John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 260 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 260 of 531)
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Whose hand soever lanced their tender hearts, Thy head, all indirectly,

gave direction iv 4 224

How rank soever rounded in with danger . . . Troi. and Cres. i 3 196
Thou shalt vow By that same god, what god soo'er it bo T. Andmn. v 1 82

How strange or odd soe'er I bear myself Hamlet i 6 170

How in my words soever she be shent, To give them seals never, my

soul, consent! - , . iii 2 416

Blest be those, How mean soe'er, that have their honest wills Cymbeline i 6 8

What villany soe'er I bid thee do, to perform it directly and truly . iii 6 112

Soft, sir I one word nmro Temprst i 2 449

I'W we nro noft as onr complexions am .... Mm*, for ji/nM. ii 4 129
l''<ir Until dnnt fiwir Mm Hoftnnd tender fork Of n poor worm . . . Ill 1 16

Soft and low, ' llemeiulmr now my brother* Iv 1 6y

Mtil, Hiiftl who waits us yondor? Com. of Errors il 2 in

Hut, soft I my door in loek'd. Oo btd them let us in .... ill 1 30

O, soft, sir I hold you still : I'll fotch my sister iii 2 69

But, soft ! I seo the goldsmith. Got thee gone ; Buy thou n ropo . . iv 1 19
In their rooms Coino thronging soft and delicate desires . Much Ado i 1 305
But, soft you, let mo bo : pluck up, my heart, and bo sad . . . v 1 207
Soft and fair, friar. Which is Beatrice? I answer to that name . . v 4 72

Huft ! whither nway so fast? //./>. Lost iv 3 186

Love's feeling is moro soft and sensible Than are tho tender horns of

cockled snails iv 8 3^7

Soft, let us see : Write, 'Lord have mercy on us' on those three . . v 2 418

But, soft I what nymphs are these? M. N. Dream iv 1 132

But soft I how many months Do you desire? . . . Mer. of Venice i 3 59
I'll not bo made a soft and dull-eyed fool, To shake the head, relent . iii 3 14

Ix>t their beds Bo made as soft as yours iv 1 96

Soft I The Jow shall have all justice ; soft! no haste . . . . iv 1 320
With soft low tongue and lowly courtesy . . . . T. nf Shrew Ind. 1 114
Kntertain'st thy wooers With gentle conference, soft and aflhble . . ii 1 253

Soft, son ! Sir, by your leave iv 4 23

But, soft ! company is coining here . iv 5 26

Why are our bodies soft and weak and smooth, Unapt to toil and

trouble? v 2 165

I will eat and drink, and sleep as soft As captain shall . . All's Well iv 3 368

Not too fast : soft, soft I T. Night i 5 312

By your leave, wax. Soft I and tho impressuro her Lucrece . . . ii 6 103

Soft! here follows prose ii 6 154

So fur beneath yonr soft ami tender breeding v 1 331

This hand, As soft as dove's down and as white as it . . W. Tale iv 4 374
Soft, swain, awhile, beseech you ; Have you a father? . . . . iv 4 402



4 807

i I

3 155
1 40

4 134
4 IS
4 141

8 141

3 339
3 178
3 32
3 25

3 89

4 19
45
1 45



45



Soft. Some say he shall bo stoned ; but that death is too soft for him

W. Tale iv

But soft, but see, or rather do not seo, My fair rose wither Richard II. v
Which hath been smooth as oil, soft as young down . . 1 lien. II'. i
But, soft, I pray you ; did King Richard then Proclaim my brother? . i
By God, soft ; I know a trick worth two of that . . . . . ii
But, soft 1 whom have we here? Did you not tell mo tin's fat man was

dead? v

But, soft I I think she comes ; and I'll prepare . . .2 lien. VI. ii
Women are soft, mild, pitiful nnd flexible . . . .3 Hen. I'/, i
I would to (lijtl my heart woro flint, like Kd ward's; Or Kd ward's soft

nnd plllfnl, like inimi Richard III. 1

But, soft ! hero coino my executioners i

Soft I I did but dream. O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict, mo ! v
Tho capacity Of your soft choveril conscience would receive . Hen. VIII. ii
Tho artist and unread, The hard and soft, seem all aflined Troi. end Crcs. i

Farewell : yet, soft ! Hector, I take my leave v

Soft! here comes sleeve, and t'other v

When steel grows soft as the parasite's silk .... Conolanits i
A stone is soft as wax, tribunes more hard than stones T. Andron. iii
Soft 1 see how busily she turns the leaves ! What would she find? . iv
But, soft 1 methinks I do digress too much, Citing my worthless praise v
Farewell, my coz. Soft I 1 will go along .... Rom. and Jul. i
But, soft I what light through yonder window breaks ? It is the cast . ii
Alack, that heaven should practise stratagems Upon so soft a subject as

myself! iii

What, dost thou go? Soft ! take Ihy physic flrat . . T. of Athens iii
Let not tho virgin's cheek Make soft thy trenchant sword . , . iv

Thy flatterers yet wear silk, drink wine, lio soft iv

But, soft, I pray you : what, did Citsar swound? J. C'awr i

But soft, behold 1 lo, where it comes again I .... Hamlet i
But, soft ! methinks I scent tho morning air ; Brief let mo be . , i

Soft you now I The fair Ophelia ! iii

Soft 1 now to my mother. O heart, lose not thy nature . . . .iii
And, heart with strings of steel, Be soft as sinews of thn now-born babo I iii
But soft, what noise? who calls on Hamlet? O, hero they coino . . iv

But soft ! but soft I nsido : here comes the king v

Her voice was ever soft, Gentle, and low, an excellent thing in woman

Lear v

O, come in, Emilia : Soft ; by and by Othello v

Soft you ; a word or two before you go v

Entreat your captain To soft and gentle speech . . Ant. and Cleo. ii

Soft, Caesar ! No, Lepidus, Jet lain speak ii

Tho beds i 1 the east aro soft ii

Tho conquering wine hath steep'd our sense In soft nnd delicate Lethe . ii
As sweet as balm, as soft as air, as gentle, O Antony I . . . . v
Soft, soft I we'll no defence ; Obedient as tho scabbard . . Cymbdinc i\i

But, suft I no bedfellow 1 O gods mid goddcssoH 1 iv

Soft, hoi what trunk is hero Without his top? iv

Soft I hero he comes : I must dissemble It .... J\- rides il
Soft I it smells most sweetly in my sense. A delicate odour . . .iii
No visor does become black villany So wnll as snft and tender flattery . iv
Soft! who comes here? Coriolaniis i 1 ; T. Andron. iv 2 : /. Ca-sar

iii 1

Soft attachment. Sleep kill those pretty eyes, And give ns soft attach-
ment to thy senses As infants'! Troi. and Cres. iv

Soft beds. 'Tis strange he [death] hides him in fresh cups, soft beds,

Sweet words Cymbeline v

Soft conditions. Our soft conditions and our hearts Should well agree

with our external parts . . ... . . .T. of Shrew v

Soft-consclenced men can be content to say .... CorwUinns i

Soft couch. His gold will hold, And his soft couch dclllo . Met: Wires i
Soft courage. Thin soft nmnign maki'H your follower faint . B Hr.n. VI. Ii
Soil graoo. Of wluwn noil, gnu-o Ftu- Ihn Ilkn IOHH I have, her Hovornign

aid And rest myfiolf cuiitoiit , Trwiirsf v

Soft-hearted. Kin, coward woman mid soft.-heiu'tod wretch I 2 iltn. \'l. ill
Why stand we like sofl.-lieai ted women hen-, Wall ing our losses? 37/ni. VI. ii
Soft hours. Now, for the love of Love and her soft hours Ant. and Cleo. i
Soft impression. With wax I brought away, whoso soft impression

Interprets for my poor ignorance .... 2'. nf Athens v
Soft infancy, that nothing canst but cry .... Troi. and Cres. ii
Soft kiss. You may ride a With one soft kiss a thousand furlongs ere

With spur wo heat an aero W. Tide I

Soft laws. I should not deal in her [love's] soft laws . 3 11m. VI. iii
Soft mercy. We yield our town and lives to thy soft mercy . Hen. V. iii

Soft mouth. Touch her soft mouth, and inarch ii

Soft myrtle. Thy sharp and sulphurous bolt Split'st tho nnwedgeablo

and gimrlod oak Than thn soft myrtle . . . Men*, for Menu, ii
Soft nurse. O sleep, O gmitln ulenp, Nature's soft nurse . 2 lien. IV. iii
Soft parts. And have not UIOKO mill parU of conversation . Uthrlln ill
Soft petitions. Moiled by thn windy breath OI'Muft nHUImm . A*. John ii
Soft phrase. Little bless'd with tho solt plnuHii of pence. . (H)irll 1

Soft pillow. A good soft pillow for that good white hiuul . Hnt. I'. Iv
Soft remorse. The vilest, stroke, That over wall-eyed wrath or staring

rage Presented to tho tears of soft remorse . . . K. John iv
Soft seizure. Her hand, ... to whose soft seizure Tho cygnet's down

is harsh Trot, and Crcs. i

Soft silencing. In your power soft silencing your sou . . 2 Hen. IV. v
Soft society. Of very soft society and great showing . . Hamlet v
Soft stillness and tho night Become tho touches of swoot, htirmony M. off. v
Soft things. I smell sweet savours nnd I fcnl soft things. T. nfXhrew I ml.
Soft way. Say to them, Thou art their soldier, and being bred in broils

Hast not the soft way Coriolanvs iii

Soften. Whoso golden touch could soften steel arid ntcmefl 7'. G. of Ver. iii
Unless you have the graco by your fair prayer To soltnn Angelo M.forM. i
You may as well do any thing most hard, As seek to soften that. than

which what's harder? His Jewish heart . . . Mcr. of Venic* iv
Wo do not know How he may soften at tho sight o' tho child IV. Tale ii
Oft have I heard that grief softens the mind ... 2 llm, VI. iv
All the charms of love, Salt Cleopatra, soften thy waned lip ! A. and C. ii 1 21
Softened. Thy beauty hath made mo effeminate And in my tmtiper nolten'd

valour's steel Horn, and Jid. iii 1 i?o

Her salt tears fell from her, and soften'd the stones . . Othello iv 3 47
Softer. A couch Softer and sweeter than the lustful bed On purpose

trimm'd up for Semiramis T. ofMtrcw Ind. 2 40

There is no lady of more softer bowels .... 7'ryi. and Crcs. ii 2 1 1
With no softer cushion than tho flint, I kneel before thoe . Coriolanvs v 3 ^3
Softest. Eyes, that are the frail'st and softest things . As Y. Like It iii ft 1-2
Their softest touch as smart as lizards' stings 1 . . 2 Hen. VI. iii 2 325
Like softest music to attending ears . . Rom. and Jul. ii 2 167



3 116

1 301

2 2

5 212

G 110

3 115
3 206
2 253
1 126
5 58

1 83

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3 272
2 104
2 338
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2 83

Si

7 114

2 3,4

4 Bi
2 295

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3 7,

2 167

1 37

3 108

2 57

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- 3"7

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4 68

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SOFTLY



141G



SOLDIER



Softly Tread softly, that the blind mole may not Hear a foot fall Temp, iv 1 194
Speak softly. All's hush'd as midnight yet . . . . IV j 206
Speak softly: yonder, as I think, ha walks . . . Com. tf Errors v 1 9
So you walk softly and look sweetly and say nothing, lam yours Itl. Ado u 1 91
Bleat softly then ; the butcher hears you cry . . . . L. 1.. Lost v J 255
With a thief in the gallows, for though he go as softly us foot can toll,

he thinks himself too soon thero ,1s r. 7.Ue /!m 2 346

Softly, my masters! if you be gentlemen, Do me this right . 1. tpShrfWl 2 238
Softly and swiftly, sir ; for the priest is ready . . l, J i *

If I could make that resemble something in me, Softly / *J* If ? '3 2
There was a man . . . Dwelt by a churchyard : I will tell it sottly II . 1 . u 1 30
O, good sir, softly, good sir ! I fear, sir, my shoulder-blade is out-
How now I canst stand ? Softly, dear sir ; good sir, softly . . iv 3 76
I will even take my leave of you, and pace softly towards my kinsman s iv 3 121
Bear me hence Into some other chamber : softly, pray . 2 lien. IV. iv 4 132
Speak softly, or the loss of those great towns Will make him burst his
V lead and rise from death . . . . . . 1 flte. 1. 1 1 63

Let's sit down quiet, For fear we wako her : softly . . Hen. \ 111. IV 2
Speak your griefs softly : I do know yon well . . - . J. Caam iv 2 42
Lead your battle softly on, Upon the left hand of the even held . . v 1 16

I will do 't, my lord.-Go softly on ll '"<>' cnv *

Where is the queen ? Speak softly, wake her not . . Ant. and Lleo. y 2 323

Our Tarqnin thus Did softly press the rushes . . . . OmtHOUU J 13

Walk softly, do not heat your hloal . . . . JV'-iJes iv 1 49

Softly-sprighted. A softly-sprighted man, is ho not? . . Jlfcr. II isi 4 25

SoftnosB. A satire against the softness ol prosperity . 1 <<j .l/hcns y 1 .|f>

Soho. Sei-k him out. - Noh.i, soho I . . . . . J ''' 'V \ }

Soil As I'lvii from lunch or soil with her As she Ivom one uiigot M. Jar si. v l 141

That would bo oa gruat ft soil In Hie now gloss of your iniirrlago M. Ado Hi 2 5

I'liu only soil of his fair virtue's gloss, 1C virtue's gloss will slain with

any soil, Is a sharp wit ... L.L.LoitHl 47

On the face of terra, the soil, the land, the earth . . . . . iy -
If you like upon report The soil, the prollt . . . -'Is Y. Like It 11 4 98

And llesli his spirit in a warlike soil .,.%, ,,* 7 J

Sweet soil, adieu ; My mother, and my nurse, that bears me yet 1 Rich. II. i 3 306
The noisome weeds which without prolit suck The soil's fertility . . ill 4 39
No more the thirsty entrance of this soil Shall daub her lips with her

own children's blood 1 Hen, IV. i 1 5

Stain'd with the variation of each soil Betwixt that Holmedon and tills

seat of ours ,;.. 4

Most subject is the fattest soil to weeds .... 2 Hen, IV. iv 4 54
For all the soil of the achievement gc.es With mo into tho earth . . iv 5 190
ItiMiounce your soil, give sheep in lions' stead . . . . llleil. VI.l 6 29
1 had hope of Franco, liven as 1 havo of lurlile England's soil 2 Urn. 1 I. i I 238
Uoro 'B the lord of the soil come to aebaiue for a stray . . iv 10 26
1,,'ads discontented sl'-ps III foreign soil .... Kldntnl 111. Iv ] 312

Whose honour heaven shield flom soil! licit. I III. I 2 26

I would have the soil of her fair rape Wiped off . . Troi. ujui Lrcs. n 2 148
Wliat hath she done, prince, that can soil our mothers?. . . v 2 134

Nor did ho soil the fact with cowardice .... T. oj" Athens III 5 16
Which give some soil perhaps to my behaviours . . . J.Uetarli 42
No soil nor cautel doth besmirch The virtue of his will . . Humla i 3 15
They clepe us drunkards, and with swinish phrase Soil our addition . i 4 20
Yet must Antony No way excuse his soils . . . Ant. and Cleo. i 4 24
You are curb'd from that enlargement by The consequence o' the crown,

and must not soil The precious note of it .... Hymleline n 3 126
Soll'd With that dear blood which it hath fostered . . . Kichurd II. i 3 125
i ir have mine honour soil'd With the attainder of his slanderous lips . iv 1 23
Stand llnu hy honour: We turn not back the silks upon the merchant,

When we have soil'd them Troi. and firs. i\ 2 70

An 'twere a thing ft little Koil'd I' the working . . . . Hamlet ill 40

Nor the soiled horse, gons to 't With a more riotous appclilo . . /r.o-ivll !;

Sollure. Nut making any scruple other soiluro. . JVoi.O7UlttW.lvl

Sojourn. Where shall we sojourn till our coronation ? . Richard III. hi 1 62

lie gone . . . , disguised from hence: Sojourn in Mantua Rom. and Jul. iii 3 165

Long ill our court have made their amorous sojourn . . Lear i 1 4!

If they come to sojourn at my house, I'll not be thero . . . . ii 1 105

You will return and sojourn with my sister . ii 4 206

How comes it he is to sojourn with you? How creeps acquaintance?

Cijmldinei 4 __,

Sojourned. Havo you long sojourned there? . . . T. (I. o/ Vcr. iv 1 2..

Uy heart to her but as guost-wiao sojonrn'd M. if. .Dmtm III S 171

In the moan time sojouln'd at my father's .... K.Johnl'l 10

Sojourner. Itupurt what a sojoui nor wo havo .... Ferula iv 2 M<

Sol. Ut, re, sol, la, mi, fa L. L. Last iy 2 102

I'll try how you can sol, fa, and sing it T. of Shrew i !

' D sol re,' one clef, two notes havo I : 'E la mi,' show pity, or I die . in 1 7;
And therefore is the glorious planet Sol In noble eminence enthroned

and sphered Amidst the other Troi. and Cres. i 3 89

O these eclipses do portend those divisions! fa, sol, la, mi . . Lear l 2 14.

Sola. All, heavens, it is a most palhetical nit ! Sola, sola I . /.. /.. Lost iv 1 15

Sola, sola! wo ha, lio! sola, sola I Who calls? Sola! . WIT. o/ I Vnu-e v 1 y

Solace. Wo will with some strange pastimo solace them . . L. L. Lost iv 3 37

Sorrow would solace and mine ago would ease . . . . 2 lien. VI. ii 3 2

For with his soul Hud all my worldly solacu iii 2 15

This sickly land might soliii-o as before .... Richard 111. ii 8 3 <
My mother, you wot wull My hazards still have been your solacu Cor. iv 1 2
One poor and loving child, But one thing to rejoice and solace in, And

cruel death hath catch'd it from my sight I . . -Rom. and Jnl. iv 6 4
Lamentable I What, To hide me from the radiant sun and solace I' the

dungeon by a snuff? Ci/inbdine i 6 8

Sold. Money buys lands, and wives are sold by fate . Her. Wives v 5 241
It would make a man mad as a buck, -to be so bought and sold C. of ET. iii 1 7
The hoy hath sold him a bargain, a goose, that's Hat . . /-. L. Lost iii 1 10

Assuredly the thing is to IHI sold - Is 1'. Like It u 4 9

1 fear yon have sold your own lauds to see other mon'a . . . . iv 1 2
1 know a man that had this trick of melancholy sold a goodly manor

f,, r ., 81)M1 r All'* WM ill 2

I have sold aM my trumpery ' Tale, iv 4 60

Have sold their fortunes at their native homos . . . K. John ii 1 6

Fly, noble English, you are bought and sold v 4

My father's goods are all distroin'd and sold . . . Kichurd II. ii 3
They sold themselves : but thou, like a kind fellow, gavest thyself away

gratis ; and I thank thee 2 Hen. 1C. iv 3 7

Wherein you would have sold your king to slaughter . . Hen. V. ii 2 17
Bore it twelve leagues, and sold it for three half-pence . . . .11124
Thou wouldst think I had sold my farm to buy my crown . . . v 2 12
Whither, my lord? from bought and sold Lord Talbot . 1 lien. VI. iv 4 i

And sold their bodies for their country's benefit V 4 10

While his own lands are bargaiu'd for and sold . . . 2 lien. VI. i 1 23



old. By thee Anjou and Maine were sold to France . 2 lien. VI. iv 1 86
She was, indeed, a pedler's daughter, and sold many laces . . . iv 2 49
There shall be in England seven halfpenny loaves sold for a penny . iv 2 71
Hero's the Lord Say, which sold the towns in Franco . . . . iv 7 23

I sold not Maine, 1 lost not Normandy iv 7 70

Two of thy name, both Dukes of Somerset, Have sold their lives unto

the house of York ...*.... 3 lien. VI. v 1 74
Be not too hold, For Dickon thy master is bought and sold Biduird III. \ 3 305
And thoil art bought and sold among those of any wit . Tmi. unit Vrcs. ii 1 51
He sold the blood and labour Of our great action . . . Curiolumts v <i 47
And, though I am sold, Not yet enjoy'd .... Horn, and Jul. iii 2 27

I sell thee poison ; thou hast sold me none v 1 83

Let all my land be sold. 'Tis all engaged, some forfeited T. of Athens ii 2 154
The feast is sold That is not often vouch'd, while 'tis a-maklng Macbeth iii 4 33
Nor will it yield ... A ranker rate, should it be sold in fee . Hamltt iv 4 22
Of being taken by the insolent foe And sold to slavery . . Othello i 3 138
If heaven would make me such another world Of one entire and perfect

chrysolite, I'ld not have sold her for it . . . . . v 2 146

'Tis thou Hast sold me to this novice . . . . Ant. and Cuo. lv 13 14
The witch shall die : To the young Koman boy she hath sold me, and

I fall . iv 12 48

Cicsar's no merchant, to make prize with you Of things that merchants

sold v 2 184

The one may be sold, or given, if thero were wealth enough lor the

purchase, or merit for the gift . . ... t'limbdinei i 90

Siucu 1 Clime, Diseases havo been sold dearer than physic . 1'eridcs iv 105
.oldat. Fiiltns vous i>i-6l; curcu sohlut icl osl dispose loiitaccll" home

da cuupor volro gorge "' V. lv ! 37

.older. Wins 'twixt you twain would be As If thu world should i-lnive,

and that slain men Should Holder up llm l lit . . A ut. uud t.'l,o. Ill 4 3.1
jolderost Thou visible god Igolil], That, solder'st close impossibilities,

And makcst them kiss 1 T. uf Athens iv 3 388

soldier. I'll woo you like a soldier, at arms' end . . T.O.mVer.vt 57

If the love of soldier can suffice Jlfc-r. Il'iivs ii 1 12

You were good soldiers and tall fellows || 2 10

Money is a good soldier, sir, and will on ii 2 176

There 'snot a soldier of us all . . . do relish the petition Mais, for Meus. i 2 15

I never heard any soldier dislike it 2 18

That in the captain's but a choleric word, Which m the soldier is Hat

blasphemy. Art avised o' that? 2 131

The great soldier who miscarried at sea i'i 1 217

Ho shall appear to the envious a scholar, a statesman and a soldier . iii 2 155
A good soldier too, lady. And a good soldier ton lady . . Mlll&jlliull 53
1 look 'd upon her with a soldier's eye, That liked, but had a rougher task i 1 300
lie was wont to speak plain and to the pnri>oso, like tin honest man and

a soldier II 8 20

Like Pharaoh's soldiers In Hie reechy painting .... .1113143

As it is base for a soldier to love L. L. lam i 2 61

Saint Cupid, then 1 and, soldiers, to the field I iv 3 366

A soldier, a man of travel, that hath seen the world . . . . v 1 113
fientlemcn and soldiers, pardon me ; 1 will not combat in my shirt . v 2 710

I will right myself like a soldier v 2 7^5

A Venetian, a scholar and a soldier Mer. of Venice i 2 1 24




You have some stain of soldier in you " HJ'i IIV-H i 1 122

"1'is our hopu, sir, After well entor'd soldiers, to return . . . . n

IJut I hope yonr lonluhhi thinks not him a uoldlor . . . . . ii o 2

Yiimliir Is heavy news within between two soldiers and my young lady ! Ill 2 36

And to boa soldier? Such In his noble purpose Ill 2 72

There was excellent command, . . . to roud our owu noldlors I . . ni i> 53

I)y the hand of a soldier, I will undertake it iii 76

Shall we have this dialogue between the fool and the soldier? . . iv 3 113
And say a soldier, Diau, told thee this, Men are to mell with . . iv 3 256
The manifold linguist and the armipotent soldier iv 3 265

I long to talk with the young noble soldier iv 5 109

He has promised mo, as ho is a gentleman and a soldier . . f. Night in 4 339
My young soldier, put up your &on : you are well fleshed . . . iv l 42
Mine enemy, My parasite, my soldier, statesman, all . . 1C. Tula i 2 168
Lot mo ha\e no lying : it becomes none but tradesmen, and they ullen

give us soldiers the lie lv 4 746

A soldier, by the honour-giving hand Of CuMir-dc-lion knighted K.Jolmt 1 53
Wilt thou . . . follow mo? 1 am a soldier and now bound to France . l 1 150

His forces strong, his soldiers confident ii 1 61

The swords of soldiers are his teeth, his fangs ii 1 353

Whom zeal and charity brought to the Held As God's own soldier . . n 1 566
Hast thou not spoke like thunder on my side, Been sworn my soldier? iii 1 125
Bravo soldier, pardon me, That any accent breaking from thy tongue

Should 'scape the true acquaintance of mine ear . . . . y 6 13
In name of lendings for your highness' soldiers . . Kithurd 11. i 1 89

Three parts of that receipt 1 had for Calms Disbursed 1 duly to his

highness' soldiers ... 1 1 127

The lining of his collers shall make coats To deck our soldiers . . i 4 62
This earth shall haven fouling and these stones Prove armed soldiers . iii 2 25
To the sepulchre of Christ, Whose soldier now, under whoso blessed

cross We are impressed lWt7i.JF.il 20

As the soldiers bore dead bodies by, He call'd them untaught knaves .1842
And but for these vile guns, He would himself havo been a soldier . 13 64
Of prisoners' ransom and of soldiers slain . . ... il 3 57

She will not part with you ; She'll be a soldier too, she'll to the wars . iii 1 195
Holds from all soldiers chief majority And military title capital . . iii 2 109
As not a soldier of this season's stamp Should go so general current . iv 1 4
Our soldiers shall march through ; we'll to Suttou Co'lll' to-night . Iv 2

II I bo not ashamed of my soldiers, I am a soused gurnet . . . IV 2 12
In exchange of a hundred and lil'ty soldiers, three hundred and odd

pounds |v 2 ! 15

Such as indeed wore never soldiers, but discarded unjust serving-men . iv J 29
Yet once ere night I will embrace him with a soldier's arm . . . v 2 74
Fellows, soldiers, friends, Better consider what you have to do . . v 2 76
Up and away I Our soldiers stand full fairly for the day . . v 3 29

Arrows tied not swifter toward their aim Than did our soldiers 2 Hen. IV. i 1 124
I>oth not the king lack subjects? do not the rebels need soldiers? . i 2 87

You are to take soldiers up in counties as you go ii 1 iy9

This Sir John, cousin, that comes hither anon about soldiers? . . iii 2 31

A soldier is better accommodated than with a wife iii 2 72

Shadow I . . . let mo have him to sit under: he's like to be a cold soldier iii 2 134
I cannot put him to a private soldier that is the leader of so many thon-

aands . . iii 2 177



SOLDIER



1417



SOLDIER



Soldier. My little soldier there, bo merry y Hen. IV. v 3 34

Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 260 of 531)