John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 263 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 263 of 531)
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Mothinks sometimes I have no more wit than a Christian . 3'. Niijht i
I delight in masques and revels sometimes altogether i

Sometimes he is a kind of puritan. O, if I thought that 1 . . ii

Kill what I love? a savage jealousy That sometime savours nobly . v
How sometimes nature will betray its folly .... 1C. Tide i
No man is froo, But that his negligence, his folly, foar, Among thu in-

llnito doings of tho world, Houwtiinn puts forth .... 1

To mo i "in -i u crealui'o, BoiiialllitUti her head on ono uldo, sumo uimUiur ill
Sometimes to sou 'em, and not to sue '0111 . . . . . . .iii

This ancient sir, who, it .should seem, Hath sometime loved . . . iv
Though I am not naturally honest, I am so sometimes by chance . . iv

Thy sometimes brother's wife Richard IL i

Did they not sometime cry, 'all hail !' to mo? So Judas did to Christ iv
Good sometime queen, prepare thee hence for France . v

Sometimes am I king ; Then treasons make me wish myself a beggar . v
Have gotten leave To look upon my sometimes royal master's face . v
Sometime he angers me With telling mo of tho mold warp 1 Hen. IV. iii
Amend this fault : Though sometimes it show greatuess, courage, blood iii
His nose, . . . sometimes pine and sometimes red . . . Hen. V. iii
That will be verined Henry the Fifth did sometime prophesy 1 lien. VI. v
Thus sometimes hath tho brightest day a cloud . . .2 lien. VI. ii
Sometime I'll say, I am Duke Humphrey's wifo, And he'a prince . . ii
Sometime he talks as if Duke Humphrey's glmut Wrro by hin Hide;

BonioLiino ho calls tho king And whispers to his pillow as to him . Ill

Jove soniotimo wont disguised, and why nut IV iv

Even with those wings Which soiuotimo thoy havo UM'd with fearful

(light, Make wur with him 3 Jlcn. I'l. ii

Sometime tho Hood prevails, and then the wind ; Now one the bolter . ii
Present to hor, as sometime Margaret Did to thy father, steep'd in

Rutland's blood, A handkerchief .... Richard 111. iv

Men shall deal unadvisedly sometimes iv

The dowager, Sometimes our brother's wife .... Hen. VIII. ii
These are stars indeed ; And sometimes falling ones . . . . iv
Sometime, great Agamemnon, Thy topless deputation he puts on

Troi. and Ores, i

Sometimes we are devils to ourselves iv

I sometime lay here in Corioli At a poor man's house . . Coriolantis i
To give forth Tito corn o' the storehouse gratis, as 'twas used Sometime

in Greece iii

My soinotimo general, I havo soon theo stern iv

VHII Inn what ho hath Haiti Which was sometime his gimtwil . . . v
Slain Iho sun with fog, as Koiiustlnio clouds When thoy do hug him T. An. iii
Sometime sho gallops o'er a courtier's nose . . . Rum. and Jid i
Sometime comes she with a tithe-pig's tail Tickling a parson's nose . i

Sometime she driveth o'er a soldier's neck i

And vice sometimes by action dignified ....... ii

I anger her sometimes and toll hor that Paris is the propcrer man. . ii
'Tis a spirit: sometime 't appears like a lord; sometime like a lawyer;

sometime liko a philosopher T. uf Athena ii

I do not always follow lover, elder brother and woman ; sometime the

philosopher ii

An otfect of humour, Which sometime hath his hour with every man J. C. ii
To keep with you at meals, ccmfort your bed, And talk to you sometimes ii
The love that follows us sometime is our trouble . . . Macbeth i
Though he took up my logs sometime, yet 1 ni.ido a shift to cast hint . ii
To do harm Is ol'ton laudablo, to do good BomuUliiO Accounted dan^oioim

fully iv

Iu which tho majesty of buried Denmark Did HOUiotlliies march Hainht i
Our sometime sister, now our queen ........ i

Sometimes he walks four hours together Here in the lobby . . . ii

How pregnant sometimes his replies are ! ii

This was sometime a paradox, but now the time gives it proof . . iii
Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well, When our deep plots do pall v
The barbarous Scythian . . . shall to my bosom Boas well neighbour'd,

pitied, and relieved, As thou my sometime daughter . . Lear i

Sometimes I am whipped for holding my peace i

Sometime with lunatic bans, sometime with prayers, Enforce their

chanty ii

Who sometime, in his better tune, remembers What we are como about iv

I lack iniquity Sometimes to do me service Othello i

Unless self-charity be sometimes a vice ii

But men are men ; tho best sometimes forget ii

Where's that palace whereinto foul things Sometimes intrude not? . iii
Have you not sometimes seen a handkerchief Spotted with strawberries? iii
Sometimes, when ho is not Antony, Ho comes loo short Ant. and Cleo. i
Tliu world and my groat ollico will sometimes Divido mo from your

bosom ii

Sometime wo see a cloud that's dragunish ; A vapour soinotimo liko a

bear or lion iv

Nay, soinotimo hangs both thief and truo man . . . t'ymbdine ii
Our vory eyes Are. sometimes liko our judgements, blind . . . iv
The ruin speaks that suinetimc It wis a worthy building . . . iv

That Belarius whom you sometime banish'd v

Yon sometimes famous princes, like thyself, Drawn by report Pencles i

It was sometime target to a king ; I know it by this mark . . . ii

Somewhat. I '11 wear a boot, to make it somewhat rounder T. G. of Ver. v

Here is a letter will say somewhat Afer, Wives iv

This gentleman told somewhat of my tale . . . Metis, for Mais, v

That's somewhat madly spoken. Pardon it v

In countenance somewhat doth resemble you . . . T. of Shrew iv
And smell somewhat strong of her strong displeasure . . All's ll'dl v
Our cullers . . . aio grown somewhat light .... Itirluird It. i

Well, some what wo must do. Come, cousin, I '11 IHspusn of you . . ii

Is't so? Why then, say an old man can do somewhat . . 2 Jlcn. IV. v

Somewhat too sudden, sirs, tho warning is . . .1 Hen. VI. v

Fall somewhat into a slower method .... Richard III. i

Chop off his head, man ; somewhat we will do . . . . . .iii

The loving haste of these our friends, Somewhat against our meaning . iii

That's somewhat sudden Hen. VIII. iii

There is a fellow somewhat near tho door, ho should be a brazier . . v
An her hair were not somewhat darker Ihan Helen's . Trot, and Cres. i
Somewhat too early for new-married ladies T. Andron. ii

Fear her not, Lucius : somewhat doth she mean iv

From this time Bo somewhat scanter of your maiden presence Hamlet i
Thou givcst me somewhat to repair myself .... I'vricles ii



2 87

3 76

3 179
3 88
3 121
3 151
1 MJ



254



3 92

4 373

4 733
2 54
1 169

I 37

5 32

5 75
1 148
1 181

no

4 3 l

4 4,

- J7-I

1 48



* 274
4 292
4 181
1 55



1 S

1 ,.,

1 -

1 ,-,j
4 77
4 79
4 82

3 22

4 216

2 115



1 251
1 285
11
3 46



2 76

1 49

2 8
2 160
2 212
1 .14



1 122
4 202



a 19

!1

3 202

3 241
3 138
3 434
1 57



a 77

2 302
2 354
5 333

1.3

2 6
5 128
1 84

1 89

2 loo

- 5
I 4-1

2 116

3 83

- M
2 116

1 193
55

2 394

4 41

1 41

2 ,5
1 9

3 121
1 128



SOMEWHERE



1421



SON



Somewhere. He's somowhero gono t-o flinncr . . . Com. of Errors ii 1 5
I prithee, vent thy folly somewhere elso ... 'J' Kight iv 1 10

Marry, for Justice, she is so employ 'd, He thinks, with Jove in heaven,

or somewhere else ....... Tw Aiidron iv 3 40

Somewhither would she have, time go with her ...... iv 1 ii

Somme. 'Tis certain he hath pass'd the river Soinme , . Hell. V. iii 6 i
Son. Good wombs have borne bad sons ..... Tempest i 2 120

The king's son, Ferdinand, With hair up-staring, then like reeds. . i 2 212
The king's son havo I landed by himself ....... i 2 221

The son that she did littor hero, A freckled whelp hag-barn . '. . i 2 282
Not bonour'd with A human shape. Yes, Caliban her son . . . i 2 284
The duke of Milan AIM! his brave son being twnin ..... j 2 438

He will carry this island home in his pocket ami give it his son for nti

apple ............. ii 1 91

For, coming thence, My son is lost ........ ii 1 I0 g

We have lost your son, I fear, for ever ....... ii 1 131

Hath here almost persuaded . . . the king his son's alive . . . ii 1 236
Lead on" this ground ; and let's make further search For my poor son . ii 1 324
So, king, go safely on to seek thy son .... . . ii 1 327

Theoof thy son, Alonso, They have bereft ...... "' '

Therefore my son i' the ooze is bedded .......

Tell me, heavenly bow, If Venus or her son, as thou dost know, Do now

attend the queen? .......... iv 1 87

Cutting the clouds towards Paphos and her son Dove-drawn with her . iv 1 93
Her wospfsh-headed son has broke his arrows ...... iv 1 99

You do look, my turn, in a moved sort, As if yon wore dismay'd . . '
I havn lost Ho w sharp tho point of this romombranco ts I My dear son
I wish HfHolfworo muddodin that ooxy bod Whom my HUH lies . .
If this prove- A vision of the Inland, one dear son Hlmll I twice lose
While of.her men, of slender ropulnUou, Tut forth their nous to fleck

preferment out: Some to the wars . . . . T. G. ofVcr. I 8 7

For all those exercises lie said that Proteus your BOH was meet . . i 3 12
I have received my proportion, like the prodigious son . . . . ii 3 4

A son that well deserves The honour and regard of such a father . . ii 4 59
Why, Phacthon, for thou art Merops* son, Wilt thou aspire to guide

the heavenly ear? ........... Hi 1 ^3

Who begot thee? Marry, the son of my grandfather. O Illiterate

loiterer I it was the son of thy grandmother ..... ii( 1 205

Wo are the sons of women ...... Mer. Wives ii 8 51

Come, Master Shallow ; come, son Slender, in ...... iii 4 79

My son profits nothing in the world at his book ..... iv 1 15

My daughter and my little son And three or four more of their growth iv 4 47
Remember, son Slender, my daughter. Ay, forsooth . . . . v 2 3

Son, how now I how now, son 1 have you dispatched? . . . . v 5 188

Were ho my kinsman, brother, or my son, It should be thus with him

Alcfts. for Metis, ii 2 81

Son, I have overheard what hath passed between you and your sister . iii 1 161
I had rather my brother dio by the law than my son should bo unlaw-

fully born ............ iii 1 195

She became A joyful mother of two goodly sons . . Com. of Errors i 1 51

Those ... I bought and brought up to attend my sons . .

Unless the fear of death doth make me dote, I see my son . .

My oidy sou Knows not my feeble key of untuned cares . .

A wife once call'd /Emilia That bore thce at a burden two fair sons

Tell me where is that son That floated with then on the fatal raft?

Rude fishermen of Corinth By force took Dromio and my son .

Thirty-three years have I but gono in travail Of you, my sons

Hath Leonato any son, my lord ? No child but Hero . .

Whore is my cousin, your son ? hath he provided this music?

Like my lady's eldest son, evermore tattling . . .

Adam's sons are my brethren



in 3 75
iii 3 100



iv 1 146

v 1 139

v 1 152

V 1 176



i 1 58
v 1 196
v 1 309
v 1 343
v 1 347
v 1 352
. . v 1 401
Much. Ado i 1 296
. i 2 2

. . ii 1 n
ii 1 66



Not till Monday, my dear son, which is henco a, just seven-night . . ii 1 374

fJivnmn this maid, your daughter? As fienly,Hoii,as<lod didgivnher nm iv 1 27

Tholr HIIIIH urn well tutnnid ny yen, and limit' daughtnvN prnllT //./,. Ln.tt\v '2 ?r>

If l.hi'lr HI HIM bn IngmiuoiiK, they Hhnll want, no timt.nu'llun . . Jv 2 So

Hhn respects me UH hnr only HOII Jlf. N. /Jjrmti I 1 160

That wiiuM hang 111, ovoty moMier'fl mm 1 2 Bn

Conm, sit down, nvory mnlhnr'rt sou, and rchearsn your parts . . Ill 1 75

Being an houeMt man R son, or rather an honest woman's son Me.r. of Ten. il 2 if>

No master, sir, but a poor man's son ii 2 53

Well, old man, I will tell you news of your son : give me your blessing ii 2 82
Munlrr cannot bo hid long ; a man's son may, but at tho length truth

will out ii 2 84

Your boy that was, your son that is, your child that shall bo . . ii 2 90

I cannot think you are my son ii 2 92

Here 's my son, sir, a poor boy, Not a poor boy, sir, but tho rich Jew's

man . ii 2 129

Oo, father, with thy son. Take leave of thy old master . . . ii 2 161

Record a gift, Hero in tho court, of all ho dies possess 'd, Unto his son . iv 1 390

The youngest son of Sir Rowland de Boys . As Y. Like lt\ 1 59 ; i 2 234

Thero comes an old man and his three sons i 2 126

I would thou hadst been son to some man clso i 2 237

I am more proud to be Sir Rowland's son, His youngest son . . . i 2 245
Had I before known this young man his son, I should have given him

tears i 2 249

Is it possible, on such a sudden, you should fall into so strong a liking

with old Sir Rowland's youngest son i 3 29

Doth it therefore ensue that you should lovo his son dearly? . . . i 3 33
Your brother no, no brother ; yet the son Yet not the son, I will not

call him son Of him I was about to call his father . . . . ii 3 19

If that you wero the good Sir Rowland's son, ... Be truly welcome . ii 7 191

I am the second son of old Sir Rowland v 4 158

I remember, Since once he play'd a fanner's eldest son . T. of Shrew Ind. 1 84

Vincentio's sou brought up in Florence i 1 14

Who shall bear your part, And bo in Padua hero Vincentio's son? . .11 200
' Be serviceable to my son,' quoth he, Although I think 'twas in another

Ronso ...II 219

Old Antonio's Ron : My falhnr dead, my fortunn livns for mo . . . i 2 191

Antmito'R son, A man wnll known throughout all Italy . . . . ii 1 68

Son to Vincentio. A mighty man of Pisa ; by report I know him . . ii 1 104

From my mother-wit A witty mother I witless else her son . . ii 1 266

'Simois,' I am Lucentio, 'hie est,' son unto Vincontio of Pisa . . iii 1 32

Give me Bianea for my patrimony. Soft, son ! iv 4 23

My son Lucentio Made me acquainted with a weighty cause . . . iv 4 25

Your son Lncentio here Doth lovo nty daughter and nho lovoth him . iv 4 40

Your son shall havo my daughter with consent. I thank you, sir. . iv 4 47

Talking with tho deceiving falher of a deceitful son . . . . iv 4 83

By my mother's son, and that's myself iv 5 6

Thero to visit A son of mine, which long I have not seen . . . iv 6 57

Gentle sir. Happily met ; the happier for thy son iv 5 59



Son. Tho sister to my wife, this gentlewoman, Thy son by this hath

married ......... T. of Shrew iv 6 63

Let me embrace with old Vincontio, And wander we to see thy honest son iv 5 69

Nay, I told you your son was well beloved v 1 26

While I play the good husband at home, my son and my servant spend

all at tho university v 1 71

He is mine only son, and heir to tho lands of me v 1 88

O, my son, my son 1 Tell me, thou villain, where is my son? . . v 1 92

Pardon, sweet father. Lives my sweet son? v 1 115

Hero's Lucontio, Right son to tho right Vincentio v 1 n8

In delivering my sou from mo, I bury a second husband . All's Well I 1 i

Welcome, count; My sou's no dearer. Thank your majesty . . . i 2 76

Her matter was, she loved your son iSns

You are my mother, madam ; would you were, So that my lord your

son were not my brother, Indeed my mother I . . . .S3 168

Love you my son? Do not you love him, madam? Go not about . i 3 193

My lord your son made me to think of this i 3 238

Whether I live or die, bo you tho sons Of worthy Frenchmen . . ii 1 n

Commend mo to my kinsmen and my son : This is not much . . . il 2 68

An they were sons of mine, I'd have them whipped . . . . ii 3 93
You are too ynuug, too happy, and too good, To make yourself a son out

of my blood ft 3 103

Well, thou hast a son shall take this disgrace off mo . . . . ii 3 249

My duty to you. Your unfortunate son iii 2 28

Your son will not bo killed so soon as 1 thought ho would . . . iii 2 39

For my part, I only hear your son wns run awny iii 2 46

Where is my son, 1 pray you ? Madam, ho'n gono to flnrvo tho duko . Hi 2 53

Hn was my son ; Hut 1 do wash his iminn out of my blood . . . Ill 2 69

My son corrupls a woll-dorivrd nature With Ills Inducement . . . Ill 2 90
I will entreat, you, when you see my son, To toll him that his pword can

never win The honour that ho loses ill 2 95

That from tho bloody course of war My dearest master, your dear son,

may hie iii 4 9

That is Antonio, the duke's eldest son iii 5 79

That downward hath Riiccpcdcd in his hoime From son to son . . Hi 7 24

Your sou was misled with a snipt-ljill'ota fellow thorn . . . . Iv 5 i .
Your daughtor-in-law had been alive at this hour, and your son horo at

homo iv5s

And that my lord your son was upon his return homo . . . , iv 5 74

To stop up the displeasure he hath conceived against your son . . iv 6 81

I have letters that my son will be hero to-night iv 5

Yonder's my lord your son with a patch of velvet on 's face . . . iv 5

Your son, As mad in folly, lack'rl the sense to know Her estimation . v 3

Come on, my son, in whom my house's name Must bo digested . . v 3

Tho ring was never hers. Son, on my life, I have seen her wear it . v 3
Leaving her In tho protection of his son, her brother . . T, Niyht i 2

Thou hast spoke for us, madonna, as if thy eldest son should bo a fool . i 5

Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know . . ii 3
If the king had no son, they would desire to live on crutches till he

had one . W. Tale i 1

Give scandal to tho blood o' the prince my son, "Who I do think is mine i 2

Take again your queen as yours nt first, Even for your son's sake . i 2

In tho which three groat ones suffer, Yourself, your queen, your son . ii 1

Tho sacred honour of himself, his queen's, His hopeful son's . . . ii 3
Tho prince your son, with mere conceit and fear Of the queen's speed,

is gone



iii 2

iii 2

iii 3

iv 1

iv 2

iv 2

iv 2



90
99
2

73
89
38
121
45

49
330
337
129

85

145
236
78
22
29
52
57
103



560
599

630
672
718
793



Rring me To the dead bodies of my queen and son

I '11 tarry till my son come ; ho hallooed but even now . . .

And remember well, I mentioned a son o 1 the king's . . .

Say to me, when sawest thou tho Prince Florizel, my son? . .

But, I fear, the angle that plucks our son thither

I think it not uneasy to got the cause of my son's resort thither .

lie compaflsnd a inoUnii of tho Prodigal Son, mid married a (.inker's wife iv 8

A father In at I ho imnt.lnl nf II!M nun u gnent. That bout becomi'H tho table Iv 4

!: :i'"'M my Hot) Hhniild rhooHO lilur rll M wlfn ...... Iv 4

My mm : he nlmll not neml |o grlcvn At knowing of Ihy rlmlro . . Iv 4

Murk your dlvoive,, young nlr, Whom son 1 dare not call . . . Iv 4

AN!CH th oo Mm sou forgiveness, As 'tween I' tho father's pnrnon . . Iv 4

We are not. furnlsh'd likn llohemla's Ron, Nor shall appear In Ricilla . iv 4
Tho old man coino in with a whoo-bub against his daughter and tho

king's son ............ iv 4

Should t now meet my father, He would not call me son . . . iv 4

I will tell tho king all, every word, yea, and his son's pranks too . . iv 4

About his son, that should have married a shepherd's daughter . . iv 4
Has tho old man o'er a son, sir, do you hear, an't like you, sir? He has

a son, who shall be flayed alive . . . . . . iv 4 810

O, that's tho case of the shepherd's son : hang him, he'll be made, an

example ............ iv 4 846

One that gives out himself Prinen Flori/rl, Son of Pulixonos . . . v 1 86

What might I have- been, Might I a son and daughter now have look'd on ! v 1 177

He was torn to pieces with a bear: this avouches tho shepherd's son . v 2 69

I brought tho old man and his son aboard the prince- . . . . v 2 124

Thy sons and daughters will be all gentlemen born ..... v 2 138

The king's son took me by tho hand, and called me brother . . . v 2 151
There was the first gentleman-like tears that ever we shed. We may

live, son, to shed many more ........ v 2 157

Prithee, son, do ; for wo must be gentle, now we are gentlemen . . v 2 164

Lot boors and franklins say it, I'll swear it. How if It be false, son? . v 2 174

This is your son-in-law And son unto tho king ...... v 3 150

In right and true behalf Of thy deceased brother Geffrey's son A'. John i 1 8
My son ! have I not ever said How that ambitious Constance would not

cease Till she had kindled France and all the world, Upon the right

and party of her son? .......... 1 1 31

Born in Northamptonshire and eldest son, An I suppose . . .1151

What art thou ? Tho son and lioir to that same Faulronbrfdgo . I 1 56
If old sir Robert did beget us both and wore our fnlher find this son

like him, Oold sir Robert, father, on my kneo I givo hen von thanks

I was not llko to iheo 1 ......... I 1 81

Do you not read some tokens of my son In tho largn composition of this

man? ............. IIP?

And took it on his death That this my mother's son was none of his . i 1 m
How if my brother, Who, as you say, took pains to got this son, Had of

your father claimVl this son for'his? ....... i 1 121

My mother's son did got your father's heir ...... i 1 128

The reputed son of Cauir-do-lion, Lord of thy presence and no land beside i 1 136

So is my namn begun ; Philip, good old ftlr Robert's wife's eldest son . I 1 159
Is it sir Robert's son that ynu seek HO? Hir Hnhm-t's son I Ay, thou

unreverend bny, Sir Robert's son : why scorn 'st thou at sir Robert?

He is sir Robert's son, and so art thou ...... i 1 226

That Geffrey was thy elder brother born, And this his Bon . . . ii 1 105



SON



1422



SON



Son. Who is it tliou dost call usurper, Franco? Let me make answer ;



thy usurping son .

My bed was ever tu Uiy sou as true As tlnim was to thy husband



This is thy old'st son's'son, Infortunato in nothing but in Ihce
1 can produce A will that bars Urn Ullu of thy son .
Young Plantagenet, Sou to the elder brother of this man
Whose sons lie scattered on the bleeding ground ....
Son, list to this conjunction, make this match ....
If ... thy princely son Can in Ihis book of beauty read ' I love ' .
Being but the shadow of your sou, Becomes a sun and makes your son
a shadow



John ii 1 J2i

. ii 1 124

. ii 1 177

. ii 1 192

. ii 1 239

ii 1 304

ii 1 468

ii 1 484



ii 1 499



iii 1

iii 1 257
iii 4 47



. 4
iii 4



iii 4 103



IV 1 22

iv 1 50

V 2 25



wo Unisons and rhildrmi of this Islo, Worn born to see BO snd an hour v

thim . . . lli'imghl, hither 1 1 miry Hereford thy bold sou? Jtuhunlll.i \

I I 117



i 3 77
i 3 217
i 3 224

i 3 233
i 3 304
ii 1 56

ii 1 105

ii 1 121

II 1 124
ii 1 171
ii 1 194



ii i 53

ii 2 86

ii 3 21

ii 3 125

iii 3 96
V 2
v '2



a shadow , .

If thou bo pleased withal, Command thy son and daughter to join hands 11 1 532

Whore is Him and hor son? lull mo, who knows |( 1 543

Why dost thou look so sadly on my sont

Let the church, our mother, breathe her curse, A mother s curse, on hor

rovolling son

Young Arthur is my son, and ho is lost : I am nol mad ....
If I were mad, I should forgot my son, Or madly think a babe of clouts

were he

lhat these hands could so redeem my sou, As they have given those

hairs their liberly I ...
He talks lo mo lhat never had a son .

My boy, my Arthur, my fair son ! My life, my joy, my food ! .
Is it my fault that I was Geffrey's son? No, indeed, is t not; and I

would to heaven I were your son
Many a poor man's son would havo lion still
Thai \v<

1 last tli

As he Is bill my laUinr's brother's sou

Wo'llcftlmthoDukoof Norfolk, you yonr noil

Throw down, my son, the Duko of Norfolk's gage i 1 161

Edward's seven sons, whereof thyself art one, Wore as seven vials of his

sacred blood, Or seven fair branches i 2 n

Furbish new the name of John a Gaunt, Even in the lusty haviour of

his son

In regard of mo lie shortens four years of my son's oxile

And blindfold death not let mo see my son

Thy son is banish'd upon good advice, Whereto thy tongue a party-
verdict gave

Come, come, my sou, I'll bring thee on thy way

Of the world's ransom, blessed Mary's Son ....

O, had thy grandsire wilh a prophets eye Seen how his son's son should

destroy his sons

Wert thou not brother to great Edward's sou . . . . .
O, spare mo not, my brother Edward's son, For lhat 1 was his father
Edward's son ...........

I am tho last of noblo Edward's sous

IH not his heir a well-deserving son f

The Duko of Lancaster is dead. And living too; for now his son is duko 11 1 225
The Lord Northumberland, his son young Henry Percy . . . .
My lord, your son was gone before I came. Ho was? Why, so ! .
My son, young Harry Percy, Sent from my brother Worcester

You have a son, Anmerle, my noble cousin

Ton thousand bloody crowns of mothers' sons

Here comes my son Aumerle. Aumerlo that was

Welcome, my sou; who are the violets now? .

Have wo more sons? or are wo like to have? Is not my teeming date


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 263 of 531)