John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 442 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 442 of 531)
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I say thy husband : dost understand the word ? My friend, thy

husband, honest, honest lago . . . . . . . . v 2 153

What yon know, you knuw: From this timo forth I never will speak

word v 2 304

Soft you ; a word or two before you go y 2 338

If they stiller our departure, death's the word . . . Ant. untl Clco. \ 2 139
Bid farewell, and go : when you sued staying, Then was tho time for

words . . . . . . . . . . . . .183.1

One word. Sir, you and I must part, but that's not it . . . i 3 86

I bring thee word, Menccrates and Menas . . . Mako the sea serve them i 4 47
Their contestation Was theme for you, you were the word of war . . ii 2 44
You may, when you hear no more words of Pompcy, return it again . ii 2 105
Our courteous Antony, Whom ne'er the word of 'No' woman heard

speak ii 2 2^8

Let him not leave out The colour of her hair : bring me word quickly . ii 5 114

Bid you Alexas Bring me word how tall she is ii 6 118

Most meet That lirst wo come to words ii 6 3

I have fair meanings, sir. And fair words to them ii 67

A word. Say in mine ear: what is't? Forsake thy seat, I do beseech

theo, captain, And hear mo speak a word ii 7 42

The wild disguiso hath almost Antick'd us all. What needs more

words? ii 7 132

Signify what in his name, That magical word of war, we have cMected . iii 1 31

1 '11 bring thee word Straight, how 'tis like to go iv 12 2

To the monument! There lock yourself, and send him word you are

deait iv 13 4

Say, that the last I spoke was 'Antony, 1 And word it, prithee, piteously iv 13 9
She sent yon word she was dead ; But, fearing since how it might work,

hath sent Mo to proclaim tho truth iv 14 11-4

He words me, girls, 1m words me, that I should not Bo noblo to myself v 2 iyt
I 'II drink tho words you send, Though ink bo made of gall . Cywbtiinc i 1 iuu
That parting kiss which I had set Betwixt two charming words . i 3 j=;

Words him, I doubt not, a great deal from the niatler . . . . i 4 16
When thou shalt bring mo word she loves my son, I'll toll theo on tho

instant thou urt then As great as is thy master . . . i 5 49

('all my women : Think on my words . . . . . . . i 5 75

You am as welcome, worthy sir, as I Have words lo bid you . . i Ii 30

Yes, I beseech ; or I shall short my word By lengthening my return . i G zoo
A wonderful sweet air, with admirable rich words to it . . . . ii 3 ao

He sweats, Strains his young nerves and puts himself in posture That

acts my words . . . . . . . . . . . iii 3

So tender of rebukes that words are strokes And strokes death to her iii 5
Where is thy lady I In a word ; or else Thou art straightway with the

(lends iii f,

Discover whoro thy mlstiCHH Is at onen, At tho next word . . . Ill &
The words of yonr commission Will tio yon to tho numbers ami tho

timo Of their dispatch iii 7

Tho rather saving reverence uf tho word . . . . . . iv 1

Thy words, I grant, are bigger, for 1 wear not My dagger in my mouth v 2
Do not play in weuch-liko words with that Which is so serious . . v 2
Use like nolo and words .... .... ..v2

1 cannot sing : I'll weep, and word it with theo v 2

Again ; and bring mo word how 'tis with her v 3

All Tho rest do nothing with this word 'Stand, stand* . . . v 3
'Tis si range ho [death] hides him in fresh cups, soft beds, Sweet words v 3
Hanging is the word, sir : if you be ready for that, you are well cooked v 4
We'll learn our freenoss ofa son-in-law ; Pardon's the word to all . v 5
1 '11 take thy word for faith, not ask thine oath . . . I'erie-les i 2
A better princo and benign lord, That will prove awful both iu deed

and word ii Cower

To luliil hi:, prince' desire, Sends word of all that haps in Tyro . ii (lower

A black Kthitmu reaching at the sun : The word, 'Lux tun vita mill!' . 11 2

I never spako bad word, nor did ill turn To any living creature

tiivo mo leave : u word, and I '11 have done presently ....

She has hero spoken holy words to tho Lord Lysimachus

We have a maid in Mylilone, 1 durst wager, Would win some words of

him v 1

A \M nl with you Mer. Wives ii 1 ; All's Well ii 3 ; 2 Ifciu IV. i 2 ; iii 2 ;

HiclMfd III. iii 4 ; licit. VIII. i 2 ; J. Vicsar iii 1 ; Macbctk iii 1
One word more Much Ado iii 3 ; Kichanl II. i 2 ; 2 Hen. IV. Epil. ;

Coriolanus iii 1 ; Macbeth iv 1 ; Hamlet iii 4



Word of inuuth. I'll deliver thy indignation to him by word of mouth

T. Niyht ii 3 141

1 will deliver his chatlcngo by word of mouth iii 4 209

And bid mo say lo you by word of month '. < " iii I 280

Wore. Is not, sir, my doublet as frosh as tho Hist day I wore it? Vt'mji'st ii 1 103

I wore it at your daughter's marriage ii 1 105

Which of tho vizards was it llmt you wore? Where? when ? . L. L. Lost v 2 385
Ho wore none but a dishcloutof JaqnenetU's, and that H' weara next

his heart v 2 720

And a chain, that yon once wore, about his neck . . As Y. Like It iii 2 191

Thy father's father wore it, And thy father bore it iv 2 16

Hut on us both did haggish ago steal on And wore us out of act All's Wtlli 2 30
I have served Prince Florizel and in my time wore three-pile W. Tale iv 3 14
You won it, wore it, kept it, gave it me .... 2 Hen. IV. jv 5 222
Sixty and nine, that wore Their crownets regal . Troi. und t'rw. Prol. 5
Doublets that hangmen would Bury with those that wore them i'oriol. i 5 8

With a proud heart he wore his humble weeds ii 3 161

Forget not With what contempt ho wore tho humble weed . . . ii 3 229
Thesn eyes aro not tho same 1 wore in Homo . . . . . v 3 38

The last That wore the imperial diadem of Homo . . . T. Andn>n. i I 6
Saw you not his face? O, yes, my lord ; ho wore his beaver up Hamlet i 2 230

That curled my hair ; wore gloves in my cap Letii' iii 4 88

1 drunk him to his bed ; Then put my tires and mantles on him, whilst

I wore his sword Philip|>an ...... Ant. and t'Vro. ii 6 23

He was my master ; and I wore my life To spend upon his haters . . v 1 8
The same suit he wore when he took leave of my lady . . Cymbelhie iii 5
But time hath nothing blurr'd those lines of favour Which then lie wore iv 2
Many years, Though Cloten then but young, you see, not wore him

From my remembrance . . . . . . . . . iv 4

A rider like myself, who ne'er wore rowel Nor iron on his heel . . iv 4
And wagei'd wilh him Pieces ol gold 'gainst this whirh then lie wuru . v fi

Worost. Wert thou tho dovil, and worest 1L on thy hum, It should ho

challenged Tmi. nnd Crea, v Ii

Work tho pence of tho present 'J'tinjiest i 1

Work you thon I



128
105

23
39
,83

95

2-1

45
238

327

493
84



Ariel, thy charge Exactly is perform'd : but there's more work . .12
Urchins Shall, for that vast of night that they may work, All exercise

on thee .............12

It works. Come on. Thou hast done well, line Ariel ! . . . j 2

I know it by thy trembling : now Prosper works upon thee . . . ii 2

My sweet mistress Weeps when she sees me work iii 1

Alas, now, pi-ay you, Work not so hard iii 1

Let's follow it, and after do our work iii 2

My high charms work And these mine enemies are all knit up . . ii
Their great guilt, Like poison given to work a great lime after . . ii
Your father's in some passion That works him strongly . . . . i\

At which time, my lord, You said our work should cease - - . ^
Your charm so strongly works 'em ........ i

Which even now I do, To work mine end upon their senses . . . \
She works by charms, by spells, by the figure, and such daubery M. W. iv 2
I'll wink and conch : no man their works must eye . . . . v 5

Then no moro remains, But that to your sufiiciency ... as yonr worth

is able, And let them work ... . Meus. for Metis, i 1

Correction and instruction must both work Ere this rude beast will

profit iii 2

I will go darkly to work with her. That's the way . . . . v 1
A very good piece of work, I assure you, and a merry . M. N. Dream i 2
Sweot Puck, You dn their work, and they shall have good luck . . ii 1
Hude mechanicals, That work for bread upon Athenian stalls . . iii 2

Hani-handed men thai work in Athens here v 1

When the work of generation was Between these woolly breeders M. nf V. i 3

Which therein works a miracle in nature iii 2

You would be prouder of the work Than customary bounty can enforce

you iii 4

I have work in hand That you yet know not of iii 4

This is not Fortune's work neither, but Nature's . . As Y. Like It i 2
Alack, in me what strange effect Would they work in mild aspect ! . iv 3
Tis a very excellent piece of work, madam lady . . . T. uf Shicw i 1

Ay, marry, sir, now it begins to work iii 2

And death should have play for lack of work .... All's Well i 1
I charge thee, AH heaven shall work in me for thine avail, To tell me

truly i 3

Ho that of greatest works is linisher Oft dues them by the weakest

minister ii 1

But I shall loso the grounds I wurk upon iii 7

This has no holding, To swear by him whom I protest to love, That I

will work against him . . . . . . . . . . iv 2

On that vice in him will my revenge lind noUble anise to work T. Niyht ii 3

I know my physic will work with him ii 3

Did not I say ho would work it out? the cur is excellent at faults . . ii 5
Does it work upon hint? Like aqua-vita: with a midwifo . . . ii 5
1 '11 go another way to work with him . . . . . . . iv 1

Will) no rash potion, Hut wilh a lingering dram that should not work

Maliciously liko |>uisoii W. Title I 2 320

How would ho look, to see his work HO noblo Vilely bound up? . . iv 4 21
Ho so chants to the hlcuve-luuid and tho work about tho square on 't . iv -1 212
A good nose- is requisite also, lo smell out work for fho other senses . iv 4 687
Every shop, church, session, hanging, yields a careful man work . . iv 4 701
Had ho himself eternity and could put breath into his work . . . v 2 107

Well then, to work K. John ii 1 37

This toil of ours should be a work of thine ii 1 93

This day hath made Much work for tears in many an English mother . ii 1 303
And pell-mell Make work upon ourselves, for heaven or hell . . . ii 1 407
It is a damned and a bloody work; The graceless action ofa heavy

hand, If that it be the work of any hand iv 3 57

It is the shameful work of Hubert's hand iv 3 62

Here's a good world ! Knew you of this fair work? . . . . iv 3 116

You look but on the outside uf this work y 2 109

Awhile to work, and after holiday Richard II. iii 1 44

And toil'd wilh works of war, retired himself To Italy . . . . iv 1 <j6
If all fhn year worn playing holidays, To sport would lie as tedious as lo

work ; Hut whim they seldom come, they wtsh'd for como 1 lieu. IV. i 2 220,

Fio u pi MI this quint life- ! 1 want work II 4 118

In this groat work, Which is almost to plnek a kingdom down 2 Hen. IV. j 3 48
How able such a work to undergo, To weigh against his opposite . . i 3 54
Though it do work us strong As aconitum or rash gunpowder . . iv 4 47
Let us, ciphers to this great accompt, On your imaginary forces work

lien. V. Prol. 18
And let another half stand laughing by, All out of work and cold for

action! i 2 114



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WORK



1741



WORLD



thy



Work. For so work the honey-boos, Creatures that by a rule in nature

teach The act of order Hen. V. i 2

Many things, having full reference To one consent, may work

contranously i 2

Saw his heroical seed, and smiled to see him, Mangle the work of nature ii 4
Work, work your thoughts, and therein sen a siege . . . .iii Prol.
Tho work Ish givo over, Iho tromnnt sound the retreat . . . . iii 2
Hy my hand, I swear, and my fiitnnr'ri nonl, (hn \vork IH!I 111 dono . .1112

Thorn In throat* 1* bn (rut, and works !< hn donn 1112

There In not work enough for nil onr bunds iv 'J

Unit we now hail here Hut ono ten thousand of those men In England

That do no work to-day I iv 3

Upon the which, I trust, Shall witness live in brass of this day's work . iv 3
Thy heart-blood I will have for this day's work . . .1 Hen. VI. i 3
Perceive bow I will work To bring this matter to the wished end . . iii 3
By inspiration of celestial grace, To work exceeding miracles on earth . v 4
So will 1 In England work your grace's full content . . 2 Hen. VI. i 3

Head you ; and let us to onr work 14

That time best fits the work we have in hand 14

To see how God in all his creatures works ! ii 1

What mischiefs work the wicked ones, Heaping confusion on their own

heads ! HI

And too well given To dream on evil or to work my downfall . . . iii 1
And work in their shirt too ; as myself, for example, that am ft butcher iv 7
Work thou tho way, and thou sh.itt execute .... 3//r. 1'f. v 7

Now havn 1 dono a good day's work Rirhnrd III. ii 1

Your honour hath no shriving work in band iii 2

Wo smothered The most replenished sweet work of nature . . . iv 8
How holily ho works in all his business 1 .... Hni. IV//. ii 2
This impiM-ious man will work us all From princes into pages . . ii 2
These sad thoughts, that work too much upon him ii 2

1 was set at work Among my maids iii 1

Has the king this? Believe it. Will this work? iii 2

And durst commend a secret to your ear Much weightier than this work v 1
I was fain to draw mine honour in, and let 'em win the work . . . v 4
Do you with cheeks abash'd behold our works, And call them shames?

Trai. nnd Cre*. \ 3
Do not Ihfso high strains Of divlnatfon in onr sister work Some touches

of remorse? j| 2

Spur them to ruth fill work, rein them from ruth . . . . . v 3
Now hero he fights on Galatho his horse, And thorn lacks work . . v fi
Now Is my day's work done ; 1 'II take good breath v H

traitors and luiwds, how earnestly am you sot a-work I . . . v 10
What work's, my countrymen, in hand? where go you With bats? Cor. i 1

Now, Mars, I prithee, make us quick in work 1 i 4

List, what work ho makes Amongst your cloven army. O, they are at

Sir, praise me not ; My work hath yet not warm'd mo ....
Alone I fought in your Corioli walls, And made what work I pleased
If I should tell theo o'er this thy day's work, Thou'ldst not belie vn t

deeds

To report A little of that worthy work

Horn's goodly work ! I would they wero a-bed !

O, you liavo made good work 1

You have made good work, You and your apron-men ! .

You have made fair work 1

Why, so : you have made good work I

Murdering impossibility, to make What cannot be, slight work
Out of that I'll work Myself a former fortune ....
Revenge is come to join with him, And work confusion on his enemies

T. Andron. v 2

How shall we be employ'd? Tut, I have work enough for you to do . v 2
Come, come with me, and we will make short work . Rom. and Jnl. ii 6
Day, night, hour, tide, time, work, play, Alone, in company . . . iii 5
Come, vial. What if this mixture do not work at all? . . . . iv 3

And l>ear this work of heaven with patience v 3

You are rapt, sir, in HOIIIO work, Home dedication . . T. nf Athena 1 1

1 have, in this rough work, shaped out a man

i like your work ; And you shall Mud I liko it : wait attendance .
Wrought ho not well tli.it painted It? He wrought bettor that mndn

the painter; and yet he's but a 111 thy pleco of work.
Look in thy last work, where thou hast feigned him a worthy fellow .
O, may diseases only work upon 't ! .
Yet thanks I must you con Tliat you are thieves profess'd, that you work

not In holier shapes iv 3

Must thou needs stand for a villain in thine own work? . . . . v 1
Graves only be men's works and death their gain ! Sun, hide thy beams ! v 1
To wear out their Hhoew, to get myself Into more work . . J. (Vir I 1

What you would work mo to, I havn sumo aim

Tho complexion of the element In favour's like the work we have in hand
Let me work ; For I can give his humour the true bent ....
Could it work so much upon your shape As it hath much prevail'd on

your condition, I should not know you

What's to do? A piece of work that will make sick men whole . ,
Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot, Take thou what course thou

wilt! _

Well, to onr work alive. What do you think Of marching to Philippi? iv 3
But this same day Must end that work the ides of March begun . . v 1
Let us meet, And question this most bloody piece of work . Macbeth ii 3

To leavo no rubs nor botches in tho work jjl 1

With Him above To rulll'y the work lild

A most miraculous work In this good king tv 3

In what particular thought to work I know not . . . Hamht I 1
Well said, old mole I canst work i' the earth so fast? . . . .15

No, I went round to work, Ami my young mistress thus I did bespeak . ii 2

What a piece of work is a man I how noble in reason !

How now, my lord ! will the king bear this piece of work?

Tis a knavish piece of work : but what o' that? . .

Conceit in weakest bodies strongest works ......

Let it work ; For 'tis the sport to have the enginer Hoist with his own

petir

I will work him To an exploit, now ripe in my device ....

This is mere madness : And thus awhile the lit will work on him .

The point, envenom'd too I Then, venom, to thy work .

Briefness and fortune, work I Brother, a word

Of my land . . . I '11 work tho moans To make then capabl .

How shall I live and work, To match thy goodness? . . . . iv V

I cannot draw a cart, nor eat dried oats ; If it be man's work, I '11 do't . v 3

He holds me well ; The better shall my purpose work on him Othrlto i H

You rise to play and go to bed to work i| 1



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Work. Thou know'st wo work by wit, and not by witchcraft .
That done, I will be walking on tho works ....
I '11 have the work ta'en out, And glve't lago . . . . .
I should be wise, for honesty's a fool And loses that it works for .
A sibyl ... In her prophetic fury sew'd the work.
Take me this work out. O Cassio, wbonco came this? .
I found it in my chamber. I liko tho work well ....
Work on, My medicine, work 1 ThtiH credulous fools are caught .
I must Uiko out tho work? A likely plocn of work, Hint you Hhonld

Ilnd it I

This Is some minx'H token, nnd I must lako out the work? . , . Iv
(Jive it your hobby-horse : wheresoever you had it, I'll take out no

work on 't

Is it his use? Or did the letters work upon his blood ? .
She did gratify his amorous works With that recognizance
Look on the tragic loading of this bed ; This is thy work

You had then left unseen a wonderful piece of work . Ant. and Clco. \ 2
Mine honesty Shall not make poor my greatness, nor my power Work

without it it 2 94

C.Tsar himself has work, and our oppression Exceeds what we expected iv 7 2
I have done my work ill, friends : O, make an end Of what 1 have

begun iv 14 105

She sent yon word slio was dead ; But , fearing sinco bow it might work,

hftth sent Mo to proclaim the truth iv 14 125

What work is hero ! ('hannian, is this well done? v 2 32!

Hero comes a llatlonng rascal ; upon him Will I llrst work . t'limlclinr i f>
DM thou work : When thou shnlt bring mo word she loves my son . .16
And every day that comes comes to decay A day's work in him . 1 6
A piece of work So bravely done, so rich, that it did strive In workman-
ship and value * . . ii 4

The sweat of industry would dry and die, But for the end it works to . iii 6
The heavens still must work. Wherein I am false I am honest . . iv 3
Having work More plentiful than tools to do't .....
You are made Rather to wonder at the things yon hear Than to work any

To work Her son into the adoption of the crown

There's other work in hand : I see a thing Bitter to mo as death .

Tho son, works high, tho wind is loud Pericles iii 1

Givo this to the 'poUiooary, And tell mo bow it works . . . . iil 2
I can speak of tho disturbances That nature works, and of her cures . Hi 2
The gods arc quick of car, nnd I am sworn To do my work with

hasto

You must tnke Homo pains to work her to your mattngo .

Worked. You have work'd for mo ; thorn's payment for you T. of Athens v 1
Working. In the working of your own affections . . Mean, for Metis, ii i
Be cunning in the working this, and thy fee is a thousand ducats

Murh Atln ii 2

By a familiar demonstration of the working . . . . /,. L. JMst i 2
For praise, an outward part, Wo bend to that tho working of the heart iv 1
His will bath in it a more modest working As Y.Like. It i 2

Thy tyranny Together working with thy jalousies . . . W. Tale iii 2 i8V
Never did base and rotten policy Colour her working with such deadly

wounds 1 Hen. IV. I 3 109

The vory opener and Intelligencer Between the grace, tho sanctities of

heaven, And our dull workings 2 Hen. II'. Iv 2 22

His passions, like a whale on ground, Confound themselves with

working 4' - .

By whoso fell working I was first advanced

Spurn at your most royal imago And mock your workings in a second

body v 2 90

Working so grossly in a natural cause Hen. V. ii 2 107

Not working with tho eye without the ear, And but in purged judgement

trusting neither ii 2 135

I am sick with working of my thoughts 1 Hen,. VI. v 5 86

A weighty and a serious brow, Sad, high, and working . Hen. 1'IIL Prol. 3
Sing, and disperse 'em, if thou canst: leave working . . . . iii 1 2
Limbs are his instruments, In no less working than are swords ami

bows Diroctlvo by tho limbs Trni. and ('res. I 8 355

By working wreak fu I vongmnce on thy fues . , . 7'. Aiidrnn. v 2 32
As 'tworo a thing a little soil'd i' tho working .... Hamlet II 1 40
That from her working all his visagn wfinn'd . . , , . .112 580
Might In tlmir working do yon that oflence, Which elsn worn Hhame /,r<tr I 4 731
They are close delations, working from tho heart . . . Othrlln Iii 8 123
Gets more with begging than we can do with working . . Pericles ii 1 69
But arc you flesh and blood? Have you a working pulse? . . . v 1 155
Working-day. Unless I might have another for working-days Much Ado ii 1 341
O, how full of briers is this working-day world I As \'. Like H\ 3 12

I have laid by my majesty And plodded liko a man for working-days

Jlen. V. [ 2 277

Wo are but warriors for tho working-day Iv 8 109

Working -house. In the quick forge and working-house of thought v Prol. 23
Workman. He, sir, 's a good workman, a very good tailor . All's Well ii 6 21
When workmen strive to do better than well, They do confound their

skill in covetousness K. John iv 2 28

The king's council are no good workmen .... 2 Hen. VI. iv 2 16
Do villany, do, since you protest to do't, Like workmen T. nf Athens iv 3 438
Excellent workman ! thou canst not paint n man so bad as is thyself . v 1 32
In respect of a tine workman, I am but, as you would Bay, a cobbler

J. Ctrsar i 1 10
That thou couldst BPO my wars to-day, and know'st The royal occupation 1

thou Hhonldst son A workman in't .... .-\ t and Cli-o. Iv 4 18

Thnioln I must pltiy Iho workman CumMlnr Iv 1 7

Workmanly. So workmnnly Urn blood nnd linn niv drawn T. n/ ( s\ |ml. 2 62
Workmanship. Ho bravely done, so rich, that It did Htiive In workman-

ihip and, value ......... (.'ymbeline. ii 4 74

Worky-day. Prithee, toll her but a \vorky-day fortune . Ant. and Clen. i 2 55

World. He whom next thyself < If all the world I loved . . Tempest i 2 69

The top of admiration ! worth What's dearest to the world ! . . . iii 1



54



33



iv 4 41

iv 5 207



I would not wish Any companion in the world but you . . . . iii 1 55

I Beyond all limit of what else I' the world Do love, prize, honour you. iii 1 72

Destiny, That hath to Instrument this lower world And what is in t . iii 3 54

I would not for the world . . * v 1 173

How beauteous mankind Is! O bravo new world, That 1ms such

people in't! v 1 183

Entreat thy company. To see the wonders of the world abroad T. n.f>fV.\l 6
Made Trie neglect my studies, loso my time, War with good counsel, set

tho world ftt nought I 1 68

He cannot be a perfect man, Not bi'hig trlpd ami tufnr'd in the world . i 3 21

Then Int her alone. Not for the world : why, man, who is mine own . ii 4 168

How will Hie world repute- me For undertaking HO nnstald a journey? . ii V 59

Ami with thy daring folly burn the world iii 1 155



WORLD



1742



WORLD



II 2



ill 4
it 1
Iv



66



World. Then may I uot HID world on wheels, when she ran spin for her

living T.d.tf IVi-. Ill 1 317

I must never trust then moro, Hut fount tho world a stranger lor thy


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 442 of 531)