John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 455 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 455 of 531)
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Yonder man is carried to prison. Well ; what has ho done? . . J 2 87

But, soft ! who wafts us yonder? Com. of Errors il 2 in

Come, go along ; my wife is coining yonder iv 4 43

Speak softly : yonder, as I think, he walks v 1 9

I came yonder from a great supper Much Ado i 3 44

Yonder s old coil at home . . v 2 98

Hereby, upon the edge of yonder coppice- L. L. J.nst iv 1 9

As bright, as clear, As yonder Venus in her glimmering Rphoro M. N. J>. ill 2 61

Look, where thy love comos : yonder is thy dour Ml 2 ijft

And yonder whines Anrora'H harbinger Ill 2 38-1

It will fall pat as I told you. Yonder aim comes v 1 188

Where is your master? Yonder, sir, he walks . . Mer. of Venice il 2 183

By yonder moon I swear you do mo wrong v 1 142

Yonder comes my master, your brother As Y. Like It i 1 28

Yonder they lie ; the poor old man, their father, making such pitiful dole i 2 137
Yonder, sure, they are coming : let us now stay and see it . i 2 156

Is yonder the man? Even lie, madam i 2 160

Yonder he is: deny him, forswear him, or else we are all undone T.ofS.v 1 113

madam, yonder is heavy news within ! All's Well iii 2 35

Yonder 's my lord your son with a patch of velvet on's fuco . . . iv C 99
lie has been yonder i' the sun practising behaviour to his own shadow

T. Night ii 5 20

He will not now be padded : Fabian can searco hold him yonder . . iii 4 310
Demand of yonder champion The cause of his arrival hero Richard II. i 3 7
Ask yonder knight in arms, Both who he is and why be conieth hither i 3 26
Yonder he comes ; and that arrant malmsey -nose knave 2 lien. JV. il 1 41

Is not that the morning which breaks yonder? I think it be Hen. V. iv 1 88
We see yonder the beginning of the day, but I think we shall never see

the end of it iv 1 91

Call yonder fellow hither. Soldier, you must come to tlie king . . iv 7 123

In yonder tower to ovorpeer tho city 1 Hen, VI. \ 4 n

By thrusting out a torch from yonder tower Ill 2 21

The burning torch in yonder turret stands Hi 2 30

Yonder's Mm head of that arch-enomy 8 Hrn. VI. il 2 2

Biavo followers, yonder stands tho thorny wood v 4 67

And yonder is the wolf that makes this spoil v 4 Bo

Tako heed of yonder dog 1 Look, when ho fawns, hn bites nicJiard II L i 3 289
Yonder comes Paris. Look yo yonder, niece . . . Tmi. nnd Cres, i 2 230
What sneaking fellow comes yonder? Where? yonder?. . . . i 2 246
The Trojans' trumpet. Yonder conies the troop . . . . iv 6 64

1 have said to some my standers by 'Lo, Jupiter is yonder, dealing life! 1 iv 5 191
I wonder now how yonder city stands When we have here her base and

pillar iv 5 211

Yonder walls, that pertly front your town, . . - Must kiss their own feet iv 5 219
We go wrong, we go wrong. No, yonder 'tis v 1 74

Then is he yonder, And there the strawy Greeks, ripe for his edge,

Fall down v 5 23

No, by the flame of yonder glorious heaven, He shall not carry him . v 6 23
Yonder conies news. A wager they have mot .... CorfofewMM i 4 i

Who's yondor, That dons appear at* ho wnro flay'd? 1 ai

Knipross I am, but yonder slls Um oiiipm'nr . . . T. Allilron. Iv 4 41
What In.ly Is that, which doth mirich tho hand Of yonder knight?

i'nin. an<1 Jn}, I 5 44



YONDER



1704



YORK



Yondor. Ho show a snowy dnvn trooping with crows, As yuiidrr lady

o'ur her fellows shows A'.-m. it ml Jul, I f>

llul, Koftl whul light Iliriniglt yonder window broakflY It is thu east . \\ %

l,ady, hy yonder blessed moon 1 swear ii -

Look, uwo, what envious streaks Do laco the severing clonda in yonder
cast



Bid me leap, rather than marry Paris, From off the battlements of

yonder tower iv 1 78

Sea, by good hap, yonder 'H my lord T. of Athens iii 2 27

Yomlur comes a pout and a painter : the plague of company light upon

then! iv 3 356

Darest thou, Cassins, now Leap in with me into this angry Hood, And

swim to yonder point? /. <'<t'^"' 1 2 104

Hide thy spurs in him, Till he have brought thee up to yonder troops . v 8 16
Where, where, Messala, doth his bndy lie? Lo, yonder . . . v 3 92

Do yon see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel? . Hamlet iii 2 393

So would 1 ha' done, by yonder nun iv 5 65

O, my good lord, yonder 'H 1'oid murders donn ! . . . (HltettQ v 2 106
Here comes Tim nohln Anlony. And yonder, Ciesar . Ant. innl <Ym. ii 2 14
Yonder They cast their rupn up and carouse together Like friends

long lost . Iv 12 n

Sir, yonder is your place. Some other is more lit . . . 1'eridcs ii 3 23

Yorlck. This same skull, sir, was Y'oriek's skull, the king's jester lln.ni. v 1 198

Alas, poor Yoriek ! I knew him, Horatio: a fellow of intinito jest . y 1 203

York. Commend me to thy brother, Edmund York . . . Jiichard II. i 2 62.

And what shall good old York there see But empty lodgings? . . i 2 67

Be York the next that must bo bankrupt so ! ii 1 151

York is too far gone with grief, Or else he never would compare between ii 1 184
Hern comes the Dnke of York. With signs of war about his aged neck ii 2 73
Ne'er shall meet again.- -That's as York thrives to beat back Boliny broke ii 2 144
What stir Kenps good old York there with bis men of war? . . u .; -

From the most gracious regent of this land, The DuKn ol York . . ii 3 78
I know my uuelo York I hith power enough to serve our turn . . iii '2 By
Yoi k ii joinM with ItnliughroKc, And all ymir northern castlrs yielded up iii 2 200
Letters came last night To a dear friend of the good Duke of York's . iii 4 70
Why, York, what wilt thou do? Wilt thou not hide the trespass of

thine own? v 2 88

Sweet York, sweet husband, be not of that mind v 2 107

Though I IM old, t doubt not but to ride as fast as York . . . v 2 115

Sweet York, be patient. Hear me, gentle liege v 3 y i

Travelling to wan Is Yuri;, With much ado at length havo gotten leave . v f> 7}
'Twas where thu miidop duUn his unehi Kept, His uncln York I II, u. IV. \ 3 ajs
That Hiiiiin nohlo prelate, \v H Imloved, Tim archbishop. - of Yoik, IN

it not? i 3 260

And then thn power ol Scotland and of York, To join with Mortimer, ha? i 3 at!o

Why, my lord of York commends the plot ii 3 -22

The Arehbisliop'sgiaceof York, Douglas, Mortimer, Capilulatoagainstus iii 2 119
Westmoreland Towards York shall bund you with your dearest speed . V 5 36
The gentle Archbishop of York is up With well-appointed powers

2 Hen. IV. i 1 189

You should have been well on your way to York 'i 1 73

My Lord of York, it better show'd with you When that your Hock,

assembled by the bell, Encircled you iv 2 4

Send Cole vile with bis confederates To York, to present execution . iv 3 So
1 beg The leading of the vaward. Take it, brave York . . Hen. V. iv 3 131
York, all haggled over, Comes to him, where in gore he lay insteep'd . iv G it
And if thou be not then created York, I will not live to be accounted

Warwick 1 lint. 17. il 4 119

Swentstem from York's great Htork il ft 4

iMivi'd From famous Mdmund Ijingloy, Duko of York . . . .
The whle inheritance I give That dul h belong unto tho house of York

1 gird thee with Hie valiant sword of York

Welcome, high prince, tho mighty Duke of York ! Polish, base prince,

ignoblo Duke of York !

These colours that 1 wtuir In honour of my noble Ijord of York

Why, what is he? as good a man as York. Hark ye ; not so .

A certain question in the law Argued betwixt the Duke of York and him iv 1 06

Your private grudge, my Ixird of York, will out . . . . . iv 1 i

<~!ood cousins both, of York ami Somerset, Quiet yourselves, I pray . iv 1 i

I see no reason, if I wear this rose, That any one should therefore be

auspicious I more iucliim to Somerset than York . . . . iv 1 15-1
Cousin of York, we institute your grace To bo our regent . . . iv 1
To Uourdeaux, York! Klso, farewell Talbot, Franco, and England's



f> 85
iii 1 165
iii 1 17

iii 1 177
" 4 30
4 36



hi



This expedition was by York ami Talbot Too rashly plotted .
That, Tull>ot d)','id, great York might bear the nan in ....
Iting'd about with bold adversity, Cries out for noble York and Somerset
York set him on ; York should have sent him aid. -And York as fast

upon your grace exclaims

York lies; lie might have sent and had the horse; I owe him little

duty

Had York and .Somerset brought rescue in, Wo should have found a

bloody day

Cousin of York, Wo hero discharge your grace from bulug rogont

1! lien. \ r

Itriivn York, Hnllshury, and victorious Warwick, Itecclvcd deep scum .
MI '. i In i York, thy ucts In Ireland, In bringing them to civil discipline

And so says York, for he hath gre-utest cause

Ho York must sit and fret and bite his tongue, While his own lands

are bargain 'd for and sold .........

A day will como when York shall claim Ids own

Then, York, be still awhile, till time do serve: Watch thou and wako .
Hr.ar the urnis of York, To grapple with the house of Lancaster

Somerset, Iliickingham, And grumbling York

! ' ! the Duke of York, this late complaint Will make but little fur his

Lenellt

I care not which ; Or Somerset or York, all's OIIH to mo

If York have ill demean'd himself in France, Then let him be dunay'd

the regentship

If Somerset be unworthy of tho place, Let York be regent

Dispute not that : York is tho worthier

York is mcotest man To be your regent in Mm rc-alm of Franco . .
(Jivo mo leave To show sumo reason, of no littlo force, That York is

must unmeet of any man .........

Pray Clod the Dnke of York excuse himself ! Doth any one accuse York

fur ;i l.aitor?

Kin 1 - n.^ lit, .itf wo were scouring my Lord of York's armour

Lot Somerset bo regent o'er tho French, Because in York this breeds

suspicion ............

Sweet York, beyln ; und it thy claim be good, The Nevils are thy subjects



iv 4
iv 4
iv 4



Iv 7

L 1 1

1 1

1 1

i i

i i

i 1

i 1

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1 3
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IS

55
76

79
90

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ork. Tho llfth [son of Kdwaid III.] was Kdmuml Langley, Duko of York

ii lieu 17. li 2

York claims It from the third (sou) ii 2

They in seeking that Shall lind their deaths, if York can prophesy

The Kurl of Warwick Shall one day make the Duke of York a king . ii

Touching tho Duko of York, I will take my death, I never meant him

any ill

York and impious Beaufort, that false priest, Have all limed bushes

And dogged York, that reaches at tho moon

'Tis York that hath morn reason for his death

If York, with all his far-let policy, Had been tho regent there instead

of me

No more, good York ; sweet Somerset, bo still : Thy fortune, York,
hadst thou been regent there, Might happily have proved far

worse than his

Now, York, or never, steel thy fearful thoughts

Perceive the commons' mind, How they allect the house and claim of

York iii 1 375

The bouse of York, thrust from the crown Hy shameful murder . . iv 1 04

.lack Cade, I he Duko of York bath taught you this Iv 2 id.-

Thus stands my slain, 'twisl Cade and York dislress'd . . . . iv !i ti
Now is Cade driven back, bis men dispersed ; And now is York in arms iv '.t

From Ireland thus comes York to claim his right v 1

York, it' thou meanest well, I greet theo well v 1

Duth York intend no barm to us, That thus he marcheth with thee

arm in arm ?

For thousand Yorks he shall not hide his head .....
Is Somerset at liberty V Then, York, unloose thy long-imprison 'd

thoughts

I arrest thee, York, Of capital treason 'gainst the king and crown
The basUird boys of Yoik Shall be the surety lor their traitor father .
Tho sons of York, thy bettors in their hiilh, Shall be their father's bail
This is my king, York, I do not mistake ; But thou mlslakest

Then, nobly, York ; 'tis fora crown thou light'st

York not our old men spares ; No more will 1 their babes

Meet I an infant of the house of York, Into as many gobbets will I cut

it As wild Medea young Alwyrtus did v 2

Saint Aluan's battle won by famous York Shall be eternized in all age . v 3
Victorious Prince of York, Before I see thee seated in that throne . . .

I vow by heaven these eyes shall never close . . .3 lint. i'l. i 1
This the regal seat : possess it, York ; For this is thine ....

Here in the parliament I I us assail the family of York ....

Thou fttctioiiH iMiku of York, descend my throne, And kneel for grai'e .
Ho made thee I hike of Yoik. - 'Twas my in hoi i Liu ice, an the earldom was
Do right unto this princely Duko ul York ......

Be thou a prey unlo the bouso of York, And die in bands for this t

Now York and I .ancaster are reconciled i 1 204

And given unto tho house of York such head

To thy foul disgrace And utter ruin of the house of York

The sight of any of the house of York Is as a fury to torment my soul .

Alas, i>oor York ! but that I hate thee deadly, I should lament thy

miserable state

I prithee, grieve, to make me merry, York

York cannot speak, unless ho wear a crown. A crown for York 1 .
OH* with his head, and set it on York gates ; Mo York may overlook the

town of York

That was a woful looker-on When as the noble Duke of York was slain
They took his bead, and on the gates of York They set the same .
Sweet Duke of York, our prop to lean upon, Now thou urt g<me, wo

have no stall', no nt-ay ii 1

O valiant h>id, the DukuofYork Is slain ! O Warwick, Warwick ! . "

No longer Karl of March, but Duko of York

Welcome, my lurd, to this bravo town of York

Ambitious York did level at thy crown, Thou smiling . . .
Ah, cousin York 1 would thy best friends did know How it doth grieve

nm that thy head is here 1

Comes Warwick, backing of the Duko of Yoik

'Twas you that kill'd young Rutland, was it not? Ay, and old York .
Their blood upon thy head ; For York in justice puts his armour on
Suppose this arm is for the Duke of York, And this for Itutland .

This is tho hand that stabb'd thy father York

Camo ou the part of York, pivss'd by his muster

Impairing Henry, strengthening misproud York

Giving no ground unto tho house of York ......

From off the gates of York fetch down the head, Your father's head
Thou didst love York, and I am sou to York ......

Whose unstanehed thirst York and young Rutland could not satisfy



1



1 293



iii 1 304

1 33>



35



v 1 56

v 1 85

v 1 88

v 1 106

v 1 1 15

V 1 110

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V 2 51

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1 254
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ii 2 54
ii 2 69
ii 2 99
ii 2 130
ii -1 -.-
ii 4
ii 5
ii
ii ti
ii G
ii G
ii G



6

66

16
5-'
73
84

In quarrel of tho house of York The worthy gentleman did lose his life iii 2 6
This arm upholds the house of Lancaster. And I tho house of York . iii 3 108
Did I forget that by the house of York My father came untimely to his

death? iii 3 186

I degraded you from being king, And come now to create you Duke of

York v 3 34

Tho Binhop of York, Fell Warwick's brother and by I hat our foe . . v -1 i i
Being thus arrived From LluVuilHpill'gll haven before Urn gains of York v 7 H
If Henry bo your King, Yet I'M ward nt tho least Is Duko of York . . v 7 !

Now, fur this night, let's harbour hero In York v 7 70

Bo penitent? And thou shalt still remain the Duke of York . . v 1 28
Both Dukes of Somerset Have sold their lives unto tho house of York . v 1 74
Come to mo, friend or foe, And tell me who is victor, York or Warwick? v 2 6

Speak like a subject, proud ambitious York ! v & 17

Now is tho winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this

sun of York Hit-hard III. i 1 2

York and Edward wept, To hear the piteous moan that Rutland made . i 2 157
Did York's dread curso prevail so much with heaven? . . . i 3 191

Cited up a thousand fearful times, During the wars of York and Lancaster 14 15
When that our princely father York Bless'd his three sons . . . i 4 241
They say my son of York Hath almost overta'en him in his growth . ii 4 6

I pray thee, pretty York, who told theo this? ii 4 31

I thought my mother, and my brother York, Would long ere this have

met us ill 1 ?o

Tho queen your mother, ami your brother York, Have lakon sanctuary iii 1 -.7
L'orsimdu thu quuen to soud. the Duko of York Unto his princely

brother iit 1 33

If my weak oratory Can from his mother win the Duke of York . . iii 1 38
My Lord of York will still be cross in talk iii 1 126



Think you, my lord, this little prating York Was not incensed by his

subtle mother? .

Noble York My princely father then bad wars in France

One hour hence, And 1 '11 salute your graco of York as mother



i 1 15'
i 5 87



YORK



YOUNCI DAUPHIN



York. Young York bo is but boot, because both they Match not tho

high perfection of my loss Richard 111. iv 4 65

Farewell, York's wife, and queen of sad mischance iv 4 114

A pair of bleeding hearts ; thereon engrave Edward and York . . iv 4 273
What heir of York is there alive but we? And who is England's king

but groat York's heir? . . . iv 4 472

1/inrastnr, Tho wronged heirs of York do pray for theo . . . . V 3 137
All this divided York and Lancaster, Divided in their dire division . v G 27
Uy thogoud discretion Of the right reverend Cardinal of York lien,. Vlll. \ 1 51
You, my hud Cardinal of York, nro join'd with mo their servant . . il 2 106
The stout Earl Northumberland Arrested him at York . . . . iv 2 13

York-place. With the same full state paced back again To York-place . iv 1 94
You must no more call it York-place, that's jwist . . . . . iv 1 95

Yorkshire. Are by the sheriff of Yorkshire overthrown . 2 lien. IV. iv 4 99
Sir Thomas Lovel and Lord Marquis Dorset, 'Tis said, my liege, in

Yorkshire arc in arms ....... Jtichnrd III. iv 4 521

You. Come on, you madcap, I'll to the alehouse with you T. G. ofVer. ii 5 8
Notwithstanding, man, I '11 do you your master what good I can M. W. i 4 97
In these times you stand on distance, your passes, stoccadoes . . ii 1 233
That will not miss ynn morning nor evening prayer . . . . ii 2 102
Cniiie down, you witch, you hag, you ; como down, I say ! . . . iy 2 188
What offence hath this man mado you, sir? . . Maw. for Jlfetis. iii 2 15

Keep your instruction, And hold you ever to our special drift . . iv 5 4
She will sit you, you heard my daughter tell you how . . Much Ado ii 3 116
You havo among you killed a sweet and innocent lady . . . . v 1 194
Hut, soft you, let mo bo : pluck up, my heart, and bo sad . . . v 1 207
Kio, lie ! you counterfeit, you puppot, you I . . M. N. Dream iii 2 288

That you should hero repent yuu, The actors are at hand . . . v 1 115
Master young man, you, I pray you, which is the way? . Mcr. nf Venice ii 2 34

Will you prepare you for this masque to-night? ii 4 23

Therefore, put you in your best array ; bid your friends As Y. Like It v 2 79
Welcome, yuu ; how now, you ; what, you ; fellow, you T. of Shrew iv 1 114

You, sir I why, what are you ? 2'. Night iii 4 346

To your own bents dispose you : you'll be found, Bo you beneath the

sky W. Tale i 2 179

John lays you plots: tho times conspire with you . . K. John ii! 4 146

Thoy will learn you by mto whoro services were dono . . //fit. V. ill 74
I'leparo you, lords, for Edward Is at hand, lUwly to light . 3 Ifm. VI. v 4 Go
Ilo will weep you, an 'twere a man born In April . . Troi. nnd Cres. \ 2 188
Mistress minion, you, Thank me no thankings . . Horn. nndJul. iii 5 152
You blocks, you stones, you worse than senseless things I J. C(csar i 1 40

1'reparc you, generals : The enemy comes on in gallant show . . v 1 12

Soft you now 1 The fair Ophelia 1 Jhnnlft iii 1 88

Soft you ; a word or two before you go Othello v 2 338

Young. By lovo tho young and tender wit Is turn'd to folly T. Cf. of Ver. i 1 47
His years but young, but his experience old ; His bead unmcllow'd . il 4 69
O' my life, if I were young again, the sword should end it . Mcr. Wives i 1 40
Would I were young for your sake, Mistress Anne I . . . i 1 268

You are not young, no more am I ; go to then, there's sympathy . . ii 1 6
Sir John anVcts thy wife. Why, sir, my wife is not young . . . ii 1 116
Ho wooes both high and low, both rich and poor, Doth young and old . il 1 118
How wise, how noble, young, how rarely featured . . Much Ado iii 1 60
To brag What I havo done being young, or what would do Were I not old v 1 61
Had we fought, I doubt we should have been too young for them . . v 1 ng
Say, can you fast? your stomachs are too young . . . L. L. Lost iv 3 294
Few taller are so young v 2 846

spite ! too old to bo engaged to young . . . M. N. Dream i 1 138
Things growing nro not ripo until their season: So I, being young, till

uow ripe not to reason il 2 nB

Pluck tho young sucking cubs from the she-bear . . Mcr. of Venice ii 1 29
Had you been as wise as bold, Young in limbs, in judgement old . . ii 7 71
Doth commend A young and learned doctor iv 1 144

1 never know so young a body with so old a head iv 1 163

Come, come, elder brother, you are too young In tliiu . As Y. Like It I I 57
Your brother IN but young and tender ; and, for your love, I would bo

loath lo i..il him, aH I muni M 135

Them ! not mm no young mid HO vlllaiioun Mih day living . . .11 161
Ills mouth full of TIOWH. Which ho will put on us, rw plgemiH feed tholr

young i 2 100

Alas, ho is ton young ! yet ho looks successfully i 2 162

f \vas too young that time to value her ; But now I know her . i 3 73

Atid says, if ladies be but young and fair, They have the gift to know it ii 7 37
I perish, Tran io, If L achieve not this young modest girl . T. of Shrew i 1 161
A wife With wraith enough and young and beauteous . . . i 2 86

I will not burden then ; l-'or, knowing thee to be but young and light . ii 1 204
Ilo is old, I young. And may not young men die, as well as old? . . ii 1 393
Young budding virgin, fair nnd fresh and sweet . . . . . iv 6 37
Kvnn KO it was with mo when I was young .... All's M'ell i 8 134
And k^pta roil with 'Too young 'and ' tho next year ' ami ' 'tis too early' ii 1 28

To bo young again, if we could ii 2 40

Yon are too young, too happy, and too good ii 3 102

She is young, wise, fair ; In these to nature she's immediate heir . . ii 3 138

I long to talk with the young noble soldier iv 5 109

Not yet old enough for a man, 7ior young enough for a boy . 7'. Night i 5 165
Young though thou art, thine eye Hath stay'd upon some favour that it

loves ii 4 24

Sooth, when I was young And handed lovo as you do . . If. Tale iv 4 358

She shall not bo so young As was your former v 1 78

When sho was young you woo'd hor ; now In ago Is film become the suitor? v 8 108
llul lusty, vouug, and chnnrly drawing breath . . . .JHi'hanl II, I !1 (>(\

I'or young hot colls being raged do rugo tlm nmrn II 1 70

N,. MM' gentle lamb more mi Id, Than was bll&tyOUHg and princely gentleman II I 175
I trud'T you my service, Much as it Is, being tender, raw, and young . ii 3 42
Molh young and old rebel, And all goes worse than I have power to tell iii 2 119
I am too young to bo your father, Though you are old enough to be my

heir iii 3 204

The very windows spake, So many greedy looks of young and old . v 2 13

Being but young, I framed to the bar]) Many an English ditty 1 Ifen. IV. iii 1 123
You that are old consider not the capacities of ns that arc young 2Hcn.IV.i "2 197
Blasted with antiquity? and will you yet call yourself young? . . i 2 209
A Rond-lhnhod fellow ; young, strong, and of good friends . . . iii 2 114
This same young sober-blooded boy doth not love mo . . . . iv 3 94
As young as I am, I have observed these three swashers . lien. V. ill 2 29
When I was young, as yet I am not old, I do remember . 1 lien. VI. iii 4 17
Marriage, undo t alas, my years aro young ! And litter is my study . v 1 21
Whose hand is that, the fl.rest bear doth lick? Not his that spoils her

young before IHT face 3 lien. VI. ii 2 14

Unreasonable creatures feed their young . . . . . . . ii 2 26

Offering their own lives in their young's defence ii 2 32

So many days my ewus havo been with yuung ii 5 35



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Young. What I can RO young a thorn begin to prick? . . 8 Hen. VI. v G
Havo now the fatal object in my eye Where my poor young was limed . v
Framed iu the prodigality of nature, Young, valiant, wise Riehard 111, i 2
Ho is young, and bis minority Is put unto the trust of Richard Gloucester i 3
He was tho wretched'st thing when he was young, So lung a-growing . ii

So wise so young, they say, do never live long iii

Ilo prettily and nptly taunts himself: So cunning and so young is


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 455 of 531)