John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 233 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 233 of 531)
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A canst) that hath no mean depomlance Upon our joint and several

dignities ii 2 193

In these several places of the city You cry against the noble .scimto t'nr. 1 1 i8tj

Thou haat beat me out Twelve several times iv ft j*8

Two several powers Aro ontor'd In the Itoman territories . . . iv it 39
I lake all ana your several visitations So kind to heart . 7'. nf Athens f 2 224
1 lu.pt! it is not so low with him as ho made it smn in the trial of his

several friends iii 7

Touch them with several fortunes iv 3 5

I will this night, In several hands, in at his windows throw, As if they

came from several citizens, Writings J. Cn-snr i 2 320

Every drop of blood That every Roman bears, and nobly bears, Is

guilty of a several bastardy . . . . . . . . ii 1 138

He gives, To every several man, seventy flve drachmas . . . . iii 2 247

The ghost of Caesar hath appear'd to me Two several times by night . v 5 18
Abound In the division of each several crime, Acting it many ways Mad. iv 3 96
Before we reckon with your several loves, And make us even with you v 8 61
An exact command, l^arde.d with many several sorts of reasons Httitilut v 2 20
We havo this hour a constant will to publish Our daughters' several

dowers ' Lnirl 1 45

The several messengers Prom hence attend dispatch . . . . ii 1 126
The senate hath sent about three several quests To search yon out Othello i 2 46
Twenty several messengers : Why do you send so thick V Ant* and Cleo. i 5 62

He shall have every day a several greeting i ft 77

That groat face of war, whose several ranges Frighted each other . . iii 13 5

fiiithor Thuir several virtues and ull'octs (ittiitlieline I 5 23

I'll then discourse our woes, fidt suvural years , . . J'criefea i 4 18
Conduct These knights unto thmr several lodgings . . . . ii 3 no

We commit no crime To use one language in each several clime . . iv 4 6

Severally entreat him Trui. and Ores, iv 5 274

I \\ill disjiatch you severally T. of Athens ii 2 196

Compare their reasons, When severally we hear them rendered J. Ctvsar iii 2 10

The counter-change Is severally in all Cymleline v 5 397

Severe. Lord Angelo is severe. It is but needful . . Metis, for Metis, ii 1 296

O just but severe law I ii 2 41

My brother Justice have I found so severe, that he hath forced me to

tell him he is indeed Justice iii 2 267

He who the sword of heaven will bear Should be as holy as severe . iii 2 276
With eyes severe ami beard of formal cut . . As Y. Like It ii 7 155

If we conclude a peace, It shall be with such strict and severe covenants

As little shall the Frenchmen gain thereby . . .1 lien. VI. v 4



Severe. Coino, you are too severe a nioraler
Severed. In she tho godduss that hath suvor'd us? .
Thus havo you heard mo sevor'd from my blixs



Severely
That w

Severest. Unto tho rigour uf severest law .
Severing. A Hutloraucn panging AH Hnd and li



Thus have you heard me sever'd from my bliss . . i'tnn. t'J Krrofs i
I Ifie am Novrr'd lips, 1'nrti'd with sugar breath . . Ulcr. uf Venice iii
The puritan ami . . . the papist, hoWBOmu'oi 1 their hearts are severed



Othello ii 3 301

/Vftljlttlt V 1 187

. Ctnii. I'J J'.'nw* \ 1 119

. Mcr. i >f Venice iii 2 118



in religion, their heads are both one ,




together ............ iv 1 2:

By uproar severM, like a flight of fowl Scatter'd by winds T. Amirou. v 3 68
Better I were distract : fciu should my thoughts be sever'd from my

griefs ............ Lear iv (3 289

Our sever'd navy too Have knit again .... Ant. and Cleo. iii 13 170

everely. And kept severely from resoil of men . . 7'. G. of I'a: iii 1 108

That will tlm king sin t-roly prosecute '(iainst us . . Kii-Jmrd II. ii 1 241



. 241

Jtinn. \nnl Jul. v 3 a6.;
Hen. I'lII. II B 16




Qvern, On the gmitlo Severn's midgy bank . . . 1 Hm. 11'. I 3 98

Tlirrti times did they drink, Upon agreement, of swift Severn 'H lluotl . I 8 iu{

Thrico from tho bunks ofWyu And sandy-bottom'd .Severn have I wtiil him Hi 1 66
England, from Trent and Severn hitherto, By nouth and east is to my

part absign'd : All westward, Wales beyond the Severn shore, . . .

To Owen Glendower iii 1 74

Till he have cross VI the Severn Cymbeline iii 5 17




i . tyonrmQ iv a 140

Lost her tongue, And in a tedious sampler sew'd her mind T. Aitdron. ii 4 39

Cut those protly flngem oil', That could have better sew'd than Phdumcl ii 4 4 j

A sibyl . . . In her pmphetic fury sow'd the work , . . Othello \i\ 4 72



Sewer. '.Sweet* quoth 'u 1 H\\eet Mink, K\veet, sower . . 7W. a nil Cres. V i K t
Sowing. You are niaiiileHt houso-koepers. \Vhul uro you newlng hmoY

Ciiriulnnits i 3 55

As I was sewing in my closet, Lord Hamlet, with his doublet all un-
braced, . . . comes before me i/~...i-* ;= -i _



1 thank God I am not a woman, to be touched with so many piddy

offences as he hath generally taxed their whole sex withal As Y.L.It iii 2 368
You have simply misused our sex in your love-prate . . . . iv 1 205

In her sex, her years, profession, . . . hath amazed me . . All's Well ii 1 86
u much against the mettle of your sex ..... T. Night v 1 330

1 am not, prune to weeping, as our sex Commonly are . . II'. Tale ii 1 iu8
My courage try by combat, if thou dares!, Ami Hutu shalt 11 nd that I

exceed my sex ......... 1 Hen. VI. i 2 90

How Ill-UoHoomlng Is It In thy Hex t ...... 3 HI-H. \'I. i '1 113

Ah, poor our sex ! this fault in us I llud, Tho error of our eye direct**

our mind : What error leads must err . . . 7Voi. and Cres. v 2 109
To square the general sex By Cressid's rule ...... y 2 132

Think you I am no stronger than my sex, Being so t'ather'd ? . J. C(e$ar ii 1 296
Follow his chariot, like the greatest spot Of all thy sex Ant. and Cleo. iv 12 36
Laden with like frailties which before Have often shamed our sex . v 2 124
I 'Id change my sex to be companion with them . . . CifwMine iii C 88



c mn w

Sexton. A stool and a cushion for the sexton
God's my life, whwe's the sexton?



.

. CifwMine iii C 88
. Much Ado iv 2



Go's my life, whwe's the sexton? ........ iv 2 72

Hy this time our sexton hath reformed Sipnior Leonato of the matter . v 1 262



y s me our sexon a reorme pnor eonao o .

Hero comes master Signior Lconnto, and the sexton too. . . . v 1 267

And threw the sons all in the sexton's face , . . 7'. o/.S7imc iii 2 175

Old Time the clock-eottor, that bald sexton Tlmu . . . A". John iii 1 324

Cliaplews, and knocked uboul the UUlzzartl with a sexton's spade lltmtlct v 1
I havo been sexton here, man and boy, thirty ye



v 1 177



avo een sexton ere, man and oy, thirty years . . . . v 1 177
If I had been the sexton, 1 would have been that day in the belfry Per. ii 1 41

Sextus Pompelus Hath given the dare to Ca'sar . . Ant. nnd Cleo. i 2 190
Sextus Pompeius Makes his approaches to the port of Rome . . 1 3 45

Having in Sicily Sextus Pompeius spoil'd, we had not rated him His part iii 25

Seymour. Lords of York, Berkeley, and Seymour ; None else of name

Riehwd II. ii 3 55

Seyton ! I am sick at heart, When I behold Sey ton, I say ! . Macbeth v 3 20
Seyton ! What is your gracious pleasure? What news more? . . v 3 29
Come, put mine armour on ; give me my staff. Seyton, send out . . y 3 49

'Sfoot, I '11 learn to conjure and raise devils . . . Troi. nnd Cres. ii 3 6

Shackle. That dost in vUe misprision shackle up My love . J//.'s H'<7/ ii 3 159
Bolts and shackles ! O peace, peace, peace 1 . . . .7'. Niyht ii fi 6-j
Which shackles accidents and bolts up change . . Ant. nttd i'lco. v 2 6

Shade. You moonshine revellers, and shades of night . Mer. Wives v & 42
I '11 drop tho paper : Sweet leaves, shade folly . . . . L. L. Lost iv 3 44

Under the cool shade of a sycamore I thought to close mine eyes . . v 2 89
To interrupt my purposed rest, Toward that shade I might behold addrest v 2 92
In silence sad, Trip we after night's shade . . M. N. Dream iv 1 101

And Thisby, tarrying in mulberry shade, His dagger drew, and died . v 1 149
Under the shade of melancholy boughs . . . As Y. Like Ji ii 7 1 1 1

Under which bush's shade A lioness, with xulders all drawn dry, Lay

couching ............ iv 3 114

To dwell in solemn shades of endless night .... Jlictmnl II. \ 3 177

With Cain go wander thorough shades of night ..... v 43

Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, im'nionsof the moon IJhn. II'. i 2 29
Under the sweet shade of your government .... Hen. I', ii 2 28

But darkness ami the gloomy shade of death Environ you I . 1 lien. J'l. v 4 89
In the shade of death I shull tind joy .... 2 Hen. VI. iii 2 54

Their sweetest shade a grove of cypress trees ! ..... iii 2 323

Gives not the hawthorn-bush a sweeter shade To Bhepnenlf}? 3 lien. VI. ii & 42
His wonted sleep under a fresh treo's shade ...... ii B 49

Under whose shade the ramping lion slept . . . . . v 2 13

And scorns the sun. And turns the sun to shade ; alas ! alas ! Witness



my son, now in the shade of death



l i 3 266



SHADE



1369



SHAKE



Shade. Now, good angola Fly o'er thy royal head, and shade thy person

Under their blessed wings ! Hen. VIII. v

And flies fled under shade Troi. and Ores, i

Your hand, and yours : Ere in our own house I do shade my head, The
good patricians must be visited ...... Coriolanu-s ii

Under their sweet shade, Aaron, let us bit ... T. Andron. ii
Let us seek out some desolate shade, and there, Weep . . Macbeth iv
To some shade, And fit you to your manhood .... I'ymbcliiie iii

Shadow. Broom-groves, Whose shadow the dismissed bachelor loves

Think that she is by And feed upon the shadow of perfection T. G. of V.
1 am but a shadow ; Aud to your shadow will I make trim love
Your falsehood shall become you well To worship shadows
One Julia . . . Would better fit his chamber than this shadow
Cot ne, shadow, come, and take this shadow up, For 'tis thy rival . . iv
Love liko a shadow flies when substance lovo pursues . Mer. Wives ii
That the time may have all shadow and silence In it Hfet*s. for Mcas. iii
Momentany as a sound, Swift as a shadow . . . M. N. Dream i

lielieve me, king of shadows, I mistook iii

The best in this kind are but shadows ; and the worst are no worse . v
If we shadows have offended, Think but this, and all is mended . . v
Ho will fence with his own shadow ..... Mer. of Venice i
Homo t hero bo that shadows kiss ; Such have but a shadow's bliss . . it
Tho substance of my praiso doth wrong this shadow In underprizing it,

so far this shadow Doth limp behind the substance .... iil
And saw the lion's shadow ero himself And ran dismay'd away . . v
1 '11 go llnd a shadow and sigh till he come . As Y. Like, }t iv

'Tis but the shadow of a wife you see, The name and not the thing

All's Well v

Yonder i' the sun practising behaviour to his own shadow . T. Right ii
'Tis such as you, That creep like shadows by him and do sigh W. Tale ii
The shadow of myself form'd in her eye ; Which, being but the shadow

of your son, Becomes a sun and makes your son a shadow A'. John ii
Each substance of a grief hath twenty shadows . . Richard II. ii
Which, look'd on as It Is, Is nought but shadows Of whitt It is not. . il

] ,et 'H stop Into tho shadow of those trees ill

The shadow of your sorrow hath destroy'd The shadow of your face.

Say that again. The shadow of my sorrow 1 ha ! lot's 800 . . iv
Those external manners of laments Are merely shadows to the unseen

grief iv

By my sceptre and my soul to boot, He hath more worthy interest to

the state Than thou the shadow of succession . . 1 Hen. IV. iii
Grieves at heart So many of his shadows thou hast met And not tho

very king v

Had only but tho corpse, IJut shadows and the shown of men, to light

2 Hen. IV. I

I am your shadow, my lord ; I'll follow you ii

Simon Shadow ! Yea, marry, let me have him to sit under : he's like to

be a cold soldier iil

Shadow, whoso son art thou? My mother's son, sir. Thy mother's son I

Ilkn enough, and thy father's shadow HI

Tho son of tho fnnmlo Is tho shadow of tho nmlo Ill

Shadow will serve for summer ; prick him, for we have a number of

shadows to fill up the muster-book iii

Choose for me. Marry, then, Mouldy, Cnllcalf, Feeble and Shadow . iii
This same half-faced fellow, Shadow ; give me this man . . . . iit
Alack, what mischiefs might he set abroach In shadow of such greatness ! iv
Long time thy shadow hath been thrall to me . . . .1 Hen. VI. U
I laugh to see your ladyship so fond To think that yon have aught but

Talbot's shadow Whereon to practise your severity . . . . ii
I am but shadow of myself : You are deceived, my substance is not here ii
Are you now persuaded That Talbot is but shadow of himself? . . ii

Must ho be then as shadow of himself? v

That nro the substance Of that great shadow I did represent . 2 Hen. VI. \
That rnnght at mountains with outstretched arms, Yet parted but the

shadow with his hand fl llm. VI. \

Wear tho Ktiglinh crown, And 1>o trno king Indeed, thou but tho shadow Iv

Wn'll yoko together, liko a double shadow iv

Have no delight to pass away the time, Unless to spy my sliadow in the

sun And descant on mine own deformity . . . Richard III.



Shine out, fair sun, till I have bought a glass, That I may see my shadow i

Then came wandering by A shadow like an angel i

I eall'd thee then poor shadow, painted queen iv

Nay, good my lord, be not afrai'l of shadows . . v

Shadows to-night Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard Than

can the substance often thousand soldiers Armed in proof . . v
I am tlm shadow of poor Buckingham, Whose figure even this instant

cloud puts on, By darkening my clear sun . . . Hen. VIII. \
Disdains the shadow Which he treads on at noon . . . Coriolanns i

That so the shadows be not unappeased T. Andron. \

And die ho must, To appease their groaning shadows that are gone . i
The green leaves quiver with tho cooling wind And make a chequer'd

shadow on tho ground .......... il

Tho^n swoot orniunwiU, Whoso circling shadows kings have sought to

sleep in ii

Orief has so wrought on him, He takes false shadows for true substances iii
With the shadow of his wings He can at pleasure stint their melody . iv
The sun's beams, Driving back shadows over louring hills Horn, and Jnl. ii
How sweet is lovo itself posse.ss'd, When but love's shadows aro so rich ! v
How dost,, fool? Dost dialogue with thy shadow? . . T. nf Athens ii
Myself and such AH slept within Mm shadow of your powor . . . V
You have no mich mirrors as will turn Your hidden worthiness Into

your oyo, That you might seo your shadow . J. I'n'wr I

Their shadows soom A canopy most fatal, nndor which Our army lies . v
Hence, horrible shadow ! Unreal mockery, hence ! . . . Macbeth iii
Show his eyes, and grieve his heart ; Come like shadows, so depart ! . iv
Thereby shall we shadow The numbers of our host and make discovery

Err in report of us v

Out, out, brief candle ! Life 's but a walking shadow, a poor player . v
Dreams indeed are ambition, for the very substance of the ambitious is

merely the shadow' of a dream Ham!?t ii

A dream itself is but a shadow. Truly, and I hold ambition of so airy

and light a quality that it is but a shadow's shadow. Then are our

beggars bodies, and our monarchs and outstretched heroes the

beggars' shadows H

Who is it that can tell mo who T am? Lear's shadow . . . Isttr i

To course his own shadow fora traitor iii

Here, father, take the shadow of this tree For your good host . . v
Swagger? swear? and discourse fustian with one's own shadow? Othello ii
Haply you shall not see me more ; or if, A mangled shadow A, ntnl C. iv



1 :6o
3 5'

1 211

3 16

3 i

4 194

1 67

1 177

2 125
2 131
4 125

4 202
2 2.5
1 257

1 144

2 347
1 213

1 430

2 66

66

2 128

1 8

1 222

3 308

5 21

3 34

1 498

2 14

2 '3

4 25

1 292

1 297

2 99
4 30

1 "93

2 174

2 132

2 137
2 141

2 144
2 267
2 283

2 is

3 36

3 46
3 50

3 62

4 133
I 14

4 69

5 50

49

1 26

2 264
4 53
4 83

3 215

3 216

1 224

1 264

1 TOO

1 126

8 '5

4 19

2 So

4 85

5 6

1 M

2 5*
4 6

2 58
1 87
4 106

1 in

4 S

5 24

2 265



2 266
4 251
4 58

2 i

3 282
2 27



Shadow. To Imagine. An Antony, were nature's pleoo 'gainst fancy,

Condemning shadows ....... Ant. and Cleo. v 2 100

Poor shadows of Elysium, hence, and rest .... Cymbeline v 4 97

I know he will come in our shadow, to scatter his crowns in the sun Per. iv 2 121
Like motes and shadows see them move awhile ..... iv 4 21

Shadowed. The shadow'd livery of the burnish'd sun . Mer. of Venice ii 1 2

There serve your lusts, shadow'd from heaven's eye . T. Andron. ii 1 130

Shadowing their right under your wings of war . . . K. John ii 1 14

Nature would not invest herself in such shadowing passion . Othello iv 1 41

Shadowy. This shadowy desert, unfrequented woods . T. G. of Ver. v 4 2

With shadowy forests and with champains rich'd .... Lear i 1 65

Shady. For aye to be in shady cloister inew'd M. N. Dream i 1 71

To draw The shady curtains from Aurora's bed . . Row. and Jul. i 1 142
Shafalus. Not Shafalus to Proems was so true. As Hhafalns to Proems,

I to you ......... M. N. Dream v 1 200

Shaft. I'll make a shaft or a bolt oii't: 'slid, 'tis but venturing Mer. W. lit 4 24
But I might see young Cupid's Hery shaft Quench'd in the chaste beams

of the watery moon ....... M. N. Dream ii 1 161

In my school-days, when I had lost one shaft, I shot his fellow of the

self-same flight The self-same way .... Mer. of Venice i 1 140
How will she love, when tho rich golden shaft Hath kill'd the flock of

all affections else Tlmt live in hor 1 ..... T. Kignt 1 1 35
Carried you a forolmnd shaft a fourteen and fourteen and a half

2//cn. IV. ill 2 52

For, O, love's bow Shoots buck ami don : Tho shaft eon founds T. and C, Iii 1 128
Kinsmen, shoot all your shafts into tho court . . . T. Andron. Iv 8 61
I am too sore onplerced with his [Cupid's] shaft To soar. Pom. and Jul. I 4 19
This murderous shaft that's shot Hath not yet lighted . . Macbeth ii 3 147
The bow is bent and drawn, make from the shaft .... Lear i 1 145
His greatness was no guard To bar heaven's shaft . . . Pericles ii 4 15
Your shafts of fortune, though they hurt you mortally, Yet glance full

wanderingly on us . . ........ iii 3 6

Shag-haired. Like a shag-hair'd crafty kern ... 2 Hen. VI. iii 1 367

Thou liest, thou shag-hair'd villain ! What, you egg! . . Macbeth iv 2 83

Shake. His bold waves tremble, Yea, his dread trident shake . Tempest I 2 206

Your story put Heaviness in inn. Shako it off ..... 12 307

If of lifo you keep a care, Shako of I' slumber, and beware . . . li 1 304
This will shako your shaking, I can tell yon, and that soundly . . H 2 87
The strong-based promontory Have I made shako ..... v 1 47

Ask my dog : if he say ay, it will ; if he say, no, it will ; if he shake his

tail ana say nothing, it will ..... T. <;. of Ver. ii 6 37
And shakes a chain In a moat hideous and dreadful manner Mer. II' ires Iv 4 33
We are made to be no stronger Than faults may shake our frames M.forM.H 4 133
The dovil will shako her chain and fright us with It . Coin, nf Krrors iv 3 77
You shake the head at so long a breathing .... Mm-h Ado il 1 377
A wither'd hermit, five-score winters worn, Might shake offfifty, looking

in her eye .......... L. L. Lost iv 3 241

Lot loose, Or I will shake thee from me like a serpent ! . M. N. Dream iii 2 261
To shake the head, relent, and sigh, nml yield . . . Mer. of Venice ill B 15
Thou shnlt hoar how ho will shako nm up . . . As Y, Like It I I 30

1 could shako them oil' my coat : HIOHO burn aro In my heart . . 1 8 16

Ay, to tho proof; as mountains aro for winds, That shako not, though

they blow perpetually ....... T. of Shrew it 1 142

Confounds thy fame as whirlwinds shake fair buds ..... v 2 140

Many a man's tongue shakes out his master's undoing . . All's HW/ il 4 24
Whore I will never como Whilst I can shake my sword or hear the dnnn II & 96
Half of the which dare not shake the snow from ofl" their cassocks, lest

they shake themselves to pieces ........ iv 3 191

Till the pangs of death shake him ...... '/'. NigJit i 6 82

Go shake your ears .......... . ii 8 134

Be pleased that I shake off these names you give me . . . . v 1 76

As or by oath remove or counsel shake The fabric of his folly IV. Tnle i 2 428
Miseries enough ; no hope to help yon, But as you shako off one to take

another ............. iv

That shakes tho rotten carcass of old Death Out of his rags I . A". John II
Our curses light on Hire, So heavy art thou nhalt not shako them oil . Ill
Bhake tho l*gs Of hoarding abboU; imprisoned ongeN Not at liberty . Ill
Then with a passion would 1 shako the world ...... Ill

They shake their heads And whisper one another in the ear
To thrill and shake Even at the crying of your nation's crow
If then we shall shake off our slavish yoke . . .
I say the earth did shake when 1 was born



Shakes the old beldam earth and topples down Steeples .
of our throne . . -. .



4 580
1 456

1 syf)

3 7

4 39

2 188
v 2 143

Richard I!, ii 1 291

1 Hen, IV. iii 1 21
. . . iii 1 32
. . . iii 2 1 1 7

2 lien. IV. ii 4 114



iv



Shake the peace and safety

Feel, masters, how I shako

Plucking to unfix an enemy, He doth unfasten so and shake a friend . iv 1 209

You withal shall make all Gallia shake ..... Hen. V. \ 2 216

Shake in their fear .......... ii Prol. 14

He'll make your Paris Louvre shake for it . . . . . . ii 4 132

And our air shakes them passing scornfully . . ' . . . . iv 2 42

I'll shake thy bulwarks to the ground .... 1 Hen. VI. iii 2 17

Wrings his hapless hands And shakes his head . . .2 Hen. VI. i 1 227
Shako ho lils weapon nt im ami pass by ....... Iv 8 18

Thus do I hojio to shako King Henry's head . . . .8 Hen. VI, I 1 20

Nor ... The proudest he .. . Dares stira wing, if Warwickshakohis bells i 1 47
They that stand high have many blasts to shake them . Richard HI. i 3 259
Why do you look on us, and shake your head? ..... ii 2 5

Like rams In the old time of war, would shake the press Hen. VIII. iv 1 78
Her foofl stmko liko a field of beaten corn. And hang their heads . . v 6 32
Wilh a pnlRy-fhrnbllng on his gorget. Hlmko in and mit tho rlvot T. m\d C.\ 8 175
And Rttiinr greet him not, Or elso disdainfully, which Mmll Hlmko him

moro Than If not look'd on ......... HI 3 si

Llko a fashionable host That slightly nhakos Ida rmrtingguofit by thn hand 111 8 166
You shako, my lord, at something: will you go? Yovi will break out . v 2 50
Thou madest thine enemies shake, as if tho world Were feverous CortoJ. i 4 60
Hence, rotten thing ! or I shall shake thy bones Out of thy garments . iii 1 179
Let every feeble rumour shake your hearts ! ...... iii 3 125

If I could shake off but one seven years From these old amis and legs . iv 1 55
He will shake Your Rome about your ears. As Hercules Did shako

down mellow fruit. You have made fair work ! . . , . Iv 6 98
Constrains them weep and shake with fear and sorrow . . . . v 3 100
A better head her glorious body fits Than his that shakes for age T. An. i 1 188
Sitting in tho sun under the dove-house wall ; . . . 'Shake,' quoth tho

dove-house ; 'twas no need, I trow, To bid me trudge Rom. and Jitl. 1 3 33
And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied flesh v 3 in
1 am not of that feather to shake off My friend whon he must ned mo.

I do know him A gentleman that well deserves . T. of Athens I 1 100
They do shake their heads, and I am here No richer in return . . ii 2 211
Let's shake our heads, and say, As 'twere a knell unto our master's

fortunes ............ iv 2 25



SHAKE



1370



SHALL



Shake. And .shakes his threatening aworU Against the walla of Athens

T. of Athens v 1 169
Otiv t-Mi'i s s;ty, Tho b;u ren, touched in I hi'i holy chase, Shako oil MM n

Htorilo cursn J. Caxttr i '2 i>

I <li<l mark How ho did h . ' > : 'n , truo, HUM god ilid shake . . i 2 121

I .tit (!;t-sitr seat him sum ; Knr \vo will shuke him, or worst) days endure i 2 326
Are not you moved, whuii ull tho sway of earth Shakes like a thing

unllrnir 184

Tliut part of tyranny that 1 do bear 1 can .shake oil' at pleasure . i 3 100

i - i each man render me his bloody hand : First, Marciw llrntus, will I

shake with you ; Next, (Jains Cassius iii 1 185

Turn him "it, Like to the empty ass, to shake his ears, Ami graze . iv 1 26
My thought . . . Shakes so my single state of man . . Macbeth i 3 140
That no compunctions visitings of nature Shake my fell purpose . 1 5 47

Some say, the earth Was feverous and did shake. T\vas a rough night ii 3 66


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 233 of 531)