John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 364 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 364 of 531)
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I have watched and travell'd hard ; Some time I shall sleep out . tear ii 2 162
Deny to speak with mo? They are sick? they are weary? They havo

travell'd all Urn night? ii 4 90

Travellers ne'er did lie, Though fools at home condemn 'em . Tempest iii 3 26

These are the villains That all the travellers do fear so much T. G. of I'cr. iv 1 6
As fast lock'd up in sleep as guiltless labour When it lies starkly in the

traveller's bones Meas. for Meas. iv 2 70

Brave Master Shooty the great traveller iv 3 18

Our court, you know, is haunted With a refined traveller of Spain L. L. L.i I 164

I may speak of thee as the traveller doth of Venice iv 2 97

Motion and long-daring action tires The sinewy vigour of the traveller . iv 8 308

But travellers must bo content As Y. Like It ii 4 18

A traveller I By my faith, you havo great reason to be sad . . . iv 1 21

Farewell, Monsieur Traveller : look you lisp and wear strange suits . iv 1 33
Or is it else your pleasure, Like pleasant travellers, to break a jest Upon

the company you overtake? T. of Shrew iv 5 72

You are a vagabond and no true traveller All's ll'ell ii 3 277

A good traveller is something at the latter end of a dinner . . . ii 6 30

Now your traveller, He and his toothpick at my worship's mess A'. John i 1 189



List if thou canst hear the tread of travellers



. 1 Hen. IV. ii 2



Now spurs the lated traveller apaco To gain the timely inn . Macbeth iii 8
The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns Hamlet iii 1
By your pardon, sir, I was then a young traveller . . . Cymbeline i 4 47
If we had of every nation a traveller, we should lodge them with this sign

Pericles iv 2 123

Travelleat. Withal make known which way thou travellest T. of Shrew iv 6 51

Travelling along this roast, I hero am romo by chance . . //. L. Lnst v 2 557

That mi'UMH, Travelling Homo.jouriioy, to repose him hero T, nffihrfw I ml. 1 76

Travelling tnwardH York, With inilGil ado. . . . ilichnrd Jl. v G 71

"1'is tiny, And yol, (lurk night strangles thn travelling lamp . JUn.'M/i II 4 7

Unto us it Is A cell of ignorance ; travelling a-bed . . . CiimbrHite iii 3 33

Travel-tainted. Here, travel -tain ted as I am ... 2 Hen. IV. iv 3 40



Travers. Here comes my servant Travers ..... 2 Ken. IV. i 1 28

Now, Travers, what good tidings comes with you? ..... i 1 33

Why should that gentleman that rode by Travers Give then such

instances of loss ? ........... i 1 55

Traverse. To see thee fight, to seo thee foin, to see thee traverse M. W. ii 3 25
Quite traverse, athwart the heart of his lover . As Y. Like It iii 4 45

Hold, Wart, traverse ; thus, thus, thus .... 2 Hen. IV. iii 2 291

Traverse I go, provide thy money ...... Othello i 3 378

Traversed. Have wander'd with our traversed arms and breathed Our

sufferance vainly ........ T. of Athens v 4 7

Tray, Blanch, and Sweet-heart, see, they bark at me .... Lear iii 6 66

Tray-trip. Shall I play my freedom at tray-trip? T. Night ii 5 208

Treachers. Knaves, thieves, and treachers, by spherical predominance Leari 2 133

Treacherous. A treacherous army levied, one midnight . . Tempest i 2 128

Treacherous man ! Thou hast beguiled my hopes . . T. G. of Ver. v 4 63

And greedily devour the treacherous bait ..... Much Ado iii 1 28

He will . . . entrap thee by some treacherous device . As Y. Like It i 1 157
Mistake mo not so much To think my poverty is treacherous . . I 3 67
Paying the line of rated treachery Even with a treacherous due of all

your lives .......... K. John v 4 38

The treacherous feet Which with usurping steps do trample thee

Richard If. iii 2 16
With full as many lies As may he holloa'd in thy treacherous ear . . iv 1 54

loyal father of a troaehorouH HOU I ........ v86o

And Huvnd Urn treucherotiH labour Of your ROI1 . . . .1 Iloi. 71'. v 4 57

A nost of hollow bosoms, which ho (Ills With tronchorous crowns

Hen. V. ii Prol. 22

But, O I the treacherous Fastolfo wounds my heart
.Sheep run not half so treacherous from the wolf
The treacherous manner of his mournful death .
Like a dastard and a treacherous coward
As true and just As I am subtle, false, and treacherous
And with thy treacherous blade Unrip'dst the bowels of thy sovereign's

son ............. i 4 211

Deep, hollow, treacherous, and full of guile, Bo he unto me 1 . . . ii 1 38
Thy age conflrm'd, prowl, subtle, bloody, treacherous . . . . iv 4 171

Fie, treacherous hue, that will betrny with blushing Tho closo enacts

and couusnls of the, heart I ...... T. Andron. iv 2 117

Or my true heart with treacherous revolt Turn to another Rom. and Jul. iv 1 58

1 am not treacherous. But Macbeth is ..... Macbeth iv 3 18
lie morse less, treacherous, lecherous, kiudless villain 1 . . Hamlet ii 2 609
The treacherous instrument is in thy hand, Un bated and envenom'd . v 2 327
Out, treacherous villain 1 Thou call'st on him that hates thee . Lear iii 7 87

treacherous villains ! What are you there? come in . . Othello v 1 58
To write and read Jlo henceforth treacherous I . . . . Cymbeline iv 2 317

Treacherously hast thou vanquish'd him ..... 8 Hen. VI. Ii 1 72
Treachery. I cannot now prove constant to myself, Without some

treachery used to Valentino ..... 7'. (J. of Ver. ii 32

1 lew him manfully in light, Without fulso vantage or huso troac.hory Iv 1 29
Those that botiay UlOlil do no lieiichery .... Mrr. Wives v 8 24
I In is composed and framed of treachery ..... Much Ado v 1 257
Who should lio coullnod, Lost that, tho treachery of thn two Hod hewn



. 1 lien. VI. \ 4 35

i 5 30

. . . ii 2 16

8 Hen. VI. ii 2 114

Richard III. i 1 37



Ho loll her to perform .



1C. 7'n/eil 1 195
37



Your breathing shall oxpiro, Paying the fino of rated treachery K. John v 4
On soino known ground of treachery in him .... RicJtard II. i 1

God for his mercy, what treachery is here I v 2 75

So sell His sovereign's life to death and treachery . . . Hen. V. ii 2 11
What treachery was used? No treachery ; but want of men and money

1 Hen. VI. i 1 68

And for thy treachery, what's more manifest? iii 1 21

If Talbot but survive thy treachery iii 2 37

monstrous treachery ! can this be so? iv 1 61

Lost most part of all the towns, Ily treason, falsehood, and by treachery v 4 109
And wilt thou still bo hammering treachery? . ... 2 Hen, VI. i 2 47
To king* Miat fear their subjects' treachery . . . .8 Hen. VI. 11 45
O, treachery I Fly, good I'lcauce, My, tly, Ily ! Thou hlRynt nvflligG

Macbeth iii 8 17
Thou slmg-hair'd villain I What, you egg ! Young fry of treachery 1 , iv 2 84

1 am justly kill'd with miiio own treachery .... Hamlet v 2 318

villany 1 Ho ! let the door bo lock'd : Treachery ! Peek it out . . v 2 323
We have seen the best of our time : machinations, liollowness, treachery

Lear i 2 123

Of Gloucester's treachery, And of the loyal service of his son . . iv 2 6
Take me from this world with treachery and devise engines for my life Oth. iv 2 221
Tread. And think'st it much to tread the ooze Of the salt deep Tempest i 2 252
Tread softly, that the blind mole may not Hear a foot fall . . . iv 1 194
Ask him why, that hour of fairy revel, In their so sacred paths he dares

to tread In shape profane Mer. Wives iv 4 59

What we do not seo We tread upon, and never think of it Mean, for Jl/w. ii 1 26
Tho poor beetle, that wo tread upon, In corporal sullnrance llnds a pang

as groat As when a giant dies ill 1 79

1 do altec t the very ground, which is base, where her shoo, which is

baser, guided by her foot, which is basest, doth tread //. L. Lost i 2 174

O, if the streets were paved with thine eyes, Her feet were much too

dainty for such tread 1 iv 3 279

Measured many a mile To tread a measure with yon on this grass . . v 2 187
The ladies call him sweet; Tho stairs, an he treads on thorn, kiss his feet v 2 330

When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws v 2 915

And the quaint mazes in the wanton green For lack of trend are undls-

tinguishable M. N. Dream ii 1 100

And, like a forester, tho groves may tread iii 2 390

A kinder gentleman treads not tho earth .... Mer. of Venice ii 8 35
France is a dog-hole, and it no more merits The tread of a man's foot

All's irellii 3 292
For this down-trodden equity, we tread In warlike march these greens

A", John ii 1 241
To tread down fair respeet of sovereignty iii 1 58

then, tread down my need, and faith mounts up! . . . . iii 1 215
Wheresoe'er this foot of mine doth tread, He lies before me . . . iii 3 62
But tread the stranger paths of banishment .... Richard II. i 3 143

On my heart they trend now whilst I live iii 3 158

For accordingly You tread tipnn my patience . . . .1 Hen. IV. i 8 4

List if thou canst hear the tread of travellers ii 2 35

An if wo live, we live to tread on kings v 2 86

By this heavenly ground I tread on 2 lien. IV. ii 1 152

1 will not clmugo my horso with any that trends hut on four pasterns

Urn. V. HI 7 12

Swear by her font, Unit H!IO may tread out the oatl iii 7 103

Uneath may sho endure the Ilinty Htvpfts, To tread thorn wlUi her

tender-feeling feet 2 Hen. I' I. ii 4 9



TREAD



1600



TREASURE



Tread. Tho envious people laugh And bid me be advised how I tread

2 Heti. VI. ii 4 36

I'll lend thy bear And tread it under foot with nil contempt . . . v 1 209
Liko ouo that stands upon a promontory, Ami spies a far-oil' shore wlu>ro

ho would Iroad U Hen. I'l. iii 2 136

Tread on the sand ; why, there yovi quickly sink v 4 30

Go, tread the path that thmi shall ne'er return . . Hichnnl III, i I 117
Such a nature, Tickled with good suecos.s, disdains the shadow Which

ho treads on at noon ........ ('oriolnnns i 1 265

Ho'll beat Aulidins 1 head below his knee And tread upon his neck . i 3 50

Or rise Triumphantly tread on thy country's ruin v 3 116

Tliou shalt no sooner March to assault thy country than to tread-
Trust to't, thou shult not on thy mother's womb . . . . v 8 123
A* shall not tread on me ; I '11 run away till I am bigger . . . . v 8 127
Tread not upon him. Masters all, be quiet ; Put up your swords . . y 6 135
Well-apparoll'd April on the heel Of limping winter treads Rom. andJid. i 2 28
So shall no foot upon tho churchyard tread . . . Hut thou shalt hear it v 3 5
Ho im'ur drinks, Hut Timon's silver treads upon his lip T. of Athens iii 2 78
I shall tread upon tho tyrant's head, Or wear it on my sword Al<t<-lif.t.h iv 8 45
Himself tho primrose path of dalliance trend* .... Hamlet i 8 50
One woe doth tread upon another's heel, So fast they follow . . . iv 7 164
If yuii will give mo leave, I will tread this unbolted villain into mortar

Lear ii 2 71
The land bids me troad no moro upou't ; It is ashamed to bear me !

Ant. and Cleo. iii 11 i

Up to yond hill ; Your legs are young ; I'll tread these flats . Cymbeline iii 3 n

You should tread a course Pretty and full of view iii 4 149

Whoso delightful stops Shall make the gazer joy to see him tread . Per. ii 1 165

Treadost. The grass whereon thou tread's t the presence strew'd Rich. II. i 3 289

Treading. With many hundreds treading on his heols . . K. John iv 2 149

He moves like an engine, and the gronna shrinks Iwforohfo treading ' -.. \ 4 20

Treason, fulony, Sword, pike, knife, gun, or need of any engine, Would I

not have Tempest ii 1 160

Some treason, masters : yet stand close Af itch Ado iii 3 113

801110 certain treason. What makes treason here? . . . /,. /,. Lost iv 3 190

Treason and you go in peace away together iv 3 192

Our parson misdoubts it; 'twas treason, he said iv 3 194

To HOO no woman ; Flat treason 'gainst tho kingly sttttfl of youth . . iv 3 293
Confess What treason there is mingled with your love. None but that

ugly treason of mistrust Aler. of Venice iii 2 27

A.s well bo amity and life 'Tweon snow and fire, as treason and my love iii 2 31

Is lit for treasons, stratagems, and .spoils v 1 85

Treason is not inherited, my lord As Y. Like It i 3 63

In tho common course of all treasons, wo still BOO thorn rovoal them-
selves All's H'fHiv 8 26

Thou art here accused and arraigned of high treason . . IF. Tale Hi 2 14

To appeal each other of high treason ..... Richard II. i 1 27

Until it had return'd These terms of treason doubled down his throat . i 1 57

All the treasons for these eighteen years Complotted and contrived . i 1 95

Confess thy treasons ero thou My the realm i 3 198

In condition of the wurst degree, In gross rebellion and detested treason ii 3 109

Murders, treasons, and detested sins. . . . . . . . iii 2 44

His treasons will sit blushing in his face iii 2 51

Every stride he makes upon my land Is dangerous treason . . . iii 3 93

For your pains, Of capital treason we arrest you hero . . . . iv 1 151

Treason 1 foul treason I Villain 1 traitor 1 slave ! v 2 72

Fool-hardy king: Shall I for love speak treason to thy face? . . . v 3 44

Thou shalt know The treason that my haste forbids mo show . . v 3 50

Then treasons make me wish myself a beggar, Ami so I am . . . v 6 33

Shall we buy treason? and indent with fours? . ... 1 Hen. IV. i 3 87

For treason is but trusted like the fox v 2 9

For the which I do arrest thee, traitor, of high treason . 2 Hen. IV. iv 2 107

Of capital treason I attach you both. Is this proceeding just? . . iv 2 109

The block of death, Treason's true bed and yielder up of breath . . iv 2 123
This grace of kings must die, If hell and treason hold their promises

Hen. V. ii Prol. 29

Treason and murder ever kept together, As two yoke-devils . . . ii 2 105

But thou, 'gainstall proportion, didst bring in Wonder to wait on treason ii 2 no
All other devils that suggest by treasons Do botch and bungle up

damnation H 2 114

But he that temper'd thee bade thee stand up, Gavo thee no instance

why thou shouldst do treason Ji 2 119

I arrest thee of high treason, by the name of Kichard Earl of Cambridge ii 2 145
I ano.st thee of high treason, by tho name of Henry Lord Scroop of

Masham ii 2 147

I arrest thee of high treason, by the namo of Thomas Grey, knight . ii 2 149
Never did faithful subject moro rejoice At the discovery of most

dangerous treason Than I do at this hour joy o'er myself . . . ii 2 162

Since God so graciously hath brought to light This dangerous treason . ii 2 186

It is no Knglish treason to cut French crowns iv 1 245

I will give treason his payment into plows, I warrant you . . . iv 8 15

A most contagious treason come to light iv 8 22

For treason executed in our late king's days . . . .1 Hen. VI. ii 4 91

By his treason, stand'st not thou attainted? ii 4 92

Condemn'd to die for treason, but no traitor . . . . . . ii 4 97

Franco, thou shalt rue this treason with thy tears iii 2 36

O, ha no words, hut deeds, roveugo this treason I iii 2 49

Lot htm perceive how ill we brook his treason tv 1 74

There Minotaurs and ugly treasons lurk v 3 189

Have wo not lost most part of all the towns, By treason, falsehood? . v 4 109

Hero is a man accused of treason 2 Hen. VI. 1 3 180

This is the man That doth accuse his master of high treason . . . i 3 185

Hold ! I confess, I confess treason ii 3

And in his simple show he harbours treason iii 1

As innocent From meaning treason to our royal person As is the sucking

lamb iii 1

I do arrest thee of high treason here iii 1

Thu purest spring is not so free from mud As I am clear from treason . iii 1

I Klmll not want false witness to condemn mo, Nor utcra of treasons . iii 1 169

To keep your royal parson From treason's secret knife and traitors' rage iii 1 174

It shall be treason for any that calls me other than Lord Mortimer . iv 6
My followers' base and ignominious treasons makes me betako mo to

my heels iv 8 66

I arrest thee, York, Of capital treason 'gainst the king and crown . . v 1 107
Nor should thy prowess want praise and esteem, Hut that 'tis shown

ignobly and in treason . v 2 23

Neither by treason nor hostility To seek to put me down . 3 Hen. VI. i 1 199

When care, mistrust, and treason waits on him ii 5 54

And not bewray thy treason with a blush iii 3 97

Both shall buy this treason Even with the dearest blood your bodies bear v 1 63



Leur i 2
5
7
8
3
3
3
1



7 g

24

534

188

124
334



83
92
122
146
170

26
7



Treason. Piercing as the mid-day sun, To search the secret treasons of

the world 3 Hen. VI. v 2 18

Yon may partake of any thing wo say : Wesprak no treason Richard HI. i 1 90
Wu would have had you he;ird Tho traitor speak, and timorously con loss

Tho manner and tlm purpose of his treason iii 6 58

Let them not live to taslo this land's increase That would with treason

wound this fair land's peace I v 5 39

Which, as I take it, is a kind of puppy To the old dam, treason Hen. VI 1 1. i l 176
I Arrest thoo of high treason, in tho namo Of our most sovereign king, i 1 201
And point by point the treasons of his master Ho shall again relate .12 7
His peers, upon this evidence, Have found him guilty of high treason . Ji 1 27
What treason were it to the ransack'd queen 1 . . . Troi. and Crcs. ii 2 150
Throw their power i 1 the dust. Manifest treason ! . . Coriolunus iii 1 172
Here lurks no treason, here no envy swells ... T. Andron. i 1 153

Treason, my lord 1 Lavuiia is surprised I i 1 284

This is tho tragic tale of Philomel, -And treats of Tereus' treason . . iv 1 48
Pallas, Jove, or Mercury, Inspire me, that I may this treason find I . iv 1 67
Abominable deeds, Complots uf mischief, treason, villanies . . . v 1 65
I spiiak no treason. O, God ye god-den .... Itwn. and Jid. iii G 173
All of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason llonrish'd ovnr us J. Ctrsar ill '2, iy6
Hut treasons capital, confess'd and proved, Havo overthrown him Alarb. i 3 115
Very frankly he confess'd hi* treasons, Implored your highness' pardon i 4 5
Committed treason enough for God's sake, yet could not equivocate to

heaven il 3 n

Awake, awake ! Ring tho alarum-bell. Murder and treason ! . . ii 3
After life's titful fever ho sleeps well ; Treason has done his worst . iii 2
'Gainst Fortune's state would treason have pronounced . . Hamlet ii 2

Such love must needs be treason in my breast iii 2

Such divinity doth hedge a king, That treason can but peep to wliat it

would iv 6

Then, venom, to thy work. Treason ! treason !

In cities, mutinies ; in countries, discord ; in palaces, treason

heavens ! that this treason were not, or not I the detector 1

It was he That made the overture of thy treasons to us . . . . iii
Stay yet ; hear reason. Edmund, I arrest thee On capital treason . v
To prove upon thy head Thy heinous, manifest, and many treasons . v
My name is lost ; By treason's tooth bare-gnawn and eauker-bit . . v

Hack do I toss these treasons to thy head v

How got she out? O treason of tho Itlood ! Othello i

O, never was there queen So mightily be tray 'd ! yet at tho tlrst I saw

tho treasons planted Ant. and Cleo. i

You think of him too much. O, 'tis treason I i

Tliofto that are botrny'd Do fuel the treason wharply, yot tho traitor

Stand* in worse ca.sn of woo Ci/inhi'liitc lit 4 88

Your ploasuro was my moro ollonco, my punishment Itsolf, ami all my

treason v 6 335

Beaten for loyalty Excited mo to treason v 6 345

Poison and treason are the hands of sin, Ay, and the targets . Pericles i 1 139
Who either by public war or private treason Will take away your life . i 2 104
Marina's life Seeks to take ott by treason's knife . . . . iv Gower 14
Treasonable. Hark, how tho villain would close now, after his treason-
able abuses ! Aleas. for Alefis. v 1 347

Treasonous. I do know To be corrupt and treasonous. Say not

'treasonous' Hen, VUI. i 1 156

Against the undivnlged pretence I fight Of treasonous malice Alacbeth ii 3 138
Treasure. You have an exchequer of words, and, I think, no other

treasure to give your followers T. G. of Ver. ii 4 44

We'll bring thee to our crews, And showtheeall tho treasure wo have gut iv 1 75
Kithor You must lay down thu treasures of your body To this supposed,

or olso to let him suller Aletis. for Alcas. ii 4 96

If so, our copper buys no better treasure L. L. Lost iv 3 386

In Baptlsta's keep my treasure is : Ho hath the jewel of my life T.ofS. i 2 118
Nay, now I see She is your treasure, she must have a husband . . ii 1 32
The tailor stays thy leisure, To deck thy body with his ruffling treasure iv 3 60

1 have writ my letters, cosseted my treasure .... All's Well ii 6 26

You waste the treasure of your time T. Night ii 5 85

Have taken treasure from her lips And left them More rich W. Tale v 1 54
I will not touch thine eye For all the treasure that thine uncle owes

A'. John iv 1 123

The purest treasure mortal times afford Is spotless reputation Richard II. i 1 177
And given my treasures and my rights of thuo To thick-eyed musing

1 Hen. IV. ii 8 48
Hethereforesendsyou, meoter for your spirit, This tun of treasure Hen.VA 2 255

What treasure, uncle? Tennis-balls, my liege i 2 258

Thine eyes and thoughts Heat on a crown, tho treasure of thy heart

2 Hen. VI. ii 1 20

Omitting Suffolk's exile, my soul's treasure iii 2 382

If thou be'st death, 1 '11 give thee England's treasure, Enough to purchase

such another island, So thou wilt let mo live iii 3 2

Will I dam up this thy yawning mouth For swallowing the treasure of

the realm iv 1 74

Our people and our peers are both misled, Our treasure seized 3 Hen. VI. iii 3 36
His subjects slain, His statutes cancell'd, and his treasure spent . . v 4 79
Go ; And thither bear your treasure and your goods . Richard III. ii 4 69
This last costly treaty, the interview, That swallow'd so much treasure

Hen. VIII, i 1 166

His treasure, Hich stuffs, nnd ornaments of household . . . . iii 2 125
Of all Tho treasure in Lnls Hold achieved and city, Wo render you the

tenth, to be ta'en forth Coriolanvs i 9 33

My dear wife's estimate, her womb's increase, And treasure of my loins iii 8 115
There to dispose this treasure in mine arms T. Andron. iv 2 173

He that is strucken blind cannot forget The precious treasure of his

eyesight lost Rom. and Jid. i 1 239

They answer, . , . That now they are at fall, want treasure T. of Athens ii 2 214

It is noised he hath a mass of treasure iv 3 404

Here, take : the gods out of my misery Have sent theo treasure . . iv 3 532
And having brought our treasure where we will, Then take we down

his load, and turn him olf J. Ca'sar iv 1 24

Though the treasure Of nature's gormens tumble all together AJadicth iv 1 58
Or if thou hast uphoarded in thy life Extorted treasure . . Handel i 1 137
Or your chaste treasure open To his unmastor'd importunity . i 3 31

O Jcphthah, judge of Israel, what a treasury hadst thou ! . . . ii '2 423
They slack their duties, And pour our treasures into foreign laps Othello iv 3 89
The firm Roman to great Egypt sends This treasure of an oyster

Ant. and Cleo. i 5 44

Be gone : My treasure's in the harbour, take it iii 11 n

To the sea-side straightway : I will possess you of that ship and treasure iii 11 21
His chests and treasure He has not with him. Is he gone? . . . iv 5 10
Send his treasure after ; do it ; Detain no jot, I charge thee . . . iv 6 12
Antony Hath aftor theo scut all thy treasure, with His bounty overplus tv i) 21



TREASUEE



1G01



TREMBLING



Treasure. This secret Will force him think I have pick'd the lock and

ta'en The treasure of her honour Cymbelinc ii 2 42

You must Forget that rarest treasure of your cheek, Exposing it . . iii 4 163

Tie my treasure up in silken bags, To please the fool and death 2'cricles iii Z 41

Besides this treasure for a foe, The gods requite his charity I . . . iii 2 74

Treasure-house. Why, then to thee, thou stiver treasure-house M. of V. II 34

Treasurer. This is rny treasurer : let him speak, my lord Ant. and Cleo. v 2 142

Treasury. I would have rausack'd The pedlar's silken treasury W. Tale iv 4 361

All my treasury Is yet but unfelt thanks . . . Richard IT. ii 3 60

As rich with praise As is the ooze and bottom of the sea With sunken

wreck and sumless treasuries . .... Hen. V. i 2 165

Thy wife's attire Have cost a mass of public treasury . . 2 lien. VI, i 3 134
Could fly to heaven? The treasury of everlasting joy . . . . ii 1 18

And revel in Lavinia's treasury T. Andron. ii 1 131

1 know not how conceit may rob The treasury of life . . . Lear iv G 43

Treat. Say what the play treats on, then read the names M. N. Dream i 2 9

That part of philosophy Will I apply that treats of happiness T. a/ Shrew i 1 19

To treat of high affairs touching that time . ... If. John i 1 lot

This is the tragic bale of Philomel, And treats of Tereus' treason T. An. iv 1 48

Treatise. I would have salved it with a longer treatise' . . Much Ado i 1 317


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 364 of 531)