John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 4 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 4 of 531)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


And made the night light with drinking ii 2 182

The oars were silvpr, Which to tho tune of flutes kept stroke, and made

Tho water which they heat to follow faster il 2 200

Ho many incrinaldH, loudod her 1' tho oyoH, And mado their heiidn

t/,n on Cleopatra too



fl



il



ii



ii 6

H G

ii

ii



ii 126
5



4
iii 5



Tho nil ; \vhlHi, but for vacancy Hud gono to

And ni'i'li- a gup In nature .........

lloyul woiirh 1 Who mado groat, ('n-sar lay II!H Hword to hod .

I made no such report

Gracious madam, I that do bring the news made not tho match

What mean you, madam? I havo mado no fault

So half my Egypt were submerged and made A cistern for scaled snakes !
And wlmt Mado the all-honour'd, honest Homan, Brutus, With the

arm'd rest, . . . To drench the Capitol?

Have one man but a man? And that is it Hath nmde me rig my navy .

You havo made mo oh>r Of Sicily, Sardinia

Thy father, Pompey, would ne'er havo mado this treaty ....

The policy of that purpose mado more in the marriage than tbo lovo

Lepidus is high-coloured. They havo made him drink alms-drink

Ho bath waged New wars 'gainst Pompey ; mado his will

Cn-sar and Lopidus havo made wars upon Pompey. This is old

I laving made use of him in the wars . . . , presently denied him rivality iii 5 7

My Hword, mado woak by my affection, would Obey it . . . . iii 11 67

If that Uiy father livo, lot him repent Thou want not mado his daughter iii 13 135

NOVIT anger Mado good guard for itsolf iv 1 10

I wish I could bo mado so many men iv 2 16

I had a wound here that was like a T, But now 'tis made an H . . iv 7 8

I made those wars for Egypt : and tho queen iv 14 15

And o'er groon Neptune's back With ships made cities . . . . iv 14 59
What havo I kept back? Enough to purchase what yon have made

known v 2 148

I '11 drink tho words you send, Though Ink bo made of gall . ftywifcr/fnc i 1 101

Tlioil tonk'Ht n boggnr ; wouldst have mado my tbvono A seat for baseness I 1 14

Tim vlnlcnrn of action haHi mado you rook as a sacrlllce , .

M.'idn him As little as a crow, or loss, oro loft, To after-oyo him

Tbo assault you havo madn to hor chastity you shall answer mo .

It is a thing I made, which hath the* king Five times rodeom'd from doath

Hands Madn hard with hourly falsehood falsehood, aa With labour

The king my father shall ho made acquainted Of thy assault .

The lovo I bear him Mado me to fan you thus, but tho gods made you,

Unlike all others, chaflloss

Thou wert dignified enough, Even to the point of envy, if 'twere made

Comparative for your virtues

His meauost garment ... is dearer In my respect than all the hairs

above thoo, Wero they all mado such men

I hopo tbo briefness of your answer made Tho speed i ness of your return ii 4 30
The vows of women Of no more bondage bo, to where they are made,

Than they aro to their virtues ii 4 m

And I will kill thee, if thou dost deny Thou'st made me cuckold . . ii 4 146

Some coiner with his tools Made me a counterfeit ii 5 6

A kind of conquest C^sar made here ; but made not here his brag . . iii 1 23
Made Lud's town with rejoicing llres bright And Britons strut . . iii 1 32



\ '2
1814
14 175
1 5 62
I 107
i 6 149

i 6 177
ii 3 133

ii 3 141



Made. Upon the love and truth and vows which I Havo made to thy

command Cymbeline iii 2 n

Tell me how Wales was made so happy as To inherit such a haven . iii 2 6?

Dainty trims, wherein You made great Juno angry iii 4 168

Our expectation that it would lw thus Hath mado us forward . . iii 5 29

She looks us like A thing more mado of malice than of duty . . . iii 5 33

But our great court Made me to blame in memory iii 6 51

For two nights together Have made the ground my bed . . . . iii 6 3
I would havo left it [money] on tho board so soon As I had made my

meal iii 6 52

Know, if you kill mo for my fault I should Havo died had I not mado it iii 58
How fit his garments sorvo me I Why should his mistress, who was

made by him that mado the tailor, not bo lit too? . . . . iv 1 4
Ho made those clothes, Which, as it norms, make thoo. Thou precious

varlet, My tailor made them not iv 2 82

Being scarce mado up, I mean, to man, ho had not apprehension . . Iv 2 109

Tho bird is dead That wo havo mado so much on iv 2 198

Thou blessed thing 1 Jove knows what man thou mightst have made . iv 2 207

Cnmest thou from where they made the stand? I did . . . . v 3 i

He, with two striplings, . . . Made good the passage . . . . v 3 23

Forthwith they fly ... slaves, The strides they victors made . . v 8 43

Yon aro mado llather to wonder at tho things you hear Than to work any v 8 53

If he'll do as he is mado to do, I know ho '11 quickly fly my friendship too v 8 6r

Great the slaughter is Hero made by tho Roman . . . . v 8 79

And happier much by his affliction made v 4 108

I am called to bo made free. I '11 be hang'd then v 4 202

You whom tho gods havo made Preservers of my throne , . . v 6 i

Whoso kinsmen have mado suit That their good souls may bo appeased v 6 71

Bwuty that mndo barren thnHvvnU'd boast. Of hint that bmtcoulu Hpeak v 5 162

Ho began IHn mistress* picture ; which by his tongue being mado. . v 6 175

Whereat I, wrotch, Made scruple of bis pnilno v G 182

I had you down and might Have mado you finish v G 412

Tho beauty of this sinful dame Mad'' many pi incrs thither frame Per. i Gower 32
Which to prevent ho mado a law, To keep her still, and men in awe i Gower 35

You gods that made mo man, and sway in lovo i 1 19

It grieved my heart to hear what pitiful cries they made to us to help

them ii 1 22

A man whom both tho waters and the wind, In that vast tennis-court,

have mado tho ball For them to play upon ii 1 64

'Twas wo that made up this garment through the rough seams of the

waters ii 1 i



55



Lot us salute him, Or know what ground's made happy by his breath . ii 4 28
No din but snores the house about, Made louder by the o'er-fed

breast iii Gowor 3

The careful search ... Is made with all duo diligence . . .iii Gower 19

Pure surprise and fear Made me to quit the house HI 2 16

I have, Together with my practice, made familiar iii 2 34

She would with sharp noodle wound Tho cambric, which she made more
Bound By hurting it ; or whon to tho lute Sho ming, and made tho

night-bird muto iv Gowev 24

She quickly pooped him ; nho made him roast-meat for worms . . iv '2 25
But ho made a groan at it, and sworo ho would sco her to-morrow. . iv 2 117

On whom foul death hath mado this slaughter iv 4 37

"Why, hath your principal made known unto you who I am? . . . iv 6 89
Seeing this goodly vessel ride before us, I made to it . . . v 1 19

Tell me, if thou canst, What this maid is, or what is like to be, That

thus hath made mo wepp? v 1 187

What minstrelsy, ami pretty din, The regent made in Mytilene . . v 2 273
By her own most clear remembrance, she Made known herself . . v 8 13
Madeira. A cup of Madeira and a cold capon's leg . . .1 Hen. IV. i 2 128
Madest. Thou strokedst mo and madest much of me . . Tempest i 2 333
Thou art the ltrnt kimvo that o'er madest a duke . . Mea*. for Mtaa. V 1 361
Wlmt nbunmiU'iii madoHl, thou In UI!H CHHO? . . . t'nw. nf Krriir* Iv '2 5
n 11, !, whlrh IM i blond madim!., NWHHKM MM nVfttli I . IIHnutl IU. 1 '2 (,,
Toll Imr thou inmti'Hl. away her undo (ilanmcn, Hor inmlo HI vow; yr-a.
and, fur hor Hiikit, Madi'Ht quick convoyiincn with hor g"i,,| aunt

Anno Iv 4 281

Thou madost thine enemies shako CbHofoiMU I 4 60

Ever since thou madest thy daughters thy mother .... J.car \ 4 188

Made-up. Remain assured That he's a made-up villain . T. of Athens v 1 101

Madly. That's somewhat madly spoken .... Mcas. for Mcas. v 1 89

Wast thou mad, That thus so madly thou didst answer me? Com. of Errors n 2 n

Met us again and madly bent on us Chased us away . . . . v 1 152

And certain stars shot madly from their spheres . . M. N. Dream ii 1 153

Will make or man or woman madly doto Upon tho noxt live creature . ii 1 171

At tho gun's report, Sever themselves and madly sweep tho sky . . iii 2 23

I play a merchant's part, And venture madly on a desperate mart 7'. i/A. ii 1 329

That] being mad hersolf, she's madly mated iii 2 246

If I were mad, I should forget my son, Or madly think a babe of clouts

wore ho : I am not mad ' .A". John iii 4 58

Like a hontn Full of high fading, nmdly hath broko lorwn . 2 Jim. IV. i 1 10
N" madly hot that im dhcmirso of mason . . . Cunqiialif'y Trni.ntnl.Vrf*. II 2 116
And madly play with tny forefathers' Jolllta . . . Ibm. and Jut. Iv U 51
How ended sho? With horror, nmdly dying, llko her llfo . .CvmZwHiU v 5 31

Madly-used. THK MADLV-UBKP MAI.VOLIO 7*. Night v 1 319

Madman. One nil of luxury, an ass. a madman . . Hints, for Ulcast. v 1 506
A madman 1 Why, thou peevish sheep, What ship? . Com. of Errors iv 1 93

In this tbo madman justly charge th them v 1 213

Behaviour, what wort thou Till this madman tdiow'd theo? . ],. I,. Is>st v 2 338
Ono flees moro devils than vast lioll can hold, That in, tho madman :

tho lovor, all aa frantic M. N. Dream v 1 10

Help, hulpl hero's a madman will munlormo. . . 7*. o/.S'Airtc v 1 60

A Hober ancient gentleman by your luiblt, but your words show you a

madman v 1 76

Ho speaks nothing hut madman T. Niyht 1 G 115

What's a diiinken man liko, fool? Like a drowned man, a fool and a

mad man 6 T 39

Ho is but mad yet, madonna ; and the fool shall look to the madman . I & 146
Madman, thou errest : I nay, there ia no darkness but Ignorance . . iv 2 46

I'll ne'er believe a madman till I see his brains iv 2 125

A madman's epistles are no gospels v 1 294

Look then to be well edified when the fool delivers the madman . . v 1 299

IK this the madman ? Ay, my lord, this samo v 1 335

Yet be well assured You put sharp weapons in a madman's hands

2 Hen. VI. iii 1 347

Art thou mad ? Not mad, but bound more than a madman is R. and J. i 2 55
Koineot humours! madman I passion! lover! Appear thou . . ii 1 7
Live, and hereafter say, A madman's mercy bade thee run away . v 3 67
Our masters may throw their caps at their money : these debts may

well be called drsperato ones, for a madman owes 'em T. of Athens iii 4 103



MADMAN



964



MAID



Madman. A madman so long, now a fool . . . . T. of Athens iv 3 221
Shall I bo frighted when a madman stares? . J. Ccuar iv 3 40

Toll me whether a madman be a gentleman or a yeoman ? A king 1 Lear iii (1 10
Is it a beggar-man ? Madman and beggar too . . . . . iv 1 32

Taught me to shift Into a madman's rags ; to assume a semblance That

very dogs disdain'd v 3 187

Madmen. Lovers and madmen have sm-h seething brains M, N. Dream v 1 4
Love is merely a madness, and, I tell you, deserves as well a dark house

and a whip as madmen do As Y. Like It iii "2 422

And crown tltee for a Under of madmen T. Night iii 4 154

For though it [music] have holp madmen to their wits, In me it seems

it will make wise men mad Rictord II. v 5 62

With great imagination Proper to madmen . . 2 lien. 11'. i 3 32

These two may run mad ; but, if with too much brain and too little

blood they do, I '11 be a curer of madmen . . . Trot, and (Yw. v 1 56
O, then I see that madman have no ears . . . Jium. and JuL iii 8 61

Hi in ii-, ami Cassias Are rid liko madmen through the gates ./. CVar;- jjj "2 274
This cold night will turn us all to fools and madmen . . . Lear iii -1 81
'Tis the limes' plague, when madmen lead tho blind . . . . iv 1 48
A dream, or elne sm-h stall* a* madmen Tongno and bniin not Ci/mbcline v -1 146
Madness. All wound with adders who with clovon tongues Do hiss me

into madness Tempest ii 2 14

The affliction of my mind amends, with which, I fear, a madness hold me v 1 116
Any madness I over yet beheld seemed but tamonoss, civility and

patience, to this bin distemper Mer. Wives iv "2 27

Ilia iictioiiH show niucli liko to madness . . . Mean, fur Mais, iv 4 4

:,. v l. . i tun not, with thiil opinion That I um touch'd with mndliQHB 1 . v 1 51
IJtir minlnuriN hath thu udihml frame of HOIIHO, Much a dependency of

tldng on thing, AH e'or 1 heard In mttdiie.ss v I fii

And wluit'ri a lover but a lit of madnossy .... Com. of Krrora v I 76
Thin 111 d:iy A most outrageous lit of madness took him . . . . v 1 139
Fetter strong mud HUSK in a silken thread, Charm ache with air Much Ado v 1 25

Such a hare is madness the youth Mer. of Venice i 2 21

If he love me to madness, I shall never requite him . . i 2 69

Jjove is merely a madness ....... As Y. Like It iii 2 420

I drave my suitor from bis mad humour of love to a living humour of

madness iii 2 439

Begot of thought, conceived of spleen, and born of madness . . . iv 1 218
I am as mad as he, If sad and merry madness equal be . . T. Night iii 4 16

Why, this is very midsummer madness iii 4 61

Though 'tis wonder that enwraps me thus, Yet 'tis not madness . . iv 3 4

This may be some error, but no madness iv 3 10

Fellow, thy words are madness V 1 101

Art thou mad? No, madam, I do but ivad madness . . . . v 1 302
If not, my nouses, bi-Uor ph-as<td with madiirss, Do bid itwolcomo W. T. iv ! 495
No Nettled HIHIHOH of tlm world can nai* h Tho pleasure of that madness v :i 73
Lady, you utter madness, and not HOITUW .... K. Jultn iii 4 43
Of this madness cured, Stoop tamely to the foot of majesty 2 Hen. Jl'. iv 2 41
What madnass rules in brainsick men ! 1 Hen. VI. iv 1 in

Were't not madness, then, To make the fox surveyor of the fold?

2 Hen. VI. iii 1 252

One word in your ear. O plague and madness I . . Troi. and Cres. v 2 35
Why, my negation hath no taste of madness v 2 127

madness of discourse, That cause sets up with and against itself! . v 2 142
A madness most discreet, A choking gall . . . How. and Jul. i 1 199
And tilt tho madness is, ho cheers them up too . . T, of Athens i 2 42
Like madness is tho glory of this life, As this pomp tmowtt . . . i " i .,.,

tlis Might was madness Mncbi-lh iv 2 3

Might doprivo your sovereignty of reason And draw you into miidmwi

lltunM I -I 74

To define truo madness, What Is't but to bo nothing else but mad? . II 2 93
And, by this declension, Into the madness wherein now ho raves . . it 2 150

Though this be madness, yet there is method iu't ii 2 207

A happiness that often madness hits on ii 2 213

But, with a crafty madness, keeps aloof iii 1 8

What he spake, though it lack'd form a little, Was not like madness . iii 1 172
It shall be so : Madness in great ones must not nnwatch'd go . . iii 1 196

1 like him not, nor stands it sale with us To let his madness range . iii 8 2
For madness would not err, Nor sense to ecstasy was ne'er so thrall'd . iii 4 73
It is not madness That I have utter'd : bring me to the test, And I the

matter will re-word ; which madness Would gambol from . . iii 4 141
Lay not that flattering unction to your soul, That uot your trespass,

but my madness speuks iii 4 146

That I essentially am not in madness, But mad in craft . . . . iii 4 187
O'er whom his very madness, like some ore Among a mineral of metals

base, Shows itself pure iv 1 25

Hamlet in madness hath Polonius slain iv 1 34

Hy heaven, thy madness shall be paid with weight . . . . iv 5 156
A document in madness, thoughts and remembrance fitted . . . iv 5 178
This U mere madnoas : And thus awhilo tho lit will wurk on him . . v 1 407
What I have done, That might your nature, honour and exception

Roughly awake, I here proclaim was madness v 2 243

Then Ilumlot does it not, llainlet denies it. Who does it, then? His

madness v 2 248

Hamlet is of the faction that is wroug'd ; His madness is poor Hamlet's

enemy v 2 250

O, that way madness lies ; lot me shun that ; No more of that . Lear iii 4 21
Hog in sloth, fox in st^ilth, wolf in greediness, dog in madness . . iii 4 97

Ilis roguish madness Allows itself to any thing iii 7 104

O, matter and impertinency mix'd ! Reason in madness ! . . . iv 6 179
In madness, Being full of supper and distempering draughts . . Othello i 1 98
Practising upon his peace and quiet Even to madness . . . . ii 1 320
If not, he foams at mouth and by and by Breaks out to savage madness iv 1 56
Hiotou.H madness, To bo entangled with those mouth-made vows! .!. ami C. i 8 29
To leave you in your mildness, 'twere my sin : I will not . CifmU-liiic ii 3 104
Not frenzy, not Absolute madness could so far have raved . . . iv 'J i 15

A fever with tho absence of her KOH, A madm-ss iv 3 3

Madonna, that drink and good counsel will aim-nd . . . T. Night i 5 47

Good madonna, give mo leave to prove you n fool i 6 64

Muke your proof. I must catechize you for it, madonna . . i 5 68

Good madonna, why mournest thou? Good fool, for my brother's death i 6 72
I think his soul is in hell, madonna. I know his soul is in heaven, fool 1 5 74
The more fool, madonna, to mourn for your brother's soul being in heaven i 5 76
Thou hast spoke for us, madonna, as if thy eldest son should bo a fool i 5 i _-,>
Uu is but mad yet, madonna ; and the fool si ml I look to tho madman . i r> 145

Prithee, rad i' thy right wits. So I do, madonna V 1 306

Madrigal. To whose falls Melodious birds sings madrigals M r. Wives iii 1 18
Maggot. Huve blown me full of maggot ostentation . . t. I.. Lust v 2 409

If the sun breed maggots in a dead dog Hamlet ii l* 181

Wo fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots . iv 8 24



Maglo. Lend thy hand, And pluck my magic garment from me Tempest i 2 24
But this rough magic I here abjure ........ v 1 50

There's nmgic in thy majesty ....... W. Tide v 3 39

If this be magic, let it be an art Lawful as eating ..... v 3 no

By magic verses have contrived his end ..... 1 Hen, VI. i 1 27

Magic of bounty ! all these spirits thy power Hath conjured T. of Athens i 1 6
Distill'd by magic sleights Shall raise such artificial sprites Macbeth iii 5 26
Thy natural magic and dire property, On wholesome life usurp Hambt iii 2 270
If she in chains of magic were not bound ...... Othello i 2 65

What charms, What conjuration and what mighty magic . . . i 3
Is't possible? "Pis true : there's magic in the web of it . . . iii 4



The noble ruin of her magic, Antony



92

69
. Ant. and Cleo. iii 10 19



Magical. What in his name, That magical word of war, we have effected iii 1 31
Magician. A magician, most profound in his art . . As Y. Like It v 2 67
I am a magician. Therefore, put you in your best array . . . v 2 78
His uncle, Wliom he repoils to bo a great magician . , . . v 4 33
That givat magician, damn'd Glendower . . " . . .1 Hen. IV. i 3 83
What black magician conjures up this liend? . . . Hlchurd HI. i 2 34
Magistrate. Some, like magistrates, correct at home . . Hen. V. i 2 191
No kind of trallic Would I admit ; no name of magistrate . Tempest ii 1 149
Fie, lords ! thai you, being supreme magi titrates, Thus contumeliously

should break the peace 1 ....... 1 Hen-. VI. i 3 57

Labour in thy vocation ; which is as much to nay as, let the magistrates

belabouring men ; and therefore should we bo magistrates 2 Hen. VI. iv 2 19
An oath is of no moment, being not took Before a true and lawful

magistrate, That hath aut.hority ovor him that wwoars 8 lle.n. VI. [ 2 23
Proud, violent, !< >! v limglHtnitnH, alilin fools .... CorivUtHlU ii I 47

They Hun, .r i IM ii niagmlratn, Ami mich it out) HM In- . . . .Ill I 104

Ity tho consent of all, wo wnni establish 'd Tho people's maglHtratcH . iii 1 yoi

Magnanimity. Infuso his bmiHl with magnanimity , . 3 Hen. VI. v 4 41

Magnanimous. Tho magnanimous and most illustrate king L. L. Lust iv 1 65

Be magnanimous in the enterprise and go on . . . . All's Well iii 70

As valiant as tho wrathful dove or most magnanimous mouse SHen.lV.iii 2 171
As magnanimous aa Agamemnon ...... Hen. V. iii 6

The mighty, or the huge, or tho magnanimous, are all one reckonings . iv 7 18
She is ... A spur to valiant and magnanimous deeds Troi. and Cres. ii 2 200
Magnanimous and most illustrious six-or-seven-tiines-honoured captain-

general ............. iii 3 277

Magni Dominator poli, Tarn lentns audis scelera? . . T. Andron. iv 1 81
Magnificence. We cannot with such magnificence in so rare I know

not what to say ......... ?r. Tale I 1 13

Magnificent. A letter from the magnificent Armado . . /-. L. Lost i 1 193

A domineering pedant o'er the boy; Than whom nomorUilsomagnilicentl iii 1 180

MagniflCO. 'MM- magnillco is much beloved .... Othello i 2 i .

'I in- inagnillcoes Of greatest pot I have ull persuaded with him

JWtr. of retiitx iii 2 uU*
Magnlflest. Him thut thou magnlflest with all those titles .Stinking and

fly-blown lies here at our feet ..... 1 Hen. VI. iv 7 75

Magnus. Up Fish Street ! down Saint Magnus' Comer 1 . 2 Hen. VI. iv 8 i
MagOt-ples. Have By magot-pies and choughs and rooks brought forth

The secret'st man of blood ....... Macbeth iii 4 125

Mahomet. Was Mahomet inspired with a dove? . . .1 Hen. VI. i 2 140
Mahu. No bettor company? The prince of darkness is a gentleman:

Modo he's called, and Malm ....... Lear iii 4 149

Hobbididance, prince of dumbness ; Malm, of stealing ; Modo, of murder iv 1 63



Maid. If you bo maid or no? No womtor, sir ; Bntcertainly a maid Temp.i ^ 428
Might I but through my prison onc.o a day Buhold this nmid
1 am your wife, if you will many mo ; If not, I '11 din your maid .



i 2 49
i 1 8.)
Hero thought they to have duim Homo wanton cliaim upon this man

and maid Iv 1 95

What is this maid with whom thou wast at play? v 1 185

What a fool is she, that knows I am a maid, And would not force the

letter to my view ! Since maids, in modesty, say ' no 1 T. G. of Ver. i 2 53
You might kill your stomach on your meat And not upon your maid . i 2 69
My sister crying, our maid howling, our cat wringing her hands . . ii 3 8
This hat is Nan, our maid : I am the dog : no, the dog is himself . . ii 3 24
'Tis a milkmaid ; yet 'tis not a maid, for she hath had gossips ; yet 'tis

a maid, for she is her master's maid, and serves for wages . . iii 1 269
She can milk ; look you, a sweet virtue in a maid with clean hands . iii 1 278
Therefore, precisely, can you carry your good will to the maid? Mer. Wives i 1 238
Can you love the maid ? I will marry her, sir, at your request . i 1 252

Desire this honest gentlewoman, your maid, to speak a good word . i 4 88

Sir, the maid loves you, and all shall be well i 4 127

It is such another Nan ; but, I detest, an honest maid as ever broke bread i 4 161

I shall never laugh but in that maid's company I i 4 163

Good morrow, good wife. Not so, an't please your worship. Good

maid, then ii 2 37

De maid is love-a me : my nursh-a Quickly tell me so mush . . . iii 2 65
My maid's aunt, the fat woman of Brentford, has a gown above . . iv Ii 77
What old woman's that? "Why, it IH my maid's mint of Brentford . iv 2 178
( >n that token, Tim maid hath given consent to go with him . . . iv 6 45
1 'II to the vicar : Bring you tho maid, you shall not lack a priest . . iv li 53

There pinch the maids as blue- as bilberry v 6 49

Where you find a maid That, ere she sleep, has thrice her prayers said v 5 53
Why went you not with master doctor, maid? You do amaze her . v 6 232
What, is there a maid with child by him? No, but there's a woman

with maid by him Mats, for Metis, i 2



'Tis my familiar sin With maids to seem tho lapwing and to jest . . i 4

A very virtuous maid, And to be shortly of a sisterhood . . . ii 2 20

Be you content, fair maid ; It is the law, not I condemn your brother . ii 2 79

Fasting maids whose minds are dedicate To nothing temporal . . ii 2 154

But this virtuous maid Subdues me quite ii 2 185

Be gone. Leave me awhile with the maid iii 1 160

What a merit were it in death to take this poor maid from tho woild 1 . iii 1 241

This forcnamed maid hath yet in her the continuance of hrrllrst affection iii 1 248

Wo shall adviso this wronged maid to stead up your appointment . iii 1 260
The maid will I frame and mako lit for his attempt . . . .mi 266

Be acquainted with this maid ; She comes to do you good . . . iv 1 51
A dollower'd maid 1 And by an eminent body that enforced The law

against it! iv 4 24

Vail your regard Upon a wrong'd, I would fain have said, a maid I . v 1 21

Are you a maid? No, my lord. A widow, then? Neither, my lord . v 1 173

You are nothing then : neither maid, widow, nor wife? . . . . v I 178

She may be a punk: for many of them are neither maid, widow, nor wife v 1 180

1 in n was in. n i n'. I ; And I confess besides I am no maid . . . v 1 185

You are pardou'd, Isabel : Ami now, dear maid, be you as free to us . v 1 393

O most kind maid, It was the swift celerity of his death . . v 1 398


1 2 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 526 527 528 529 530 531

Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 4 of 531)