John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 118 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 118 of 522)
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Hie thee to thy charge ; Use careful watch, choose trusty sentinels . v 8 53

Go, gentlemen, every man unto his charge v 3 307

For the most part such To whom as great a charge aa little honour He

meant to lay upon Hen. VIII. i 1 77

Take good heed You charge not in your spleen a noble person . . i 2 174

Place you that 8ide ; I '11 take the charge of this i 4 20

Give my charge up to Sir Nicholas Vaux, Who undertakes you to your

end ii 1 96

You charge me That I have blown this coal ii 4 93

Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition iii 2 440

Till further trial ui those charges Which will require your answer. . v 1 103

I charge you, Embrace and love this man v 8 171

As doth a battle, when they charge on heaps The enemy flying

Troi. and Cres. iii 2 29

With such a hell of pain and world of charge iv 1 57

I charge thee use her well, even for my charge iv 4 128

I'll nothing do on charge : to her own worth She shall be prized . . iv 4 135

How now, my charge I Now, my sweet guardian 1 v 2 6

Mend and charge home, Or, by the fires of heaven, I'll leave the foe

And make my wars on you Coriolanus I 4 38

Obey, I charge thee, And follow to thine answer ill 1 176

In this point charge him home, that he affects Tyrannical power . . iii 3 i
We charge you, that you have contrived to take From Home all season'd

omce iii 8 63

Peace ! We need not put new matter to his charge . . . . iii 3 76
The centurions and their charges, distinctly billeted . . . . iv 3 48
And yet to charge thy sulphur with a bolt That should but rive an oak v 8 152

Answering us With our own charge v t> 68

Our spoils we have brought home Do more than counterpoise a full

third part The charges of the action v 6 79

Let It be your charge, as it is ours, To attend the emperor's person care-
fully T. Andron. ii 2 7

Hold, hold ; meanwhile here's money for thy charges . . . . iv 3 105
Go with me ; I charge thee in the prince's name, obey . Rom. and Jul. iii 1 145
The letter was not nice but full of clmrgo Of dear import . . . v 2 18
1 clmrgo thoo, Wlmlo'or thou hcar'nt or soest, stand all aloof . . . v 8 25
I'm weary of this clmrgo, the gods can witness . . T. of Athens iii 4 25

Go. I charge thee, invite thorn all iii 4 118

Things unluckily charge my fantasy J. Cccsnr iii 8 2

Fetch the will hither, and we shall determine How to cut off some

charge in legacies iv 1 9

Bid our commanders lead their charges off A little from this ground . iv 2 48
Shall wo give sign of battle? No, Crcsar, we will answer on their

charge v 1 24

Speak, I clmrge you Macbctki 8 78

The surfeited grooms Do mock their charge with snores . . . . ii 2 6
A good and virtuous nature may recoil In an imperial charge . . iv 8 20
By heaven I chargo thee, speak I It is offended. See, !t stalks away I

Hamlet i 1 49
Stay I speak, speak I I charge thee, speak I 'Tis gone, and will not

answer i 1 51

Look to't, I charge you: come your ways. I shall obey, my lord. . 1 8 135
That would dishonour him. 'Faith, no; as you may season it in the

charge ii 1 28

And by what more dear a better proposer could charge you withal . ii 2 297
Proclaim no shame When the compulsive ardour gives tho charge . . iii 4 86
Witness this army of such mass and charge Led by a delicate ana tender

prince iv 4 47

And many such-like ' As'es of great charge v 2 43

Is not this your son, my lord? His breeding, sir, hath been at my

charge Lear i 1 10

To lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star I . . i 2 139

With his prepared sword, he charges home My unprovided body . . ii 1 53
Sith that both charge and danger Speak 'gainst so great a number . ii 4 242
Whore will you that I go To answer this your charge? . . . Othello i 2 85

Bpoak. who began this? on thy love. I charge thro 11 8 178

You clinrgn me most unjustly. Witn nought but truth . . . . lv 2 186

O, did he so? I charge you, go with me v 1 120

What, are you mad? I charge you, get you home v 2 194

O, that I knew this husband, which, you say, must charge his horns

with garlands ! Ant. and Cleo. i 2 5

You have broken The article of your oath ; which you shall never Have

tongue to charge me with ii 2 83

A charge we bear i' the war, And, as the president of my kingdom, will

Appear there for a man iii 7 17

Welcome : Thou look'st like him that knows a warlike charge . . iv 4 19
Send his treasure after ; do it; Detain no jot, I charge thee . . . iv 6 13
Go charge Agrippa Plant those that have revolted in the vau . . iv 6 8
If sleep charge nature, To break it with a fearful dream of him Cymbeline iii 4 44
With this strict charge, even as he left his life, ' Keep it, my Pericles '

Perides ii 1 131

Patience, good sir, Even for this charge iii 1 27

Here I charge your charity withal, leaving her The infant of your care . iii 8 14
Charge of foot. I'll procure this fat rogue a charge of foot . 1 Hen. IV. ii 4 597
Charged. My master charged me to deliver a ring . . T. G. of Ver. v 4 88
That I beat him And charged him with a thousand marks in gold

Com. of Errors iii 1 8

She was charged with nothing But what was true . . . Mitch Ado v 1 104
Chargnd my brother, on his blessing, to brood me well . As Y. Like Itil 3
My father charged you In his will to give me good education . . 1 1 70

Heaven Nature charged That one body should bo flll'd With all graces . iii 2 149
Your physicians have expressly charged . . . . T. of Shrew Ind. 2 123

For HO your father charged me at our parting i 1 218

I will tell you ; Since I am charged in honour .... W. Tale i 2 407

I charged thee that she should not come about me ii 3 43

Their battering cannon charged to the mouths K . John ii 1 382

Send him to answer thee, or any man, For any thing he shall be charged

withal 1 Hen. IV. ii 4 566

I can purge Myself of many I am charged withal iii 2 21

To venture upon tho charged chambers bravely . . .2 Hen. IV. ii 4 57
His soul Shall stand sore charged for the wasteful vengeance Hen. V. i 2 283
All abreast, Charged our main battle's front . . - 8 Hen. VI, I 1

With this, we charged again : but, out, alas I We bodged again . . i 4 18
Charged us from his soul to love each other . . . RicJiard III. i 4 243

The king hath straitly charged the contrary iv 1 17

Believe me, sirs, Wo shall be charged again .... Corinlanus i 4
Shall I bo charged no further than thin present? Must all determine here? iii 8 42



They charged him even As those should do that had deserved his hate Iv 112
What a sign is there 1 The heart Is sorely charged .



Macbeth v 1 60



Charged. Get thoe back ; my soul is too much charged With blood of

thine already Macbeth v 8 5

Charged me, on pain of their perpetual displeasure, neither to speak of

him, entreat for him, nor any way sustain him .... Lear iii 8 4
Wherefore to Dover? Wast thou not charged at peril . . . . iii V 52

My lady charged my duty in this business iv 6 18

What you have charged me with, that have I done ; And more, much

more v 8 162

I have charged thee not to haunt about my doors .... Othello i 1 96
What mighty magic, For such proceeding I am charged withal . i 3 93

Being charged, we will be still ny land .... Ant. and Cleo. iv 11 i
The king Hath charged you should not speak together . . Cymbeline I 1 83
Or have charged him, At the sixth hour of morn, at noon, at midnight,

To encounter me with orisons . . . . . . . i 3 30

Chargeful. The fineness of the gold and chargeful fashion Com. of Errors iv 1 29
Charge-house. Do you not educate youth at the charge-house on the

top of the mountain ? L. L. Lost v 1 87

Ohargeth. They are both forsworn : In this the madman justly chargeth

them Com. of Errors v 1 213

Charging. If they shall chance, In charging you with matters, to commit

you Hen. VIIL v 1 146

Chariest. The chariest maid is prodigal enough, if she unmask her beauty

to the moon Hamlet i 8 36

Chariness. That may not sully the chariness of our honesty Mer. Wives 11 1 102
Charing -cross. Two razes of ginger, to be delivered as far as Charing-cross

1 Hen. IV. ii 1 27

Chariot. In a captive chariot into Rouen Bring him our prisoner Hen. V. iii 5 54
I consecrate My sword, my chariot and my prisoners . . T. Andron. i 1 249

Horse and chariots let us have, And to our sport ii 2 18

Her chariot is an empty hazel-nut Made by the joiner squirrel Rom. and Jul. i 4 67
And when you saw his chariot but appear, Have you not made an universal

shout. That Tiber trembled? J. Caxarl 1 48

Thy grand captain Antony Shall set thee on triumphant chariots

Ant. and Cleo. iii 1 10

Follow his chariot, like tho greatest spot Of all thy sex . . . . iv 12 35
It fits us therefore rlpoly Our chnriota and our horsemen bo in rradlness

Cymbeline III 6 23

Ho was seated in a chariot Of nn inestimable valuo . . . 1'eridcs ii 4 7
Chariot-wheel. That erst did follow thy proud chariot-wheels 2 Hen. VI. if 4 13
Stab them, or tear them on thy chariot-wheels . . T. Andron. v 2 47
What conquest brings he home ? What tributaries follow him to Rome,

To grace in captive bonds his chariot-wheels ? . . J. Cassar I 1 39

Charitable. Let him be furnished with divines, and have all charitable

preparation Meus. for Meas. tit 2 222

A clinrlljiblo duty of my order Com. of Krrors v 1 107

Why had ! not with charitable hand Took up a beggar's issue? Much Ado iv 1 133
You were born under a charitable star. Under Mars, I . . All's Well i 1 205

You ha' done mo a charitable office Jr. Tale Iv 8 80

The peace of heaven is theirs that lift their swords In such a Just and

charitable war K. John II 1 36

I come to thee for charitable license Hen. V. Iv 7 74

What black magician conjures up this fiend, To stop devoted charitable

deeds? Richard III. I 2 35

Most charitable care Have the patricians of you . . . Coriolanus i 1 67
Do this, and be a charitable murderer .... T. Andron. it 8 178
Pardon me for reprehending thee, For thou hast done a charitable deed iii 2 70

A charitable wish and full of love iv 2 43

Why have you that charitable title from thousands? . T. of Athens i 2 94
Ho does deny him, in respect of his, What charitable men afford to beggars iii 2 82
Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents

wicked or charitable Hamlet i 4 42

For charitable prayers, Shards, flints and pebbles should be thrown

on her v 1 253

The ruddock would, With charitable bill, bill, sore-shaming Those

rich-left heirs that let their fathers lie Without a monument I

Cymbeline lv 2 325
Charitably. How can they charitably dispose of any thing, when blood

is tlioir argument? Hen. V. iv 1 149

Charities. As your charities Shall best Instruct you, measure me W. Tale II 1 113
Charity. Out of his charity . . . did give us .... Tempest i 2 162
Thou hast not so much charity iii thee as to go to the ale with a Christian

T. G. of Ver. ii 5 60

Bound by my charity and my blest order . . . Meas. for Meas. ii 8 3
Might there not be a charity in sin To save this brother's life . . u 4 63
I '11 take it as a peril to my soul, It is no sin at all, but charity . . ii 4 66
To dp't at peril of your soul, Were equal poise of sin and charity . . ii 4 68

Sir, induced by my charity iv 3 53

Thy love is far from charity, That in love's grief desirest society L. L. Lost iv 8 127
For charity itself fulfils the law, And who can sever love from charity ? iv 8 364
He hath a neighbourly charity in him . Mer. of Venice i 2 85

But what of that? 'Twere good you do so much for charity . . . iv 1 261
He that knows better how to tame a shrew, Now let him speak : 'tis

charity to show T. of Shrew iv 1 214

If not, elsewhere they meet with charity iv 8 6

Of charity, what kin are you to me? . . . . . . T. Night v 1 237

There your charity would have lacked footing .... W, Tale iii 8 113

Whom zeal and charity brought to the field K. John ii 1 565

Ransacking the church, Offending charity iii 4 173

I will not vex your souls Since presently your souls must part your

bodies With too much urging your pernicious Hvos, For 'twere no

charity Rkhard II. ill 1 5

A tear for pity and a hand Open as day for melting charity 2 Hen. IV. iv 4 32

The dead with charity enclosed in clay Hen. V. iv 8 129

Virtue Is choked with foul ambition And charity chased hence by

rancour's hand 2 Hen. VI. iii 1 144

Fie I charity, for shame ! speak not in spite v 1 213

'Twas sin before, but now 'tis charity 3 Hen. VI. v 5 76

Sweet saint, for charity, be not so curst .... Richard IIL 1 2 49
You know no rules of charity, Which renders good for bad, blessings for

curses i 2 68

Have done I for shame, if not for charity i 8 273

Urge neither charity nor shame to me : Uncharitably with me have you

dealt I 3 274

My charity is outrage, life my shame 13 277

Brother, we have done deeds of charity ; Made peace of enmity . . 11 1 49
Put meekness in thy mind, Love, charity, obedience, and true duty I . ii 2 108
My learn'd lord cardinal, Deliver all with charity . . . Hen. VIII. i 2 143
You speak not like yourself; who ever yet Have stood to charity . . ii 4 86
T will not wish ye half my miseries ; I havo more charity . . . ill 1 109
I could despise this man, But that I am bound in charity against it I . iii 2 298



CHARITY



220



CHARMINO



Charily. Is come to lay his weary bones among ye ; Give liiin a little

narth for charity f ....... lien. Vlll. iv 2 33

Glvo mo hiave to spook him, Ami vet with charity ..... Iv 2 33

Love I rli'iidshlp, charily, in u subjects ull To envious and calumniating

Uniu .......... Troi. and Cra. Ill 8 173

Wo would give much, to use violent thefts, And rob In the behalf of

charity ............. v 8 93

A man by hia own alma empolson'd. And with hit) charity slain Coriofl. v Ii 12
This was but a deed of charity To that which tliou shall hear of me

T. Andron. v 1 89
Thou art a soldier, therefore seldom rich ; It comes in charity to thee

T. ofAthtnsi 2 329

Thou shall butld from men ; Hate all, curse all, show charity to none . iv 3 534

Dy Ois and by Saint Charity, Alack, and lie for shame ! . . Hamlet iv 5 59
Sometime with lunatic bans, sometime with prayers, Enforce their

charity ............ Lear 11 8 30

Talk with the duke, that my charity be not of him perceived . . iil 8 17

Do poor Tom some charity, whom tho foul tlend vexes . . . . ill 4 61

Let s exchange charity. 1 am no less In blood than Ihou art . . v 8 166

Boar some charity to my wit ; do not think it so unwholesome Othello iv 1 123
1 care not for you, And am so nuar the lack of charity To accuse mysnlf

I ha to you ......... Cyinlxline II 8 114

I 'Id lot a pulsh of such Clotens blood, And praise myself for charity . iv 2 169

O, the charity of a penny cord I it sums up thousands in a trice . . v 4 170
And finding little comfort to relieve them, 1 thought it princely charity

to grieve them ......... Pericles i 2 100

Your honour haa through Ephesus pour'd forth Your charity . . Ill 2 44

Besides this treasure for a fee, The gods requite his charity I . . . iii 2 75

Here I charge your charity withal, leaving her The infant of your care 1H 8 14
In reverend Cerimou there well appears Tue worth tliat learned charity

aye wears . .' ........ v8 Gower 94

Oharlemaln. Nay To give great Charlemaln a pen in's hand And write

to her a love-line ......... All's Well U 1 80

The Lady Lingare. Daughter to Charlemain .... lien. V. I 2 75

Charles. Was not Charles, the duke's wrestler, bent . At Y. Like /til 94

Good Monsieur Charles, what 's the uew news at the new court? . i 1 101

Charles, I thank theo for thy love to me ....... i 1 141

I'll tell thoo, Charles : it Is the stubbornest young fellow of France . 11 148

Farewell, good Charles. Now will I stir this gamester . . . .11 109

The eldest of Ihe three wrestled with diaries, the duke's wrestler ;

which Charles In a moment throw him and broke throe of his ribs . 1 2 134

Young man have you challenged Charles the wrestler? . . . . i 2 178

How dost tlion, Ohnrlus? Ho cannot u|H.>ak ...... 1 2 931

poor Orlando, Ihou art overthrown I Or Charles or something weaker

masters thuo ............ 12 373

The wrestler Tliat did but latuly foil the sinewy diaries . . . . II I 14

Hugh Capet also, who usurp'd the crown Of diaries the duke of Ixirralne

Hen. f. 1 2 70

The Lady Ermongare, Daughter to Charles the forosald duke of Lorraine I 2 83

Charles Delabreth, high constable of France . . . ill 6 40; IT 8 97

Charles Duke of Orleans, nephew to the king ...... iv 8 ii

The Dauphin Cliarles is crowned king in Khelma . . .1 II, n. VI. I 1 93

Hero comoth Charles : I marvel how lie sped ...... 11 1 48

Wherefore Is Charles Impatient with his friend? ..... ii 1 54

I'll by a sign give notice to our friends, Tliat Charles the Dauphin may

encounter them ........... Ill 2 9

See, noble Charles, the beacon of our friend ...... ill 2 29

Now whero's the Dastard's braves, and Charles his gleeks? . . . 1112133
Who craves a parley with the Burgundy ? The princely Cliarles of

France ............. Ill 8 38

What say'st thou, Chiulcs? for I am marching hence . . . . ill 3 39

Return, thou wandering lord ; Charles and the rest will take thee in

their arms ............ Ill 8 77

And join'd with Charles, the rightful King of France . . . . iv 1 60

1 hope ere long To be presented, by your victories, With Charles,

Alencpu and that traitorous rout . . . . . . . iv 1 173

Charles, Burgundy, Alencou, Relgnier, compass him about . . . iv 4 ao
Earl of Armaguac, near knit to Charles, A man of great authority In

France ............. v 1

Then march to Paris, royal Charles of France ...... v 2

Command the conquest, Charles, it shall bo thine ..... v 2

O, Charles the Dauphin Is a proper man ....... v 8



.......

A plaguing mischief light on Charhui and thoo I ..... v

We'll have no bustards live ; Especially xlnca Charles must father It



v 4

v 4



"f was neither Charles nor yet the duke I named

Cliarles, and the rest, It Is enacted thus .......

Aud, Charles, upon condition thou wilt swear To pay him tribute .
Insulting Charles 1 hast thou by secret means Used intercession to

obtain a league? ........... v 4 147

How say'st thou, Charles? shall our condition stand? . . . . v 4 165

80 the Earl of Armaguao may do, Because he Is near kinsman unto

Charles ............. v 5

Here are the articles of contracted peace Between our sovereign and the

French king Charles ........ 2 lien. VI. 1

It is agreod between the French king Charles, and William de la Polo . 1



v 4 133

29



45



Charles the emperor, Under pretence to see the queen hlsaunt Hen. VIII. i
Cliarles, I will play no more to-night ; My mind's not on't . . . T
Sir, I did never win of you before. But little, Charles . . . . v

'Tis midnight, Charlea ; Prithee, to bed v

Charles tho Great, having subdued the Saxons, There left behind and

settled certain Frencn ........ Hen. V. i 2

Charles the Great Subdued the Saxons, and did seat the French Beyond

the river Sala, in the year Eight hundred five i 2

diaries the duke' of Lorraiue, sole heir male Of the true line and stock

of Charles the Great . 12

Charleinain, who was the son To Lewis the emperor, and Lewis the son

Of Charles the Great .... 12

By the which marriage the line of diaries the Great Was re-united to

the crown of France 12

Charles' wain is over the new chimney 1 Hen. If. u 1

Charm. Who, with a charm join'd to their suffer'd labour, I have left

asleep Tempest 1 2 231

All the charms Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on. you I . . i 2 339
MymeauerministersTheirseveralKinds havedone. My high charms work iii S 88
Here tliought they to have done Some wanlon charm upon this man

and maid iv 1 95

Now does my project gather to a head : My charms crack not . . v 1 2

Your charm so strongly works 'em v 1 17

My charms I '11 break, their senses I '11 restore, And they shall be them-
selves v 1 31



,



84



Charm. . When I have required Some heavenly music, which even now

I do, To work mine end upon their senses that This airy charm is

for, 1 'II break my stall 1'mywsl v 1 5.,

Tho charm dissolves apace v 1 64

Now my charms are all o'erthrown, And what strength I havo's mine

own Ki.ll. i

Surely I think you have charms, U ; yes, In truth . . tier. M'irei II 2 107
Sotting the attraction of my cood parts asldo I have no other charms . ii 2 1 1 1
She works by charms, by spells, by the figure, and such daubery . . iv 2 185
Music oft hath such a charm To make bad good, and good provoke to

harm Meta. for Meat. Iv 1 14

Beauty is a witch Against whose charms faith melteth into blood

Much Ado ii 1 187

Yet Is this no charm for the toothache ill 2 73

Charm ache with air and agony with words v 1 26

Ere I take this charm from off lr sight, As I can take it M. N. Dream ii 1 183
Never harm, Nor spell, nor charm. Come our lovely lady nigh . . II 2 17
Churl, upon thy eyes I throw All the power this charm doth owe . . II 2 79

I'll charm his eyes against tdiu do appear Ill I 99

I will charm him llrst to keen his tongue T. of Shrew I 1 314

To tamo a shrew and charm her chattering tongue Iv 2 58

Unchuln your spirits now with spelling cliarms . . .1 Hen. VI. 831
This liana of mine hath writ in thy behalf And therefore shall it charm

thy riotous tongue 2 lien. VI. Iv 1 64

Peace, wilful boy, or I will charm your tongue . . .8 llm. VI. v 6 31
Have done thy charm, thou hateful wither'd hag I . . Richard III. i 8 215
That have prevail'd Upon my body with their hellish charms . . iii 4 64
Now the fair goddess, Fortune, Fall deep in love with thee ; and her

great charms Misguide thy opposers' swords I . . . Curiolanut 1 5 22
This siren, that will charm Home's Saturnine ... T. Andron. il 1 23
Till I find ... a charm to calm these fits, Per Styga, per manes vehor ii 1 134
Is beloved and loves again, Alike bewitched by the charm of looks

Rom. and Jid. 11 Prol. 6
Upon my knees, I charm you, by my once-commended beauty J. Cauar ii 1 371

Peace I the chann's wound up Uacbeth i 3 37

I, the mistress of your charms, The close contriver of all lianns . . iil 5 6
Your vessels and your spells provide, Your charms ami every thing

beside Ill 5 19

For a charm of powerful trouble. Like a hell broth boil and bubble . Iv 1 18
Cool It with a baboon's blood, Then the charm is firm and good . . iv 1 38
I '11 charm tho air to give a sound, While you perform your antic round Iv 1 129

Despair thy charm v 8 13

No fairy lakes, nor wlUh liutli power to i-liimu . . . llnmUt I 1 i6j
Mumlillng of wicked charms, conjuring the moon .... Lear II 1 41
Whose age luis charms in It, whoso title morn, To pluok tho common

bosom on his sldo v 8 48

Is there not charms Uy which the property of youth and maldhood

May be abused ? Othello i 1 173

Thou hast practised on her with foul charms i 2 73

What drugs, what charms. What conjuration and what mighty magic . 1891
Forth of my heart those charms, thine eyes, are blotted . . . . v 1 35
Goto, charm your tongue. I will uot cliarm my tongue ; I am bound

to speak v 2 183

All the charms of love, Salt Cleopatra, soften thy waned lip 1 A. and C. ii 1 20
When I am revenged upon my charm, I have done all . . . . iv 12 16

this false soul of Egypt I this grave charm . . ... . . Ivl2 25

'Tis your graces That from my mutest conscience to my tongue Charms

this report out Cymbeline i 6 117

No exerciser harm theo I Nor no witchcraft charm theo ! . . . iv 2 277
Charmed. I charm'd their ears That calf-like they my lowing follow'd

Tempest Iv 1 178

And then 1 will her charmed eye release From monster's view U. A'. Dr. iii 2 376
Fortune forbid my outside have not charm'd her I . . .7". Night 11 2 19
Whose dangerous eyes may well bo chann'd asleep . . 2 Hen. IV. iv 2 39
Has almost charmed me from my profession, by persuading mo to it

T. 0/AthcTutv S 454
Swelter'd venom sleeping got, Boil thou first 1' the charmed pot Maclxth Iv 1 9

1 bear a charmed life, which must not yield To one of woman bom . v 8 12
I, in mine own woe charm'd, Could not find death where I did hear him

groan (>mWin v S 68

Charmer. She was a charmer, and could almost read Tho thoughts of

I*>plo Olhtlla III 4 57

Oharmeth. Music, hoi mnslc, such as chaniioth sleep I . Jlf. N. Hrmm Iv 1 88
Oharmlan. llnlii mo away, dour Charmlan ; I shall full . Aut. uiul Clco. I 8 15

Cut my lace, Chariiilan, como I I 71

Look, prithee, Charmian, How this Herculean Roman docs become The

carriage of his chafe i S 83

Charmian T Madam? Ha, ha 1 Give me to drink inandragora . . 16 i

Charmian, When) think'st thou he Is now? I 5 18

Note him, good Channian, 'tis the man ; but note him . . . 1 6 54


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 118 of 522)