John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 221 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 221 of 531)
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See, brother, see ; note how she quotes the leaves iv 1 50

And sea their blood, or die with this reproach . . . . . . iv 1 94

To see so great a lord Basely insinuate and send us gifts . . . iv 2 37

O, tell me, did yon seo Aaron the Moor? iv 2 52

Hark je, lords ; ye see I have given her physic iv 2 162

This done, seo that you take no longer days iv 2 165

I seo thou wilt not ti List tho air With secrets iv 2 169

Let me see your archery ; Look ye draw home enough . . . . iv 3 2
Is not this a heavy case, To see thy noble uncle thus distract? . . iv 8 26

I'll be at hand, sir; see you do it bravely iv 3 113

Sirrah, hast thou a knife? come, let me see it iv 3 115

First hang the child, that he may see it sprawl v 1 51

Thy child shall livo, and I will see it nourish'd v 1 60

What I moan to do Sue horo in bloody linos I have net down . . . v 2 14
I'll play tho conk, And MOO them ready 'gainst their mother cumcs . v 2 206
And see tin: ambush of our friends bo strong . . . . . . v 8 9

Some stay to see him fas ten 'd in the earth v 8 183

See justice done on Aaron, that dainn'd Moor v 3 201

From the city's side, So early walking did I see your son Rum. and Jul. i 1 130
Alas, that love, whose view is muflled still, Should, without eyes, see

pathways to his will 1 i 1 178

Hear all, all see, And like her most whoso merit most shall bo . .12 30
But, I pray, can you read any thing you see? Ay, if I know the letters i '2 63



iii 1

iii 2

iii 2

iii 3



63
61

55
i-j6
167



iii D 199



See. Pretty fool, To see it tetchy and lull out with the dug!

Ham* n nd Jul. i 3 32

To si-o, now, how a jest shall come about 1 4845

An 1 might livo to nee llieu married once, I have, my wish . , . i U 61
K Mimnm uvi-ry married lineament And sro how I.IIM unulhrr lends n-nlrnl i 8 64
O, Hum, 1 HCO '.jin i'U Mali halli boon with )ou. Kho is tho lairios' mid-
wife 14

See, how she leans her cheek upon hor hand 1 O, that 1 were a glove I . ii 2

If they do see thee, they will murder thee ii 2

I dare draw as soon as another man, if I see occasion in a good quarrel . ii 4 168
She, good soul, had as lief see a toad, a very toad, as see him . . . ii 4 215
Can you not stay awhile? l>u you not sro that 1 am out ol breath? . ii 5 30
Villain am I none ; Therefore farewell ; I soo thou kno\\'st mo not . iii 1 68
Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties
Honest gentleman ! That ever I should live to see thee dead !

O, then I see that madmen have no ears

Methinks 1 see thee, now thou art below, As one dead in tho bottom of

u tomb . . . . . . . . . , . . . iii f

Tell him so youi'sull, And Hoe how he will take it tit your hands . . ill fi
This only child ; But now 1 seo this one in ono too much . . .iii fj
In there no pity silting in the clouds, That sens into the butlum of my

grief?

O, look 1 mothinks I seo my cousin's ghust Seeking out Itomeo . . iv 3 55
She's dead, she's dead ! Ha ! let me see her : out, alas ! she's cold . iv 5 25
Have I thought long to see this morning's face? . . . . . iv 5 41

Let's seo for means . v 1 35

Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor: Hold, there iti forty ducats v 1 58
Karly in the morning See thou deliver it to my lord and lather . . v 3 24

Poison, I see, hath boon his timeless end v 3 162

We seo the ground whereon these woes do lie v 3 179

Thou art early up, To seo thy son and heir more early down . . . v 3 209
What fmthi'r woe conspires against mine age? Look, and thou shalttsce v 3 213
fSoo, what a scourge is laid upon your hato . . . . . v II 292

I have a jewel here O, pray, let's see't . . . T. vf Athens i 1 13

Let's see your piece. 'Tis a good piece. So 'tis i 1 28

You see this confluence, this great flood of visitors i 1 42

To see meat till knaves and wine heat fools i 1 271

you gods, what a number of men eat Timon, and he sees 'em not ! i 2 40
It grieves me to see so many dip their meat in one man's blood . . i 2 41

You see, my lord, how ample you're beloved i 2 136

Heo them well entortain'd ii 2 45

Would wn could .see you at Corinth ! ii 'J 72

Now 1 seo thou ait a foul, and lit lor thy master iii 1 52

See, by good hap, yonder 'H my lord ; 1 have sweat to see his honour . iii 2 ?8
O, see the monstrousness of man When he looks out in an ungrateful

shape ! iii 2 79

1 see no sense for't, But his occasions might have woo'd me first . . iii 3 14

Push! did you seo my cap? I have lost my gown iii 119

Yet do our hearts wear Timon's livery ; That see I by our faces . . iv 2 18
Tlum saw'st them, when I had prosperity. 1 seo them now . . . v 3 78
I '11 visit thee again. If 1 hope well, I '11 never seo thee more . . v 3 171
When I know not what else to do, I '11 see thee again . . . . v 3 359
Choler does kill me that thou art alive ; I swound to see thee . . v 3 373

Let us first seo peace in Athens v 3 461

Ne'er see thon man, and let me ne'er see thee v 3 543

You shall see him a palm in Athens again, and flourish with the highest v 1 12

Havo I once lived to sen two honest men? v 1

Liit it [ingratitude] go naked, men may ace 'I tho better . . . . v 1
Yon hear him cog, see him dissemble, Know his gross palchory . v ]

We make holiday, to see Caesar and to rejoice in his triumph . J. Cttxntr i 1



59
7 ,,
yS
35
47
66



To see great Pompey pass tho streets of Rome i 1

See, whether their basest metal be not moved i 1

Set him before me ; let me see his face. Fellow, come from the throng i 2

Will you go see the order of the course? Not I. I pray you, do . . i 2 25
Tell me, good Brutus, can you see your face? No, Cassius ; for the eye

sees not itself, But by reflection . . . . . . . .1251

Turn Your hidden worthiness into your eye, That you might seo your

shadow i 2 58

And since you know you cannot seo yourself So well as by reflection, I,

your glass, Will modestly discover to yourself i 2 67

I see, Thy honourable mo till may bo wrought 1'Yom that it is disposed . i 2 312

Cast yourself in wonder, To soo tho strange impatience of tho hia.vnns . i 3 61
I know he would not bo a wull, But that ho sees tho Humans aro but

slump i 3 105

Come, Qiscn, you and 1 will yet ero day >Sno IJruliis at his houso . . 1 !l 15.)

Brutus, thou sleep'bt: awake, and soo thyself il 1 46

'Tis your brother Cassius at the floor, Who duth desire to seo yon . . ii 1 71
The things that threatened mo Ne'er look'd but on my back ;'when they

shall see The face of Ciesar, they are vanished ii 2 1 1

I go to take my stand, To seo him pass on to the Capitol . . . ii 4 26
You see we do, yet see you but our hands And this the bleeding business

they have done: Our hearts you see not iii 1 167

To see thy Antony making his peace, Shaking the bloody fingers of thy foes iii 1 197

Thy heart is big, get thee apart and weep. Passion, I see, is catching . iii 1 283

You all did see that on the Lunercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown iii 2 100

Seo what a rent the envious Caeca made .... . . iii 2 179

I do not like your faults. A friendly eye could never see such faults . iv 3 90

Let me go in to seo the generals ; There is some grudge between 'em . iv 3 124
Why comest thou? To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi. Well ;

then I shall see thee again? Ay, at Philippi. Why, 1 will seo thee

at Philippi, then iv 3 284

I do not know that I did cry. Yes, that thou didst : didst thou see any

thing? iv 3 298

Behold no more. O, coward that I am, to livo so long, To seo my best

friend ta'on before my face 1 v 3 35

Brutus, come apace, And see how I regarded Cains Cassius . . . v 3 88

T owe more tears To this dead man than you shall see me pay . . v 3 102

Go on, And see whether Brutus be alive or dead ; And bring us word . v 4 30
With his former title greet Macbeth. I'll see it done . . Macbeth i 2 66

Stars, hide your fires ; Let not light see my black and deep desires . i 4 51

Yet let that be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to seo . . i 4 53

That my keen knife seo not the wound it makos i G 53

O, never Shall sun that morrow seo ! . . . . . . . . i 62

Is this a dagger which I seo before me, Tho handle toward my hand?

Come, let mo clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see theo still ii 1 33

I see thee yet, in form as palpable As this which now I draw . . ii 1 40

I see thee still, And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood . . ii I 45

To not bid me speak ; See, and then speak yourselves . . . . ii 8 78

Up, up, and seo Tho great doom's imago! ii 8 82

How goes the world, air, now? Why, sue yon not? . . . . Ii I -i



SEE



1347



SEE



And some I see That two-fold balls and treble sceptres carry

Horrible sight ! Now. I see, 'tis true

When shalt tliou see thy wholesome days again?

You see, her eyes are open. Ay, but their sense is shut

Within this threo mile may you sec it coming ......

Whiles I see lives, the gashes Do better upon them . . . .

Fainted upon a pole, and nndenvrit, 'Here may you see the tyrant' .
Yet, by these I see, So great a day as this is cheaply bought . . .
Thanks to all at once and to each one, Whom we invite to soe us crown'd
My lord, I came to see your father's funeral. ... I think it was to
'



See. Woll, limy you non things wnll done thorn : adieu I . . Macbeth ii 4 37
Prithee, 860 there I U'huldl look! lo! how say you? . . . . iii 4 6g

Oil! 'em ; let mo see 'em .......... iv 1 63

Another yet I A seventh I I'll see no more : And yet the eighth appears iv 1 118

iv 1 120
iv 1 122
Jv 3 105
v 1 28
v 5 37
v 8 2
v 8 27
v 8 36
v 8 75
rd, I came to see you '

see my mother's wedding ....... Hamlet i 2 176

Me thinks I see my father. Where, my lord? In my mind's eye, Horatio i 2 184
And these few precepts in thy memory See thou character . . . i 3 59
See you now ; Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth . . ii 1 62
Moreover that we much did long to see you, The need we have to use

you did provoke Our hasty sending ....... ii 2 2

That great baby you see there is not yet out of his swaddling-clouts . ii 2 401
We'll e'en to't like French falconers, fly at any thing we see . . . ii 2 450
As wo of Lou see, against some storm, A silence in the heavens . . ii 2 505
lint if tho gods thoMiKolvos did see her thru When H)IO saw PyrrhuB . il 2 535
(loud my Innl, will you mm 1,1m pluyei'H well hrHlmvnd? , . , . II '1 546
lln Immweh'd me to imlroul, your iimJosUiwi Ti> hear and son Urn mutter . II! 1 23
Now RCO that noblo and most suvereign reason, Like sweet bells jangled iii 1 165
O, woe is me, To have seen what I have seen, see what I see ! . . iii 1 169
You shall see anon ; 'tis a knavish piece of work ..... iii 2 250

I coukl interpret between you and your love, if I could see tho

puppets dallying. You are keen, my lord ...... iii 2 257

You shall see anon how the murderer gets tho love of Gonzago's wife . iii 2 274
O, the recorders ! let me see one. To withdraw with you . . . iii 2 360
Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel ? . . . iii 2 393
Yon go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see tho inmost part

of you ............. iii 4 20

See, wli.it a gnicn was seated on this brow ; Hyperion's curls , . . ill 4 55
There I see such black and grained spots As will not lo,ave their tinct . iii 4 90
Do you sen nothing there ? Nothing at all ; yet all that is I see . . iii 4 132
Where is Folonius? In heaven ; send thither to seo . . . . iv 3 35

If thou knew'st our purposes. I see a cherub that sees them . . iv 3 50
While, to my shame, I see The imminent death of twenty thousand men iv 4 59
God be wi' ye. Do you see this, O God? ....... iv 5 201

To-morrow shall I beg leave to see your kingly eyes . . . . iv 7 45

I see, in passages of proof, Time qualifies the spark and fire of it [love] iv 7 113
Here's fine revolution, an we had tho trick to see't . . . . v 1 99

Yorick's skull, the king's jester. This? E'en that. Let mo see . . v 1 202
An hour of quiet shortly shall we see ; Till then, in patience onr

proceeding be ........... v 1 321

So much for this, sir : now shall you see the other ..... v 2 i

By the image of my cause, I seo the portraiture of his . . . v 2 77

You shall llnd in him tho continent of what jiart a goutloman would see v 2 116
Tlitw in tno hi'jwy, I<il; mo Him anoUinr. ThlH liken mo woll . . . v 2 275
I low dors tho (juoou? Sho H wounds lo we.o I hem blued . . . . v '2 319

Whero is this sight? What is it yo would Rro?i ..... V 2 373

Out of my sight 1 Soo bettor, Lear; and let mo still remain Tho true

blank of chine eye ......... L&iri 1 160

Wo Ilavo no such daughter, nor shall ever see That face of hers again . i 1 266
You seo how full of changes his ago is ....... i 1 291

I see the business ........... i 2 198

Shalt see thy other daughter will use thee kindly ..... i 5 14

And received This hurt you see, striving to apprehend him . . . ii 1 no
I have seen better faces in my timo Than stands on any shoulder that

I see



Nothing almost sees miracles But misery .
"itne



ii 2 ioo
" 2 172
ii 4 51
ii 4 130
ii 4 223
ii 4 275



But fathers that bear bags Shall see their children kind .

I am glad to see your highness Regan, I think you are .

Farowell : We'll no more meet, no more seo one another.

You see mo hero, you gods, a poor old man, As full of grief as ago .

If you shall seo Cordelia, As fear not but you shall, show her this ring iii 1 46

Then comes the time, who lives to see't, That going shall bo used with

feet iii 2 93

He 's a mad yeoman that sees his sou a gentleman before him . . iii 6 14
Will you lie down and rest upon the cushions? I'll see their trial first iii 6 37
Let them anatomize Regan ; see what breeds about her heart . . iii 6 80
When we our bntters see bearing our woes, Wo scarcely think our

miseries our foes iii 109

I would not see thy cruel nails Pluck out his poor old eyes . . . iii 7 56
I shall seo The winged vengeance overtake such children. Seo't shalt

thou never. Fellows, hold the chair. Upon these eyes of thine I '11

set my foot iii 7 65

You liavo one eye left To see some mischief on him. O ! Lest it see

more, provont it. (Jut, vilo jelly I iii 7 82

You cannot see your way. I havo no way, and therefore want no oves . iv 1 19
Might I hut livn to soo thea in my touch, I'M Bay 1 had oyon again 1 . iv 1 25

That will not NOM Uenuiso 1m doth not feed iv 1 71

Soo thyself, dovil 1 Proper deformity seems not in tho fiend .So hoi rid as

in woman iv 2 59

And by no means Will yiold to BOO his daughter Iv 8 43

Htioii mriy I how und nun him I . . . . . , . . . Iv 4 29

When I dn sl-arn, seo how tho subject quakes Iv (I no

Wc;ro all the lol,Urs HIIIIH, I could not see mm iv 143

You snn bow Mils world goes.- I sen It feelingly iv 151

A man may sue bow this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears iv 153

See how yond justice rails upon yond simple thief iv 6 155

Get thee glass eyes ; And, like a scurvy politician, seem To see the things

thou dost not iv 6 176

Let 's see these pockets : the letters that lie spp.iks of May be my friends iv 261
J should u'en die with pity, To sco another thus . . . . . |v 7 54
Ko comforted, good madam : the great rage, Ymi see, is kill'd in him . iv 7 79



The b.itllo done, and they within our power, Shall never see his pardon

' .; I the

We'll see 'em starve first



Shall wo not see these daughters and these sisters?



v 1 68
v 3 7
v 3 25
v 3 287
v 3 304
v 8 310
v 8 326

Whore didst thou seo her? O unhappy girl ! With tho Moor? . Othello i 1 164
Fathers, from honce trust not your daughters' minds By what you seo

them act i 1 172



I am tho very man, T '11 seo that straight

O, seo, sco IAnd my poor fool is hang'd ! No, no, no lifo ! .

Do you soo this ? Look on her, look, her lips, Look them, look there !

We that are young Shall never see so much, nor live HO long



5eo. I did not sen you ; welcome, gontlo slgnior ; Wo lack'd your counsel

Othdto i 3 50

Look to her, Moor, if thou hast eyes to see : Sho has deceived her father i 3 293
It was a violent commencement, and thou shalt see an answerable

sequcstratirin . . . . . , . . . . i 8 351

Lot's to the seaside, ho 1 As well to see the vessel that's come in. . U 1 37

See for tho news ii 1 96

See suitors following and not look behind ii 1 158

It gives me wonder groat as my content To see you hero before mo . ii 1 186
Didst thou not see her paddle with the palm of his hand ? . . . ii 1 259
You see this fellow that is gone before ; He is a soldier lit to stand by

Caesar And give direction : and do but see his vice . . . . ii 3 126
It were well Tho general were put in mind of it. Perhaps he sees it not ii 3 138
This fortification, gentlemen, shall we see't? We'll wait upon your lord-
ship iii 2 5

I '11 seo before I doubt ; when I doubt, prove iii 3 190

They do let heaven soo the pranks They dare not show their husbands . iii 8 202
I see this hath a little dash'd your spirits. Not a jot, not a jot . . iii 8 214
What is spoke Comes from my love. But I do see you're moved . . iii 3 217

Whereto we see in all things nature tends iii 8 231

Doubtless Sees and knows more, much more, than ho unfolds . . iii 8 243
Make mo to see't ; or, at tho least, so prove it, That tho probation bear

no hingo nor loop To hang a doubt on Hi 8 364

1 ROO, sir, you aro oaten up with passion : I do repent mo , . . til 8 391
|)iuiiu tltoin tlion, If over inurlAl oyofl tlu 800 Ifhotn bolHlorl . . . Ill H 399
Wlwro'H satisfaction? It Is impossible yon should BOO this . . . ill 8 402
Nay, but be wiso : yet we se,o nothing done ; She may be honest yet . iii 3 432
Such a handkerchief . . . did I to-day See Cassio wipe his beard with . iii 3 439

Now do I see 'tis true iii 3 444

Fetch 't, let me see't. Why, so I can, sir, but I will not now . . iii 4 85

And think it no addition, nor my wish, To have him nee me wonmn'd . iii 4 195

Bring me on the way a little, And say if I shall see you soon at night . iii 4 198

I'll see you soon. 'Tis very good ; I must be circumstanced . . . iii 4 200

O, I seo that nose of yours, but not that dog I shall throw it to

Well, I may chance to see you ; for I would very lain speak with you

And did you see the handkerchief? Was that mino?

And to seo how ho prizes tho foolish woman your wife ! .

1 am glad to see you mad. Why, sweet Othello, Dovil ! .

What is your pleasure? Lot me seo your eyes ; Look in my face .

Why. now I seo there's mettle in thee

Let husbands know Their wives have sense like them : they seo and

smell iv 3 95

Look upon her : Do you see, gentlemen? nay, guiltiness will speak . v 1 109

Kind gentlemen, let's go see poor Cassio dress'd v 1 124

Be not afraid, though you do see me weapon'd v 2 266

You shall see in him Tho triple pillar of the world transform'd Into a

strumpet's fool : behold and see Ant. and Clco. i 1 ir

It is a heart-breaking to see a handsome man loose-wived

We kill all our women : we see how mortal an nnkindness is to them .

Where is ho ? I did not soe him since. See where ho is .

See when and whero sho died

Now I soe, I soe, In Fulvia'H death, how mino veroived nlmll ho

Vim iimv wee, Lopldiw, in id hnm'elorlh know, It In not Cu-mir'n imlmal

vice I 4 i

O'or-picturiiig that Venus wbcro wo Bee Tho fancy outwork nature . ii 2 205
Your reason? I KOO it in My motion, have it, nut in my tonguo . . ii 8 13
Wo '11 follow, Till I shall seo you in your soldier's drosB . . . ii 4 4
You see wo have burnt our cheeks : strong Euobarb Is weaker than

the wine ii 7 129

To see't mine eyes are blasted iii 10 4

I '11 see yon by and by iii 11 24

See you here, sir? O fie, fie, fie I iii 11 30

See, How I convey my shame out of thine eyes iii 11 51

I see men's judgements are A parcel of their fortunes . . . . iii 13 31
Whip him, fellows, Till, like a boy, you see him cringe his face . . iii 13 ioo
And I see still, A diminution in our captain's brain Restores his heart . iii 13 197
See it done : And feast the army ; we have storo to do't . . . iv 1 14
Haply you shall not see 1110 more ; or if, A mangled shadow . . . iv 2 26

Let's sco if other watchmen Do hear what we do iv 3 18

Follow the noise so far as wo have quarter ; Let 's see how it will give off iv 3 23
That thou couldst see my wars to-day, and knew'st The royal occupa-
tion 1 thou shouldst see A workman in't iv 4 16

To-morrow, Before the sun shall see's, we'll spill the blood . . . iv 8 3

sun, thy uprise shall I see no more : Fortune and Antony part here . iv 12 18
Sometime we see a cloud that's dragonish ; A vapour sometime like a

bear iv 14 2

iv 14 64
iv H 72

1 would not seo't. Come, then ; for with a wound I imibl be cured . iv 14 77
O, see, my women, The crown o' the earth doth melt . . . . iv 15 62
When such a spacious mirror's set before him, He nerds must Fee himself v 1 35
To my tent ; whero you shall seo How hardly I was drawn into this Mar v 1 73

flo with me, and soe What I can Hhow in this V 1 76

You KPO how easily sho may bo Burpriscd v 2 35

Lot tho world se,o His iiubh'iiess well acted v 2 44

O, such another sleep, that I might seo But such another man 1 . , v 2 77

ip is fullow'd ! mino will now bo yours v 2 150



iv 146
iv 174
iv 183
iv 185
iv 250
iv 2 25
iv 2 207



J2 74
i 2 138
i 8 i

i s 62

64



1 8



When I should sre behind me Tho inevitable prosecution of Disgrace
Wouldst thou be window'd in great Rome and see Thy master thus?
'



O, such another sloop, that 1
Sue, Ca-sar I O, behold, How



,

And I shall sco Soino squeaking Cleopatra boy my KrentneHs .
' '



v 2 219



I'll novor Hoo't ; for, I am HIHO, my niilU Aro Htronnur than mino ryes . v 2

I HOO him ruiiso lilniMnll'To pnilsn my liobln net ..... v 2 287

Dust thou nut HCO my baby ivt, my breast, That mirk* Uiu mnno asleep? v 2 312

Tltysdfnrt coming To nao porfoiiu'd tho drwulcd act . v 2 335

Tin* manner of their deaths? 1 do not sou thorn bleed . . . . v 2 341

Come, Dolabella, see High order in this great solemnity . . . v 2 368
But that there is this jewel in the world That I may see again Cymldhte i 1 92

the gods ! When shall we wee again ? . . . . . i 1 124
You shall at least Go soe my lord aboard : for this time leave me . i 1 178

1 see you have some religion in you, that you fear ..... | 4 148
Hath nature given them eyes To seo this vaulted nrch? . . . i G 33
I cross'd the seas on purpose ami on promise To see your grace . i 6 203
I'll go see this Italian : what I have lost to-day at bowls I'll win to-

night of him ............ ii 1 53

The flame o' tho taper Bows toward her, and would under-pcep her

lids, To see tho enclosed lights ........ ii 2 21

I see her yet ; Her pretty action did outsell her gift . . . . ii 4 101

True risnnio, Who long'st, liko inn, to no thy lord . . . . iii 2 55

I see before, mo, man : nor here, nor hm'o, Nor what ensues, but have a

fog in them .... . .... iii 2 Bo



To apprehend thus, Draws us a profit from nil things we seo .
Ne'er long'd my mother so To BOO mo first, as I have, now



SEE



1348



SEEK



Soe. I suo into thy end, and am almost A man already . . QymbtlvM iii
Thin pa|H)i- IN the history ul' my knuvvlctlgn Tonehing hur flight.

Iii
iii
iii
iii
iv
iv



1 169

6 10.)
6 143
i
f. 56
2 243

2 359
4 23
36
97



1 99
1 ,34

3 7

4 3
4 33

4 48
1 81
1 126

1 165

2 7

3 45

5 92
2 95

4 9
1 loo



Thoro Hhall him MV my vidonr, which will Ihun bn a torment .

I sou a man's lit'n is a tedious ono ........

I HrK you 're angry

Great griefs, I seo, niudicinn the loss

Let's seo tho buy's laco. He's alive, my lord

Cloten then but young, you see, not woro him From my remembrance .

What thing is it that I never Did see man die I iv

That a man should have the best use of eyes to see the way of blindness ! v

I see a thing Bitter to me as death v & 03

.See further; he eyes us not; forbear v 5 24

But we saw him dead. Be silent ; let's see further . . . . v 6 27
Whereupon Methinks, I see him now Ay, so thou dost . . . v 5 09
You arc my father too, ami did relieve me, Tu see this gracious season . v 5 401
See \vhero sho comes, anparoll'd like thu spring . . . Pericles i 1 12
I'll inako my will Uiun, and, as sick men do Who know thu world, soo

heaven i 1 48

Tim breath is gono, und tho sore eyus soo cloar To atop the air would

hurt thum i

For wisdom sees, thoso men Blush not in actions blacker than the night i

Now do I seo he had some reason for't i

By relating tales of others' griefs, See if 'twill teach us to forget our own i

But seo what heaven can do 1 i

Thoso which seo them fall Have scarce strength left to give them burial i


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 221 of 531)