John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 27 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 27 of 531)
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lv 1 ; Cm-Mam** Iv 5

That's no matter MnchAifavl ; As Y. LikeltttiZ; iv8; CbrtoZonu* II 8
What's tho matter? Tempest it 1 ; II 2 ; T. O. of Ver. ii 8 ; v 4 ;

Mer. Wives ii 1 ; iii 8 ; iv 5 ; Meas. for Meas. ii 1 ; ii 2 ; Com. of

Errors iv 2 ; Much Ado iii 2; As Y. Like It ii 3 ; T. of Shrew i 2 ;

v 1 ; All's Well ii 3 ; iii 2 ; 2'. Night v 1 ; Richard II. ii 1 ; v 2 ; v 3 ;

1 Hen. IV. ii 4 ; 2 Hen. IV. ii 1 ; ii 4 ; Hen. V. iv 8 ; 2 Hen. VI. iii 2 ;

Richard III. i 1 ; Hen. VIII. v 1 ; Troi. and Cres. ii 1 ; iv 2 ;

Coriolanus ii 1 ; v 2 ; Rom, and Jul. iv 5 ; J. Cwsar iv 3 ; Macbeth

ii 3 ; Hamlet ii 1 ; iii 4 ; iv 5 ; tear i 4 ; ii 2 ; Othello i 2 ; ii 8 ; iv 1 ;

iv 2 ; v 1 ; v 2 ; Ant. and Clco. i 8 ; Cymbeline i 1 ; i G ; iii 4 ; iii ;

J'eridca Iv rt

Matthew. Thither I will send you Matthew GofTo . . 2 lien. VI. iv

Mattock. 'Tis you must dig with mattock and with spado T. Awlron. iv

Givo mo that mattock and tlm wrenching iron . . . Rom. and Jul. v

Wo took this mattock and this spado from him, As ho was coming . v

Mattress. A certain queen to Ca?sar in a mattress . . Ant. and Cleo. ii

Mature. Since their more mature dignities and royal necessities made

separation of their society W. TnU \

A true knight, Not yet mature, yet matchless . . . Troi. and Cres. iv
This lies glowing, I can tell you, and is almost mature . Coriolaniis iv
In the mature time With this ungracious paper strike the sight Lear iv
'Tis to be chid As we rate boys, who, being mature in knowledge, Pawn

their experience to their present pleasure . . . Ant. and Clco. i
Most praised, most loved, A sample to the youngest, to the more

mature A glass that feated them Cymbeline i

When onco he was mature for man, In Britain where was lie That could

stand up his parallel? v

Maturity. The seeded pride That Imtli to this maturity blown up In

rank Achilles . Troi. and Cr. i

Maud, Bridget, Marian, Cicely, Gillian, Ginn ] . . Com. of Error* iii

Maudlin. Mend forth your amorous token for fair Maudlin All's Well v
Maugre. I lovo theo so, that, maugre all thy pride, Nor wit nor reason

can my passion hldo ........ T. Night iii

This maugre all the world will I keep safe T. Andron. iv

I protest, Maugre thy strength, youth, place, and eminence . . Lear v

Maul. I'll so maul you and your toasting-iron . . . . K. John iv

'Tis sport to maul a runner Ant. and Cleo. iv

Mauri. 'Integer vitw, scelerisque pnrus, Non eget Mauri jaculis, nee

arcu.' O, 'tis a verse in Horace T. Andron. iv

Mauritania, lie goes into Mauritania and takes away with him the fair

Desdemona Othello iv

MauvaiS. Co Hont mots do son nmnvata, corruptible, pros . Hm. V. iii

Maw. Do thou but, think Whnt- 'tin to mini a ni:i\v . Mats, fur Mfn*. iii

Your maw, like mlny, should be your clock And strike you homo C. (//'.V. i



2 ii

2 *5
2 53
2 113
2 178

2 187
5 54
7 63
2 73



4 14

2 192
8 28

5 169
5=43
2 109



6 n

8 11

8 22

8 185

6 71

1 27

6 97

3 26

282

4 31

1 48

4 52

3 317

1 31

8 68

1 163

2 no
8 131

3 99

7 14

2 21

2 229

4 56



Maw. Bid the winter come To thrust his Icy fingers in my maw A". John v 7 37
In thy throat, And in thy hateful lungs, yea, in thy maw, perdy Hen. V. ii 1 52
Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death ! . . . Rom. and Jul. v 8 45
Then they could smile and fawn upon his debta And take down the

interest into their gluttonous maws .... 7". nf Athens iii 4 52
If charnel-houses and our graves must send Those that we bury back,

our monuments Shall be the maws of kites . . . Macbeth iii 4 71
WIU-lios' mummy, maw nnd gulf Of the mvln'd n!t-KM Nlmrk . . Iv 1 23
Maxim. Thin maxim out of lovn 1 tench: Achluvommit IN ruliitiiand ;

ungaln'd, benooch . . . . : / -. . Troi. nnd Cres. I 'J 318

May It please you . . T. G. of Ver. I 8 39

And, may I say to thee, this pride . . . hath drawn my love from her iii 1 72
If any man may, you may as soon as any .... Mer. Wives n 2 245

He speaks holiday, he smells April and May iii 2 70

Yon may, I may not ; you are yet unsworn . . . Meas. for Meas. i 4 9
Which princes, would they, may not disannul . . Com. of Errors i 1 145

Come again when you may ,'. . iii 1 41

And may it bo that you have quite forgot A husband's office? . . iii 2 i
Her cousin, an she were not possessed with a fury, exceeds her as much

in beauty as the first of May doth the last of December Much Ado i 1 194

May this be so? I will not think it iii 2 120

Despite his nice fence and his active practice, His May of youth . . v 1 76
Why should I joy in any abortive birth? At Christmas I no more desire '

a rose Than wish a snow in May's new-fangled mirth . /,. L. Lost i I 106
Ijove, whose month is ever May, Spied a blossom jmssing fair . , iv 8 102

To do obsei vanco to a morn of May M. N. Ih-eam \ 1 167

Hhino comforts from the east. That I may back to Athens by daylight . Ill 2 431
No doubt they rose up wirly to observe The ilto of May . . . iv 1 138
1 never may bellevo These antique fables . . ...... ...vl 2

May you stead me? will you pleasure me? . . . Mer. of Venice I 8 7
Here do I choose, and thrive I as I may ! . . : . . t .- . . H 7 60
Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes As Y. Like It iv 1 148

Haply to wive and thrive as best I may T. of Shrew i 2 56

It may not be. Let me entreat you. It cannot be . . . . iii 2 200
Thank both heaven and me ! You may so in the end . . All's Well iv 2 68
But, come what may, I do adore thee BO . ,-,' ,.' . ;.r ' . T. Nfyht it 1 48
More matter for a May morning . . ... '' . ,.t i, ... . iii 4 156

What would my lord, but that he may not have? v 1 104

If you may please to think I love the king W. Talo iv 4 532

I may not go without you to the kings. Thou mayst, thou shalt A'. John iii 1 66
May this be possible? may this be true? . . ;.. - . t . . . y 4 21
To find out right with wrong, it may not be i . .*..*' Richard II. ii 3 145

Worst in this royal presence may I speak iv 1 115

She came adorned hither like sweet May, Sent back like Hallowmas . v 1 79
The moon shines fair ; you may away by night . . 1 Hen. IV. iii 1 142
As full of spirit as the month of May, And gorgeous as the sun . . iv 1 101

I am coining on, To venge me as I may Hen. V. i 2 292

When time shall serve, there shall be smiles ; but that shall be as it may iii 7
I will live so long as I may, that's the certain of it ; and when I cannot

live any longer, I will do as I may ii 1 15

Things must be as they may : men may sleep, and they may have their

throats about them at that time ii 1 23

It must be as it may : though patience be a tired mare, yet she will plod ii 1 25

Whoe'er he be, you may not be let in 1 Htn. VI. i 8 7

Uion the which, that every one may read, Shall be engraved . . ii 2 14
And crown her Queen of England ere the thirtieth of May 2 Hen. VI. i 1 49
But be it as it may : I here entail The crown to thee . . 8 Hen. VI. i 1 194

With all the heed I may Richard III. iii 1 187

Hark, what good sport is out of town to-day ! Better at home, if

' would I might 1 were ' may' . ' 1 1-" , . . . Troi. and Cres. i 1 117
I '11 spring up in his tears, an 'twere a nettle against May . . i 2 191

Whom may yon else oppose, That can from Hector bring his honour off? i 8 333
Sweet lord, thou hast a line forehead. Ay, yon may, you may . . Hi 1 118
"You aro never without your tricks : you may, yon muy . . Coritnnnnt 11 8 39

You may mil puss, you must return v 2 5

And chauco It ns It may . . . >. '! f -i i * T. of Athens v 1 129

Come what come may M<t?i>cthi 8 146

Who may I rather challenge for unkindness Than pity for mlnclmnco ! . iii 4 42
Foryourdesire to know whatis between us, O'ermaster'tHH youmay flam. I 6 140
With all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May iii 8 81

rose of May 1 Dear maid, kind sister, sweet Ophelia 1 . . . iv 6 157
May you suspect Who they should be that have thus mangled you? Oth. v 1 78

May be. As little by such toys as may be possible . . T. G. of Ver. I 2 82
May be the knave bragged of that he could not compass Mer. Wives iii 3 211
May be he tells you true iii 4 n

1 '11 know His pleasure ; may bo he will relent . . Meas, for Meas. ii 2 3

May bo I will call upon you anon . Iv 1 23

Hut be It as It may be, I will marry thoo . . . .Ait Y. Lttc 11 Iii 8 42

May be the amorous count solicits her Air 8 Well til 5 72

May bo he will not timeh young Arthur's life . . . ' . . K. John iii 4 160

And may be so we shall 1 Hen. IV. iv 8 113

Happily met, my lady and my wife ! That may be, sir, when I may be

a wife. That may be must be . . . . . Rom. and Jnl. iv 1 19

It may be I shall raise you by and by ..'.*':. . .-. J. C(e$ar iv 3 247
It may be I shall otherwise bethink me . . , i : . . . iv 3 251
May be she pluck'd it off To send it me . ... . . Cymbeline ii 4 104

That, may be, hath endured a grief Might equal yours . . Pericles v 1 88

May-day. As fit as ... a morris for May-day . . . All's Well ii 2 25

As 'tis to make 'em sleep On May-day morning Hen. VIII. v 4 15

May -morn. In the very May-morn of his youth, Ulpe for exploits Htn. V. i 2 120

Mayor. How London doth pour out her citizens I Tim mayor and all

his brethren in best sort v Prol. 25

Peace, mayor I thou know'st little of my wrongs . . .1 Hen. VI. i 8 59

Mayor, farewell : thou dost but what thou mayst 1 8 86

To Ixmdon, where we will have the mayor's sword borne before us

2 Hen. VI. iv 3 ifi

The lord mayor craves aid of ymir honour from tho Tower . . . iv & 4
But, master mayor, If Henry 'bo your king, Yet Edward at tho least Is

Duke of York. True, my good lord .... 8 Hen. VI. iv 7 20
Why, master mayor, why stand you in a doubt? Open the gates . . iv 7 27
My lord, the mayor of London comes to greet you . . Richard III. iii 1 17
Is Catesby gone? He is ; and, see, ho brings the mayor along . . iii 6 13

Lord mayor, Look to the drawbridge there ! iii 6 14

The mayor towards Guildhall hies him in ell pout iii 5 73

I reprehended them ; And ask'd the mayor what meant this wilful silence iii 7 28
Will not the mayor then and his brethren come? The mayor is here at

hand iii 7 44

Tin- lord mnyor knocks. Welcome, my lord : I daiieo attendance hem iii 7 55
Tell him, myself, Ihn mayor and cillxons, In ilntp drui^im . . . An*

eomo to liavo aonin confcri-hcp with |I!H grace ill 7 66



MAYOR



1004



MEAN



Mayor. When last I was at Exeter, The innyorln courtesy show'd mo tho

J cftatlo Itlchanl III. tv 2 107

He sent command to tho lord mayor straight To atop tho rumour

Hen. nil. ii 1 151
To you, my good lord mayor, Ami your good brethren, I am much

belioldiug v 5 70

Maypole. How low nm I, thou painted maypole? speak M. N. Dream iii 2 296
Mayst. Thou mayst perceive how well 1 like it . . T. G. of Vvr. i 3 35

Thou dost but wliat thou mayst 1 Hen. VI. i 3 86

Long mayst thou live to wail thy children's loss ! . . Richard III. i 3 204

Remain in 'baa thou mayst *!* and Cleo. ii 6 29

Maze. Here's a maze trod Indeed Through forth-righta and meanders !

Tempest iii 3 2

This !n as strange a maze an o'or mon trod V 1 242

The nine mon'u morris in nil'd up with mud, And tho quaint mazes In

tha wanton green For luck of tread are undtstlnguishable M. N. J). II 1 99
I have thrust myself Into this maze, Haply to wive and thrive T. of H. i 2 55
Mazed. Change Their wonted llvuries, and the mazed world, By their

lucruaso, now knows not which Is which . . . M. N. Mi-nun ii 1 uj
A little herd of England's* timorous doer, Mazed with a yelping kennel

of French curs ! 1 //. VI. iv 2 47

That many mazed considerings did throng And press'd in Hen. VIII. ii 4 185
Mazzard. knocked about the mazzard with a sexton'fl spado . Hamlet y 1 97



Let me go, sir, Or I '11 knock you o'er the mazzard .
Me, iwor man, my library Was dukedom large enough



Othello ii 3 155
Tempest i 2 109
And thence 'retire me to my Milan ........ v 1 310

I am the dug Oh [ tliu dog ia me, and I urn myself . T. G. of Ver. ii 3 25
lie thrusts mo himself into the company of threu or four gentlemanlike

dog* ............. iv 4 18

<> mo unhappy I Louk to tho hoy ........ v 4 84

Tho huimmr rlmm ; It Is good ; humour mo the RIlgolH . . Mtr. Wire* I 3 < \
Come me to what was donu to her ..... Mean, fur Afnts. 11 1 121

I do repent mo, as It n an evil ......... ii 3 35

Let me excuse me, and believe me so ....... iv

I cannot, nor I will not, hold me still ..
She leans me out at her mistress' chamber-window
Get you from our court. Me, uncle? You, cousin
'



. ,

I hear no harm. No, say'st me so, friend?
A foolish knight, That's me, I wan-ant you
Build me thy fortunes upon the basis of valour
WiH either of you bear me a challenge to him ?



Scout me for him at the corner of the orchard like a hum-bnily
H.it hoar me this : Blnco you U> non-rogardaiice cast my faith
Or both yourself and mo (Jry lost, and so good night t



Com. of Errors iv 2 17
Much Ado iii 8 155
As Y. Like It i 3 44
. T. of Shrew i 2
. T. Night ii 5
iii 2
iii 2



87
35
43

ill 4 193
. v 1 123
W. Tale i 2 410
Imagine me, Gentle spectators, 1 1ml 1 now mtiy bn In fair Bohemia . iv 1 19

in.- 1 it is my mother. How now, good lady ! . . . A'. .'',, 1 1 a-^o
Me rulher hud my heart might fuel your lovo . . . Itttftttid 11. iii 3 192
To quit their griefs, Tell thou the lamentable tale of me . . v 1 44

1 followed mo close, came iu foot and hand . . . .1 Hen. IV. ii 4 241

See how this river comes me cranking in ....... iii 1 98

It [slier rid] ascends me into the brain; dries me there all the foolish

and dull and crudy vapours ..... 2 Uen. IV. iv 3 105
And think me honoured To feast so great a warrior . 1 Hen. VI. ii 3 81

It [my shame] will . . . show itself, attire me how I can . 2 Hen. VI. ii 4 109
Me seemeth then it id no policy, Respecting what a rancorous mind he

beard ............. iii 1 23

Here on this molehill will I sit me down ..... 3 Hen. VI. ii 5 14

Peace, tawny slave, half me and half thy dam ! T. Andron. y 1 27

Rests me his minim rest, one, two, and the third in your bosom R. andJ. ii 4
Where I have learn'd me to repeut the sin Of disobedient opposition . iv 2



O me, O mo ! My child, m
He plucked me ope his do



my only life, Revive, look up !
mulet and offered them his throat



A man no mightier than thyself or me In personal action
O, yet I do reixmt me of my fury, Tliat I did kill them .



. iv 6 19

J. Ctesar i 2 267

. i 3 76

Macbeth ii 3 112

. iii

Hamlet iii 1 168

Lear i 2 106
49



The cloudy messenger turns me his back, And hums
O, woe is me, To have seen what I have seen, see what

Wind me into him, I pray you

Whip me such honest knaves ........ Othello i 1

Is she as tall as me? She is not, madam .... Ant. and Cleo. iii 3 14

And make a conquest of unhappy me t'ericles i 4 69

Tho word, 'Me jwmpie provexit apex' ii 2 30

Come you between, And save poor me, the weaker iv 1 91

Meacook. A meacock wretch can make the curstest shrew T. vfShreiv ii 1 315

Mead. And flat meads thatch'd with stover .... Tempest iv 1 63

In dale, forest or mead, By paved fountain or by rushy brook M. N. D. ii 1 83

It blots thy beauty as frosts do bite the meads . . T. of Shrew v 2 139

The even mead, that erst brought sweetly forth The freckled cowslip

Hen. V. v 2 48
And as our vineyards, fallows, meads and hedges, Defective in their

natures, grow to wildnous V 2 54

One hour's storm will drown the fragrant meads; What will whole

. T. Andrun, 11 4



montliH of team thy father'* oyoa?

Wll.lt j.i.'nl.'iillH llvi'I'h Uh'l Wldlt-Hltlrtoil Miruitrt .

Meadow. Du italnt thn meadow* wllh dullght .
As meadows, yet not dry, With miry ullniu left on them

Meadow -fairies, look you sing

Meagre. Thou meagre lead, Which rather threateneat
Turning . . . The meagre cloddy earth to glittering gold
As hollow aa a ghost, As dim and meagre as an ague's lit
Of ashy semblance, meagre, pale and bloodless
Meagre were his looks, Hharp misery had worn him to the bones It. andJ. v 1 40

Meal. What strange fish Hath made his meal on thee? . . Tempest ii 1 113
One fruitful meal would set me to't .... Metis, for Meas, iv 3 161

Unquiet meals make ill digestions Com. of Errors v 1 74

And but one meal on every day beside L. L. Lost i 1 4C

Give them great meals of beef and iron and steel . . . Hen. V. iii 7 161
Give me but the ten meals I have lost, and I 'Id defy them all 2 Hen, VI. iv 10 66
Why hast thou not served thyself in to my table so many meals? T.andC. ii 8
Meal and bran together lie throws without distinction . Corwlanus iii 1
Whoae hours, whose bed, whose meal, and exercise, Are still together . iv 4 14
If I were a huge man, I should fear to drink at meals . T. of Athens i 2
To keep with you at meals, comfort your bed J. Catsar ii 1

Ere we will eat our meal in fear and sleep In the affliction of these

terrible dreams That shake us nightly .... Macbeth iii 2
Let's to-night Be bounteous ut our meul .... Ant. and Cleo. iv 2
Hi-re's money for my meat : I would have left It on tlm board so soon

As 1 had made my meal Cymbeline Hi G

Nature hath meal and bran, contempt and grace iv 2

Mealed. Were ho meal'd with that Which heontH'ts, then were he ty mil-
lion* ; But this being so, hu's just . , , MVUS./VI- ,1/ciw. iv 2 86



s i

J.Mr \ 1 6(J

. ! I hint v 2 907
T. Andron, Hi 1 125
Mer. Wives v 6 69
Mer. of Venice iii 2 i
K. John iii 1 80
.. iii 4 85
2 Hen. VI. iii 2 162



Mealy. Men, like butterflies, Show not their mealy wings but to the
summer, And not a man, for being simply man, ll.it h any honour

Troi. and Crcs. Hi 8 79
Mean. But for tho miracle, I mean our preservation . . Tvmjtcst ii 1 7
Here is every thing advantageous to life. True ; save means to live . ii 1 50

1 mean, in a sort. That sort was well fished for ii 1 103

Since they did plot The means that dusky Dis my daughter got . . iv 1 89

What do you mean To dote thus on such luggage? iv 1 230

Supportable To make the dear loss, have I moans much weaker Than you v 1 146
You mistake ; I moan the pound, a pinfold T. It. of Ver. i 1 uj

What means this iassion at his name? Pardon, dear madam . i 2 16

There wantebb but a mean to nil your song. The mean is drown'd . i 2 95
Hast thou observed that? even she, I mean. Why, sir, I know her not ii 1 49
I mean that her beauty Is exquisite, but her favour infinite . . . ii 1 59
What means your ladyship? do you not like it? Yes, yes . . . ii 1 127

Tut, man, I mean thou 'It lose the flood ii 8 46

Here he means to spend his time awhile : I think 'tis no unwi-lconm

news to you , il 4 80

Too nii'itn a servant To have a look of such a worthy mistress . . ii 4 107
And all the means Plotted and 'greed on fur my happiness . . . ii 4 182
Tell me some good mean How, with my honour, I may undertake A

journey ii 7 5

They have devised a mean How he her chamber-window will ascend . iii 1 38

For 'get you gone,' she doth not mean 'away !' iii 1 101

But she I mean is promised by her friends Unto a youthful gentleman iii 1 106
' Friend,' quoth I, 'you mean to whip the dog?' 'Ay, marry, do I,'

quoth he iv 4 27

Be my mean To bring me where to speak with Madam Bilvia . . . iv 4 113
The more degenerate ami base art thou, To make such means for her ns

thou hast done And luuvo her on such Might conditions . . . v 4 137
What inruii you by that saying? Pleaso you, I'll tell you . . . v 4 167
Briolly, I do niuan to make love to Ford's wife . . . Mer. Wives i 3 47
1 had lid verso good means, as desire, to make myself acquainted with you II 2 i8y
Whatsoever I have merited, either in my mind or in my means . . ii 2 211
Do not marry me to yond fool. I mean it not ; I seek you a better

husband iil 4 88

HIT lather means she shall be all hi white iv it 35

Which means she to deceive, father or mother? Both . . . . iv 46
No man means evil but the devil, and we shall know him by his horns v 2 15
By the woman's means? Ay, sir, by Mistress Overdone's means M.fvrM. ii 1 84
Your honour cannot come to that yet. No, sir, nor I mean it not . ii 1 124
Does your worship mean to geld and splay nil the youth of the city? . ii 1 242

l.nther have mindful, but not lavish, means ii 2 24

"1'is all us easy Falsely to take away a llfu true made AH to put metal

iu restrained means To makti a mlse ono 11 -I 48

There were No earthly moan to save him . II 4 95

It oft falls out, To have what wu would have, wo sprak nut what wo

mean H 4 118

The evil that thou causest to be done, That is thy moans to live . . iii 2 22

For other means was none Coin, of Errors i 1 76

Many a man would take you at your word, And go indeed, having so

good a mean i 2 18

I mean not cuckold-mad ; But, sure, lie is stark mad . . . . ii 1 58
1 am glad to see you in this merry vein : What means this jest? . . ii 2 21
Thou drunkard, thou, what didst thou mean by this? . , . . iii 1 10

Though my cates be mean, take them in good part iii 1 28

A crow without feather? Master, mean you so? iii 1 81

I will depart in quiet, And, in despite of mirth, mean to be merry . iii 1 108
This woman that I mean, My wife but, I protest, without desert

Hath oftentimes upbraided me withal in 1 m

He gains by death that hath such means to die iii 2 51

A wondrous fat marriage. How dost thou mean a I at marriage? . . iii 2 95
What Adam dost thou mean? Not that Adam that kept tho Paradise . iv 3 15

I hope you do not mean to cheat me so iv 3 79

I will not let him stir Till I have used the approved means I have . v 1 103
When mean you to go to church? ...... Much Ado ii 1 370

Means your lordship to be married to-morrow? iii 2 91

The fashion of a doublet, or a hat, or a cloak, is nothing to a man.

Yes, it is apparel. I mean, the fashion iii 3 128

What means the fool, trow? Nothing I iii 4 59

What do you mean, my lord ? Not to be married iv 1 44

Nor age so eat up my invention, Nor fortune made such havoc of my

means lv 1 197

Policy of mind, Ability in means and choice of friends . . . . iv 1 201
Claudio did mean, upon his words, to disgrace Hero . . . . iv 2 56
And knows me, How pitiful I deserve, I mean in singing . . . v 2 30
Things hid and barr'd, you mean, from common sense? . . L. L. Lost i 1 57
Now for the ground which ; which, I mean, I walked upon . . . i 1 242
Pretty and apt. How mean you, sir ? I pretty, and my saying apt ? . i 2 20
My beauty, though but mean, Needs not the painted nourish of your

praise ii 1 13

IIu rather means to lodge you In tho Held ii 1 85

I mean Hotting thuo at liberty, iinfineduiiilng thy purnon . . . Ill 1 u|
As I for praise alone now HOOK Iu Hplll The poor doer's blood, Hint my

heart means no ill iv 1 35

Ho can sing A mean most meanly ; and in ushering Mend him who can v 2 328
If you my favour mean to get, A twelvemonth shall you spend . . v 2 830

Herein mean I to enrich my pain M. N. Dream i 1 250

I mean, that my heart unto yours is knit So that but ono heart we can

make of it ii 2 47

I understand not what you mean by this . . . . . . . iii 2 236

Heavens shield Lysander, if they mean a fray ! iii 2 447

And thus she means, videlicet : Asleep, my love? What, dead? . . v 1 330
By something showing a more swelling port Than my faint means would

grant continuance Afer. qf Venice i 1 125

My extremest means Lie all unlock'd to your occasions . . . .11 138
O my Antonio, had I but the means To hold a rival place with one of

them ! i 1 173

It Is no mean happiness, therefore, to be seated in the mean . . .128

Yet his means ore in supposition i 3 17

Ijind-rats and water-rats, water-thieves and land-thieves, I mean pirates i 3 24
To yield myself His wife who wins me by that means I told you . . ii 1 19

But stop my house's ears, I mean my casements ii 6 34

Subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means . . . . iii 1 65
When your honours mean to solemnize The bargain of your faith . . iii 2 194
And do you, Gratiano, mean good faith? Yes. faith, my lord . . iii - ia
Engaged my friend to his mere enemy, To feed my means . . . iii 2 266
If on earth ho do not mean it, then In reason ho should never come to

heaven iii 6 82

No lawful means can t'uny me Out of his envy'a reach . . . . iv 1 y



MEAN



1005



MEAN



' 77

2 26

5 44

1 10

1 75



Mean. I do beseech you, Make no more offers, use no farther means

Mer. of Venice iv 1 81

You take my life When you do take the means whereby I live . . iv 1 377
The clerk that never means to do it. Unless he live until he be a man . v 1 282
Have by underhand means laboured to dissuade him . As Y. Like It i 1 146
Never leave thee till he hath ta'en thy life by some indirect means or

other i 1 159

An you mean to mock mo after, you should not havo mocked mo before 1 2 220


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 27 of 531)