John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 142 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 142 of 522)
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Complain. You'll complain nf me to the king? .
Wltut wad dune to Elbow 'a wife, that he hath caim



COMPLAINT



205



COMPOUNDED



Complaint. Cannot bo quint Bcarco n breathing-while, But you must

trouble him with lewd complaints .... Richard HI. J 3 61
Give me no help In lamentation ; I am not barren to bring forth

complaints !l 2 67

And lost your office On the complaint o' the tenants . . Hen. VIII. i 2 173

Unite in your complaints, And force them with a constancy . . . iii 2 i

Hath so far Given ear to our complaint v 1 48

I have, and most unwillingly, of late Heard many grievous, I do nay,

my lord, Grievous complaints of you v 1 99

Said to be something imperfect in favouring the first complaint Coriolanus ii 1 54

Each buzz, each fancy, each complaint, dislike .... Lear 1 4 348
Let him do his spite : My services which I have done the signiory Shall

out-tongue his complaints Qtliello i 2 19

Complement. In all the accoutrement, complement and ceremony of It

Mer. Wives Iv 2 5
A man of complements, whom right and wrong Have chose as umpire

of their mutiny L, L. Lost 1 1 169

These are complements, these are humours ; these betray nice wenches iii 1 23

Gnrnish'd and deck'd in modest complement .... Hen. I', ii 2 134

O, he is the courageous captain of complements . . Rom. and Jul. il 4 20

Complete in feature and in mind With all good grace . T. G. of Ver. ii 4 73
Believe not that the dribbling dart of love Can pierce a complete bosom

Meas. for Meas. \ 3 3

A maid of grace and complete majesty L. L. Lost i 1 137

They are both the varnish of a complete man 1 2 47

Brawling in French 7 No, my complete master iii 1 ii

Such as she is, in beauty, virtue, birth, Is the young Dauphin overy way

complete : If not complete of, say lie Is not sho . . K. John il 1 433

In complete glory she reveal'd herself 1 Hen. VI. i 2 83

The most complete champion that ever I heard I . . 2 Hen. VI. iv 10 58
Thereby to see the minutes how they run, How many make the hour

full complete 3 Hen. VI. il 5 26

Take with thee my most heavy curse ; Which, in the day of battle, tire

theo more Than all the complete armour that thou wear'st I Kick. III. iv 4 189

This man so complete, Who was euroll'd 'mongst wonders . Hen. VIII. i 2 118

Sho is a gnllant creature, and complete In mind and feature . , . iii 2 49

Tlmn nmrvol not, thou great find complete man . . Trot, ami Cres. ill 8 181

A thousand complete courses of thn HUH iv 1 27

And how does that honourable, complete, free-hearted gentleman?

T. of Athens Hi 1 9

The one is filling still, never complete ; The other, at high wish . . iv 3 244

Again in complete steel Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon Hamlet i 4 52

A pestilent complete knave ; and the woman hath found him already Oth. ii 1 252

Complexion. His complexion is perfect gallows . . . Tempest i 1 32

So curses all Eve's daughters, of what complexion soever Mer. Wires iv 2 25

How near the god drew to the complexion of a goose ! . . . . v 5 9
We are soft as our complexions are, And credulous to false prints

Meas. for Meas. ii 4 129

Thy complexion shifts to strange effects, After the moon . . . iii 1 24
Grace, being the soul of your complexion, shall keep the body of it ever

fair HI 1 187

What complexion Is sho of? Swart, liko my shoe . . Com. of Errors Iii 2 103
How sweetly you do minister to love, That know love's grief by his

complexion I Much Ado i 1 315

Civil as an orange, and something of that jealous complexion . . (I 1 305

A woman, master. Of what complexion? Of all the four . L. L. Lost I 2 82
Tell me precisely of what complexion. Of the sea-water green, sir. Is

that one of the four complexions? i 2 85

Of all complexions the cull'd sovereignty Do meet, as at a fair, in her

fair choek iv 8 234

And Ethiopos of their sweet complexion cnu-k Iv 8 268

I f he have the condition of a saint and the complexion of a devil

Mer. of Venice i 2 143
Misliko mo not for my complexion, The Bhadow'd llvnry of tho burnish'd

mm II 1 i

I :i't all of )ih complexion cliooflo tnn RO II 7 79

It In 11 10 complexion of thorn all to Icavo tho tlnin Ill 1 32

Good my complexion I As Y. Like It 111 2 204

Rntwoen the palo complexion of truo love Ami tho rod glow of scorn . lil 4 56

Ho '11 make .1 proper man : the best thing in him Is hia complexion . ill 5 116
There is too great testimony in your complexion that it was a passion

of earnest. Counterfeit, I assure you iv 8 171

Complexions that liked me and breaths that I defied not . . . Epil. 20

The exprossure of bis eye, forehead, and complexion . . T. Night ii 8 172

What kind of woman ta't? Of your complexion II 4 27

That, should sho fancy, It should bo one of my complexion . . . 11 6 30
Your changed complexions are to me a mirror Which shows me mine

changed too W. Tale i 2 381

Whose fresh complexion and whoso heart together Affliction alters . iv 4 585
Men judge by the complexion of the sky The state and inclination of

the day Richard II. iii 2 194

Change the complexion of her maid-pale peace To scarlet indignation iii 3 98
It discolours the complexion of my greatness to acknowledge it

2 Hen. IV. 11 2 6

What see you In those papers that you lose So much complexion ? Hen. V. ii 2 73

Impious war . . . with his smirch'd complexion iii 3 17

She praised his complexion above Paris .... Troi. and Ores, i 2 107
His complexion is higher than his ; he having colour enough, and tho

other higher, is too flaming a praise for a good complexion . . i 2 m

Ridges horsed With variable comirtoxions . . . Coriolnnim II 1 228

The complexion of the element In favour's like the work wohavo J. Co-sari 3 128

By the o'ergrowth of some complexion Hamlet i 4 27

Hath now this dread and black complexion smear'd With heraldry more

dismal ii 2 477

But yet methinks it is very sultry and hot for my complexion . . v 2 102
Not to affect many proposed matches Of her own clime, complexion, and

degree Othello ii] 8 230

Turn thy complexion there, Patience, thou young and rose-Upp'd

chorubln Iv 2 62

That excellent complexion, which did steal The eyes of young and old

Verifies Iv 1 41
Take you the marks of her, tho colour of her hair, complexion, height Iv 2 62

You shall have tho diffflronco of all complexions Iv 2 85

Complice. Their complices, The caterpillars of the commonwealth

Richard IL li 8 165

Away, To fight with Glondower and his complices ill 1 43

The lives of all your loving compllcos IXMW on your health . 2 Hoi. IV. I 1 163

To quell tho rebels and tholr compile-on 2 Hen. VI. v 1 212

In despite of all mischance, Of thee thyself and all thy complices

8 Hen. VI. iv 3 4)



Compliment. Manhood Is melted into courtesies, valour into compliment

Much Ado Iv 1 322
Thine, in all compliments of devoted and heart-burning heat of duty

L. L. Lost i 1 279

Stay not thy compliment ; I forgive thy duty : adieu . . . . iv 2 147
That they call compliment is like the encounter of two dog-apes As Y. Like It ii 6 26
'Twas never merry world Since lowly feigning was call'd compliment

T. Night iii 1 no
Even now I met him With customary compliment . . . W. Tale i 2 371

Saving in dialogue of compliment K. John i 1 201

Come, come ; sans compliment, what news abroad? . . . . v 6 16
But farewell compliment ! Dost thou love me? . . Rom. and Jul. 11 2 89

There is further compliment of leave-taking Lear i 1 306

The time will not allow tho compliment Which very manners xirges . v 8 233
The native act and figure of my heart In compliment extern . . Othello 1 1 63
Worthy shameful check it were, to stand On more mechanic compliment

Ant. and Cleo. iv 4 32

Complimental. I will make a complimental assault upon him 7V. and Cr. iii 1 42
Complot. Never by advised purpose meet To plot, contrive, or complot

any ill Richard II. I 8 189

I know their complot is to have my life . .''.''.'' 2 Hen. VI. iii I 147
Lord Hastings will not yield to our complots . . . Richard III. Hi 1 192
Let us sup betimes, that afterwards We may digest our complots in

some form lil 1 200

I bring this fatal writ, The complot of this timeless tragedy T. Andron. fi 3 265
Compiots of mischief, treason, villanics Rnthful to hear . . . v 1 65
lU'vonge now goes To lay a complot to betray thy foos . . , . v 2 147
Complotted, All the treasons for these eighteen yearn Complottod and

contrived in this land Richard II. I 1 96

Comply. Let me comply with you in this garb .... Hamlet ii 2 390

He did comply with his dug, before he sucked it v 2 195

Nor to comply with heat the young affects In me defunct . Othello i 3 264
Compose. Thy undaunted mettle should compose Nothing but males Macbeth i 7 73

If we compose well hero, to Farthia Ant. and Cleo. ii 2 15

And with her neeld composes Nature's own shape, of bud, bird Pericles v Gower 5

Composed. He 'a composed of harshness Tempest iii 1 9

Whom) composed rhymos Should be full-fraught with Serviceable vows

- T. (!. of Ver. Ill 2 69

He Is composed and framed of treachery Much Ado v 1 257

One that composed your beauties M. N. Dream 1 1 48

Frank nature, rather curious than in haste, Hath well composed thee

All's Wein 2 21

With musics of all sorts and songs composed To her unworthiness . iii 7 40
Then did they imitate that which I composed to my courser . Hen. V. iii 7 46
They're loving, well composed with gifts of nature . . Troi. and Cres. iv 4 79
Were it a casque composed by Vulcan's skill, My sword should bite it v 2 170
Words of BO sweet breath composed As made the things more rich

Hamlet iii 1 98
Composition. If the duko with the other dukes come not to composition

Metis, for Meas. 12 2

Her promised proportions Camo short of composition . . . . v 1 220
Tho composition that your valour and fear makes in you is a virtue of

a good wing All's Well i 1 217

And thinks himself made In tho unchaste composition . . . . Iv 8 22
Do you not read some tokens of my son In the large comjfositlon of tills

man 7 K. John i 1 88

Mad world ! mad kings I mad composition I il 1 561

Aged Gaunt? O, how that name befits my composition I Richard II. ii 1 73
A prince should not be so loosely studied as to remember so weak a com-
position 2 Hen. IV. II 2 10

You did mistake The outward composition of his body . . 1 Hen. VI. II 3 75
That it was which caused Our swifter composition , . Coriolantis iii 1 3
Sweno, the Norway's king, craves composition . . . Macbeth \ 2 59
Who, hi the lusty stealth of nature, take More composition Lear i 2 12
Art nntlilng but tho coiimoflltlmi Of ft kimvo, beggar, cownrcl . , . 11 2 22
Thorn Id no composition (n HIOHO news That glvnn thorn credit . OtJitllo 18 i
I crave our composition may bo writ tnn, And sejil'd botwoon tin

Ant. and Ueo. 11 59
Compost. Do not spread the compost on the weeds, To make them ranker

HamJet HI 4 151
Composture. The earth's a thief, That feeds and breeds by a com posture

stolen From general excrement T. of Athens iv 8 444

Composure. It was a strong composure a fool could disunite Troi. and Cres. il 8 109
Thank the heavens, lord, thou art of sweet composure . . . . ii 8 251

His composure must be rare indeed Whom these things cannot blemish

Ant. and Cleo. i 4 22
Compound. There was the rankest compound of villanous smell that ever

offended nostril ........ Mer. Wives iii 6 93

If you think it meet, compound with him by the year Meas. for Meas. iv 2 25

We will compound this quarrel 'J'. of Shrew i 2 27

I will compound this strife : 'Tis deeds must win the prize . . . ii 1 343

Compound whose right is worthiest K. John ii 1 281

If thou didst, then behold that compound . . . .1 Hen. IV. ii 4 136

Compound me with forgotten dust 2 Hen. IV. iv 6 116

As manhood shall compound : push home .... Hen. V. ii 1 103
I come to know of thee, King Harry, If for thy ransom thou wilt now

compound iv 8 80

I must perforce compound With mistful eyes, or they will issue tco . iv 6 33

Compound a boy, half French, half English v 2 221

I pray, my lords, let me compound this strife . . . .2 Hen. VI. 11 1 58
I find the ans in compound with the major part of your syllables Coriolanusii 1 64
There is thy gold, worse poison to men's souls, Doing more murders in
this loathsome world, Than these poor compounds that thou nrnyst

not sell Rom. and Jul. v 1 82

To have his pomp and all what state compounds But only painted, like

his varnlsh'd friends? T. of Athens iv 2 35

Tills solidity and compound mass Hamlet fii 4 49

Moat poisonous compounds, Which aro tho movers of a languishing death

CymMine I 5 8
I will try tho forces Of those thy compound* on mtcli creatures as We

count not worth the hanging 1 6 19

I, dreading that her purposo Was of more danger, did compound for her

A certain stuff v 6 254

Compound of majesty. Thou whoreson mad compound of majesty

2 Hen. IV. ii 4 319
Compounded. It Is ft melancholy of mino own, compounded of many

SimplOB A*Y> Mb* It Iv 1 16

I would to God nil strifes were well compounded . . Rfchard III. II 1 74
What four throned ones could have welgh'd Such a compounded one?

Hen. VIII. 1 1 12



COMPOUNDED



266



CONCEIVE



Compounded. Wo hero deliver, . . , Together with the seal o' the

senate, what We liavo compounded on .... Coriolnnut v 6 84

Who in spite put ,s(url To sonio she beggar and compounded thoo Poor

rogue hereditary ........ T. uf Athene iv 3 273

W.uit Ymvo you doim, my lonl, with tUo dead body ? Qorapoun Jod it

with diiNt, whm-eto m kin ....... Haintft Iv -j 6

My fulhur eompomuiod with my mothor under tho dngO&'B tall . Lear t 'J 139
Kiuin evury uuu Tho best she hath, and nho, ol*all coinjHJundeU, Outsells

tho ID nil ........ . . Cyiubelin* iil 6 73

Comprehend. You shall comprehend all vagrom men . . Much Ado lit 8 25
ThTuo t-'i'i-'-i, Where all those pleasured live that art would comprehend

L. 1. l*st iv 2 114
Fantasies, Unit apprehend More Ihuii cool reason ever comprohondti

M. N. Dream v 1 6
If it would but apprehend sumo Joy, It comprehends sonn) Lringor of

thutjoy ............. v 1 M

Comprehended. Our watch, sir, havu indeed comprehended two aspicfoun

persona ........... Much Ado ill 6 50

Compromise. And will be glad to do my benevolence to make atonement*

and compromise* between yuu ...... Mer. W\vt\ \ 33

Comprised. She M our capital demand, comprised Within tho fore-rank

of our articles ..... .... lien. r. v 2 96

Comprising all tlmt may l>e sworn or said .... Richard II. lii 8 m

Compromise. Mend fair-pl.iy orders and nmko compromise . A'. John v 1 67
Lint basely yielded upun compromise That which hid noble ancestors

achieved with blown ....... Richanl II. II 1 253

Now the matter grows U> compromise, Stand'st thou aloof? . 1 Hen. VI. v 4 1^9
Compromised. Whim I^abun and himself were compromised Mer, of Venice i 8 79
Compt. That thou didst love her, strikes somo scores away From the

gruit compt .......... Alt'* Well V 3 57

Tuk>' the bonds along with you, And liave the datm in compt 7'. of Atheist il 1 35
Your servants over Huvu thoirs, themselves and what It! theirs, In compt,

To make their audit ........ Macbeth 1 36



When we shull meet at compt, This look of thine will hurl my soul from
heaven, And (lends will snuU:h at it ..... Othello v

Compttble. I am very comptlble, even to the leant sinister usage T. Xitjht I
Comptroller. I was spoke to, with Sir Henry Guildford This night to be

comptrollers .......... Hen. VIII. 1

Oooipulsaiory. By strong hand And terms coinpulsatory . Hamlet i
Compulsion. Then must the Jew be merciful. On what compulsion must
I? tell me that ........ J/cr. f Venire iv

In the highest compuUlon uf base feur ..... Alia Will Iil

lly tho compulsion of their onlinancu ..... K. John 11

What a HOMO combat hunt thou fought Detwoeu compulsion and a
limvo rosimet ! ........... v

An I wtini at Mi" tttromudo, or all the rucks In tho world, I would lint
loll yuu on compulsion ....... 1 Hen. Ii'. II

Ulvu yuu a reason on compulsion I if reasons woro as plentiful as black-

berries, I would give no man a reason upon compulsion . . . II
To deliver her possession up On terms of base compulsion 1 Troi. and t'r. II
As if we were villains by necessity ; fools by heavenly compulsion Lear I
Compulsive. Proclaim no shame When the compulsive ardour gives the

charge ........... llaudet III

Whoso icy current and compulsive course Ne'er feels retiring ebb Othello iil
Compunctious. That no compunctious visiting* of nature Shako my fell

purpose . ...... , . , . Macbeth I

Computation. In care U> seek me out By computation . Cam. of Errvn II
Uy just computation of the tlmo ..... Richard III. Ill

Comrade. The nimble-footed madcap Prince of Wales, And his comrades

1 lien. IV. IV

IX) not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each now-hatch'd, un llodgi.nl
comrade .......... Hamlet I

To bo a comrade with the wolf and owl, Necessity's sharp pinch ! Lear II
Con. Hero are your puiU: and 1 am to entreat you, reorient you and

desire you, to con them ...... M. .V. Dream I

But I con him no thanks for't, in the nature he delivers it All's Well Iv
It is excellently well penned, 1 liave taken groat pains to con it T. Night I
An auctioned ass, that cons state without book . . . . . II

And this they con perfectly In tho phrase of war . . . Hen. V. Ill
Thy horse will sooner con au oration than thou leant a prayer without
book .......... Troi. and CVo. 11

Yet thanks I must you con That you are thieves profess'd T. of Athena Iv
Concave. I do think him as concave as a covered goblet As Y. Like it ill
Tiber tromUod underneath bur bunks, To hear the replication of your
sounds Made lu her concave shores ..... /. Ciesar I

Concavities. Tho concavities of it is not sulllcient . . . Hen. V. iil
Conceal. That which I would discover The law of friendship bids me to

conceal .......... T. G. of Ver. Hi

I may not conceal them, sir. Conceal them, or thou diest Mer. Wives Iv
You may conceal her, As best U-UU her wounded reputation Much Ado iv
A time that lovers' nights doth still conceal . . . M. N. Dream I
I'll pay theo bounteously, Conceal me what I am , T. Night I

Ho shall conceal it Whiles you are willing it shall come to nutc . . iv
I hold it tho in. no knavery to conceal It ..... H". Tale iv

Thou fond mad woman, Wilt thou conceal this dark conspiracy?

Richard H. v

There'sbut two ways, either to utter thorn, or to conceal them 2 Hen. IV. v
'Tis wisdom to conceal our meaning ..... 3 Hen. VI. Iv

Thou art sworn as deeply to e fleet what wo intend As closely to conceal
what we Import ........ Richard IIL Hi

Tills secret is so weighty, 'twill require A strong faith to conceal it

Hen. VIII. ii
He i in! conceals him, death ........ Lear U

I am glad to be cons train 'd to utter that Which torments me to conceal

CtjitiMine v

Who wanteth food, and will not suy he wants It, Or can conceal his
hunger till ho Italian? ........ I'ende* 1

Concealed. Bring me to hear them speak, where I may be concealed

J/u. for Meat, iii
That thou mighUt pour this coucealed man out of thy mouth

As Y. Like It 111
Very good ; let It be concealed awhile ..... All's Well ii

To divo like buckets in concealed wells ..... K. John v

Sorrow concealed, like an oven stopp'd, Doth burn the heart to cinders

T. Andron. ii

Wliat saya My conceal'd lady to our cancell'd love? . Rom. and Jul. iii
I pray you all, If you have hitherto conceal'd this sight, Let it bo ten-
able in your silence still ....... Hamlet i

Concealing. By concealing it, heap on your head A pack of sorrows

T. (,'. (/ Ver, iii



2 273
5 187

3 67
1 103

1 183

31

1 ai8



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4 264

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8 454

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1 19



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. lii

As Y. Like It ii

. v

'/'. of Shrew? Iv



3 7 8
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4 114



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Concealing. My tongue will tell tho anger of my heart, Or else my

heart concealing it wilt break T. t^f Shrew Iv

Close pent-up guilts, Rive your concealing continents . . . I.tur iii
Oonoealment. Bho never told her love, lint let concealment, like A worm

1' tho bud, 1 i'1'il on hur damask cheuk . . . . T. .% i.Af 11

Imprison 't not In ignorant concealment II'. Talc 1

Kxcoedingly well read, and profited In strange concealments 1 lien. IV. lit
'Twere a concealment Worse than a theft, no less tlmu a truducenient

Corlotanus I

Somo dear cause Will in concealment wrap me up awUilo . . Lear Iv

Oonoelt. The good conceit 1 hold of thee .... T. 0. of Ver. Iii

l-iy open to my earthy-gross conceit, timother'd In errors Cow. of Errors iii

I am proas'd down with conceit Conceit, my comfort, und my injm-y lv

If ho bo so, his conceit in lulse Ahtch Ado ii

His fair tongue, conceit's expositor L. L. / .( it

A good lustru of conceit in a turf of earth ; Ore enough for a Mint . . lv
Their conceits have wings Fleeter than arrows, bullets, wind, thought, v
Cut me to pieces with thy keen conceit .... . . v

With bracelets of thy liair, rings, gawds, conceits . . if. N. Dream i
To bo dress'd in an opinion of wisdom, gravity, profound conceit

Mer. of Venice I

You have a noble and a true conceit Of god-liko amity
Let it be aa humours and conceits shall govern
Thy conceit is nearer death titan thy powers .
I know you are a gentleman of good conceit
The conceit is deeper than you think for .
Thy conceit la soaking, will draw in More than the common blocks

W. Tale i
The prince your son, with inoro conceit and fear Of tho quoen'ti i>ood,

la gone lii

Using conceit alono, Without eye*, ears and harmful sound of words

A'. John 111
Tis nothing but conceit, my gracious lady . . . Richard II. 11

Conceit Is still derived From some forefather grief tt

Infusing him with self and vain conceit . . . . . . .HI

There's no more conceit In him than Is in a mallet . . .2 Hen. IV. II
With forgu> 1 quaint conceit To set a gloss ujion his bold intent 1 Hat. VI. iv
A volume uf enticing lines, Able to ravinh any dull conceit . . . v
There's some conceit or other likes him well . . . Hit-hard IIL ill
I shall not fall to approve the fair conceit The king hath of you

Hen. VIII. II
Like a strutting player, whose conceit Lies in his hamstring

Troi. and Cres. I
8he would applaud Andmnlcus* conceit .... '1\ Awlron. Iv

Conceit, muru rich in mattur Limn In words, Drugs of his miUlancu

/;' andJvl. II 30
Tho horrible conceit of death and night, Toguthur with Iho terror uf tho

nhico lv 8 37

Noble and young, When thy first griefs were but a mere conceit

T, of Athens v 4 14
Rich conceit Taught thee to make vast Neptune weep for aye On thy

low grave v 4 77

One of two bad ways you must conceit me . . . . J. Conor 111 1 193
In a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit Hamlet il 2 579
A broken voice, and bis whole function suiting With forms to hln

conceit ii 2 583

Conceit In weakest bodies strongest works iil 4 114

Conceit upon her father lv 6 45

Moat delicate carriages, and of very liberal conceit v 2 160

I know not how conceit may rob Tho treasury of lifo . . . Lear Iv 43
As if thou then had at shut up In thy brain Sumo horrible conceit

I'thellotil 8 115
That your wisdom yet, Krom one that so Imperfectly conceits, Would

tako no notice Ill 8 149

Dangerous conceits are, In their natures, poisons lii 8 326

A thing too young for such a place, Who, If It hud conceit, would die

rerides iil 1 16
Conceited. lie was gotten in drink : Is not the humour conceited?

Mer. Wives I 8 26

The youth 's a devil. He Is as horribly conceited of him . T. Night iii 4 333
Thou tAlkest of an admirable conceited fellow .... IK. Tale iv 4 204
Well conceited, Davy: about thy business, Davy . . .2 Hen. IV. v 1 39
Our great ueod of him You have right well conceited . . J. Ctvxur i 3 163
Conceltless. Thlnk'st thou I am so shallow, so concoitleati, To be seduced

by thy flattery ? T. (I. of Ver. lv 2 96

Conceive. Do nut approach Till thou dost hear me call. Well, I conceive

Tempest Iv 1 50
Nay, conceive me, conceive me, sweet cox .... Mer. Wives i 1 350

Plainly conceive, I love you Meas. for Meat. 11 4 141

' Fair ' in ' all hail ' Is foul, as I conceive L. L. /xwi v 2 340

We have laugh M to see the sails conceive And grow blg-bellieil with the

wanton wind M. N. Dream 11 1 128


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 142 of 522)