John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 210 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 210 of 531)
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Deliver what you will ; I'll say 'tis so v 2 26

What slmll I say you are? 2 Hen. IV. i 1 2



SAY



1327



SAY



Say. This them would st say, ' Your son did thus and thus ; Your brother

thus' 2 Hen. II'. i 1 76

Yet, for all thin, say not that Percy's dead i 1 93

If he be slain, say so ; The tongue offends not that reports his deatli . i 1 96
He doth sin that doth belie the dead, Not he which says the dead is not

alive i 1 99

Yr't did you say ' Go forth ' i 1 175

You giant, what says the doctor to my water? i 2 i

Ho will not stick to say his face is a face-royal i 2 26

Why, sir, did I say you were an honest man? | 2 92

You lie in your throat, if you say I am any other than an honest man . i 2 98
You hoar not what I say to you. Very well, my lord . . . i 2 136

All tallow : if I did say of wax, my growth would approve the truth . i 2 180
If ye will needs say I am an old man, you should give me rest . i 2 242

Mhe says up and down the town that her eldest son is like you . . ii 1 114
If a man will make courtesy and say nothing, ho ia virtuous . . . ii 1 136
The midwives say the children are not in the fault . . . . . ii 2 28
The worst that they can say of me is tli.it I am a second brother . . ii 2 71
Never prick their linger but they say, 'There's some of tho king's blood ' ii 2 122
' How comes that?' says lie, that takes upon him not to conceive . ii 2 123
It perfumes tho blood ere one cn.ii Kay ' What's this?' . . . . H 4 31
'Neighbour Quickly,' Bays ho, 'receive those that aw civil* . . . ii 4 96

1 llecoivo,' Hiiys 1m, 'no RWBggorlng companioim' ii 4 101

I am Uin worsn, when nun says swnggor . . . . . . . ii 4 113

What says the almanac to that? ii 4 287

What says your grace? His gmco says that which his flesh rebels against ii 4 378
I may say to you, wo knew where tho boim-rolias worn . . . . iii 2 25
Hho would always say she could not abide Master Shallow . . . iii 2 214
' Rah, tali, tab,' would a' say ; ' bounce ' would a' say . . . . iii 2 304
You shall say indeed, it is the time, And not tho king . . . . iv 1 105

Say you not then our offer is compell'd iv 1 158

Since sudden sorrow Serves to say thus, 'some good thing cornea to-
morrow ' ' . iv 2 84

That I may justly say, with the book-nosed fellow of Rome . . . iv 3 44
The old folk, time's doting chronicles, Say it did so a little time before iv 4 127
No prince nor poor shall Imvo just oauso to flay, God shorten Harry's

Imppy llfn ono day I v 2 141

Why then, aiy an oM man can do somewhat v 8 82

' Where is tho' life that late I led?' say they : Why, bore it is . v 8 147

What I have to say is of mine own making ; and what indeed I should

say will, I doubt, prove mine own marring Epil. 5

You would say it hath been all in all his study . . . Hen. V. i 1 42
Our master Says that you savour too much of your youth . . i 2 250

I say little ; but when time shall serve, there shall be smiles . . ii 1 5

Hear me, hear me what I say ii 1 67

They say he cried out of sack. Ay, that a' did ii 3 29

I say 'tis meet we all go forth To view the sick and feeble parts of France ii 4 21
He scorns to say his prayers, lest a' should be thought a coward . . iii 2 40
Our madams mock at us, and plainly say Our mettle is bred out . jjj & 2 ^
Say to England that we send To know what willing ransom he will give iii 6 62
Thus says my king : Say thou to Harry of England . . . . iii 125
To say the sooth, . . . My people are with sickness much enfeebled . iii 151
Wo would not seek a battle, as wo aro ; Nor, as wo are, wo say wo will

not shun It : So toll your masler iii 174

I will not say so, for fear I should bo faced out of my way . . . iii 7 89
Von may as well say, that's a valiant flea that dare oat his breakfast on

the lip of a lion iii 7 155

This lodging likes me better, Since I may say ' Now Ho I like a king 1 . iv 1 17
I myself heard the king say he would not be ransomed . . . . iv 1 202

If ever thou come to me and say, after to-morrow iv 1 230

What's to say? A very little little let us do, And all is done . . iv 2 32
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian :' Then will he strip his sleeve

and show bis scars, And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day ' iv 3 46
He says his name is Master Fer. Master Per 1 I'll fer him, and flrk him iv 4 28
With a feeble gripe, says ' Dear my lord, Commend my service' . . iv 6 22

Your majesty says very true . iv 7 101

Thou Hlinlt die. You say very true, Rcauld knave, when God's will in v 1 33
I know no ways lo mince it in love, but directly to say ' I lovo yon :'
then !f you urge me farther than to say 'do you in faith?' 1 wwir

out my suit v 2 130

Take mo ; if not, to say to tlico that I shall die, is true . . . . v 2 158
Take me by the hand, and say ' Harry of England, I am thine' . . v 2 255
It is not a fashion for the maids in France to kiss before they are married,

would she say ? v 2 29 1

No, I say, distrustful recreants ! Fight till the last gasp . 1 Hen, VI. i 2 126

What she says I '1! confirm : we'll fight it out i 2 128

A maid, they say. A maid 1 and be so martial 1 ii 1 21

Then say at once if I maintain'd tho truth ii 4 5

And say withal I think he held the right ii 4 38

He bears him on the place's privilege, Or durst not, for bis craven heart,

say thus ii 4 87

Look to it well and say you are well warn'd .... . ii 4 103

Why didst thou say, of late thou wert despised? ii 5 42

If you love me, as you say you do, Let me persuade you to forbear awhile iii 1 104

When Gloucester says the word, King Henry goes iii 1 184

Say, gentlemen, what makes you thus exclaim? iv 1 83

Tho world will say, ho is not Talbot's blood iv 5 16

If I bow, they'll say it was for fear iv 6 29

Who art thou? say,' that I may honour then v 3 50

My band would mm b.-r, but my heart nays no . . ... . v 3 Gi

|,;!dy, vouchsafe I') liflttm what I say v It 103

Such commendations an becomes a iuaid, A virgin and his servant, say

to him v 3 178

Say, when I am gone, I prophesied France will bo lost ere long 2 Jfen. VI. i 1 145

They say ' A crafty knave does nred no broker* 12 100

Say, man, were these thy words? 13 189

What shall we say to this in law? i 3 207

Sometime I'll say, I am Duke Humphrey's wife ii 4 42

I will subscribe and say I wrong'd the duke . .. iii 1 38

It serves you well, my lord, to say so much. I say no more than truth iii 1 119

Say as you think, and speak it from your souls iii 1 247

Say but the word, and I will be his priest . . . . . . . . iii 1 272

Say you consent and censure well thn deed iii 1 275

Say ho be taken, rack'd and tortured, I know no pain they can inflict

upon him Will nmko him Hav I moved him to thoHO arum . . til 1 376

Hay tliatlio thrive M'fcls groat Hkolio will ill 1 379

Hay wo Inland In try JI|M unicn In-day, If 1m bo utility, HH 'tin publlnhrd ill 2 if>
Well forewarning wind Mid seem to say ' Het-k not a scorpion's nest' . HI 2 86
Say. if thou darcat, proud Lord of Warwickshire, That I am faulty . iii 2 201
Madam, be still ; with reverence may I say iii 2 207



lay. And say it was thy mother that thou meant'st . 2 lien. VI. iii 2 222
I say it was never merry world in England since gentlemen came Tip . iv 2 9

iv 2 89
iv 2 149



Some say the bee stings : but I say, 'tis the bee's wax
liat's false. Ay, there's the question ; but I say, 'tis true .



Tl



And furthermore, we'll have the Lord Say's head for selling the duke

dom of Maine

I tell you that I,ord Say hath gelded tho commonwealth, and made itni

eunuch ...

I/ord Say, Jack Cade hath sworn to have thy head ....

Here's the Lord Say, which sold the towns in Franco ....

Ah, thou say, thou sergo, nay, thou buckram lord !

You men of Kent, What say you of Kent? Nothing but this ,

Go, take him away, I say, and strike off his head presently .

Wliat say ye, countrymen ? will ye relent, And yield to mercy? .

His sons, ho says, shall give their words for him .

What Rays Ixml Warwick? Khali wo after them? v a

My foes will shed fust-falling tears, And say ' Alas 1 ' .8 Htn. VI, 1 4

Say how ho died, for I will hear it all ii 1

For chair and dukedom, throne and kingdom sny ; Either that is thine,

or else thou wert not his

If for the last, say ay, and to it, lords

And long horOftfter say unto his child .......

II' that Im right which' Warwick Rays Is right, Thorn Is no wrong .

lie nor noes nor hoars us what wo nny

Let mo embrace thoo, sour adversity, For wiso men say it is tho wisest

course

She weops, and says her Henry is deposed; Ho smiles, and says his

Edward is install'd . . . iii 1 45

Say, what art thou that talk'st of kings and queens ? . . . iii 1 55

Ay, if thou wilt say ' ay ' to my request ; No, if thou dost say 'no' . iii 2 79

Say that King Edward take thee for his queen? iii 2 89

Well, say there is no kingdom then for Richard ; What other pleasure? iii 2 146
Why, say, fair queen, whence springs this deep despair? . . . iii 8 12
Often heard him say and swear That this his love was an eternal plant, iii 3 123
I hoar, yet say not much, but think the more iv 1 83



iv 2 170

iv 2 174
iv 4 19
iv 7 23
iv 7 27
iv 7 60
iv 7 116
iv 8 ii
v 1 137
v 8 27
163
49

ii 1 93

ii 1 165

ii 2 36

II 2 131

ii & 63

iii 1 25



iv 1
iv 1

iv 2
iv 7



101

34

3

7

13
22
29
73
67

70
39
56



I blame not. line, she could say llttlo less

I *:iy nut, slaughter him, l''nr I Intend but only to surprise him

And says that onco morn I shall interchange My waned state

Say, Somcrvillo, what sayn my loving son? v 1

Say Wai wick was our anchor ; what of that? v 4

Keep our course, though tho rough wind say no v 4

Say you can swim ; alas, 'tis but a while I v 4

What I should say My tears gainsay v 4

Down, down to hell ; and say I sent thee thither V 6

I have often heard my mother say I came into the world with my legs

forward v 6

Which says that G Of Edward's heirs the murderer shall be Richard III. i 1
And says a wizard told him that by G His issue disinherited should be i 1
You may partake of any thing we say : We speak no treason, man : wo

say the king Is wise and virtuous

Say that I slew them not? Why, then they aie not dead
Say, then, my pcaco is made. That Khali you know hereafter

To yOUT good prayers will scarcely Ray nninn

What doth Rim say, my Ixml of Buckingham ? Nolhlng that I respond
Hemombor this anotherihiy, . . . And saypoorMargarotwuHaprophotoBs!
Then he will say 'twas done cowardly, when lie wakos ....

Why, then ho will say we stabbed him sleeping

Take thou the fee, and tell him what I say . .

I say with noble Buckingham, That it is meet so few should fetch the

prince H 2 138

But say, my lord, it were not register'd, Methinks the truth should live iii 1 75

So wise so young, they say, do never live long iii 1 79

Therefore is he idle? O, my fair cousin, I must not say so . . iii 1 106

In weightier things you'll say a beggar nay iii 1 119

So it should seem by that I have to say iii 2 7

Besides, he says there are two councils held iii 2



Bn



i 1

i 2
I 2

1 8 21

i 8 795

I 8 301

t 4 103

I 4 107

i 4 284



,
I'll tell him what you say ........ iii 2 34; iii 7

Yi*t who's so blind, but says he ROOS it not? Bad is tho world .



How now, my lord, what K\y the citizens?

If you plead us well for thmn As I can say nay to thoo for myself .

Marry, G"d forbid his grace should say us nay !

You say that Edward is your brother's son : So say wo too .

We see it, and will say it. In saying so, you shall but say the truth

And die, ere men can say, God save the queen 1 ....

Say, have I thy consent that they shall die? Give me some breath

Say it is done, 'And I will love thoo, and prefer thee too .

What says your highness to my just demand?

Dear God, I pray, That I may live to say, The dog is dead I



iii

. iii 7

. fii 7

. iii 7

. iii 7

. iii ^



70
12



'77
237
63
23



Much less spirit to curse Abides in me ; I say amen to all
lie is of royal blood. To save her life, I'll sny she is not so .



SI



iv 2

iv 2

iv 2 97

iv 4 78

iv 4 197

4 212



A handkerchief ; which, say to her, did drain The purple sap from her

sweet brother's body iv 4 276

Say that I did all this for love of her iv 4 288

What were I best to say ? her father's brother Would be her lord ? or

shall I say, her uncle? iv 4 338

What shall I say more than I have inforr'd? v 8 314

What says Lord Stanley? will he bring his power? v 8 342

Trace lives again : That she nmy long live here, God say union I . . v 5 41
I'll say A man mny weep upon bis wedding-day . . Hen. VIII. Frol. 31

M>'U might sny, Till fbi* Umn pomp wns nlnglo I 1 14

Suy not ' treasonous.' To the king 1 '!! way 't I 1 150

I say, tako hoed ; Yes, heartily beseech you I 2 175

There's mischief in this man : caust thou wiy further? 1 2 187

What say they? Such a one, they all confess, There is indeed . i 4 82



Hear what I say, and then go homo ami loso mo ii 1 57

I had my trial, And, must needs say, a noblo one "

And when you would say something that is sad, Speak how I fell .

They will not stick to say you envied him

Eminence, wealth, sovereignty ; Which, to say sooth, are blessings

I'll to the king, And say I spoke with you

Say, Are you not stronger than you were?

To nnthink your ppr-aking And to flay HO no tnoro

That's to say, I meant to rectify my conscience

I have spoke long : be pleased yourself to say How far you Bfttlsfled mo
Wuld tlmy Kpnnk with ino? Tlioy wljl'tl mo my no
Hut Hay. I wiun'd yu ; Tnkn herd, for h'



09



Hut nay. I win nil yo; Tiikn ] HUM I. for Hmvnii'N tmico
"|'|H woll mild nuiiln ; And 'tin n kind of good deed to wiy well ,

And, If you may confess It, n;iy withal, If ynn arn bound to UH or no
8ay, I taught theo, Say, Wolsry, that onco trot! tho wayu of glory .
AH tho rest aro countesses. Tholr coronets say so .



ii 1 1 19

ii 1 135

ii 2 127

ii 3 30

ii 3 80

II 8
ii .1

ii 4 202

il 4 210

lil 1 18

III 1 inn

III 2 !fis
ill 2 434

IV 1 54



SAY



1328



SAY



Say. No man living Could say 'This Is my wifo' thovo . Hen. VJTT. Iv 1 80
lln would nay untruths ; and bo over iloublo Until in hi* words ami

moaning iv 2 38

Say his lung I rouble nmv in pfUtfllllfl Onl.nl this world . iv 2 16-

Alliilrri, UiuL wulk, A* I liny nay HiilHU <l<i, ul midnight . v I i ,

And yot my nniHrknici) HiiyH Him H ugood rrmlurn . . v 1 -j.\

M:uiy grievous, 1 do say, my lunl, Grievous complolllU of you . . v 1 98

N tho queen deliver'd? Suy, uy ; and of a boy v 1 163

I could say more, But reverence to your calling makes mo modest . v 3 68
I cry your honour mercy ; you may, worst Of all this table, say so . v 3 79

Stay, good my lords, I have a littlo yet to say v 3 98

I will say thus mucli for him, if a prince May be beholding to a subject v 3 156
The common voice, I sec, is veritird Of thee, which says thus . . v 3 177

So, 'tis clear. They'll say 'tis naught Epil. 5

If they smilo, And say 'twill do, . . . All tho best mwi are. ours . . Epil. 12
This thou loll'sl mo, . . . when I say I lovo her . . Ti'oi. and Crcs, i 1 61
Say I Him Is not fair? I do not earn wholhor you do or no . . . i 1 81
They nay ho Is n very man pur HO, Ami sUnds alono . . . I 'J 15

Was he ungryV Mo he wiy.s la- re. True, ho WUH so 1 '2 56

1 say Troll u H i* TrollUH. Thon yon wiy MH I uy i 2 70

To Hay IrnLli i - 104; ttom. andJul. i ft 69

At ft thousand wtilemw. May uno of your watches . . Troi, and CI-M. i 2 ayo
And lint.-..- boils did rim ? say so : did not tho general run then? . . ii 1 5
I'll tell you what I say of him. What? I say, this . . . . ii 1 81
Thus once again says Nestor from the Greeks : ' Deliver Helen ' . ii 2 2

I have said my prayers and devil Envy say Amen ii 8 23

If she that lays thee out says thon art a fair corse . . . . ii 3 35

I shall say so to him ii 3 90

Yon shall not sin, If you do say we think him over-proud . . . ii 3 132

Will you subscribe his thought, and say he is? US 157

Jupiter forbid, And say in thunder, ' Achilles go to him ' . . . ii 3 209

Well said, my lord ! well, you say so in tits iii 1 61

They say all lovers swear more performance than they are able . . iii 2 91
What envy can say worst shall be a mock for his truth . . . . iii 2 104
Let them say, to stick the heart of falsehood, ' As false as Cressid ' . iii 2 202
To do what? let her say what : what have I brought you to do? . . iv 2 28
Is he hen>, say you? 'tis more than I know, I'll be sworn . . . iv 2 53
Hut 'bo thon true,' say I, to fashion in My sequent protestation . . iv 4 67
But that yon say, ' bo't so,' I'll spi\ik it iu my spirit and honour, 'no' iv 4 156
Kate, hear mo what I say I I reck not llmugh I end my lilo to-duy . v ii 25
CIHIIO Imrn ulmnt mo, you my Myrmidons ; Murk what I say . . . v 7 -2
Let him that will a m-.rooch-owl uyis bn call'd, Go In to Troy, and say

there, Her tor's dead . . . . . . . . , . v 10 17

Hector is dead ; there is no more to say v 10 22

I say unto you . . . ; soft-conscienced men can be content to say it was

for his country Coriotanus i I 36

You must in no way say he is covetous i 1 44

Whereof, they say, The city is well stored. Hang 'em ! They say ! . i 1 194

Shall say against their hearts ' We thank the gods' i 3

I can't say your worships have delivered the matter well . . . ii 1 62
I must be content to bear with those that say you are reverend grave men ii 1 66
I had rather have my wounds to heal again Than hear say how I got them ii 2 74
What must I say? ' I pray, sir, 1 Plague upon 't I I cannot . . . ii 3 55
Not one amongst us, save yourself, but says He used us scornfully . ii 3 170
With his hat, thus waving it in scorn, ' I would be consul,' says he . ii 3 176

Say, you chose him More after our commandment ii 3 237

Say wo read lectures to you, How youngly ho began to serve his country ii y 243
Wants not spirit To .say lie 'II turn your current in a ditch . . . iil 1 96
False to my nature? liather say I play The man 1 am . . . . iii '.i 15
Say to them, Thou art their soldier, and being bred in broils Hast not

tho soft way iii 2 80

He must, and will. Prithee now, say you will, and go about it . . iii 2 98

When they hoar me say ' It shall be so ' iii 3 13

Then lot them, If I say fine, cry *Fine;' if death, cry 'Death' . . iii 3 16

First, hear me speak. Well, say. Peace, ho ! iii 3 41

I am content. Lo, citizens, he says he is content iii 3 48

Answer to us. Say, then: 'tis true, I ought so iii 3 62

I would say 'Thou liest' unto thee with a voice as free As I do pray

the gods iii 3 72

I' the people's name, I say it shall bo so. It shall be so . . . , iii 3 105
Yon wens used To say extremity was the trier of spirits . . . . iv 1 4
When yon were wont to say, If you had been tho wife of Hercules . iv 1 16
Say their groat onemy is gono, and thoy Stand in thoir unciont strength iv 2 6

They Kay shu's mad iv 2 <j

I would I had tho powor To say so to my husband iv '2 16

Have you an army ready, say you? A most royal one . . . . iv 3 46
If Jupiter Should from yond cloud speak divine things, And say "Tis

true,' I'ld not believe them more Than thee iv 5 m

Let me commend thee tlrst to those that shall Say yea to thy desires . iv 5 151

Faith, look you, one cannot tell how to say that iv 5 178

Why do you say 'thwack our general'? I do not say 'thwack our

general* iv 6 190

lio MT.S oier too hard for him ; I have heard him say so himself . . iv 5 196

I .. say tho troth iv ft 198

I In'll go, ho nays, and so-.vl the porter of Home galon by tlio oars . . iv G an
I .t;t me have war, .say I ; it exceeds pcucu as far u.s day does night . . iv 236
For his best friends, it thoy Should say. ' Bo good to Homo,' they charged

him even As those should do that had deserved his hate . . . iv 112

I have not the face To say ' Beseech you, cease ' iv 6 1 1 7

Say not we brought it, How 1 Was it we ? iv 6 120

Very well : Could ho say less? v 1 22

Say that Marcius Return me, as Cominius is return'd, Unheard ; what

then? v 1 41

I am one that, telling true under him, must say, you cannot pass . . v 2 34

I 'II say an errand for you v 2 65

I say to you, as I was said to, Away 1 v 2 114

Forgive my tyranny ; but do not say For that, ' Forgive our Romans ' . v 3 43

Say my request's unjust, And spurn me back v 3 164

His mother, may prevail with him. But I say there is no hope in 't . v 4 7
Ere he express himself, or move the people With what he would say . v ti 56
Given up . . . your city Rome, I say 'your city,' to his wife and mother v 94
I say no more, Nor wish no less ; and so, 1 Uko my leave . T. Andron. i I 40

Had I tho powor that sonm say Plan hail ii 3 6

O, be to me, though thy hard heart aay no, Nothing so kind, but some-
thing pitiful ! Ii 3 155

Shall I speak for thee? shall I say 'tis so? O that I know thy heart I . ii 4 3 )

O, say thou for her, who hath done this deed? iii 1 87

Had she a tongue to speak, now would she say That to her brother

which I said to theo iii 1 144

I 'II deceive you in another sort, And that you '11 say, ere half an hour i>ass iii 1 192



Say. Say I account of them As jewels purchased at nn easy price T. An.W 1 198



Hark, Marcus, what sho says ; I can interpret all her marly r'd sign-
MM' says -In- drinks no other drink but tears .



,ay full oft, Kxtrnmlfcy of grii Is



iii a

iii '2



''or I havo heard my grandsin

niako men mad iv I

So ho bndii mo miy ; And BO I do . . . . . , . Iv 2 i j

Hnro lacks but your mother fur to say amen . . . . . . iv 1 2 44

But say, again, how many saw the child? iv 2 140

What says Jupiter? O, the gibbet-maker I he says chat he hath taken

them down again . . . . . . . . . . . iv 3 79

But what says Jupiter, I ask theo? Alas, sir, I know not Jnpitrr . iv 3 83

I could never say grace in all my life ... . . iv 3 100

Myself hath often over-heard them say . . . . . . . iv 4 74

And as he saith, so say we all with him v 1 17

I say thy child shall live. Swear that he shall v 1 69

What, canst thou say nil this, and never blush? . . . . v 1 121

1 1 1 you say wo shall, Lo, hand in hand, Lucius and I will fall , . . v 3 135

ts tho law of our sido, if 1 say ay? Hum. and Jvl, \ 1 55

I In, his own nflTactioiiB 1 coaiiHollor, Is to himself I will not say how trno i ] 154
What say you to my suit? But saying oVr what 1 have said belorn . 1 2 C>
Ti thorn wiy, My houso niid wolcoino on tholr ploanuro stay , . . i 2 ^6

YD say honestly: rest you merry 1 i 2 65

I cannot choose but laugh, To think it should leave crying and say 'Ay' i 3 51

Stint thou too, I pi-ay theo, nurse, say I i 3 58

I would say thou hadst suck'd wisdom from thy teat . . i 3 68

What say you? can you lovo the gentleman? i 3 79

I say, he shall : go to ; Am I the master here, or you ? go to . . . i 5 79
She speaks, yet she says nothing : what of that? Her eye discourses . ii 2 12
Dost thou love me? I know thou wilt say 'Ay,' And I will take thy wurd ii 2 90

At lovers' perjuries, They aay, Jove laughs ii 2 93

I'll frown and be perverse and say thee nay, So thou wilt woo . . ii 2 96
Too like the lightning, which doth cease to be Ere one can say ' It

lightens 1 ii 2 120

What she bade me say, I will keep to myself ii 4 174

Truly, sir ; not a penny. Go to ; I say you shall ii 4 196

Did you ne'er hear say, Two may keep counsel, putting one away? . ii 4 208
I '11 wan-ant yon, when I say so, she looks as pale as any clout . . ii 4 218
How art thou out of breath, when thou hast breath To say to me that

thou art out of breath? ii r

Ts thy nous good, or bad? answer to that ; Say either . . . . ii fi
All this did 1 know bcfuni. What my*i ho of our nmniagn? . . ii !i

Your lovo ways, like an hours t gnntlomun, Whunt IH your mot hut 1 ?. . ii fi
Claps mo his sword upon the la bio and says 'God send me no need of

theo!' iii 1

Say thou but ' I,' And that bare vowel ' I ' shall poison more . . . iii 2
If lie be slain, say ' I ' ; or if not, no: Brief sounds determine of my weal

or woe iii 'j

Ha, banishment! be merciful, say 'death' iii 3

What says My conceal 'd lady to our cancell'd love? O, she says nothing iii 3 97
What say you to Thursday ? My lord, I would that Thursday were to-
morrow iii 4 28

I '11 say yon grey is not the morning's eye iii 5 19

Vuu say you do not know the lady's mind iv 1 4

I cry you mercy ; you are the singer : I will say for you . . . . iv 5 142
What says Homeo? Or, ii' his mind be writ, give me his letter . . v 2 3
Ho gone ; live, and hereafter say, A madman's mercy bade thee run away 8 66
Then say at once what thou dost know in this ...... ^ 21:8


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 210 of 531)