sectary, That's the plain truth . . Hm. VIII. v 3 71
Pain way. Laid falsely I 1 the plain way of his merit . Coriolanus iii 1 61
Plain words. Honest plain words best pierce the Kir of grief . L. I,. Lest v 2 761
Plainer. Tlio plainer dealer, the sooner lost . . . Com. of Errors ii 2 8<

Follow mo, then, To plainer ground M. N. Dream iii 2 404

lint, beseech .your grace, Be plainer with mo .... W.Talelix6
But in the plainer and simpler kind of people, the deed of saying is quite

. out of use T. O f Athens v 1 2

Plainest. Do I not in plainest truth Tell you, I do not, nor I cannot love

y n ; M. N. Dream ii 1 200

L took film for the plainest harmless creature That breathed lliclianl 111. iii 6 25

Plaining. Piteous plainiugs of the pretty babes . . Com. of Errors i I 7 '

After our sentence plaining comes too lato . . . .Richard II i 3 17^

Plainly conceive, I love you Mem. for Meas.' il 4 141

Ho struck so plainly, I could too well feol his blows . Com. of ISrrnrs ii 1 52
lint I must toll them plainly, Claudio undergoes my challenge Much Ailn v '.' ^7
And toll thoni plainly ho Is Hung tlio jollier . . . M. N. Jirenm ill 1 47

Now my I'oos toll mo plainly I am an ass T. Ntiilit v I

Who mays t see Plaluly as heaven sees earth and earth soea heaven iv.Talei 2 315

llo plainly give you out an uiistaiu'd shepherd iv 4 i 4 c

Once or twice I was about to speak and toll him plainly . . . iv 4 454
Tongues of heaven, Plainly denouncing vengeance upon John K. John iii 4

Speak plainly your opinions of our hopes 2 Hen. IV. i 3

Hear me more plainly . iv 1 6C

( inr madams mock at us, and plainly say Our mettle is bred out Hen. V. iii 6 28
I mind to tell him plainly what I think .... 3 Hen. VI. iv 1 8

A

A.... uiiwv. inn IIUDIIJ i .mjiu.l.Tln'fl.T ll'l.rt tllclu Jll;llmy MOO b . U'OrlOW

Itoport t the Volscian lords, how plainly I havo borne this business . v 3
Then plainly know my heart's dear love is set On tlio fair daughter of

rich Capnlet R om . and Jill, ii 3 57

I odoal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind . . . Lear iv "i 6"
Plainness. And now in plainness do confess to thee. . . r. ofShrem i 1 157



. ,. , i,.,, lv ,, V i t/juiuuj onj \_nai jucuviu 10 LUCU vuu iie'l. r ill O 20

I iiiinit to tell liim plainly what I tliink .... 3 Hen. VI. iv 1 8

Which plainly signllled That I should snarl ami bito nml play tlio dog . v 6 76

An honest tale speeds bent being plainly told . . . Richard III. iv 4 358

And out of Ida noble caroloHsnoss lots them plainly soo't . Corwlanus il 'J 16



Iv 4



. . .

Your plainness and your shortness please me well

Therefore with frank and with uncurbed plainness Tell us . Hen. V. i 2 244
For the truth and plainness of the case, I pluck this pale and maiden

blossom here ......... 1 u m . VI. ii 4 46

Thy plainness and thy housekeeping, Hath won the greatest favour

2 lien. VI. i 1 iqi
Whilst some with cunning gild their copper crowns, With truth and

plainness I do wear mine bare ..... Troi. and Crcs. iv 4 108

Lot pride, which she rails plainness, marry her .... Lenr i 1 131

To plainness honour's bound, When majesty stoops to folly . . .11 ,,-,,,
In IhlH plnlimosH llnrliiiiir momcmft and more coirupler end* . .IIS 107
In honoxl pliilnnoHs tlion liiwt hoard mo nay ..... titliillul 1 07

ICnJoy thy plainness, It nothing 111 becomes tlino . . Ant. nndUco.il H 6..

Plaint. Hearing Imw our plaints and prayers do plorcu . Hlijuml II. v a 127
Uuolless are plaints, nifd cureless are my woimdi . . . 8 Jim. VI. 11 21
And Nero will bo tainted with remorse, To hear and see her plaints . iii 1 41
What causn have I, Thine being but a moiety of my grief, To overgo thy

plaints anil drown thy cries I ..... Richard III. ii 2 61

Plaintiff. Come, bring away the plaintiffs. ..... Much Ado v 1 261

This plaintiff here, the offender, did call me ass . . v 1 314

Thnn nhalt be both the plaintiff and the judge Of thine own cause T. N. v 1 362

Plaited. Time shall untold what plaited cunning hides . . . Lear i 1 283

Planched. And to that vineyard is a planched gate . Metis, for Meas. iv 1 30

Planet. I was not born under a rhyming planet . . . Mitch Ado v 2 41
It is a bawdy planet, that will strike Whore 'tis predominant W. Tnk i '2 201
I here s some ill planot rolgna: I must bo patient ..... il 1 105

What I shall we curse the planets of mishap? .... I Hat. VI. I 1 23

Combat with adverse planets in the heavens I ...... i 1 54

Hath this lovely face Killed, like a wandering planet, over mo? 2 lien. V/.iv 4 16
lie opposite all planets of good luck To my proceedings ! Ricliard III. iv 4 402
The planets and this centre Observe degree, priority and place T. and C. i 3 85
Therefore is the glorious planet Sol In noble eminence enthroned . . i 8 89
hose medicinable eye Corrects the ill aspects of planets evil . . i 3 92
Hut whnn the planets In evil mixture to disorder wander, What plagues! i 3 94
And with a sudden re-inforcement struck Coriolf like a planot Coriulanus ii 2 118
Koine planot strike me down, That I may slumber in eternal sleep I

2'. Andron. ii 4 14

I he nights are wholesome ; then no planets strike . . . Hamlet i 1 162
As if some planet had unwittod men ...... Othdln ii 3 182

Now the Meeting moon No planet is of mino . . . Ant. and Clto. v 2 241
To glad her presence, The senate-house of planets all did sit . I 'e rides i 1 10

Planetary. Ho as a planetary plague, when Jove Will o'er some high-

vh-od e.ily hang his poison In tlio sick air . . . T. of Atlirnn Iv 8 108
liy nn enforced ubudlonuo of planetary Influence .... Lr.a,r\ti$$

Plank. To crouch In litter of your stable planks . . . K. John v 2 140
Do not light by sea ; Trust not to rotten planks . . Ant. and Clco. iii 7 63

Plants with goodly burthen bowing ...... Tcmiiest iv 1 113

Such barren plants are set before us, that we thankful should be L. L. I., iv 2 29

, - - A..., ..!.... t :- *.._...< ..... :,.,



tuu uiirreii pianis are sol, oeioro us, tnat we tnaniuul snoulil he L. L. L. iv 2
His lines would ravish savage ears And plant in tyrants mild humility iv 3
Abuses our young plants with carving ' Rosalind ' on their harks

As Y. Li Iff. It III 2 -

11. Is In us to plant Ihiiio honour where Wo please . . . All's ll'rff II I! '16
I will plant you two, and lot tlio fool make a third . . . T. Niciht ii 3 18
Ami in one solMiorn Inmr To plant and o'orwholm custom . IK. V'ir/f iv 1 i
Pray t!od tlio plants thou gralt'st may never grow . . llicluird II. iii 4 10
Thou, which know'st the way To plant unrightful kings . . . v 1 6



Plant. In thy piteous heart plant thon thine ear . . Richard II. v 3 126
Amongst a grove, tho very straightest plant . . . ..17icn.vr.il 82

And plant this thorn, this canker, Holingbroko is I? 6

Plant neighbourhood and Christian-like accord In their sweet bosoms

Hen. V. \ 2 381

They laboured to plant the rightful heir 1 Hen. VI. ii 5 So

1 '11 plant Plantagenet, root him np who dares . . . .3 Hen. VI. i 1 48
This may plant courage in their quailing breasts ; For yet is hope . ii 3 54
His lovo was an eternal plant, Whereof the root was lix'd in virtue's

T ground iii 8 124

How sweet a plant havo you untimely cropp'd ! v 5 62

And plant your joys in living Edward's throne . . Richard III. ii 2 100

Her royal stock graft with ignobln plants iii 7 127

We will plant some other in tho throne iii 7 216

Tho parents live, whoso children thou hast bntcher'd, Old withor'd planls iv ! 394
To his music plants and flowers Ever sprung . . . Hen. VIII, iii 1 6
Every man shall eat in safety, Under his own vine, what ho plants . v 6 35
Plant lovo among 'a I Throng our large temples with the shows of peace 1

Coriolanvs iii 3 35

Ho water d his now plants with dews of flattery v 6 23

O, mickle is tho powerful grace that lies In herbs, plants, stones R.and J.ii 3 16

Full soon the canker death eats up that plant ii 3 30

Welcome hither : I have begun to plant theo, and will labour To make

theo full of growing Macbeth i 4 z8

n itliin this hour at most I will advise you whore to plant yourselves . iii 1 129
A faith that reason without miraclo Could never plant in mo. . Ltar i 1 226
If wo will plant nettles, or sow lettuce, set hyssop .... Othello i 3 325
Borne o' their plants ore ill-rooted already . . . Ant. and Clco. ii 7 2
Plant those that havo revolted In the vnn . . . . . . Iv u n

Uow dare the plants look up to honvon! reticle* i 2 55

Plantage. As true as steel, as plantago to the moon . Trot, and CITS, iii 2 184
Plantagenet. Arthur Plantagenot lays most lawful claim To this fair

island K. John i 1 9

Bear his name whoso form thon bear'st : Kneel Ihou down Philip, but



rise more great, Arise sir Richard and riantagcnct .
'



i 1 162



, . .

Tlio very spirit of I'laiilncnnnt I I am thy grandam, Diehard .
Young 1'IanUigonot, Son to the older brother of this limn . . .111238
Befriend me so much as to think I come one way ol the riaiilagenels . v 11
That KIIIIIO night-tripping fairy Imd exchanged In cradle -clothes our

children whore they lay, And call'd mine Percy, his riantagonet I

1 Hen. IV.il 89
England is thine, Ireland is thine, France is thine, and Henry Planta-

genet is thine .......... ]i cn . v. v 2 259

Remember to avcngo mo on the French.' Plautagenet, I will 1 Hen. VI. i 4 95
I pluck this white rose with Plantagenet ....... ii 4 36

No, Plantagenet, 'Tis not for fear but anger that thy cheeks Blush . ii 4 64
Hath not thy rose a thorn, Planlagonet? ....... ii 4 da

\Vhero false L'lanUvgOnot dam not be seen ........ ii ' 74

Turn not thy scorns this, way. PJaiitngonot ...... il 4 77

Richard Plantagenet, my lord, will come: Wo soul unto the Tomplo . ii 5 18
Hichard 1'lantagenel, my friend, is ho come? Ay, noble uncle . . ii 5 34
In honour of a true Plantagenet And for alliance sake . . ii 5 5 ->

Plantagenet, I see, must hold his tongue ...... iii 1 61

Which in the rightof Hichard Plantagenet Wedoexhibit to your majesty iii 1 150
Hiso, Hichard, like a true Plantagenet ....... iii 1 172

My mother a Plantagenet, I know her well ; she was a midwife

2 lien. VI. iv 2 44
Unless Plantagenet, Duke of York, bo king ... .3 Hen. VI. i 1 40

1 '11 plant Plantagenet, root him up who dares : Resolve lliee, Richard .1148
Plantagonet, of theo and those thy sons, Thy kinsmen and thy friends,

I'll havo more lives Than drops of blood were in my father's veins. I 1 95
Hive King Henry leave to speak. Plautagenet shall speak first . . i 1 121
Plantagenet, for nil the claim thou lay'st, Think not that Homy slmll

lin Hddiipnsod. DopiiHod ho Hlinll 1m ....... | l , VJ

llh-hitid PlnidiiK ...... I, ICnJcpy Iho lilnu.lnm niter niydoeoiiHo . I I 171

Long live King Henry I Plaillllgoliut, Otnbrora him . . . I i w,'

I'lailtngoliotl 1 ( ..... 10, PliinUgenel I And this thy son's blond rh'iivlnj;

to my blade Slmll rust upon my weapon, till thy blood, (Jongcal'd

with this, do make mo wipe oil both ....... I II 40

Yield to our mercy, proud Plantagenot .... i ! ra

lint how is it that great Plantagenet Is crown'd so soon? . .' ! i 4 on
We, the sons of brave Plantagenet, Each one alreadv blazinc bv our



mees ....... si j

That Plantagenet, Which held thee dearly as his soul's redemption '. ii 1 ,01

Edward Plantagenet, arise a knight ; And learn this lesson . . ii 2 61
Is not the causer of the timeless deaths Of these Plantagenets, Hcnrv

and Edward, As blamefnl as the executioner? . . Richard ill i 2 118

Ho lives that loves thee bettor than he could. Name him. Plantagcnot i 2 14-

Callant-springing bravo Plantagenet, That princely novico . . . I 4 ~~j

Famous I'laulagonet, must gracious pilncn, l.oml favourable oars . iii 7 ioo



, , . .

Who moots us hero? my nloce PlanUigonet Led In the hand of her Idml
mint?



........... Iv 1 i

Edward Plantugouet, why art thou dead? Plantagenot doth quit

Plautagenet. Edward for Edward pays a dying debt iv 4 jo

Whore is thy brother Clarence? And little Ned Plantagenot, his son ? . iv 4 146
lantaln. O, sir, plantain, a plain plantain I no I'onvoy, no 1'envoy ; no

salve, sir, but a plantain 1 ....... /, /, /^j jjj j -

'lantaln-leaf is excellent for that. For what, I pray theo? For your

broken shin ......... Som. and M. i 2 5-

antatlon. Had I plantation of this isle, my lord . . . Tempest l[ 1 14,
lanted and placed and possessed by my master . . . Mnch Arlo iii 3 iso
A man in all the world's new fashion planted . . . . L. L. last i 1 165

Iho fool hath planted in his memory An urniy of good words H. o/ Vcn. iii 5 71
Ann nted, crowned, planted many years .... Richard II. iv 1 127

Ho hath so planted his honours in their eyes . . . . Corinlnum ii 2 32

You are but newly planted In your throne . . . . T. Andmu. i l ,

Iliy temples should bo planted prosonlly Wlfh horns, us was Actii'on's II 8 V

What s morn to ilo, Which would bo planted newly with the time Mnrhrth v s 6s

Yot at the lira 1 1 saw the treasons plan tod . . . Ant. and Clco. I 8 26

lantetn. It engenders clioler, plontetli anger . . . T. afshnmiv 1 175

'lash. As ho that leaves A shallow plash to plunge him in tho de..p . i 1 23

'lashy With all good speed at Plashy visit mo . . . Itiehard II. i 2 66

Lot thee to Plashy, to my sister Gloucester . . ii 2 oo

I should to Plashy too; Hut time will not permit . ' Ii 2 i"o

Instor. Von rub the xorn, When you should bring Mm piaster Trun,,',t II I ,i

Ut him have some plaster, or Home loam . . . . H. N Dramllll 70

lam not glad that Rilch a Horn of UmnHlioilldHenk a planter . I! .Mm v 2 11
Bolls and plagues I'liistor you o'er, that yon may bo nbhon-'d I fariolnn> i 4 12
aaterer. Villain, thy lather was a plasterer ... 2 lien. VI iv 2 ,L
lasterlng. Beautled with plastering art



Hamlet iii 1 51



PLAT



1180



TLAY



Plat. That very Mab That plats the manes of horses in the night R. and J. i 4
Plate. My house . . . Is richly furnished with plate and gold T. of Shrew ii 1
Wo do seize to us The platd, coin, revenues and moveables Richard II. ii 1
Wo Hulzo into our hands His plate, bis goods, his money and his lands ii 1
I must be fain to |>awn both my plato and tho tapestry . . 2 lien. IV. ii 1
Tho several ]>arcels of his plato, his treasure, Hich stults Hen. Vlli. iii 2
Hemove the court-cupboard, louk to the plate . . . ltoi. and Jul. i 6
As money, plate, jewels and such-like trifles . . T. of Athens iii 2

Plalo sin with gold, And tho strong lance of justice hurtless breaks Isnr iv
Hi-alms and islands wore As plates dropp'd from his pocket Ant. and Cleo. v 2
This is tlm brief of monoy, plate, mid jmvrls, I niu poaafuu'tl of . . v 2
'Tis plato of mro device, and |I*WD|H Of i Ir.h and oxi|uisitu form ptfttilvlil
Platod. Thus plated In Imbillmimta of wiir .... JiMturd tl. 1 a
Those his goodly oyos, That o'er the Illus und musters of tho war Havo

glow'd liko platuil Mars Int. und Clco. 1 1

Platform. And lay new platforms to endamago them . . 1 Hen. VI. ii 1

JJut where was this? My lord, upon the platform where wo wateh'd Ham. i 2

Upon the platform, 'twixt eleven and twelve, I'll visit you . . . i 2

To tho platform, masters ; come, let's set the watch . . Othello ii 3

Plausible. Answer hia roqniring with a plausible obedience . Af. for Hi. iii l

Plausive. His plausivo words Ho scatUsr'd not in ears . . All's Well I 2

It must be a very plausive invention that carries it . . . . iv 1

Some habit that too much o'er-leavens Tbe form of plausive manners Ham, i 4

Plautus. Seneca cannot be too heavy, nor Plautus too light . . . ii 2

Play. Where's the master? Play the men .... TeMjtst i 1

What foul play bad we, tliat wo came from thence?

](y foul play, as thou say'st, were wo heaved thenco . . . .12
He will shoot no more but play with sparrows And bn a boy right out . iv 1
Hvveet lord, you play mo false. No, my dear'st love, I would not . . v 1
For a score of kingdoms you should wrangle, And I would call it fair

play

What is this maid with whom thou wast at play?

He plays false, father. How? out of tune? . . T. G. ofVer. iv 2

You would havo them always play but ono tiling?-! would always havo

ono play but ono thing iv 2

When a man's servant shall play the cur with him, look you, it goes hard iv 4

Our youth got mo to play the woman's part iv 4

I made her weep agood, For I did play a lamentable part . . . iv 4
Waster Slender is let the boys leave to play. Blessing of his heart !

Mer. Wives iv 1

CJo your ways, and play ; go iv 1

.Sho hath prosperous art When she will play with reason Alms, for Metis, i 2
I would not . . . Tonguo far from hour!, play with all virgin* so . i 4
ri i\ . m.'li laiiljisth', ini'U Iml'ori) high hiiuvnii AH muLti LllU llligolu Wuop II '2
Ni play Mm i.iiiM"li l.hi'oiigH with mut tluit MWOOIIH . . . . . II !

'l-iii Win I Id in.i!. " mnivy Hwmr und play tlm tyrant Ill 'J

I f wo two bo ono and thou play falno, 1 do digest tho poison I'ow.o/AVru/jill 2

Dromio, play the porter well ii 2

Or do you play the flouting Jack? Much Ado i 1

Ami nil Kurupa shall rejoico at thro, As once Europa did at lusty Jove,

When bo would play the noble beast in love v 4

Therefore play, music. Prince, thou art sad ; get theo a wife . . v 4
That aged ears play truant at his tales L. L. Lost ii 1



i 2
1 2



V 1
v 1



iv 1
iv 1



iv 3
v 1
v 1
v 2
v 2
v 2
v 2



1 IMIl .l,^'M I ,LI i pL.lV HUttllL ilt 1119 l.Ll''.-> . . . . , JJ.

Where is the bush That we must stand and play the murderer in?

And be from forage will incline to play

All hid, all bid ; an old infant play

And N us tur play nt push-pin with tho boy a

I will play three myself. Thrice-worthy gentleman !

I 'II make one in a danco, or so ; or I will play On tho tabor .

Tim music plays ; vouchsafe ome motion to it. Our oars vouchsafe it

Swtinl., adieu : Mince you can rng, I 'II play no moio with you .

When he plays at tallies, chide* the dlro In hunouiablo terms

Unless you play the honest Troyaii, the poor wench Is cast away .

For your fair sakes have wo neglected time, Play'd foul play with our

oaths ............. v 2

Our wooing doth not end liko an old play ; Jack hath not Jill . . v 2
A twelvemonth and a day, Ami then 'twill end. That's too lung for a play v 2
Hero is tho scroll of every man's name, which is thought lit, through

nil Athens, to play in our interlude . . . Af. N. Dream i 2

Say what tho play treats on, then read the names of the actor's : "

Marry, our play is, The most lamentable comedy .
I ruiild play Ercles rarely, or a part to tear a cat in, to ma
Lot not me play a woman ; I havo a beard coming
You shall play it in a nr ^ ~- ' "~
Let me play Thisby too



ake all split



g

You shall play it in a mask, and you may speak as small as you will
y too, I '11 speak in a monstrous little voice .



e me pay sy oo, spea n a monsrous e voce .
No ; you must'play Pyramus : and, Flute, you Thisby . . .
llobiu Starveling, you must play Thisby's mother
1 hope, here is a play litted



,

List mo play the lion too : I will roar
You can play no purl but Pynunus
What board were I boat to play it in ? Why, what you will .
And then you will play barefaced
I will draw a bill of properties, such as our play wants .



I will sing it in tbe latter end of a play

If he come not, then the play is marred : it goes not forward, doth it? .

For the short and the long is, our play is preferred

Let not him that plays tbe lion iktro his nails

Is there no play, To easo tbe anguish of a torturing hour?
A play there is, my lord, some teu words long, Which is as brief as I
have known a play ..........

For in all tho play There is not ono word apt. one player Titled
What are they that do play it? Hard-handed men that work in Athens
Aii'l now have toil'd their unbioathed memories With this same play .
1 will hear that play ; For never anything can bo amiss, When simple-
ness and duty tender it .........

Here she comes ; and her passion ends the play

No epilogue, I pray you ; for your play needs no excuse. Never excuse
This palpable-gross play hath well beguiled The heavy gait of night
A stage where every man must play a iart, And mine a sad one. Let

me piny tho fool . . Mer. of Venice i 1

If Hercules and Lichas play at dice Which is the better man . . . ii 1
If a Christian did not play the knave and get thee, I am much deceived ii 3
When you shall please to play the thieves for wives, I '11 watch as long ii
Come at once ; For tbe close night doth play the runaway . . . ii U

In her hairs The paintor plays the spider iii 'j

Wo '11 play with them tho Jlrst boy for u thousand ducats . . .iii 2



i 2
i 2
i 2

i 2

i 2

i 2

i 2

i 2
i 2
i 2
i 2
i 2
iii 1
iii 1
iii 1
iii 2
iv 1
iv 2
iv 2
iv 2
v 1

V 1

V 1

V 1

V 1

V 1

V 1

V 1

V 1



216



Ma: of Venice iii 5 48



139
142
'57

3 1 4
63

14

68
i8.f



18
69

9 2
96

37
55
132
136
139
25-1
328

185



Ind. 2

lud. 2

Ind. 2

Ind. 2

Iml. 2

i 1

ii 1

iii 1

iii 2



i

ii 4

ii 5

ii f>

Iii 1

Ill |

Ill !

v 1



Play. How every fool can play upon the word 1

If two gods should play some heavenly match ......

This wide and universal theatre Presents more woeful pageants than tho

scene Wherein wo play in ...... AS Y. like U ii 7

And ouu man in his timo plays many parts, His nets being boven ages . ii 7
And so he plays his part .......... ji 7

And under that habit play the knave with him ..... iii ^

And you shall say I '11 prove a busy actor in their play . . . . iii 4

Patience herself would startle at this letter And play the awaggerer . iv 3
What, to make thee an instrument and play false strains 111*011 thee 1 . iv 3
And fall into our rustic revelry. Play, music ! ..... \ \

A good play needs no opiloguu ......... Kpil.

(lood plays provo tho better by the holp ol'K'i epilogues . . . JCjiil.
Nor cannot insinuate with you in the boliull of a good play . . . Kpil.
I charge you, O women, fur the love you bear to men, to liko as much

of this play as please you ......... Epil.

I charge you, Omen, for the love you bear to women, . . . that between

you and the women the play may pk-ase ...... Epil.

My lord, I warrant you we will play our part , . . T. of Shrew Iml. 1
There is a lord will hear you play to-night ..... Iml. 1

For yet his honour never heard a play ...... Iml. I

Apollo plays And twenty caged nightingales do sing . . .
Even as the waving sedges play with wind .....

Hearing your amendment, Are come to play a pleasant comedy .
They thought it good you bear a play And frame your mind to mirth
Lot them play it. la not a comonty a Christmas gambold ? . .
Sly lord, you nod ; you do not mind tho play ......

Now I play a merchant's part, Ajid venture madly on a desperate mart
Take you your instrument, play you tho whiles .....

Hark, hark I I hear the minstrels play .......

While I play the good husband at homo, my sou and my servant spend

all at the university .......... v 1

And death should have play for lack of work .... All's Wdl i 1

I phiy the noble huusewite with the timo, To entertain 't so merrily . ii 2
Thru go thou forth ; And fortune play upon thy prosperous holm 1 . iii 3
.So lust doth play With what it loathes lor that which is away . . iv 4
The king's a beggar, now the play is done ...... Epil.

If music bo the food of love, play on ...... T. Niyht i 1

He plays o' the viol-de-gamboys, and speaks three or four languages . i 3
Ami yet, by the very fangs of malice I swear, I am not that I play .
Seek him out, and play the tune the while ......

And perchance wind up my watch, or play with my some rich jewel .
Shall I play my freedom at tray-trip, and boeonm thy boiid-slavu? .
I WOtlld play l.uid Tiuidai'iiM of riii'VKla .......

n,'. Mlmv IN Wlmi < i,.,n ( I, to I'lay lliu fnol ......

What, malt I 'tlH not fur gravity U play ul cherry-pll with NiiU.n . .
I'rlino, wrcundo, loitlo, Is u gootl play .......

That's all one, our play is done, And we'll strive to pleaso you every

day . .......... y 1

Go, play, boy, play : thy mother plnys, ami I I'lay too . . II'. Talc i 2
I llcni.iin <i pincb'd thing ; yea, a very trick For thi-m to play at will . ii 1
Like a bank for love to lie and play on ....... iv 4

Wethinks I play as I have seen them do In Whitsun pastorals . . iv 4
lly care To have you royally appointed as if The scene you play were

mine ............. iv 4

I see tho play so lies That I must bear a purt ...... iv 4

I ('she did play false, the fault was hers

What tho devil art thou ? Ono that will play tho devil, sir, will


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 126 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531

Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 126 of 531)