John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

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Ye've heard that I have gold ; I am sure you have : speak truth . . v 1 80
To speak truth of Cajsar, I have not known when his affections sway'd

More than his reason J. Caxar ii 1 19

To bo afoard to toll gray beards the truth il 2 67

Now, as you aro a Human, toll mo truo. Then like a Roman bear the truth iv 8 188

1' tho uamo of truth, Are yo fantastical? Macbeth i 3 52

Often times, to win us to our harm, The instruments of darkness tell us

truths i 3 124

Two truths aro told, As happy prologues to tho swelling act . . .18 127

Why Imth it given mo earnest of success, Commencing in a truth? . i 8 133
I dreamt last night of the three weird sisters : To you they have show'd

flonio truth (1 1 21

I T Umrn como truth from llioiu Aj upon thoo, Macbeth, their speeches

shine iii 1 6

Reconciled my thoughts To thy good truth and honour . . . . iv 3 1x7

And delight No less in truth than life iv 3 130

I have two nights watched with you, but can perceive no truth in your

report vl2

To doubt the equivocation of the fiend That lies like truth . . . v 5 44
And of the truth herein This present object made probation . Hamlet \ I 155

What is between you? give me up the truth i 3 98

Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth ii 1 63

Doubt truth to be a liar ; But never doubt I love ii 2 118

If circumstances lead me, I will find Where truth is hid . . . ii 2 158

Will you ha' the truth on't? v 1 26

Lot it be so ; thy truth, then, be thy dower Lear i 1 no

Truth's a dog must to kennel ; he must be whipped out . . . i 4 124

He cannot flatter, he, An honest mind and plain, he must speak truth 1 ii 2 105

Bo fiimplo answerer, for we know the truth iii 7 43

All my reports go with the modest truth ; Nor more nor clipp'd, but so iv 7 5

Tell mo but truly but then speak tho truth v 1 8

I will maintain My truth and honour (irmly v 3 101

Go forth, And give us truth who 'tis that Is arrived . . Othello ii 1 58



Truth. If partially affined, or leagued in office, Thou dost deliver more

or less than truth, Thou art no soldier .... Othello ii 3 219
Yet, I persuade myself, to speak trm truth Shall nothing wrong him . ii 3 223
Strong circumstances, Which lead directly to the donr of truth . . iii 3 407
You charge me most unjustly. With nought but truth . . . . iv 2 187

Send for him hither ; Let him confess a truth v 2 68

She said so : I must needs report the truth v 2 128

Nay, stare not, masters : it is true, indeed. 'Tis a strange truth . . v 2 188
Such full license as both truth and malice Have power to utter A. and C. i 2 112
Speak no more. That truth should be silent I had almost forgot . . ii 2 109
Truths would be tales, Where now half tales bo truths , . . . ii 2 136
She sent you word sho was dead ; But, fearing since how it might work,

hath sent Me to proclaim the truth . . . . . . . iv 14 126

Speak the truth, Seleucus. Madam, I had rather seal my lips . . v 2 144
Do here pronounce, By tho very truth of it, I care not for you Cymbdine ii 3 113
My circumstances, Being so near the truth as 1 will make them, Must

first induce you to beliovo ii 4 62

Let there bo no honour Whoro Micro is beauty ; truth, whoro semblance ;

love, AVhoro there's another man ii 4 109

Disloyal ! No: She's punish'd for her truth iii 2 7

How! that I should murder her? Upon the love and truth and vows

which 1 Havo nmdo to thy command ? iii 2 12

Brldlly die tlmir joys That placo thrni on tho truth of girls and boys . v G 107
Bitter torturo shall Winnow thn truth from falsehood . . . . v 5 134
Time of both this truth shall iw'cr convince .... 7Vrirfcsl 2 123
Thou snom'nt a palace Kor tho crown'd Truth lo dwell In . . . v 1 123
For truth can novcr bo conflrm'd nnougli, Though doubts did over sleep v 1 203

A ()guro of truth, of faith, of loyalty v 8 Gowor 92

Truth Is. The truth is, sho and I, long since contracted, Are now so sure

Mar. Wives v 5 236
The very truth is that the Jew, having done me wrong, doth cause me,

as my father, being, I hope, an old man, shall frutify unto you

Mer. of Venice ii 2 140

Well, the truth is, Sir John, you live in great infamy . . 2 Hen. IV. i 2 155
The truth is, I am only old in judgement and understanding . . i 2 214

The truth is, poverty hath distracted her ii 1 116

Truth is, that Fulvia, To havo mo out of Egypt, made wars here A. nndC. ii 2 94

Try. Bring her to try with main-course Tempest I 1 38

Somo to tho wars, to try their fortune there ; Some to discover islands

T. G. of Ver. i 3 8

I will try thee. Tell me this : who begot thee? iii 1 293

This proves that thou canst not read. Come, fool, come ; try me in thy

paper . . . . . iii 1 299

I will lay a plot to try that Mer. Wives iii 3 202

We '11 try that ; for I 11 appoint my men to carry tho basket again . iv 2 96
The jury, passing on the prisoner's life, May in the sworn twelve have a

thief or two Guiltier than him they try . . Meas. for M eas. ii 1 21

I '11 teach you how you shall arraign your conscience, And try your

penitence. fc ii 8 22

And ili'sircd linr To try linr grncloufl fortune) v 76

Try all Mm frkmds thou hast in Hplnmw .... Com. qfJBrron I 153

Well, I will marry ono day, but to try 11 42

That's a question : how snail wo try it? We'll draw cuts . . . v 421
As time shall try: 'In time the savngo bull doth urar tho yoke' MuchAdol 262
To try whoso right, Of tliino or mine, is most in Helena M. JV. Dream iii 2 336

Follow my voice : we'll try no manhood hero iii 2 412

Go forth ; Try what my credit can in Venice do . . Mer. of Venice i 1 180
I pray you, lead me to tho caskets To try my fortune . . . . ii 1 24

I will try confusions with him ii 2 39

Hath a disposition to como in disguised against me to try a fall AsY.L.lti 1 132
I come but in, as others do, to try with him the strength of my youth . i 2 181

You shall try but one fall i 2 216

Hem them away. I would try, if I could cry ' hem ' and have him . i 3 19

Yon will try in timo, in despite of a fall i 8 24

Timo is the old justice Mmt examines all such offenders, nnd lot Timo try iv 1 204

I'll try how you can sol, fa nnd sing It T. of Shrew \ 2 17

I urn a gentleman. That I 11 try ii 1 220

If lie were living, I would try him yet All's Well i 2 72

Would your honour But Rive me leave to try success . . . . i 3 253

What I can do can do no hurt to try 11 1 137

Thy physic I will try, That ministers thino own death if I die . . ii 1 188
I would I knew in what particular action to try him . . . . iii G 19
I know not how it tastes ; though it be dish'd For me to try how W. Tale iii 2 74
I, that please some, try all, both joy and terror Of good and bad . . iv 1 i
Give me the lie, do, and try whether I am not now a gentleman bom . v 2 144
The day shall not be up so soon as I, To try the fair adventure of to-
morrow K . John v 5 22

Mino honour lot me try ; In that I live and for that will I die Ric.hard II. 1 1 184

Now shall ho try his friends that llntter'd him ii 2 85

Hero do I throw down this, If ho may bo repcal'd, to try his honour . iv 1 85

Try fortune with him in a elnglo fight 1 7/rn. IV. v 1 100

Let tho end try tho man 2 lien. JV.il 2 50

But, for all our loves, First let them try themselves . . . . ii 8 56
You knew I was at your back, and spoke it on purpose to try my

patience . ii 4 334

We ready aro to try our fortunes To the last man iv 2 43

I put it on my head, To try with it, as with an enemy . . . . iv 5 167
If it como to tho arbitrament of Hwunln, can try it out . . Hen. V. iv 1 169
Tr> try lior fikill, Ilolgniur, stand thou as Dauphin In my placo 1 Jlcn. VI. i 2 60

My cnurago try by combat, If Mioii darosl 1 2 89

Presently wo '11 try : cnmn, lot's away 12 149

We'll try what these dastard Frenchmen dare i 4 m

Your lordship takes us then for fools, To try if that our own bo ours

or no iii 2 63

Unchain your spirits now with spelling charms And try if they can gain

your liberty v 8 32

Or one that, at a triumph having vow'd To try his strength . . . v 5 32
My Lord of York, try wlmt your fortune is ... 2 Hen. VI. iii 1 309

Try your hap against tho Irishmen jii 1 314

Say we intend to try his grace to-day, If ho bo guilty, as 'tis published . iii 2 16
Give us leave : I'll try this widow's wit .... 3 Hen. VI. iii 2 33
Now do I play the touch, To try if thou be current gold indeed Rich. III. iv 2 9
I gave ye Power as he was a counsellor to try him, Not as a groom

Hen. VIII. v 3 143
There's some of ye, I see, More out of malice than integrity, Would try

him to the utmost, had yo moan v 3 146

You cannot shun Yourself. Lot mo RO and try . . Trot, and Crcs. iii 2 154
Come, try upon yourselves what you have Been mo . . Coriolama iii 1 225
I '11 try whether my old wit bo in request With thoMQ that have but little iii 1 251
Defying Thoso whose great power must try him iii 8 80



TRY



1616



TUNIS



Try.
I '1



: Your Moor and you Are singled forth to try experiments T. Andron. ii 3 69
11 trv if they can lick their lingers. How canst thou try them so?

Itam. aiulJvl. iv 2 4
And try the argument of hearts by borrowing . . . T. of Athens ii 2 187
I account them blessings ; for by llu'so Shall 1 try friends . . . n 2 i.jj
I think this honourable lord did but try us this other day . . . iii 0' 3
Tills breaking of his has been but a try for his friends . . . . v 1 n
There shall I try. In my oration, how tho people take Tho cruel issue

of these bloody men J.CasmrBll 292

And, Romans, yet cie night We shall try fortune in a second light . v 3 no
And Ihou opposed, being of uo woman born, Yet I will try the last Mucb. y 8 32

How may we try it further? llumlct ii 2 159

We will try it. But, look, where sadly the jwor wretch conies reading u 2 167
Who in want a hollow friend doth try, Directly seasons him his enemy iii 2218
What then? what rests? Try what repentance can : what can it not ?. iii 3 65
And, like the famous ape, To try conclusions, in the basket creep . . iii 4 195
Fight for a plot Whereon the numbers cannot try the cause . . . iv 4 63
Iso try whether your costard or my hallow bo tho harder . . Lear iv (i 246
Had it pleased heaven To try me with allliution . . . Utliello iv 2 48
And what may follow, To try a larger fortune . . . Ant. and Cleo. ii 34
I'll try you on the shore. Ami shall, sir: give's your hand . . . ii 7 133
To try thy oloquenco, now 'tis lime : dispatch ; From Antony win

Cleopatra iii 12 26

Try thy cunning, Thyreus ; Make thine own edict for thy pains . . iii 12 31
I will try the forces Of these thy compounds .... Cymbeliiie i 5 18
To try the vigour of them and apply Allayments to their act . . . i 5 21
I have adventured To try your taking of a false report . . . .1.6173
If you can penetrate her with your lingering, so ; we'll try with tongue ii 3 16
Try many, all good, serve truly, never Find such another master . . iv 2 373
Tub. Sho hath eaten up all her beef, and she is herself in tho tub

J/ctis. for Metis, iii 2 59

Make use of thy salt hours : season the slaves For tubs and bathg T. of A. iv 3 86
That satiate yet unsatisfied desire, that tub Both lill'd and running Oymb. 16 48
Tubal, a wealthy Hebrew of my tribe, Will furnish mo . Mer. of Venice i 3 5

How now, Tubal t what news from Genoa? . iii 1 83

1 thank thee, good Tubal : good news, good news ! ha, ha 1 where? in

Genoa? iii 1 111

Thou torturest me, Tubal : it was my turquoise . . . . iii 1 126

(;.>, Tubal, fee mo an ollker ; bespeak him a fortnight before . . . iii 1 131
Co, go, Tubal, and meet me at our synagogue ; go, good Tubal ; at our

synagogue, Tubal iii 1 134

I have heard him swear To Tuluil and to Chus, his countrymen . . iii 2 287
Tub-fast. Hi ing down ruse-cheeked youth To tho tub-fast T. of Athens iv 3 87
Tuok. Dismount thy tuck, bo yaro in thy preparation . . T. Night iii 4 244
Tucket. Lei the trumpoU sound Tho tucket uommce . . Hen. V. iv 2 35
Tuesday. But Tuesday night lust gone in 'a garden-house lie know mo

as a wifo J/cus. for Mcas. V 1 229

He swore a thing to mo on Monday night, which he forswore on Tuesday

morning Much Adov 1 170

As a pancake for Shrove Tuesday, a morris for May-day . . All's Well ii 2 25
A purse of gold most resolutely snatched on Monday night and most

dissolulely spent on Tuesday morning . . . .1 Hen. IV. i 2 40
Whom I sent On Tuesday last to listen after news . . . 2 lien. IV. i 1 19
On Tuesday last, A falcon, towering in her pride of place, Was by a

mousing owl ha wk'd at and kill'd Macbeth ii 4 n

Why, then, to-morrow night ; or Tuesday morn ; On Tuesday noon Olh. iii 3 60

Tuft. Write In emerald tufla, flowers purple, blue, and white Mcr. Wives v 5 74

If you will know my house, 'Tis at tho tnlt of olives hero .-Is Y. Like It iii 6 75

liohiud tho tuft ol'pinos I met Uiem 1C. Tale 11 1 34

There stands the rjuillo, by you tuft of trees . . . lliclmrd II. ii 3 53
Tug. Lot mysiilf and fortune Tug for Iho lime to com o . . II'. Tale Iv 4
And Knglaiid now la loft To tug and scumble .... K. John. Iv :i 146
Beware your beard ; I mean to tug it and to cull' you soundly 1 Hen. VI. 1 3 4
Tug him away : being whipp'd, Bring him again . . Ant. and Cleo. iii 13 102
Tugged. As one that grasp'd And tugg'd for life . . 2 lien. VI. iii 2 173
So weary with disasters, tngg'd with fortune .... Macbeth iii 1 112
Tugging. Both tugging to be victors, breast to breast . . 3 Hen. VI. ii 5
Tuition. So I commit you To the tuition of God . . . Much Ado i 1 283
Tullus. Thou Shalt see me once more strike at Tullus' face . Coriolanus i 1 24
Within these three hours, Tullus, Alone 1 fought in your Corioli walls,

And made what work I pleased 18

If, Tullus, Not yet thou knowest me, and, seeing me, dost not Think me

for the man I am, necessity Commands me name myself . . . iv 5 60
O Tullus, Thou hast done u doed whereat valour will weep . . v Ii 133
Tully. A- Roman sworder and banditto alavo Murder'd sweet Tully

2 Hen. VI. iv 1 136
Cornelia never with more care Read to her sons than she hath read to

thee Sweet poetry and Tully's Orator . . . T. Andron. iv 1 14
Tumble. With that, they all did tumble on the ground . . L. L. Lost v 2
Hammering treachery, To tumble down thy husband and thyself 2//en. VI. i 2 4!
Like a druukou sailor on a mast, Ready, with every nod, to tumble down

Into thu fatal bowels of the deep .... llichard 111. iii 4 102
As many coxcombs As you throw caps up will he tumble down Corwl. iv 135

Tumble mo into some loathsome pit T. Andron. ii 3 176

Though the treasure Of nature's germens tumble all together Macbeth iv 1 59
Let us grant, it is not Amiss to tumble on the bed of Ptolemy A. and (.'. i 4 17
As to a wliale ; a' plays and tumbles, driving the poor fry before him

Pericles ii 1 34
Tumbled. A.s a little snow, tumbled about, Anon becomes a mountain

A". John iii 4 176
Now Phaethon hath tumbled from his car, And made an evening at the

noontide prick 3 Hen. VI. i 4 33

Like to a bowl upon a subtle ground, I have tumbled past the throw

Coriolanus v 2 2

Quoth she, before you tumbled me, You promised me to wed Hamlet iv 5 6
Said not I as much when I saw the porpus how he bounced and

tumbled ? 1'ericles ii 1 2.

Tumbler. And wear his colours like a tumbler's hoop 1 . . /-. L. Lost iii 1 19.
Tumbling. Like hedgehogs which Lie tumbling in my barefoot way

Tempest ii 2 i

While wo lie tumbling In thu hay W. Talc iv 3 i

Overboard, Into the tumbling billows of tho main . . Richard III. I -1
Tumbling trick. Let them play it. Is not u comouty a Christmas

gambold or a tumbling-trick? T. of Shrew Ind. 2 14

Tumult. Hostility and civil tumult reigns Between my conscience and

my Cousin's death K. John iv 2 24

Hero's a goodly tumult ! I '11 forswear keeping house . . 2 Hen. IV. ii 4 21
What stir is this? what tumult's in the heavens? . . . 1 Hen. VI. i 4 9

What tumult's this? An uproar, I dare warrant iii 1 7

For what hath broach'd this tumult but thy pride ? . .3 Wen. VI. ii 2 15



umultuous wars Shall kin with kin and kind with kind confound

Hiclinrd II. iv 1 140

Nought rests for me in this tumultuous strife . . . .1 //en. VI. i 3 70
Why, what tumultuous clamour have wo hero? . . 2 lien. VI. iii 2 239

Now IHTO u period of tumultuous broils 3 lien. VI. v 6 i

*un. This whale, with so many tuns of oil in his belly . Mcr. H'iirs ii 1 65
An old fat man ; a tun of man is thy companion . . .1 Hen. 11'. ii 4 493
He therefore sends you, meeter for your spirit, This tun of treasure

Hen. V. i 2 255

Drawn tuns of blood out of thy country's breast . . Coriulanns iv 5 105

uu tiibh For tilling a bolllo wilh a Inn-dish . . Mcas. fur Mats, iii 2 182

"line. Set all hearls i' the state To what tune pleased his ear . Tciiqicst i 2 85

This is a very scurvy tune to sing at a mau's funeral . . . . ii 2 46

This is a scurvy tune too: but here 'a iny comfort ii 2 57

That's not the tune. What is this samel This is the tune of our

catch, played by the picture of Nobody iii 2 133

Some love of yours hath writ to you in rhyme. That I might sing it,

madam, to a tuno T. G. of Ver. i 2 80

Sing it to the tune of 'Light o' love. 'It is too heavy for so light a tune i 2 83
Keep tuno there still, so you will sing it out : And yet inelhinks I do

not like this tune i 2 90

To their instruments Tune a deploring dump iii 2 85

Now, gentlemen, Let'a tune, and to it lustily awhile . . . . iv 2 25
lie plays false, father. How ? out of tune on the strings ? . . . iv 2 60
And to the nightingale's complaining notes Tuno my distresses . . v 4 6
No more adhere and keep place together than the Hundredth Psalm to

the tune of 'Green Sleeves' Mer.Wivalll 64

Let it thunder to the tune of Green Sleeves, hail Itissing-comlits . . y 6 21
What sayest thou to this tune, matter, and method? Mcas. for Meu*. 1ii 2 50
Do yon speak in tho sick tune? I am out of all other tuno Much Ailu iii 4 42
It would neither servo for tho wriling nor the tune . . . /.. L. Lust i 2 119
To jig oil" a tune at the tongue's end, canary to it with your feet . -'111 Iz
Keep not too long in one tune, but a snip and away . . . . iii 1 22
And profound Solomon to tuno a jig, And Nestor play at push-pin . iv 3 168
I would sing my song without a burden : thou bringest me out of tune

As Y. Like It iii 2 262
'Tis no matter how it be in tune, so it make noise enough . . . iv 2 9

Both in a tune, like two gipsies on a horse v 3 16

You'll leave hia lecture when I am in tune? That will bo never t tuno

your instrument '/'. of Skma ill 1 24

Sly instrument's in tune. Let 'a hear. O lie! the treble jars . . iii 1 38
Madam, 'tis now ill tune. All but the base. The base is light . . iii 1 46

You dare not. Out o 1 tune, sir : ye lie T. Niyhtii li u2

Seek him out, and play the tune tho while . . . . . ii 4 14

How dost thou like this tuno? It gives a very echo to the seat Where

Love is throned Ii 4 20

If it be aught to the old tune, my lord vl in

He sings several tunes faster thau you '11 tell money . . ir. Tale iv 4 184
He utters them as he had eaten ballads and all men's ears grew to lu's

tunes iv 4 186

Forewarn him that he use no scurrilous words in's tunes . . . iv 4 216

Here's one to a very doleful tune iv 4 265

This is a passing merry one and goes to the tune of ' Two maids wooing

a man' iv 4 295

'Tis in three parts. We had the tune ou't a month ago . . . . iv 4 300
He would not stir his pettitoes till ho had both tune and words . . iv 4 619
That knows uo touch to tune the harmony .... Richard II. i 3 165
An I have not ballads made on you all and sung to lllthy tunes

1 Hen. IV. il '2 49
And sung thoxo tunes to thu over-scutched huswives that ho hnird tlm

carmen whistle Ii licit. IV. Ill 2 3-|u

A raven's noto, Whoso dismal tuno burelt my vital powoi'H 2 lien. }'l. Hi 2 41
Much a noise arose As tho shrouds make at sea ill a stiff tempest, As

loud, and to as many tunes Hen. VIII. iv 1 73

But he ia not in this tune, is ho? No, but he's out o' tune thus

Troi. and Ores, iii 8 301

If it may stand with the tune of your voices that I may be consul Coriol. ii 8 92
It is the lark that sings so out of tune, Straining harsh discords

Rom. and J-ul. iii 6 27

This is a sleepy tune. O murderous slumber I . J. Ctumr iv 8 267

Went it not so? To the selfsame tunu and words . . . Macbeth i 3 88
This tune goes manly. Come, go we to tho king ; our power is ready . iv 3 235
Now BCO that noble and most sovereign reason, Like sweet bells

jangled, out of tunu and harsh Hamlet iii 1 166

She chanted snatches of old tunes ; As one incapable of her own

distress iv 7 178

Only got the tune of the time and outward habit of encounter . . v 2 198

Who sometime, in his better tune, remembers Lear iv 3 41

My advocation is not now in tune Othello iii 4 123

Then murder's out of tune, And sweet revenge grows harsh . . . y2 115
The oars were silver, Which to the tune of Hutes kept stroke A. and C. ii 2 200

And scald rhymers Ballad us out o' tune v 2 216

Come on ; tuno : if you can penetrate her with your fingering, so Cymb. ii 3 15
For notes of sorrow out of tune are worse Than priests and fanes that lie iv 2 241
Breathe not where princes are. Tho tune of Imogen 1 . . . . v 5 238
The fingers of the powers above do tune The harmony of this peace . v 5 466
Y'et hope, succeeding from so fair a tree As your fair self, doth tune us

otherwise I 'c rides i 1 115

Tuneable. More tuneable tlian lark to shepherd's ear . AI. N. Dream i 1 184
A cry more tuneable Was never holla'd to, nor cheer'd with horn . . iv 1 129
Who had even tuned his bounty to sing happiness to him All's Well iv 3 12
With an accent tuned ill selfsame key Retorts to chiding fortune

Troi. and Cres. i 3 53

Some joy too fine, Too subtle-potent, tuned too sharp in sweetness . iii 2 25
O, you are well tuned now 1 But I'll set down the pegs that make

this music, As honest as I am Othello ii 1 201

Tuned. His lecture will bo done ere you have tuned . T. QfSlimu iii 1 23
His voice was propertied As all tho tuned spheres . . Ant. and Vim. v 2 84
Tuners. Tho pox of such untie, lisping, affecting fantosticoes ; these new

tuners of accents I Kim. and Jill, ii 4 30

Tunis. In Afric, at the marriage of tho king's fair daughter Claiihol to

tho King of Tunis 7'cuy/isJ ii 1 71

Tunis was never graced before with such a paragon to their queen . ii 1 74
She was of Carthage, not of Tunis. This Tunis, sir, was Carthage . ii 1 82
Our garments seem now as fresh as when we were at Tunis at the marriage ii 1 97
Claribel. She that is queen of Tunis ; she that dwells Ten leagues beyond

man's life ii 1 246

'Tis true, my brother's daughter's queen of Tunis ; So is she heir of

Naples ii 1 255

How shall that Claribel Measure us back to Naples? Keep in Tunis . 111259



TUNIS



1G17



TURN



Tunis. In one voyage Did Claribel her husband find at Tunis . Tempest v 1 209
Tupping. An old black ram Is tupping your white ewe . . . Othello i 1 89
Turban. The gates of monarchs Are arch'd so high that giants may .jet

through And keep their impious turbans on . . . Cymbeline iii 3 6
Turbaned. A malignant and a turban VI Turk Beat a Venetian Olhrllo v 2 353

Turbulence. I have dream'd Of bloody turbulence . . Trot, anil C'r*vv. v 3 n
Turbulent. Who once a day with his embossed froth The turbulent surge

shall cover ......... T. of Athens v 1 221

With turbulent and dangerous lunacy ..... Hamlet iii 1 4

T has been a turbulent nnd stormy night ..... Pericles iii 2 4

Turd. If doro bo one or two, I shall make-a the turd , Mer. Wives iii 3 253

Turf. A good lustre of conceit in a turf of earth . . . L. L. Lost iv 2 90

One turf shall serve as pillow for ns both. . . . M. N. Dream ii 2 41

Who you saw sitting by me on the turf . . . . As Y. Like It iii 4 52

A good soft pillow for that good white head Were better than a churlish

turf of France. Not so, my liege ..... Hen. V.iv 1 15

At his head a grass-green turf, At his heels a stone. . . Hamlet iv 5 31

Close by the battle, ditch'd, and wall'd with turf . . . Cymbeline v 3 14

Turfy mountains, where live nibbling sheep .... Tempest iv 1 62

Turk. Tester I'll have In pouch when thou shalt lack, Base Phrygian

Turk I ........... Mer. Wives \ 3 97

An you be not turned Turk, there's no more sailing by the star II. Ada iii 4 57
Turks and Tartars, never train'd To offices of tender courtesy M. of V. iv 1 3?
She defies mo, Like Turk to Christian . . . . As Y. Li];!, It iv 3 33

I would send them to the Turk, to make eunuchs of . . All's Well ii 3 94
Streaming the ensign of the Christian cross Against black pagans, Turks,

and Saracens ........ Richard II. iv 1 95

Peace shall go sleep with Turks and infidels ...... iv 1 139

Turk Gregory never did such deeds in arms as I have done this day


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 373 of 531)