John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 236 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 236 of 531)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


And usest none in that true use indeed Which should bedeck thy shape iii 3 125
Thy noble shape is but a form of wax, Digressing from the valour of

a iiinn iii 8 126

Thy wit, that ornament I<s1iii|in and lovo, Misshapen in thn conduct

of them both iii 8 130

I nail shapes that man goes np and down in from fourscore to thirteen,

this spirit walks in T. of Athens ii 2 119

0, see the moustrousness of man When he looks out in an ungrateful

sliape 1 iii 2 80

Yet thanks I must you con That you are thieves profess'cl, that you

work not In holier shapes iv 3 430

Could it work so much upon your shape As it hath much prevnil'd on

your condition, I should not know you ..../. Caesar ii 1 253
It is the weakness of mine eyes That shapes this monstrous apparition iv 3 277
Take any shape but that, and my firm nerves Shall never tremble Macb. iii 4 102
With all forms, moods, shapes of grief, That can denote me truly Hamlet i 2 82
Thou contest in such a questionable shape Tlmt I will speak to thec . i 4 43
Virtue, as it never will bo moved. Though lowdness court it in a shape

of heaven i 6 54

The devil hath power To assume R pleasing shape .' . . . . H 2 629
Imagination to give them shape, or time to act them iu . . . . iii 1 129
Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel? . . . iii 2 394

1, in forgery of shapes and tricks, Come short of what he did . . iv 7 90
Weigh what convenience both of time and means May fit us to our shape iv 7 151
There's a divinity that shapes our ends, Ilough-hew them how we will v 2 10

He'll shape his old course in a country new Lear i 1 190

My dimensions are as well compact, My mind as generous, and my shape

as true 128

I'll resume the shape which tlmu dost think I have cast off for ever . i 4 331
Poorest shape That ever penury, in contempt of man, Brought near to

beast ii 8 7

Howe'er thou art a fiend, A woman's shape doth shield theo . . . iv 2 67

My hopes do shape him for the governor Othello ii 1 55

Oft my jealousy Shapes faults that are not iii 3 148

Ho hath fought tn-dny As if a god, in hate of mankind, had Destroy'd

in such a shape Ant. and Clco. Iv 8 26

Here 1 am Antony ; Yet cannot hold this visible shnito, my knave . iv 14 14
1 11 move the king To any shape of thy preferment . . . CymMinf i 5 ?'
1 know the shape of 'a leg : this is his hand ; His foot Mercurial . . iv 2 309
With her neeld composes Nature's own shape, of bud, bird, branch, or

berry Pericles v Gower 6

Shaped. Then, since tlm heavens have shaped my body so, Let hell make

cronk'd my mind to answer it . . . . .3 Hen. VI. v 78

I, tlmt am not shaped for sportive tricks .... Jiichant III. 11 i.(
1 have, In this rough work shaped out a mrtn . . . T. of Athent 11 41
It IH shaped, sir, llkn llnou: and it Inns Immd AH li hath breadth : It Ifl

Just so high as It IH Ant. ttwl Clco. II 7 47

The more of you 'twas felt, thn more it shaped Unto my end Cymbeline v 6 3.16

Shapeless. Wear out thy youth with shapeless idleness . T. O. of Ver. i 1 8

Ill-faced, worse bodied, shapeless everywhere . . . Com. of Errors iv 2 20



SHAPELESS



1374



K HEALED



Shapeless. Disguise*! like Muscovites, in shapeless genr . . L. L. Lost v 2 303
Tn set a form upon that indigent Which he hath left so shapeless K.Johiiv 7 - 7
Shaping. Such se.flthiiig brains, Such shaping fantasies . M. N. Dream v I 5
hh.ml. For i-haittalilo prayers, HlmnU, ttlliW itn<l puhhlni whould tin

thrown on lior Hamlet v 1 zsj

Thny are his Hhiinls, and he their beetle .... Ant. and Clco. ill "2 n_i
Shard-borne. Tho shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums . Macbeth iii 2 4^
Sharded. Often, to our comfort, shall we lind The sharded beetle in a

safer hold Than is the full-wing'd eagle .... Cymbeline iii 3 20
Share. Didst not thou share? hadst thon not fifteen pence? Mer. Wives ii 2 14
Good plots, they are laid ; and our revolted wives slmro damnation

together iii 2 40

With such gifts that heaven shall share with you . . Meas. for Meas. fi 2 147
Share the good of our returned fortunn . . . -4s 1'. Like It v 4 180

I '11 in among the rest, Out of hope of all, but my share of the feast 7'. o/.S. v 1 146
Thy goodness Share with thy birthright 1 .... AU'3 Well i 1 73

Share the advice betwixt you ii 1 3

My part of death, no one so trno Did sham it . . . T. Nitjltt ii 4 59

1 Khali have share in this most happy wreck v 1 27 j

An art winch in their piediiens shams With grout creating nature W. 7'u/riv 4 ^7
Nny, lot UH nliare thy thoughts, as thou dost onrs . . Richard If. ii 1 -? f

Tliou Hliult have a share in our purchase 1 lien. IV. il 1 iui

Let us share, and thtm to horse before day ii 2 104

Think not, Percy, To share with me in glory any more . . . . v 4 64
The fewer men, the greater share of honour .... Hen. V. iv 3 22
I would not lose so great an honour As one man more, methinks, would

share from me For the best hope I have iv 3 32

Make boot of this ; The other, Walter Whitmore, is thy sh.iro 2 Hen. VI. iv 1 =4
'Tis beauty that doth oil make women prom! ; But, Cod ho knows, thy

share thereof is small 8 Hen. VL i 4 ug

Thn least of you shall nlmre his part llmrcof . . . Richard Hi. v -S
What glory our Achilles shares from Hector, Wore ho nol proud, wo all

should share with him 7'roi. and (.Yes. I 3

Will ho not upon our fair request Untent his person and share the air

with us? ii 3

Shall pride carry it? An 'twould, you 'Id carry half. A' would have

ten shares ii 3

That book in many's eyes doth share the glory, That in gold clasps locks

in the golden story Rom. and Jul. i 3

So shall you share all that he doth possess, By having him, making

yourself no less _. i 3

We'll share a bounteous time In dillerent pleasures . T. of Athens i 1
Good fellows all, The latest of my wealth I '11 share amongst you , . iv 2
Is it tit, The throe-fold world dividod, ho should sUnd Ono Of the thrftO

to slwro it? Bo you thought him J. ('nwir iv 1

T commend your paiim ; And every one shall slmro I' the gains Macbeth iv 1

No mind that's honest But In it shares some wue iv 3

Haifa share. A whole one, I Hamlet iii 2

Shared. All the counsel that we two have shared . . M. N. Dream iii 2
Stands aloof, While all is shared and all is borne away . . 2 Hen. VI. i 1
Founded his good fortunes on your love, Shared dangers with you Oth. iii 4
Sharing. As we were sharing, sonio six or seven fresh men set upon us

And unbound the rest 1 Hen. IV. ii 4

Hear me, you wrangling pirates, that fall out In sharing that which yon

have pill'd from me I Richard 1U. \ 3

Shark. Maw and guH' Of the ravin'd salt-turn shark . . . Macbeth iv 1

Sharked. Hero and there Slmrk'd up a list of lawless rcsulntcs Hamlet i 1

Sharp. To run upon the sharp wind of the north . . . Tern] text i 2

Sharp furxes, pricking gnss and thorns, Which entor'd their frail shins iv 1

How sharp the point of this remembrance is I v 1

It is too sharp. Yon, minion, are too snucy . . . T. 0, of Vcr. i 2
Hut you, Sir Ihurio, are not sharp enough ; You must lny lime . . iii 2
What he gets more of her than sharp words, let it lio on my head M. W, ii 1
With thy sharp and sulphurous bolt .... Meas. for Meas, ii 2
Fit thy consent to my sharp appetite ; Lay by all nicety . . . ii 4
If voluble and sharp discourse be marr'd, Unkindness blunts it C. of Er. ii 1
How fiery and how sharp he looks ! Mark how he trembles in his

ecstasy 1 iv 4

A good sharp fellow : I will send for him .... Much Ado i 2
A sharp wit match'd with too blunt a will . . . . L. L. Lost ii 1
Your reasons at dinner luive been sharp and sententious . . , V 1
Look, how you butt yourself in those sharp mocks 1 . , . . v 2
Thrust thy sharp wit quite through my ignorance ; Cut me to pieces . v 2
To that place the sharp Athenian law Cannot pursue us M. N. Dream i 1
No metal can . . . bear half the keenness Of thy sharp envy M. of Ten. iv 1
Thy sting is not so sharp As friend remember'd not . As Y. Like It ii 7
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty . . . T. of Shrew iv 1
When he ruar'd With sharp constraint of hunger . . . All's Well iii 2

Ah, what sharp stings are in her mildest words 1 iii 4

When briers shall have leaves as well as thorns, And be as sweet as sharp iv 4
Goaded with most sharp occasions, Which lay nice manners by . v 1

My desire, More sharp than filed steel, did spur me forth . T. Night iii 3
By heaven, I think my sword's as sharp ns yours . . K. John iv 3

Children yet unborn Shall feol thisday as sharp to them n* thorn Hick. II. \v 1
His nose was as sharp as a pen, and a' babbled of groou Holds Hen. V. Ii 8
Speed him hence : Let him greet England with our sharp defiance . iii 5
Wmrp stakes pluck'd out of hedges They pitched in the ground I Hen. VI. i 1
In theso nice sharp quillets of the law, Good faith, I am no wiser than

a daw fi 4

Hath not thy rose a thorn, Plantagenet? Ay, sharp and piercing . ii 4
I feel such sharp dissension in my breast, Such fierce alarums . . v 5
Sharp Buckingham unbnrthens with his tongue The envious load that

lies upon his heart 2 Hen. VI. iii 1

Yet be well assured You put sharp weapons in a madman's hands . iii 1
My words are dull; O, quicken them with thine ! Thy woes will make

them sharp, and pierco like mine .... Richard III. iv 4

By this OHO bloody trial of sharp war v 2

I know his sword Hath a sharp edge Heii. VIII. i 1

Alleged Many sharp reasons to defeat the law il 1

Tho sharp thorny points Of my alleged reasons, drive this forward . ii 4
The king Does whet his anger to him. Sharp enough, Lord, for thy

justice! iii 2

You are a little, By your good favour, too sharp v 3

Though you bite so sharp at reasons, You are so empty of them T. and C. ii 2
Tunod too sharp in sweetness, For tho capacity of my ruder powers . in 2

Great Tnty is ours, and our sharp wars are ended v

With opportunity of sharp revenge T. Andron. \ 1

You are very short with us ; But, !f we live, we'll be as whurp with you i 1
lie dies upon my scimitar's sharp point That touches this . . . Iv 2
Tis true, 'tis true ; witness my knife's sharp point v 3



Ho out of tune, Straining harsh d ist-i .1 ds and unploasing sharps
ru his looks, Hlmrp im , \ hud worn him to the bmir



Sharp. Thy wit is a very bitter sweeting ; it is a most sharp sauce

Rom. and Jitl. ii 4 84

. iii 5 28

. v 1 41

Hlriko thuir sharp nhlim, And mar mrii's spurring . . T. of Athens !v 8 152

His great love, sharp us his Hpur, li:ilh holp him To his home Macbeth i ti 23

Pray can I not. Though inclination lm as sharp as will . . Hamlet iii 3 39

Here stood he in the dark, his sluu^ sword out .... Lear ii 1 40

To be a comrade with the wolf and owl, Necessity's sharp pinch ! . ii 4 214

Through the sharp hawthorn blows the cold wind iii 4 47

Do not please sharp fate To gran- it w ith your sorrows . Ant. and Cleo. iv 14 135

With thy sharp tooth this knot iulriiisicato Of life at once untie . . v 2 307

There cannot be a pinch in death More sharp than this is . Cy^nbeline i I 131

Till the diminution Of space had pointed him sharp as my needle . . i 3 19

Forbear sharp speeches to her : she's a lady So tender of rebukes . . iii 5 39

We'll enforce it from theo By a sh:up torture iv 3 12

Sharp physic is the hist Perides i 1 72

So sharp are hunger's teeth, that man and wife Draw lots who first shall

die to lengthen life 1 4 45

She would with sharp ncedlo wound Tho cambric . . . . iv Gower 23

If 11 res bo hot, knives sharp, or wiilrvs deop Jv 2 159

Sharpen. Now she sharpens : well said, whetstone 1 . Trtd. and Cres. v 2 75

Epicurean cooks Sharpen with cloyless sauce his appetite Ant. and Cleo. ii 1 25

The air is quick there, And it pierces and sharpens the stomach Pericles iv 1 29

Sharper. Slander, Whose sting is sharper than the a word's . W. Tale ii 3 86

Finds brotherhood in thee no sharper spur? . . . .Richard II. i 2 9

With spirit of honour edged More sharper than your swords . Hen. V. iii 6 39

How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is To have a thankless child 1 Ltar i 4 310
Haply this life is best, If quiet lilt- be best ; sweeter to you That have a

sharper known ; well corresponding With your stiff ngo Cymbelint iii 8 31

'Tis slander, Whoso edgo Is sharp"! 1 than tho sword iii 4 36

Sharpest. All deaths aro too few, Dm sharpest too onsy . . W. Tale Iv 4 809

Both conjointly beml Your sharpest deeds of malice on this town K.Johnii I 380

And so give me up To the sharp'st kind of justice . . Hen. VIII. ii 4 44

Ready for the way of life or death, 1 wait the sharpest blow . Perides i 1 55

Sharp-ground. Hadst thou no poison mix'd, no sharp-ground knife, No

sudden mean of death ? Rom. and JvL iii 3 44

Sharp-looking. A needy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch Cow. of Er. v 1 240

Sharply. One of their kind, that relish all as sharply . . Tempest v 1 23

My greatest grief, Though little he do feel it, set down sharply All's If. iii 4 33

With a swaggering accent sharply twanged off . T. Night iii 4 198

Though those that are betray'd Do feel the treason sharply, yet the

traitor Stands in worse case of woo OymbeUnt iii 4 88

Sharpness. Contempt nor bitterness Wuro in his pride or sharpness

All's Well 1 2 37
Tho friend hath lost his friend ; And the best quarrels, In tho heat, aw

cursed By those that feel their sharpness Lear v 3 57

Thou must not take my former sharpness ill . . . Ant. and Cleo. iii 3 38
Sharp -pointed. If thy revengeful heart cannot forgive, Lo, here I lend

thee this sharp-pointed sword Richard III. I 2 175

Sharp-provided. With what a sharp-provided wit he reasons! . . iii 1 132
Sharp -quilled. Till that his thighs with darts Were almost like a sharp*

quill'd porpentine 2 Hen. VI. iii 1 363

Sharp-toothed. O Regan, she hath tied Sharp-tooth 'd unkindness, like

a vulture, here Lcarli 4 137

Shatter. Ho raised a sigh so piteous and profound As it did seem to

shatter all his bulk Hamlet Ii 1 95

Shave the head, and tie the beard .... Meas. for Meas. iv 2 187

Now, by God's mother, priest, I '11 shave your crown for this 2 Hen. VI. ii 1 51
Were I the wearer of Autonius' l>c;trd, I would not shavo't to-day

Ant. and Cleo. if 2 8

Shaved. Bardulph was shaved and h^t ninny a hair . 1 lien. IV. iii 8 68

Shaven. Sometime like tho shaven Hercules .... Much Ado iii 8 145

Shaw. Go, Lovel, with all speed to Doctor Shaw . . Richard III. Hi 5 103

She. I never saw a woman, But only Sycorax my dam and she Tempest iii 2 109

Dost thou know my lady Silvia ? She that you gaze on BO? T. G. of Vcr. ii 1 46

Much less shall she that hath Line's wings to fly ii 7 n

Thou art not ignorant How she opposes her against my will . . . iii 2 26

I say, sir, I will detest myself also, ;is well as she . . Meas. for Meas. ii 1 76

She should this Angelo have married ; was aftianced to her . . . iii 1 221

There will she hide her, To listen our purpose .... Mitch Ado iii 1 n

Then we, Following the signs, woo'd but the sign of she . L. L. Lost v 2 469

The fair, the chaste and unexprcssive she . . .As Y. Like It iii 2 10

What 'her' is this? Why, Doctor She All's Well ii 1 82

Yon are thecrutll'st she alive T. Niyht i 6 259

Go to, go to ! How she holds up the neb, the bill to him ! . W. Tale i 2 183

But she I can hook to me : say that she were gone, Given to the fire . ii 3 6
Sooth, when I was young And hrtnde.d love as you do, I was wont To

load my she with knacks iv 4 360

Doll Tearsheet she by name Hen. V. ii 1 81

I have, and I will hold, the quondam Quickly For the only she . . ii 1 83
I made no spare, sir ... If I spared any That had a head to hit, either

young or old, He or she Hen. VIII. v 4 35

That who beloved knows nought that knows not this . Troi. and Cra. i 2 314
That she was never yet that ever knew Love got so sweet BH when desire

did sue i 2 316

Praise him that got Iheo, she that gave theo suck il 8 252

The earth hath swallow'd all my hupe.s but who . . Item, and Jnl. i 2 14

She whom I love now Doth grace for grace and love for love allow . ii 8 85
How ! will she none? doth she nut give us thanks? Is she not protid?

doth she not count her blest, Unworthy as she is? . . . . Hi 5 143

You have seen Cassio and she together Othello iv 2 3

So saucy with the hand of she here, what's her name? Ant. and Cleo. iii 13 98
Make him swear The shes of Italy should not betray Mine interest and

his honour Cymbelinei 3 29

Apes and monkeys Twixt two such shes would chatter this way and

Contomn with mows the other I 6 40

The temple Of virtue was she ; yen, and she herself . . . . v fi 221

She-angel. You would think a smock were a she-angel . . IK. Tule iv 4 211

She-bear. Pluck the young sucking nibs from the she-bear Mer. ofVeniceii 1 29
She beggar. Who in spite put stull To some she beggar . T. of Athens iv 8 273
She foxes. Thou, sapient sir, sit here. Now, you she foxes ! . . Lfar iii 6 24
She knight -err ant. Come, you she Knight-errant, come . . 2 Hen. IV. v 4 25
She-lamb. To betray a she-lamb of a twelvemonth . . As Y. Like It iii 2 86
She Mercury. Be brief, my good she-Mercury . . . Mer. Wives ii 2 82
She-wolf of Franco, but worse than wolves of France 1 . .3 Hen. VI. i 4 in
Shoaf. They that reap must sheaf and bind . As Y. Like It iii 2 113
O, let me teach you how to knit again This scatter'd corn into one

mutual sheaf, These broken limits again into one body T. Andrnn. v 3 71
Shealed. That's a shealed peascod Lwr 14219



SHEAR



1375



SHELL



Shear. I am shepherd to another man And do not shear tho lleeces that

I graze As Y. Like It ii 4 79

So many years ere I shall shear the fleece . . . .3 Hen. VI. ii 5 37
Shearer. She hath made me four and twenty nusegays fur the shearers

W. Tnteiv 3 44
If I make not this cheat bring out another and the shearers prove sheep iv 3 130,

Shearing. Welcome to our shearing I iv 4 77

Shearman. Villain, thy father was a plasterer ; And thon thyself a

shearman, art thou not? 2 Hen. VI. iv 2 141

Shears. There went but a pair of shears between us . Meas. for Metis, i 2 29
Since yon have shore With shears his thread of silk . M. N. Dream v 1 348

Think you I bear the shears of destiny? K. John iv 2 91

With his shears and measure in his hand, Standing on slippers . . iv 2 196
Sheath. You tailor's-yard, you sheath, yon bow-case . . 1 Hen. IV. ii 4 273

Kro thou sleep in thy sheath 2 lira. VI. Iv 10 61

Go to ; havo yonr lath gluod within your sheath Till you know better

how to handle it T. Andron. ii 1 41

O happy dagger I This is thy sheath ; there rust, and let me die

How. find Jvl. v 3 170

Sheathe thy impatience, throw cold water on thy choler . Mer. Wives ii 3 88
Put it np again. Not till I sheathe it in a murderer's skin . A'. John iv 3 80

And sheathe for lack of sport Hen. V. iv 2 23

Here sheathe thy sword, 1 'II pardon thee my death . . 3 lien. VI. v 5 70
There's his period, To sheathe his knife In us . . . . Hen. VIII. i 2 210
Hero Goths have given mo leave to sheatho my sword . . T. Andron. i 1 85
Draw yonr swords, and sheathe them not Till Saturninus be Rome's

emperor * 1 20 4

Sheathe your dagger : Bo angry when you will, it shall have scope J. C. iv 3 107
Either thou, Macbeth, Or else my sword with an nubatter'd edge I

sheathe again undeeded Macbeth v 7 20

Sheathed. And sheathed their swords for lack of argument . Hen. V. iii 1 21

Put np. Not I, tilt I have sheathed My rapier in his bosom T. Andron. ii 1 53

Sheathing. Walter's dagger was not como from sheathing T. of Shrew iv 1 138

Sheathing the steel in my adventurous body . . . T. Andron. v 3 112

Shed. Like a foul bombard that would shed his liquor . . Tempfit ii 2 22

Yet did not this cruel-hearted cur shod one tear . T. G. of Ver. ii 8 10

The dog all this while shells not a tear nor speaks a word . . . ii S 34

But more merry tears Tho passion of loud laughter never shed M. N. D. v 1 70

If thon dost sheil One drop of Christian blood, thy lands and goods Are,

by the laws of Venice, confiscate .... Mer. of Venire iv 1 309
Shed thou no blood, nor cut thon less nor more But just a pound of flesh iv 1 325
Bid him shed tears, as being overjoy'd .... T. of Shrew Iml. 1 120
The tears that she hath shed for theo Like envious floods . . ^ Iml. 2 66
Those great tears grace his remembrance more Than those I shed All's IV. i 1 92

He weeps like a wench that had shed her milk iv 3 124

A devil Would have shed water out of fire ere done 't . . II'. Tale iii 2 194

Tears shed thoro Shall be my recreation HI 2 240

And so we wept, and there was the llrst gontlonian-llko tears that ever

wo shod. We may live, son, to flheil many more . . . . v 2 156
Wo shall repent each drop of blood That hot rash hasto so Indirectly

she.1 A". John II 1 49

Farewell, my blood ; which if to-day thou shed, Lament we may, but

not revenge thee dead Richard II. I 3 57

What store of parting tears were shed? Faith, none for me . . . i4 5
On his part I '11 empty all these veins, And shed my dear blood drop by

drop in the dust 1 #' "' i 3 '34

There will be a world of water shed Upon the parting of your wives

and you iii 1 94

He to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother Hen. I . iv 3 61
Interchanging blows I quickly shed Some of his bastard blood 1 Hen. VI. iv 6 19

For thy sake have I shed many a tear . v 4 19

My sword should sheil hot blood, mine eyes no tears . . 2 Hen. VI. i 1 1 1 8
Thou shalt be waking while I shed thy blood . . . . . iii 2 227

The honourable blood of Lancaster Must not be shed by such a jaded

groom . . . . . - > . . iv 1 52

Upon my siml, the hearers will shed tears ; Yea even my foes will shed

fast-falling tears 8 Hen. VI. I 4 161

How will my wife for slaughter of my son Shed seas of tears I . . n B 106

traitors ! murderers I They that stabb'd Cicsar shed no blood at all v B 53
O, may such purple tears bo alway shed From those that wish the

downfall of onr house I y 64

These eyes, which never shed remorseful tear . . . Richard III. i 2 156

By Christ's dear blood shed for onr grievous sins i 4 195

The liquid drops of tears that you havo shed Shall come again . . iv 4 321
The brother blindly shed the brother's blood .y 5 24

1 did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries . . Hat. I III. m ! 42
By the blood we have shed together, by the vows Wo have made Co-rial. , i 6 57
As for my country I have shed my blood, Not fearing outward force . iii 1 76
The extreme dangers and the drops of blood Shed for my thankless

country . iv 6 76

And bear the palm for having bravely shed Thy wife and children s blood v 3 1 17
Rno the tears I shed, A mother's tears in passion for her son T. Andron. 1 1 105
At thy feet I kneel, with tears of joy, Shod on tho earth . . . I 1 162
No man shed tears for noble Mntius ; Ho lives in fame . . . . I 1 389
Upon my feeble knee I beg this boon, with tears not lightly shed . . n

For all my blood in Rome's great quarrel shed n] 1 4

I have not another tear to shed ... ill

Draw you near, To shed obsequious tears upon this trunk . . v 6 152

Like a loving child, Shed yet some small drops from thy tender spring v 3 167
thou art true, For blood of ours, shmHilood^of Montague R. and J. iii 1 154

J.'cnWrili 1 258
. Iii 2 173

lilood hath been shed 'ere now, i' the olden time . . . Macbeth Hi 4 75
I '11 not shed her blood ; Nor scar that whiter skin of hers than snow

Othello v 2

How many worthy princes' bloods were shed .... Periftes i 2 88

Shedding. No tears W of my shedding . . . . Mer. of Venue m 1 io t

Make some pretty mateh with shedding tears . . . Richard II. in 3 165

Achilles must or now be cropp'd, Or, shedding, breed a nursery of like

evil, To overbulk us all Trot, and Orel. IS 3ig

Sheen. By fountain clear, or spangled starlight sheen . M. N. Dream 11 29

Thirty dozen moons with borrow'd sheen .
Sheep. Turfy mountains, where live nibbling sheep .

I have plav'd tho sheep in losing him ... _

Indeed a sheep doth very often stray, An If the shepherd be a while away : 1 74
Yon conclude that my master is a shepherd then and I a sheep? I do .
A silly answer and lilting well a sheep. This proves me still a sheep . I 1 8:

9'



AH MiOU nrl i/rup, ror uiuu'i "i m^. mr
(> Gn<l I did Uonioo'n Imnd flhed Tybult'fl blood?
Won to tlm Imnd that shed this costly blood I .
If you have tflara, prepare to shed them now



Hrimlel ill 2 167

Tempest iv 1 62
T. (i. of Ver. i 1 73



A silly answer and lilting well a sheep. This proves me si a seep .
The shepherd seeks the sheep, and not the sheep the shepherd . . i
I seek my master, and my master seeks not me : therefore I am no sheep i 1



Sheep. The sheep for fodder follow the shepherd ; the shepherd for food
follows not the sheep: . . . therefore thou art a shftep. Such


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 236 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531

Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 236 of 531)