John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 100 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 100 of 522)
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And the business you have broached here cannot be without you

Ant. and Clen. 1

Till which encounter, It is my business too i

You do mistake your business ii

Ere wo put ourselves in anus, dlspnU-h \voThobusinosswohavo talk'd of II

Iet mo. request you oil: our graver business Frmvns at this levity . II

1 will employ thfy bark again ; I find theo Most lit for business . , 111



2 198

1 129
5 17

4 24

5 18

285

1 24
1 45

3 318

1 154

2 40
'2 90
8 13

8 S3

8 268
8 272

8 117

1 40

3 181
3 469

2 166



2 178
4 80
2 45
2 169

7 127

8 40



Business. Thy business? The news is true, my lord . Ant. and Cleo. iii 7 54
To business that we love we rise.bethne. And go to't with delight . . iv 4 20
The business of this man looks out of him ; We'll hear him what he says v 1 50
Myself and other noble friends Aro partners in the business . Cymbeline i 184
Since I received command to do this business I have not slept one wink iii 4 102
'Tis not sleepy business ; But must be look'd to speedily and strongly . iii 5 26

Wo do incite The gentry to this business Ill 7 7

There's business in theso faces v 5 23

Buskined. Tho bouncing Amazon, Your buskin'd mistress M. N. Dream ii 1 71

Husky. How bloodily the sun begins to peer Above yon busky hill 1

1 Hen. IV. v 1 2

Buss. Come, grin on mo, and I will think thou smilest And buss thee as

thy wife K. John ill 4 35

Thou dost give me flattering busses 2 Hen. IV. ii 4 291

Y'ond towers, whose wanton tops do buss the clouds . Troi. and Cres. iv 6 220

Bussing. Thy knee bussing the stones for in such business Action is

eloquence Coriolanus iii 2 75

Bustle. And leave the world for mo to buatle in . . Richard III. i 1 152
Come, bustle, bustle ; caparison my horse v 3 289

Bustling. Listen well ; I beard a bustling rumour, like a fray. J. Cccsar ii 4 18

Busy. Most busy lest, when I do it Tempest iii 1 15

Hath ho provided this mimic? Ho la very busy about it . Much Ado 1 2 3

Have a caro this busy tltno, . i 2 99

Brief, I pray you : for you seo it Is a busy tlino with me . . . . HI 6 6
On meddling monkey, or on busy npo . . . M. N. Dream II 1 181

Yon ahall Buy I '11 prove ft bimy actor In their piny . . As Y. I.Ike H ill 4 62
They're busy within ; you wero bost knock londor . . T. of Shrew v 1 15
She is busy and she cannot come ! Is that an answer? . . . . v 2 82
Bo it thy course to busy giddy minds With foreign quarrels 2 lien. IV. iv 6 214

Whiles I was busy for the commonwealth v 2 76

With busy hammers closing rivets up .... Hen. V. iv Frol. 13
You be by her aloft, while we be busy below . . . .2 Hen. VI. i 4 n
My brain more busy than the labouring spider Weaves tedious snares . iii 1 339

O, beat away the busy meddling fiend I iii 3 21

In those busy days Which here you urge to prove us enemies Richard III. i 8 145
Let's want no discipline, make no delay ; For, lords, to-morrow is a

busy day v 3 18

We are busy ; go. This priest 1ms no pride in him? . Hen. VIII. H 2 81
The busy day, Wakod by tho lark, Imtli roused tho ribald crows

Troi. and Cres. Iv 2 8

What, arc you busy, ho? noM you my help? . . . Rom. and Jid. Iv 8 6
Fantasies, Which busy caio draws In tho brains of men . . J. C'n/sar II 1 232
Take thy fortune ; Thou find'st to bo too busy is some danger Hamlet Hi 4 33

Do you busy yourself about that? Lear i 2 155

In the mean time, Let me bo thought too busy in my fears . Othello iii 8 253

He did not call ; he's busy in the paper iv 1 241

Some eternal villain, Some busy and insinuating rogue . . . . iv 2 131

But. The wills above be done ! but I would fain die a dry death Tempest I 1 72
I have dono nothing but in cnre of theo, Of theo, my dear one . 1 2 16

But how Is it That this lives in thy mind? 1 2 48

With that which, but by being so retired, O'er-prized all popular rate . i 2 91
I should sin To think but nobly of my grandmother . . . i 2 119

But With colours fairer painted their foul ends i 2 142

Whose influence If now I court not but omit, my fortunes Will ever

after droop 12 183

All but mariners Plunged in the foaming brine and quit the vessel . i 2 210
But was not this nigh shore? Close by, my master. But are they,

Ariel, safe? I 2 216

Thy charge Exactly is performed : but there's more work . . . 1 2 238

Subject To no sight but thine and mine 12 302

And, but he's something stain'd With grief that's beauty's canker, thou

miphtst call him A goodly person i 2 414

Ambition cannot pierce a wink beyond, But doubt discovery there . II 1 243
Yond saino cloud cannot choose but fall by pallfuls. . . . . ii 2 24
Not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver . . . . ii 2 30

When that's gone He shall drink nought but brine iii 2 74

Will you troll the catch You taught me but wlule-ere? . . . . iii 2 127
Is nothing but heart-sorrow And a clear life ensuing . . . . iii 8 8f
It shall go hard but I '11 prove it by another ... 7". G. of Ver. i 1 86

But tell me, dost thou know my lady Silvia? ii 1 44

I'll die on him that says so but yourself ii 4 114

But when I look on hex perfections, There is no reason but I shall be

blind . . . ';nT.t>l II 4 211

What lets but one may enter at her window? iii I 113

Him we go to find : there's not a hair on 's head but 'tis a Valentino . iii 1 192
Havo you any thing to take to? Nothing but my fortune . . . iv 1 43
But nobody but has his fault ; but lot that pass . . . Mtr. ll'im ! 4 14
Tells JMO 'tis a tiling Impossible 1 should lovo thee but OH a property . ill 4 10

Well, let it not be doubted but he'll come iv 4 43*

Spirits are not finely touch'd But to fine issues . . Meas. for Meas. \ 1 37
But, like a thrifty goddess, she determines Herself the glory of a creditor i 1 39
Your brother is a forfeit of the law, And you but waste your words . ii 2 72
A man that apprehends death no more dreadfully but as a drunken

sleep iv 2 150

Nay, but it is not so. It is no other . iv 3

Our soul Cannot but yield you forth to public thanks . . . . v 1
There had she not been long but she became A joyful mother Com. of Err. i 1
The one 50 like the other As could not be distingnish'd but by names . i 1



7

5

II 2 105
II 2 204
III 1 25
Iv i
v 1 320



But your reason wan not substantial, why there in no time to recover .
Klso It could never bo But I should know her IIH w<<ll IIH nho knows mo .
And wolcotmi nmro common ; for that's nothing but wunlH , . t, ,

There's nut a nmn I moot but doth Raluto mo

But KOVOU years slnee, in Hynicusa, bny, Thou know'st wo pnrtod .

It must not bn donlrd but 1 am u plain-dealing villain . . Mitch Adn I 8 33

I do but stay till your marriage bo cwiHummnto ill 2 i

I am much deceived but 1 loinombcr the stylo . . . . /.. I,. Lost iv 1 98

Or ever, but in vizards, show their faces v 2 271

If thou follow me, do not believe But I shall do thee mischief M. N. Dream ii 1 237
It cannot bo but thou hast murder'd him ; iSo should a murderer look . iii 2 56
Can you. not hate me, as I kjiow you do, But you must join in souls to

mock me too?

Saint Valentine is past : Begin these wood-birds but to couple now? .
But tell not me ; I know, Antonio Is sad to think upon Ma merchandise.

Believe me, no Mer. of Venice I



iii 2 150
iv 1 145



I'll plead for you myself, but you shall havo him . . 7'. of Shrew
How speed you with my daughter? How but well, sir? how but well?
For, but I be deceived, Our lino musician groweth ani"ious . .. .

With no greater a run but my hend and my nock

And but I be deceived .Slgulnr Bnpllsta limy roiliombot mo

Can't no other, But, 1 your daughter, ho unmt bo my brother? J//> MY// 1 B 172



39



BUT



184



BUTTERFLY



i i 183

ii 2 82

iii 2 177

ill 2 387



78



But. There were no further danger known but tho mod only which I* so

lost .1 ' . h ./MI; a 29

Ho hath known you but three days, anil already you are no stranger

T. Might I 4 3

Thou know 'hi no less but all i 4 13

That it cannot but turn him into a notable contempt . . . . ii 5 334
One that knows What she should shame to know herself But with her

most vile principal IV. Tale ii 1 92

I<et them come in ; but quickly now iv 4 350

But hear me A'. John ii 1 421

Then speak again ; not all thy former tale, But this one word . . iii 1 26
Hut on this day let seamen fear no wreck ; No bargains break 1 . . iii 1 93

Your uncle must not know but you are dead iv 1 128

If thou didst but consent To this most cruul act, do but despair . . lv 3 125

We three are but thyself Richard II. ii 1 375

l.rt no man sjmuk again To alter this, for counsel Is but vain . . . ill 2 214
Had only but tho corpse, Hut shadows and the shows of men, to fight

J Hen. IV. 1 1 193

My honour Is at |iawn ; And. but my going, nothing can mdoom It . 11 H 8
Whiit towim of iiny moment but wu havuY . . . .1 Hen. VI. 1 2 5
I novtir read but Knglund'n kings havo had I^argo sums of ,-! I and

dowries with their wlvoa 2 Urn. 17. 1 1 128

I never saw but Humphrey Duke of Gloucester Did bear him like u noble

gentleman

The greatest man iu England but tho king

It cannot be but ho was murder'd here .......

If thou be found by me, thou art but dead

My woful banishment, Could all but answer for that peevish brat ?

Richard III. I 3 19

Which of you But Is four Volsces? Coriolanus i 6 7

None of you but is Able to bear against the great Aufldius A shield as

hard as his I fl

He would miss it rather Than carry it but by the suit of the gentry . ii 1
'I would IKI consul,' says lie: 'aged custom, But by your voiced, will

not so [>erinit me ' . . . . . . . . . , . ii 8 177

And but thou love me, let them find mo here . . . Rom. ami Jul. ii 2 76
It cannot bo But I am pigeon-liver'd and lack gall . . . Hamlet ii 2 605
There's none so foul and foolish thereunto. But does foul pranks Othello 11 1 143
I do not think but Desdemona'a honest. Long live she so 1 . . . lit 8 225
He hath, and Is again to cope your wife : I say, but mark his gesture . lv 1 88
Death will seize her, but Your comfort makes the rescue Ant. and Cleo. iii 11 47
But being charged, we wilt be still by land, Which, as I take 't, we shall Iv 11 i

Not any, but abide the change of time Cymbeline II 4 4

Other of them may liave crook'd noses, but to owe such straight anus,

none iii 1 38

Of Ills content, All but In tlmtt iii 2 35

Were you a woiuun, youth, I nhotild woo hard but lm your groom . . Ill 70

And, but she s|niko It dying, I would not Believe her lips . . .641

But even now worth this, And now worth nothing . . Aler. of Venice \ 1 35

But ever. Would I in i r ;M Hut ever see that man! . . . Tempest i 2 169

But for. Which 1 was much unwilling to proceed in But for my duty

T. G.ofVer.\\ 1 113

Happy but for me, And by me, had not our hap been bad Com. of Error* I 1 38
Hut for staying ou our controversy, Had hoisted sail . . . . v 1 20
Truly, she's very well indeed, but for two things . . . AU'i Well U 4 8
Hut for these vilo guns, lie would himself have been a soldier 1 Hfn. IV. 1 8 63
And, but for shame, In such a parley should I answer thee . . . ill 1 303
But fora sallot, my brain 1*11 had been cleft with a brown bill 2 Htn. VI. lv 10 12
I 'Id have buuUn him like a dog, but for disturbing the lords within ConW. lv 6 57
But for your company, I would have been a-hed an hour ago R, and J. iii 4 6
' 1 i:i our match : The sweat of industry would dry and die, But for the

end it works to CymUline 111 33

But now he parted hencu, to embark for Milan . . . T. 0. of Ver. 1 1 71

As if but now thoy waxed jmle for woo til 1 328

But now I was the lord Of this fair mansion . . . Mer. of Venice iii 2 169
And even now, but now, This house, these servants and this same myself

Are yours iii 2 171

My liege ! my lord 1 but now & king, now thus. . . .A'. John v 7 66
But now tho Duke of Buckingham and 1 Aru come from visiting

Richard III. 1 8 31
That she, that even but now was your b*st object, . . . should In this

trice of time Commit ti thing so monstrous .... /.car 1 1 217
But only. Who but Humour, who but only I, Make fearful musters?

2 Hen. IV. Iml. n

I say not, slaughter him, For I intend but only to surprise him S Hen. VI. lv 2 25
But perhaps, my son, Thou Hliamcst to acknowledge me in misery

Com. of Error* v 1 321
But that. The sky, it seems, would pour down stinking pitch, But that

the sea, mounting to the welkin s cheek, Dashes the lire out Tcmi>est i 2 4
No news, my lord, but that ho writes How happily he lives T. G. of Ver. I 8 56
But that his mistress Did hold his eyes lock'd in her crystal looks . ii 4 88

Feur not but that she will love you iii 2 i

I hud boon drowned, but Unit thoidioro was filial vy and shallow Mer. M'iuj lil B 15
For which 1 would not plmid, but that I mimt ; For which I must not

plead, but that 1 um At wnr 'twlxt will and will not Meat, for Jlfnu. 11 2 31
But that you Uiku what doth to you belong, It woro u fault to snnU'h

words from my Um^iui L. L. Luit v 2 381

Woltiomu, Momido ; Hut Unit thou lutornipt'Ht our morrlmnnt . . v 'J 735
1 am not yet HO low But that my nulls can reach unto thinu oycg

At. N. Dream Iii 2 398

That could give more, but that her hand lacks means . As Y. Like It i 2 359
Cannot for all that dissuade succession, but that they are limed Ail's Well iii 6 25

I neither can nor will deny But that I know them v 8 167

Out that it would be double-dealing, sir, I would you could . T. Night v 1 32
He who shall speak for her is afar off guilty But that he speaks If. l\ilt ii 1 105
Peace itself should not so dull a kingdom, . . . But that defences,

musters, preparations, Should be maintain'd . . . Htn. V. 11 4 18
I would ne'er have fled, But that they left me 'midst my enemies 1 Hen. VI. I 2 34
But that I am prevented, I should have begg'd 1 might have been

employ'd lv 1 71

But that my heart's on future mischief set, I would speak blasphemy

oro bid you fly 2 Hen. VI. v 2 84

But that I haUUheo tlmdly, I should lament thy mlnoruble state- 3 lien. VI. 1 4 64
Think you, but that 1 know our state secure, 1 would bo MO triumphant

as I am? Richard III. ill 2 83

I cannot promise But that you shall sustain moo new disgraces Urn. VI II. iii 2 5
I could despise this man, But that I nm bound in charity u^un^t it 1 . iii 2 298
Hut that I um forbid To tell the secrets of my priaon-houfift, I could a

tale unfold Ilnmlet i 6 13

It cannot bu But that my master is abu*ed .... Cymbeline 111 4 123



But that. But that It oata our victual*, I should think Herowuro a fully

CymleliHt III

Whoso life, But that her flight provontod it, ulio had Tu'on off by poison v
But then <-uu Uy do All iwlnU of my command .... /',.,,,< I

But though we think it so, it is no mutter Hen. V. Ii

But till. Ami depart when you bid me. O, stay but till then! Much Ado v

He only lived but till he was a man Macbeth v

But what. Not only with what uiy revenue yielded, But what my power

might else exact ......... Temj>cst i

Padua affords nothing but what is kind .... T. of Shrew v

Draw no aworda but what are sanctified .... 2 Hen. IV. iv



Othello iv

. Iv

Tempest ii



T. Niyht 1

Mtwbtth Iv

Othellu Iv



Nor answer have I none, But what should go by \\ati-r .
And said nothing but what I protest Intenomant of doing
But yet. Well, I have done: but yet, IIu will be talking .
I tthall miss thee ; But yet thou slmlt have freedom
A gracious person : but yet 1 cannot love him ....
Hut yet I '11 make assurance double miro .....
That's IH.I mui-,t ; But yutknup time In all ....
I do not like ' Hut yet,' it dona allay Tim good prcc^denco Ant. ttiuULt*. 11
' Hut yet' I* as u guoh<r to bring forth Homn moiiHtroim mtiluluctor . 11
Butoher. Havel Hvud to bu carried In a buwket, likua burruw of butcher's

oflul? .......... Mtr. H'tiwjlll

lllrot softly then ; tho butcher hears you cry . . . . L. L. Lost v

That eyes . . . Should be call'd tyrants, butchers, murderers!

As You Like It iii
Is yet the cover of a fairer mind Than to be butcher of an innocent child

K. Joh n iv
To stir against the butchers of his life ..... Richard II. i

Teaching stern murder how to butcher thee ...... i

O, sit my husband's wrongs on Hereford's si>ear, That it may enter

butcher ftlowbray's breast ! ......... J

Goodwife Kccch, the butcher's wife ...... 2 Hen. IV. ii

1 could lay on like a butcher and hit like a jack-an-apt-s, never on" Hen. V. v
As the butcher takes away the calf And binds tho wretch 2 Hen. VI. iii
Who finds the lie ifcr dtad and bleeding fresh And htv.s fast by a butcher

with an axe, Hut will suspect 'twas he lli.it made the slaughter? . lif
Are you the butcher, Suffolk r Where's your knife V . . . .iii

Where's Dick, the butcher of Ashford? ....... iv

And work In their shirt too ; as myself, for example, that am a butcher iv
Are you there, butcher? O, I cannot apeak ! . . . .8 Hen. VI. ii

Butchers and villains t bloody cannibals ! How sweet a plant have you

untimely cropu'd ! You liave no children, butchers f . . . v
Where Is that devil's butcher, Hord-favour'd Richard . . . . v
So lint the harmless tiheep doth yield hi* fleece And next his threat unto

the butcher's knife .......... v

The father ru.shly MlaughU'r'il Ida own BOD, The BOII, compell'd, 1m n

butchur to tho Kiru ....... Slit-hard III. V

Tliis butcher's cur U venom-mouthM, and 1 Have not the power to muzzle

him ; therefore best Not wake him ..... Hm. VUI. I
Were he the butcher of my son, he should Be free as is the wind Coriolativt I
With no leaa confidence Than boys pursuing summer butterflies, Or

butchers killing flies .......... Iv

The very butcher of a silk button, a duellist . . . Horn, and Jut. ii
I>et us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius . J. Cirtar U

O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, That I am meek and gentle

with these butchers I .......... HI

The cruel ministers Of this dead butcher and his fiend-like queen Mailrth v



41

6 46
2 499

4 42
2 45
8 40

2 99

2 14

< 4

2 104

2 305

1 25

1 96

5 3I

1 83

} 93

6 50
fl 5 j

6 5

2 255

5 14



Prithee, dispatch : The lamb entreats the butcher . . * . C^mleline iii

Butchered. A thousand of his people butchered . . .1 Hen. IV. 1
Which his hell-govern 'd arm hath butchered ! . . . Richard III. I

And shamefully by you my hopes are butcher'd 1

How they at Pom fret bloodily were butcher'd Jit

The |ttreiiU live, whose children thou hast butcher'd . . . . iv
The wronged souU Of butcher'd princes light in thy belialf . . . v
HftVu by my means been butcher d wrongfully 1 . . T. Andron. iv

Butcheries. Behold this pattern of thy butcheries . . Richard HI. i '.
Provoked by thy bloody mind, Which never dreamt on aught but

butcheries 12

Butcherly. How butcherly, Erroneous, mutinous and unnatural I

8 Hen. VI. 11 fl

Butchery. This house Is but a butchery : Abhor It, fear It At Y. Li\e It 11 S
In tho intestine shock And furious close of civil butchery . 1 Hen. IV. I 1
Whom I did suborn To do this ruthless plecu of butchery Richard III. iv a

Butler. Is not this Stephano, my drunken butler? . . . Tempest v
She was both pantler, butler, cook, Both dame and sen-ant . M'. Tale lv
Hath Butler brought those horses from the sheriff? . . 1 Hen. IV. 11
Bid Butler lead him forth into the park U

Butt. I escaped upon a butt of sock which the sailors heaved o'erboard



2 32
2 48

1 1OI

2 U7

1 3IO

2 189

2 195

7 58
2 95

6 61

5 77

6 9
6 26

1 120

9 88

95

1 1&6 1

1 255

8 69
4 9,

1 43

2 07

3 276

4 92
<393

8 122

55
54



89



Hast any more of this? The whole butt, man : my cellar Is in a rock
by the sea-side ........... jf

When the butt is out, we will drink water ; not a drop before . . iii
Look, how you butt yountulf In these sharp mocks 1 . . L. L. I.ott v
llulievo mo. sir, thoy butt together well.- lint. I, and butt! an hintty-
wittod body Would ttuy >our head and butt weru head and horn

T. of Shrew v

To which 1s fixed, as an aim or butt, Obodlonco . . . Hen. V. I
I nm your butt, and I abldu your idiot ..... 8 II, u. \'l, I

You rnlnoim butt, you whoroaon Indistinguishable cur . Trvi. and Cm. v

The beast With many heads bulU me away . . . Coriolanvt iv

ii-'i" i-, my butt, And very sea-mark of my utmost sail . . Othello v

Butt-end. That is the butt-end of a mother's blessing . Richard III. ii

Butter. I will rather trust a Fleming with my butter . Mer. Wives ii

As subject to heat as butter ; a man of continual dissolution and thaw . iii

Not so much as will serve to be prologue to an egg and butter 1 Hen. IV. i

They are up already, and call for eggs and butter ..... 11

Didst thou never see Titan kiss a dish of butter? pitiful-hearted Titan 1 ii
A gross fat man. As fat as butter ........ 11

I think, to wteul cream indeed, for thy theft hath already made tlieo
butter ............. iv

Buttered. I 'U have my brains ta'en out ami buttered . Mer. H'ir iii
Twos hur brother that, in pure kindness to his horno, buttered hitt hay

Itur II
Butterflies. Pluck the wings from painted battoifllM To fan the moon-

beams from his sleeping eyes ..... M. N. 7>rim ill

Men, like butterflies, Show not their mealy wings but to the summer

2'rot. and Cra. lit

With no IOHS confidence Than boys pursuing summer butterflies Corit-l. iv

Lau^h At gilded ljiitlerm.s, and hear i^tor rogues Tulk of court news Lear v

Butterfly. I saw him run after a gilded butterfly . . . Corivlanu* i



i '3

? 5

1 277

4 56
8 70

5 75

2 126

2 ,37
2 i
2 251



4 29

1 32

1 2

2 267
2 no
2 3,7
.0 118
2 ,3

1 65

A '

4 560

2 67

6 8

4 127

1 -75

8 78

8 94

8 ,3

3 66



BUTTERFLY



186



BY



Butterfly. There Is difleroncy between a grub and a butterfly ; yet your

butterfly was a grub Corlolaniut v 4 12

Buttering. I will henceforth eat no fish of fortune's buttering All's Well v 2 9
Butter-woman. Tongue, I must put you into a butter-woman's mouth . iv 1 45
Butter -women. It is the right butter-women's rank to market ^s Y.L.It iii 2 103
Buttery. Takn them to tho bnttory, And give them friendly welcome

T. qfShrr.w Ind. 1 103

Buttery-bar. Bring ymir hand to Mm buttery-bar ind lot It drink 7'. NlgJit \ 8 74
Buttook. hi what purl, of hor body MnmlH Ireland? Marry, sir, In hnr

bllttockll (Vni!,. of ttrrnra \\[ 2 120

It In llkn a bArbor's clmlr MiaL II tn all buttocks, tho pin-buttock, tho

qimtch-buttock, Mm brawn buttock, nr any buttock . All's U'cll ii 2 17
Ono tlml converses moro with tho buttock of tho night than with the

forehead of the morning Coriolanus ii 1 56

Button. Tis in his buttons ; ho will carry't . . . Mer. Wives iii 2 71
The very butcher of a silk button, a duellist . . . Rom. and Jnl. ii 4 24
The canknr galls thn infants of thn spring, Too oft before their buttons

bo dlxHmod Ilnmlct I IJ 40

On fortune's cap we arn not tlio very button. Nor tlio solns of her shoo? ii 2 233
Thou'It conm no morn, Never, never, never, never, never! Pray you,

undo this button : thank you, sir Lear v 3 309

Buttoned. One whoso hard heart is button'd up with steol Com. nf Errors iv 2 34
Button-hole. -Let mo tako you a botton-holo lower . . . L. L. Lost v 2 706
Buttress. No.jutty, friezo, Buttress, nor coign of vantage . Macbeth i 6 ^
Butts. 'Tis Butts, Tho king's physician .... Hen. VIII. v 2 10

I'll show your graco thn strangest sight What's that, Butts? . . v 2 20
By holy Mary, Butts, thorn's knavery . . . . . . v 2 33

Butt-shaft. Cupid's butt-shaft is too hard for Hercules' club . L. L. I^ost i 2 181
Thn very pin of his heart cleft with thn blind bow-boys butt-shaft

Rom. and Jul. ii 4 16
Buxom. A soldier, flrm and sound of heart, And of buxom valour Hen. V. iii 6 28

So buxom, blithe, and full of face Pericles i Gower 23

Buy. What things are these, my lord Antonio? Will money buy 'em? T&np.v 1 265
That will be excellent. I '11 go buy them vizards . . Mer. Wives iv 4 69

That silk will I go buy iv 4 73

Money buys lands, and wives are sold by fate v 5 246

You will neods buy and soil mmi and women like beasts Meets, for Mcas. iii 2 2
Wo do instate and widow you withal, To buy you a hotter husband . v 1 430
Nol. bring abln to buy out his llfo According to tho stntuto Com. qf Krrorn \ 2 5

(In thou And buy a ropn'n nnd Iv 1 16

(Kit Minn KOIIO; lluy thon a rnpo and bring It homo to mo . . . Iv 1 20
You Hlmll buy this sport as dour As all tho metal In your shop will

answer . . iv 1 81

Some olfor mo commodities to buy Iv 8 6

Would you buy her, that you inquire after her? Can the world buy

such a jewel? Yea, and a case to put it into . . . Much Ado i
The endeavour of this present breath may buy That honour . L. L. Lost i


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 100 of 522)