John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) online

. (page 98 of 531)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 98 of 531)
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He that in this action contrives against his own nobility, In his proper

stream o'erflowa himself - . iv 8 30

Thy overtlow of good converts to bad .... Richard II. y 3 64
When heaven doth weep, doth not the earth o'erllow? . T. Andron. iii 1 222
Nay, but this dotage of our general's O'ertiows the measure Ant. and Cleo. i 1 2
Our griefs are risen to the top, And now at length they overflow 1'cridts ii 4 24
Overflowed. Then must my earth with her continual tears Become a

delugo, overflow'd und drown'd '-/'. Andron. iii 1 230

Therefore tho earth, fearing to bo o'erHow'd, Hath Thetis' birth-child

on the heavens bestow'd Pericles iv 4 40

Overflowing. As the o'erflowing Nilus presageth famine . Ant. and Cleo. i 2 49
Overflown. Loath to have you overflown with a bonny-bag M. N. Dream iv 1 17

Over-fond of the shepherd's daughter W. Tale v 2 126

Over-fraught. The grief that does not speak Whispers the o'er-fraught

heart and bids it break Macbeth iv 8 210

Over-full. Being over-full of self-affairs, My mind did lose it M. N. Dreami 1 113
Overgalled. Their eyes o'ergalled with recourse of tears . Troi. and Ores, v 3 55
Overglance. I will overglance the superscript . . , . L. L. Lost iv J! 135
Overglanced. But with a cnrsorary eye O'orglancod the articles Hen. V. v 2 78
Overgo. What causo havo I, Thine being but a moiety of my grief, To

overgo thy plaints and drown thy cries I . . . Richard III. ii 2 61

Overgone. Many weary miles you have o'ergoue . . . L. L. Lost v 2 196

Sad-hearted men, much overgone with care . . . .3 Hen. VI. ii 6 123

Overgorged With gobbets of thy mother's bleeding heart . 2 Hen. VI. iv 1 84

Over-great. The o'er-great cardinal Hath show'd him gold . Hen. VIII. i 1 222

Over-greedy. Their over-greedy love hath surfeited . . 2 Hen. IV. I 8 88

Overgrow. They'll oVrgrow the gardnn Ami t-lioko the herbs 2 lien. VI. iii 1 311

Ovorgrown. Kvnn llkn an o'orgrown lion In u (uivu . . Jlfc<i.i. fur Mian. \ II -2-2

A vvrntrhi'il nigged man, o'orgrown with hair . . As Y. fAke It Iv H 107

l.ikn i ,.>! wildly overgrown with hair .... .'/. V. v 2 43

Yimrsnll Ho imt, of thought, and Uinrnto mi o'nigrnwn . . Cymbdiita iv I 3j

Overgrowth. Uy tho oV-rgrowth of nmne complexion . . Hamlet i 4 27

Overhang. As fearfully as doth a galled rock O'erhang and jutty his

confounded base Hen. V. iii 1 13

Overhanging. This brave o'erhnngiug firmament . . . Hamlet ii 2 312

Over-happy. Happy, in thnt wo are not over-happy ii 2 232

Overhasty. His father's death, and our o'erhnsty marriage . . ii 2 57

Overhead. The street should sen as sho walk'd overhead . . L. L. Lost iv 3 281
Over head and ears. Knee-deep, o'er head and ears . . W. Tale i 2 186
Overhear. And overheard what you shall overhear . . . L. L. Lost y 2 95

I will overhear their conference M. N. Dream ii 1 187

Some more audience than a mother, Since nature makes them partial,

should o'erhear The speech, of vantage .... Hamlet iii 3 32

Overheard. Son, I have overheard what hath passed . Meas. for Meas. iii 1 161

Were thus much overheard by a man of mine .... Much Ado 12 n

Who in the night overheard mo confessing to this man . . . . v 1 241

I should blush, I l<nuw, To 1m o'nrhmird and taknu napping BO /.. /-. 7x>si iv H 130

And ovnrlmard what you shall ovnihnar v ii 95

Him HtM'.rntlv o'orhuard Your daughter und her cousin . As Y. Like It 11 2 11

1 overheard him and bis practices ii 3 26

If they have overheard me now, why, hanging. . . . W. Tale iv 4 639
Myself hath often over-heard them say .... 3*. Andro-n. iv 4 74

I have o'crbeard a plot of death upon him Lear iii 96

Overheardest. Say that thou overneard'at us . . . . Much Ado Hi 1 6

Thou overheard 'st, ere I was ware, My true love's passion Rom. and Jul. ii 2 103

Overbold. If be ovorhold his price so much, We'll none of him T. and C. ii 3 142

Over-joy. Such as my wit affords And over-joy of heart . . 2 Hen. VI. i 1 31

Overjoyed with finding a bird's nest Much Ado ii 1 230

Biii him shod tears, as being ovorjoy'd .... T. of Shrew Ind. 1 120
" 11 oVirjoy'd, Save lliOHQ In bonds ; lot them bo joyful too



All



Look to the lady ; O, hhu's but o'oijoy'd
ver-kind. Bicllm cannot show himself over-kind



Cymlidine V f 40

I'crii-ti-.i v 11

d to llohmnia jr. Talc 1 1 23

Over-kindness, Yourovor-kindneKS doth wring tears from mo I Much A do v 1 302
Over-laboured. The crickets sing, and man's o'er-labour'd sense Repairs

itself by rest ......... Oymbcline ii 2 n

Over-land, I desire of you A conduct over-land to Milford-Haveu . . iii 5 8

Overleap. I do beseech you, Let me o'erleap that custom . Coriolanus ii 2 140

That is a step On which I must fall down, or else o'erleap . Macbeth i 4 49

Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other . i 7 27

Over-leather. My toes look through the over-leather . T. of Shrew Ind. 2

Over-leaven. Some habit that too much o'er-leaveus The form of plansivo

manners .......... Hamlet i 4 29

Overlive. That your attempts may overlive the hazard . 2 ffe-n. IV. iv 1 15

Over-long. O, bold me not with silence over-long ! . . .1 Hen. VI. v 3 13

Overlook. Your eyes, where I o'erlook Love's stories written M. N. Dream ii 2 121

Uy this hand I swear, That sways the earth this climate overlooks K.Johnii 1 344

Willing you overlook this pedigree ...... Hen. V. ii 4 90

Spirt up so suddenly into the clouds, And overlook their grafters. . iii 5 9
So York may overlook the town of York ..... 8 Hen. VI. i 4 i"



Tfark ! a drum. Catesby, o'erlook the walls
Overlooks the highest-peering hills
1 will oVrlonk thy paper

O'crlouk What shipping ami what lading's in our haven
Overlooked. Yet I would I had o'erlooked the hitter
Vile worm, thou wast o'erlook'd even in thy birth .
''



Richard III. iii 5 17
T. Andron. ii 1

l^ar v 1 50
. Pericles i 2
T. G. of Ver. i 2 50
. . Mer. Wives v 6 87

Beahrew your eyes, They have o'ertook'd mo and divided me Mer. of Venice iii 2 15
Stoop low within those bounds wo have o'erlook'd ... A'. John v 4 55
Whim limn shalthavo overlooked this, give thuso follows some moans to

tlm king : thoy havo letters for him ..... Hamlet iv

Overlooking. Bequeathed to my overlooking .... All's Wdl \ 1

Ho much as 1 havo perused, I Und It not lit for your o'or-looking . Lear i 2 40

Over-lusty. Tho conlldent and over-lusty French . . lien. V. iv Prol 18

When a man's over-lusty lit legs, then be wears wooden nether-stocks Lear ii 4 10

Overmaster. For your desire to know what is between us, O'ermaster't

as you may .......... Hamlet i 6 140

Overmastered. Would it not grieve a woman to bo overmastered with a

plane of valiant dwt? ........ Mwh Ada Ii 1 6

verm (isto rest. Which uwo the crown that Ihuti u'uinuisterost A*, .lului ii 1 101



tvermatohed. Who with me Set from our o'erniateh'd forces forth for aid

1 lien. VI. iv 4 n

> 1 1 nr MH-II ylnld, with robhrrs HO oVi niatch'd . . . H lien. \'l. 1 4 64
ivur-matohlng And wpnnd hnr Mtrniigth with iivor-nmtchlng waves . I 4 21
tver-measuro. (lonm, enough.- Hiiouulii with ovor-mniiHimi t'oriolannx Hi 1 i^>
tvor merry. I'll in to counsel them ; haply my prosouco May well abate

tlie over-merry splnmi ....... T, of fihrew Ind. 1 137

rraount. With your thuinn, I could O'ormnunt tho birk Hen. VIII. ii 3 9.^
)v or -mount Ing. Did drench His over-mounting spirit . 1 Hen. VI. iv 7 15

)ver-much. You tempt him over-much JT. Tule y 1 73

Kept an evil diet long, And overmuch consumed his royal person Rich. III. i 1 140
Over-name them ; and as thou uamest them, I will describe them

Mer. of Venice i 2 39
Over-night. And so, good rest. As wretches have o'ernight That wait

for execution in the mom T. G. of Ver. iv 2 133

Shame her with what bo saw o'er night Much Ado iii 3 174

1'anlon me, madam: If I had given you this at over-night, sho might

havo been o'erta'en All's Wdl iii 4 23

Will tho cold brook, Candied with ice, caudle thy morning tasto, To

cure thy o'er-night's surfeit? T. of Athens iv ft 227

)verpald. To be acknowledged, madam, Is o'erpaid .... Leitr iv 7 4

)verparted. Alas, you see how 'tis, a little o'er parted . . L. L. Lost v 2 588

)verpassed And like a hermit overpass'd thy daya . . .1 Hen. VI. ii 5 117

Dverpast. That tbou hast wronged in the time o'orpast . Richard III. iv 4 388

That tbou hast Misused ere used, by time misused o'erpast . . . iv 4 396

Over-pay. Which I will over-pay and pay again . . . All's Wdl tii 7 16

Yuur very goodness and your company O'erpays all I can do . Cy-mbdine ii 4 10

Overpeer. Do overpeer the petty tratlickers . . . Mer. of Venice i 1 u

In yonder tower to overpeer the city 1 Hen. VI. i 4 u

And mountainous error be too highly beapt For truth to o'erpeer Corwl. ii 3 u8
Dverpeered. Whose top-branch ovorpeer'd Jove's spreading tree 8 Hen. VI. v 2 \.\
Overpeerlng. The ocean, oveipeering of his list, Kats not the tlats with

more impetuous haste ... .... Humid iv 5 99

Dver-peroh. With love's light wings did I o'er-perch these walls; For

stony limits cannot hold love out .... Rom. ami Jul. ii 2 66

3' er- picturing that Venus Ant. and Cleo. ii 2 205

Overplus. Our overplus of shipping will we burn iii 7 51

Antony Hath after thee sent all thy treasure, with His bounty overplus iv 22
Over-posting. You may thank tho unquiet time for your quint o'nr-

ponUng tint I action 'J Hen. IV. I 2 171

Overpowered. The lion dying Ministtitli forth hln puw, And wounds tho

rjirth, if nothing else, with nigo To bo o'orpownr'd . Ridtard II. v 1 31

Near him, thy nngcl Kin-omtiH u fear, us being o'urpowor'd Ant. and ('lio. ii ]l an

Ovorpresaed. lln oestrld An o'or-prosa'd Roman . . . Coriolunns Ii 2 97

And yet the fire of life kindlo again The o'erpress'd spirits . Perides iii 2 84

3'erprized all popular rate Tempest i 2 92

Over-proud. Lost, being over-proud in sap and blood, With too much

riches it confound itself Richard II. iii 4 59

Say wo think him over-proud And under-honest . . Troi. und Cres. ii 8 132

Over-rate. You o'er-rato my poor kindness .... Cymbdine i 4 41

Over-raught. The villain is o'or-raught of all my money . Com. of Ei-r&rs i 2 96

Certain players We o'er-raught on the way .... Hamlet iii 1 17

Over-reach. We'll over-reach the greybeard . . . T. of Shrew iti 2 147

And will o'errench them in their own devices ... T. AiuJron. v 2 143

It might be the pate of a politician, which this ass now o'er-reaches Ham. v 1 87

Overreaching. To prevent so gross o'erreaching as this . Mer. Wives v 6 145

Over-read. You shall anon over-read it at your pleasure Meas. for Meas. iv 2 212

Bid them o'er-read these letters, And well consider of them 2 Hen. IV. iii 1 2

o'or-ruad, At your bust loisum, this bis humble suit . . J. Cttvur iii 1 a

It IHII Inttnr In y bnillmr, Unit 1 llUVG Hot fill o'm'-rtmd . . l.rnr\ 2 38

Ovor-rod. tlo prick thy faro, ami over-rod thy fnar . . . Madid h V H 14
Over-ripened. Why droops my lord, like over-ripen'd corn? . 2 Hen. VI, i 2 i
Over-roasted. Feed it with such over-roasted flesh . . T. of Shrew iv 1 178
Are you ready for death? Over-roasted rather ; ready long ago Cymbeline v 4 154
Over-rode. I over-rode him on the way . . . . .2 Hen. IV. i 1 30

Over-rule. Let me o'errule you now L. L. Lost, v 2 516

Kate o'er-rnles, that, one man holding troth, A million fail M. N. Dream iii 2 92

You shall o'er-rnle my mind for onco .... Richard III. iii 1 57

Ay, my lord ; So you will not o'errule me to a peace . . Humid iv 7 61

Over-ruled. And comes not in, o'er-ruled by prophecies . 1 Hen. IV. iv 4 18

Ynt balh a woman's kindness ovor-mled 1 Hen. VI. ii 2 50

WhtiHo mind and minn, I know, in that uro mio, Not to bn ovcr-i nltnl /.no- 1 It 16
Ovor-run. Whoro 1 havo uuun corruption boil and bubble Till it o'or-run

tho stow Mean, for Mats, v 1 321

I will o'or-run tlioe with policy As Y. Like It v I 61

Like envious Hoods o'or-run her lovely face . . T. of Shrew Ind. 2 67

Why doubt'st thou of my forwardness? An army have I inuster'd in my

thoughts, Wherewith already France is overrun . . 1 Hen. VI. i 1 102

And in thy thought o'er-run my former time . . . .8 Hen. VI. i 4 45

For pavement to the abject rear, O'er-run and trampled on Troi. and Cres. iii 8 163

A chilling sweat o'er-runs my trembling joints . . T. Andron. ii 3 212

Over-running. We may outrun, By violent swiftness, that which we run

at, And lose by over-running Hen. VIII. i 1 141

Over-scutchod. And sung those tunes to the over-scutched huswives

that ho heard the carmen whistle- .... 2 Hen. IV. iii 2 340

Overset. And since we are o'erset, venture again i 1 185

Without a sudden calm, will overset Thy tempest-tossed body R. and J. iii 5 137

Overshade. Fear o'ershades me 1C. Tale I 2 457

Dark cloudy death o'orshades bis beams of life . . .3 Hen. VI. ii 6 62
Black night o'orshade thy day, and death thy life ! . . Richard III. i 2 131
The elder-tree Which overshades the mouth of that same pit T. Andron. ii 3 273
Overahine. I in tho clear sky of fame o'orshino you as much as tho full

moon doth the cinders of the clement ... 2 //en. IV. iv 3 57
And ovor-shino tho earth as this the world . . . .8 Hen. VI. ii 1 38

Yea, overshines oursolf Troi. and Cres. iii 1 171

Dost ovorsbino tho gallant'st dames of Rome . . . . T. Andron. i 1 317

Over shoes. He was more than over shoes in love . . T. G. of Ver. 1 1 24

A man may go over shoes in the grime of it . . Com. of Errors iii 2 106

lining o'er shoes in blood, plunge in the deep . . . M. N. Dream iii 2 48

Overshot. So study uvermorn is overshot /.. /-. Lost i 1 MJ

But aro you not nshumodY nuy, urn you not, All throe of you, to bo

thus much o'orshol? Iv 3 160

You luivo shot over. Tis not the ilrst time you were overshot Hen. V. Hi 7 134

I havo o'ershot myself to tell you of it J. tVt'sur iii 2 155

Overshowered. In sorrow all duvour'd, With sighs shot through, and

biggest tears o'ershower'd Perides iv 4 26

Oversights. With new lamenting ancient oversights . . 2 Ile-n. IV. ii 3 47
O'er-sized with coagulate gore, With nyes like rarlmncles . . II amid ii 2 484
Ovorsklp. Tho mind much sullniancu doth o'orsklp, When grief Imth

malos, and bearing followuhlp Lear 111 iij



OYEUSLTP



1131



OWE



Overslip. When that hour o'orslips nio in tho day Wherein i sigh not,

Julia, for tliy sake T. G, of Ver. ii 2 g

Overspread. With hostile forces he'll o'erspread the land . Pericles i 2 24
The noble image of my youth Is overspread with them [weeds] 2 Hen. IV. iv 4 56
Tho dragon wing of night o'erspreads the earth . . Troi. and Crcs. v 8 17

Overstain'd With slaughter's pencil K. John iii 1 236

O'erstep not tho modesty of nature Hamlet iii 'J 21

Overatunk. The foul lake O'urslimk tlicir font, .... Tempest iv 1 184

Ovorsway. Ho porttiiunt-Hkfi would I o'omvay hm Htnln . . 1,. L. /xwi v 2 67

Nnvnr fear thai : if lie bo so resolved, I can o'crsway him . J. Cccsar ii 1 203

And, but that great command o'ersways the order . . . Hamlet v 1 251

Over-swear. All those sayings will I over-swear T. Night y 1 276

O'erswell With course disturb'd even thy confining shores . K. John ii 1 337

Let floods o'erswell, and fiends for food howl on I . . . Hen. V. ii 1 97

Fill, Lucius, till the wine o'erswell the cup . . . . J. Ccesar iv 3 161

Overt. To vouch this, is no proof, Without more wider and more overt

tost Than these thin habits Othello i 3 107

Overtake. A quick wit. And yet it cannot over take your slow purse

T. G. of Ver. i 1 133

When she is able to overtake seventeen years old . . . Mer. Wives i 1 55
His act did not o'ertake his bad intent .... Afros, for Meas. v 1 456

Run and overtake him ; Givo him tho ring . . . Mer. of Venice iv 1 452
To break a jest Upon thn company you overtake . . T. of Shrew iv 5 73
O'ortako mo, if thou canst ; I scorn thy strength . . .1 Hen. VI. I G 15
If tho trial of tho law o'ortako yo, You '11 purl away disgraced Hen. VIII. iii 1 96
That swiftest wing of recompense is slow To overtake thee . Macbeth i 4 18
J shall see The winged vengeance overtake such children . . Lear iii 7 66
O'ertake us, hence a mile or twain, 1' tho way toward Dover . . . iv 1 44
Hear me one word. I '11 overtake yon . . . . . . v 1 39

Yon ribaudred nag of Egypt, Whom leprosy o'ertake ! . Ant. and Cleo. iii 10 ii
I will o'ertake thee, Cleopatra, and Weep for my pardon . . . iv 14 44

Would I might never O'ertake pursued success v 2 103

Overtaken. Fair sir, you are well o'erta'eu . . . Mer. of Venice iv 2 5
Pardon me, madam: If I had given you this at over-night, She might

have been o'erta'en . . . . . . , .All's Well iii 4 24

My sou of York Hath almost overta'en him in his growth Richard III. ii 4 7
lie that has but effected his good will Hath overta'en mine act Coriol. i 19
Overtaketh. Giving a gentle kiss to every sedge Ho overtaketh in his

pilgrimage T, G. of Ver. ii 7 30

Over-tedious. Speak on ; but bo not over-tedious . . 1 Hen. VI. iii 3 43

Over-teemed. About her lank and all o'er-teemed loins . . Hamlet ii 2 531

Overthrow. Hath all the glory of my overthrow . . . Much Ado i 8 69

That thine own trip shall be thine overthrow T. Night v 1 170

It is in my power To o'erthrow law IV. Tale iv 1 8

Present medicine must be minister'd, Or overthrow incurable ensues A'. Johnv 1 16
To-day, to-day, unhappy day, too late, O'erthrows thy joys, friends,

fortune and thy state Richard II. iii 2

Traitors That sought at Oxford thy dire overthrow v

1 In torn thy mwt UfUlttHl overthrow Hfii V. Iv B

What! Hhnll wn curmi tho plannU of mishap Thut plotlod thus our

glory's overthrow? 1 Hen. VI. I 1

Hath the lato overthrow wrought this oll'mice? Do not dlsmay'd . .12
That nooks to overthrow religion i



Wo aro like to have tho overthrow again



II

8i

=4

49
65

iii 2 106

Depart when heaven please, For I have seen our enemies' overthrow . iii 2 in
False allegations to o'erthrow his stato .... 2 Hen. VI. iii 1 181
I fear thy overthrow More than my body's parting with my soul I 3 Hen. VI. ii 6 3
Though fortune's malice overthrow my state, My mind exceeds . . iv 3 46
His overthrow heap'd happiness upon him . . . Hen. VIII. iv 2 64

Misadventured piteous overthrows Rom. and Jul. Prol. 7

Sudden push gives them the overthrow J. Cowar v 2 5

He sweats not to overthrow your Almain .... Othello ii 3 85
Yet famine, Ere clean it o'erthrow nature, makes it valiant . Cynibeline iii 6 20
You happily may think Are like the Trojan horse was stufTd within

With bloody veins, expecting overthrow .... Pericles i 4 94

Overthrown. Now my charms aro all o'erthrown . . . Tempest Epil. i

You're shamed, you're overthrown, you're undone for over I Mer. Wives iii 8 102

And all tho preparation overthrown Murk Ado 11 2 51

There's no such sport as sport by sport o'erthrown . . L. L. last v 2 153

You have overthrown Alisander the conqueror ! v 2 577

You have wrestled well and overthrown More than your enemies As Y. L. It i 2 266

poor Orlando, thou art overthrown I . . . . . . i 2 271

Your honour not o'erthrown by your desires W. Tale v 1 230

Are by the sheriff of Yorkshire overthrown ... 2 Hen. IV. iv 4 99
Lord Talbot was o'erthrown : The circumstance I'll toll you 1 Hen. VI. i 1 108
So many peers, So many captains, gentlemen and soldiers, That in this

quarrel havo boon overthrown v 4 105

Most detestable death, by theo beguiled, By cruel cruel theo quite over-
thrown 1 O love I O life I Rom. and Jul. iv 6 57

Octavius Is overthrown by noble Brutus' power, As Cassius' legions

aro by Antony J. Civsar v 8 52

Treasons capital, confess'd and proved, Have overthrown him Macbeth I 3 116
O, what a noble mind is hero o'orlhrown I .... Hamlet iii 1 158
Our wills and fates do BO contrary run That our devices still are over-
thrown iii 2 222

Not Cesar's valour hath o'erLhrowu Antony, But Antony's hath

triumph'd on itself. So it should bo . . . . Ant. and Clro. iv 15 14

Overtook. I mot and overtook a dozun captains, Bare-headed . 2 Hrn. IV. ii 4 387

Thn Illi^hty purpose novor In o'ortook (TlilOHS Um deed go with It Mtr/ir/ft iv 1 145

There was a gaming ; there o'ortook in's ronso . . . Hamlet ii 1 58

Overtop. Though loss than yours in past, must o'ertop yours T. and C. iii 3 164

Till of this flat a mountain you havo made, To o'ertop old Tolion Hamlet v 1 276

Overtopped. This pine is bark'd, That overtopp'd them all Ant. and Cleo. iv 12 24

Over-topping. Who to advance and who To trash for over-topping Tempest i 2 81

Of wisdom O'ortopping woman's power .... Jlen. Vlil. ii 4 83

Overtrip. In such a night DidThisbo fearfully o'crtrip the dew Jlf. of Vcn. v 1 7

Overture. I hear there is an overture of peace .... All's Well iv 3 46

1 could not answer in that course of honour As she had made the overture v 3 99
[ bring no overture of war, no taxation of homage ... 3*. Night i 5 225
I wish, my liege, You had only in your silent judgment tried it, With-
out more overture. How could that be? . . . . W. Tale ii 1 172

It was he That made the overture of thy treasons to us . . . Lear iii 7 89
Overturn. We shall o'crturn it topsy-turvy down . . 1 Hen. IV. iv 1 82

Uut blow on them, The vapour of our valour will o'erturn them Hen. V. iv 2 24
Overturned. O Ood, I fear all will bo ovorturn'd I . . .2 Urn. IV. v 2 19
Overvalue. Which, in my opinion, o'oi valm-s it something . Cwnbelinc I 4 120
Over-veiled. Whose pitchy mantle over-vril'd the earth . . 1 lien. VI. ii 2 2
Over-view. Are we betray'd thus to thy ovor-viow? . . . L. L. test iv 8 175
Over-walk. As to o'er-walk a current roaring loud On the unsteadfast

footing of a spear 1 Hen. IV. i 3 192



Overwatched. I fear wo shall out-sleep the coming morn As much as wo

this night have overwatch'd M. N. Dream v 1 373

Poor knave, I blame thee not ; thou art o'erwatch'd . . J. Cresar iv 3 241
All weary and o'erwatch'd, Take vantage, heavy eyes . . . Lear ii 2 177
Over-weathered. With over-weather'd ribs and ragged sails, Lean, rent,

and beggar'd Mer. of Venice ii 6 18

Ovorween, I might bo some allay, or I o'erweon to think so , IV. Talc iv 2 9

Yon ovonvoon to lako it so 2 7/cn. IV. iv 1 149

My oyn'rt too quick, my heart n'orwoons too much . . 8 Hf.n. VI. iii 2 144

Thou dost over-ween in all ; And so in this, to bear me down T. Andron. ii 1 29

Overweening. Go, base intruder ! overweening slave t . T. G. of Ver. iii 1 157

Here's an overweening rogue ! T. Night ii 6 34

Hurl down my gaze Upon this overweening traitor's foot . Richard II. i 1 147
Whose overweening arm I have pluck'd back ... 2 Hen. VI. iii 1 159
Oft have I seen a hot o'erweeuing cur Run back and bite . . v 1 151

Lash hence these overweening rags of Franco . . . Richard III. v 8 328
Overwelgh. My place i' tho state Will so your accusation overwoigh

Mea-s. for Meas. 11 4 157

Say what you can, my false o'erweighs your true ii 4 170

The censure of the which one must in your allowance o'erweigh a wholo

theatre of others Hamlet in 2 31

Overwhelm. In one self-born hour To plant and o'erwhelm custom W. T. iv 1 9
Let tho brow o'erwholm it As fearfully as doth a galled rock . Hen. V. iii 1 n
Thou wrotc.h, dospito o'oi whelm thoo I .... Coriolttmts iii 1 164
Foul deeds will risn, Though all tho oarth o'orwholm thorn, to men's oyes

Hamlet i 2 258

With the hell-hated lie o'erwhelm thy heart Lear v 8 147

And humming water must o'erwhelm thy corpse . . . Pericles iii 1 64
Avaunt, thou damned door-keeper 1 Your house, but for this virgin that

doth prop it, Would sink and overwhelm you iv 6 128

Overwhelmed. Whose joy of her is overwhelm'd like mine . Much. Ado v 1 9
Like a sow that hath overwhelmed all her litter but one . 2 Ken. IV. i 2 13

And wrath o'erwhelm'd my pity Coriolanus i 9 86

What an if His sorrows have so overwhelm'd his wits? . T. Andron. iv 4 10

Whilst you were hero o'erwhclmed with your grief . . . Othello iv 1 77

Overwhelming. In tatter'd weeds, with overwhelming brows R. and J. v 1 39

Over-worn. But tho word is over-worn T. Night iii 1 66

The jealous o'erworn widow Richard III. i 1 81

Over-wrested. Such to-be-pitied and o'er-wrested seeming Troi. and Cres. i 8 157

Ovid. The most capricious poet, honest Ovid . . .As Y. Like It iii 3 8

So devote to Aristotle's checks As Ovid be an outcast . . T. of Shrew i 1 33

Tifl Ovid's Metamorphoses ; My mother gave it me . . T. Andron. iv 1 42

Ovldius Naso was the man : and why. indeed, Naso, but for smelling out

the odoriferous flowers of fancy? L. L. Jmt iv 2 127

Owe. This is no mortal business, nor no sound That the earth owes Temp, i 2 407
Wherefore? That such an ass should owe them . . T. G. of Ver, v 2 28
When they weep and kneel, All thoir petitions are as freely theirs As


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 2) → online text (page 98 of 531)