John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 177 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 177 of 522)
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We did sleep day out of countenance, and made the night light with

drinking II 2 181

You'll win two days upon me 11 4 9

Pompey doth tins day laugh away his fortune 11 8 109

I had rather lust from all lour days Than drink so much in one . . II 7 108
sin- In the hiiliilnneiiu of the goddess Isis That day appcar'd . . lii 18

To-morrow 1.1 the duy. It will determine one way iv 3 i

The gixls make thin a happy day to Antony I . . . . . iv 6 i

Prove this u prosperous Jay, the three-nook'd world yhall bear the

olive freely Iv 8 6

And drink carouses to the next day's fate Iv 8 34

This last day was A shrewd one t-.'.s Iv 9 4

The long day's task is done, And we must sloop Iv 14 35

Most limvy day I Nuy, good my fellows, do not please sharp fate To

grace it with your sorrows ... iv 14 134

I must {xirforce Iluve shown to thee such a declining day, Or look on

thine V 1 38

The bright d.'iy Is dono, And we are for the dark v 2 193

Within three tluys You with your children will ho send Uiforo . . v 2 201

Lnt hur languish A drop of blood a duy 1 CjpnleUne I 1 157

And every day that comes comes to decay A day's work In him . . I 5 56
It's almost morning, is 't not? Day, my lord . . . . . . II 8 n

Ijuake In the present winter's state and wish That wanner days would

come 11 4 6

If one of mean affairs May plod It in a week, why may not I Glide

thither In a day ? Ill 2 54

A goodly duy not to keep house, with such Whose roof's as low as

ours I Ill 8 i

They took thee for their mother, And every day do honour to her grave lit 8 105
Hath llnLiin all the sun that shines? Day, night, Am they not but In

Britain? Ill 4 139

Nor to us h.it h tender'd The duty of the day lil o 32

Her old servant I have not seen these two days HI & 55

May This night forestall him of the coming day I HI & 69

I hud no iiiliid To hunt this day . . If S 148

The day that she wait mlKHlng he was hero Iv 8 17

It U a day turn'd strangely: or betimes Let's reinforce, or fly . . v 2 17
Consider, sir, the chance of war: the duy Was yours by accident . . v 5 75
Misinterpreting, We might proceed to cancel of your days . I'trtclca I 1 113
Forty days longer wo do respite yon . . . . . . . I 1 1 16

Not an hour, In the day's glorious walk, or peaceful night . . .124
Day serves not light more fuithful than 1 II u . . . . . 1 2 no

If I had been the sexton, I would havo been that duy In the belfry . li 1 41
If it be a day lits you, search out of the calendar, anil nobody look

after It 11 1 58

This day I'll rise, or else add ill to ill . 11 1 173

And on set puritoso let his armour rust Until this day, to scorn It in the

dust II 2 55

And crown you king of this day's happiness II 8 n

Cull it by what you will, the duy Is yours . . . . . . U 3 13

Your presence glads our days . . . , . . . . . H 8 91

Welcome : happy day, my lords II -I 23

Who'll weil the stranger knight, Or never more to view nor day nor

light II S 17

And she is fair too, is she not? As a fair day In summer, wondrous

fair II 5 36

When canst thou reach It ? By break of day, if the wind cease . . Ill 1 77

We every day Kx]>ect him here Iv 1 34

Whilst ours was blurted at and held a malkln Not worth the time of day Iv 3 35
And ourselves Will in that kingdom spend our following days . . v 3 81
Alack (alas) the day I Her. Wivtt III 6 ; Iv 2 ; L. I.. IM! Iv 8 ; Mer. of
Venict II 2 ; Aa Y. Like It III 2 ; T. Niaht II 1 ; II 2 ; 4 Urn. 1Y. II 1 ;
7V.ii. niul I'm. ill 2 ; A'UIII. and Jill. Ill 2 ; Iv 6 ; tludxth II 4 ; lair
Iv U; OfMl.iill 4; Iv 2
Alack (alas) the heavy day I Jlirkuni II. Ill 8 ; Iv 1 ; Cllkdla Iv 2

By this day Much Ailo II 3 254 ; Iten. V. Iv 8 66

Hy this good day .... Much Ada v I 95 ; 2 llm. It'. Ill 2 81



Fair time of day 1



/.. /.. iMl V 2 339 ; lien. \'. v 2 3

U ', 1 .



Good time of any 1 2 Hen. IV. I 2 ; Richard UI. i 1 ; i S ; T. of Athens

iii

Good day T. (1. of Ver. iv 4 ; Much Ado v 1 ; At Y. Like It iv 1 ;
H'. Tale i 2 ; '2 Hen. IV. iv 2 ; Richard III. I 1 ; 2'roi. and Cm. Ill 3 ;
Coriolanua i 3
Day and night. Teach me how To name the bigger light, and how the

less, That bum by day ami night Tempest 1 2 336

This exceeding posting duy and night Must wear your spirits low

All's Well v 1

Both day and night did we keep company T. Niyht v 1 99

Who studies day and night To answer all the debt he owed to you

1 Hen. IV. \ 3 184

As la the difference betwixt day and night til 1 220

And posted day and night To meet you on the way v 1 35

As it wore, to ride day and night 2 Hen. IV. v 5 ai

Hy duy und night, He's traitor to the height .... Hen. Vlll. 1 2 213
U highly us concerns By day aud night to attend him carefully

T. Andron. iv 3 28
O day and night, but this is wondrous Htrnnge ! Hamlet i & 164

>]'! i and 1 1'],, .so lock from me duy and night t lit 2 227

By day and night he wrongs mo Lear i 3

Day-bed. Having come from a day-bed T. Night 11 6

lie is not lolling on a lewd day-bed, But on his knees at meditation

Richard III. ill 7 72
Day by day. Tis a chronicle of day by day, Not a relation for a break-

fast Tempest v 1 163

The younger of our nature, That surfeit on their ease, will duy by day

Come here for physic All'* Well iii 1

And day by day I '11 do this heavy task .... T. Andron. v 2 58
Days of answer. Procure your sureties for your days of ansu.T

Richard II. Iv 1 159
Day of audience. Rejourn the controversy of throe pence to a second

day of audluncu CVriofuiiua ii 1 80



13
F 3



)ay of battle. Tnke with then my most honvy curse ; Which, In the duy
of Itattlu, tiro theu more Tluui all tho complete armour that thou

wt'ur'Htl Hit-Hani III. tv 4 188

Day Of oombat. Tho ilay of comluit shall bo Ihu UHL uf tho nuxt munth

2 Hen. I'l. I U 934
)ay of desolation. If ever I do ttoo thu merry days of desolation that I

have seen L. L. Lost 1 2 164

Day of doom. To change blows with thee for our day of doom Rich. II. lii 2 189

And triumph, Henry, in thy day of doom . . . .8 Hen. VI. v fi 93

This is the day of doom for Bassianua .... T. Andron. II 8 42
)ay of joy. One who, to put thee from thy heaviness, Hath sorted out

a sudden day of joy Hum. and Jul. Ill 6 no

)ay of judgement. Heaven forgive my sins at the day of Judgement I

Mer. Wives III S 226
)ay of life. Thy eyes' windows full, Llko death, when he shuts up tho

day of life Hum. and Jul. lv 1 101

of love. Joy and fresh days of lovu Accompany your hearts 1

AI. N. Itifam v 1 29

Days of marriage. Our day of marriage shall be yours . T. il. of Ver. y 4 172

Name the day of marriage, and God give thee joy . . . Much Ado ii 1 312

I will presently go learn their day of marriage II 2 57

He'll woo a thousand, 'point the day of marriage, Make feasts 7'. of Shrew iii 2 15
Days of nature. Till the foul crimes done in my days of nature Are

burnt and purged away Hamlet I o u

Days of quiet. Grating so handily all his days of quiet With turbulent

and dangerous lunacy ill 1 3

Day of season. I am not a day of season, For thou mayst see a sunshine

and a hail In mo at oncu .Ufa Well v 3 32

Day of success. Thoy mot me In the day of anrcoss . . .V... , ;'. 1 5 i
Day o' the world. O thou day o' the world, Chain mine ann'd neck !

Ant. and Cleo. lv 8 13
Day of trial. Your differenco.H shall all rest under guge Till we assign

you to your days of trial Itichard II. lv 1 106

Be it your charge To keep him safely till his duy of trial . . . iv 1 153
Day of triumph. We have not yet set down this day of triumph 1

JHcAorri ///. ill 4 44
Day of victory. Let us banquet royally, Aftar this golden day of victory

1 Hen VI. 10 31
Day of vlllany. Ami what should poor Jack FalstafTdo In the days of

villany? 1 Hen. IV. Ill 3 187

Day of wrong. I havo scon tho day of wrong through tho little holu of

discretion L. L, Lost v 2 733

Day or two. Pleaso you, deliberate a day or two . . T. O. of Ver. I 8 73

1 pray ymi, Uirry : ]ianso u day or two Iluforu von hnaird Mer. of Venice 111 ! i
H 1 may COUIIMU! you, MOIIIU day or two Your nlghnusH Mhull H>IOHO you

at the Towur Richard UI. Ill I 64

Make pastime with us a day or two, or longer .... Cymbeline III 1 79
Day's journey. 'Twill U> Two long days' journey, lords, or ere we meet

K. John tv 8 ao

You liavo well saved mo a day's Journey .... Coriolanus iv 8 12

Now Is the sun upon thu Itlghmoot hill Of this day's Journey A'.-m. unit Jul. 11 C 10

Marry, air, half a day's Journey Pericles II 1 112

Day's march. From Turn worth thither Is but one day's march Rich. III. v 2

Day's work. Shalt witness live In brass of this day's work . Hen. V. iv 8

Thy heart-blood I will have for this day's work . . .1 Hen. VI. I S

Now have I dono a good day's work Richard III. il 1 i

Now Is my day's work dono ; I '11 take good breath . . Troi. and (Yes. v 8 3
If I should t'-ll thee o'er this thy day's work, Thou'ldst not believe thy

deods Coriolanus t P i

Kvery day Hint cornea conies to decay A day's work In him . Ci/mMiue t & 57

Day to day. From day to day Visit Ihu njwechlesa nick . . L. L. Lost v 2 B6o
To-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty paco from day to day

Macbeth v 5 20

Day-wearied. The old, feeble and day-we&ried sun . . .A'. John v 4 35

Day-woman. She is allowed for the day-woman . . . L. L. Lost I 2 136

Daylight. Wo burn daylight : hero, read, read . . . Mer. Wive$ It 1 54

1 can see a church by daylight Much Ado II 1 86

Thou shall buy this dear, If ever I thy face by daylight aeo M. N. Dream HI 2 427

Shine comforU from the east, That I may back to Athena by daylight . til 2 433
This night mothlnks is but the daylight sick ; It looks a llttlu paler

Mer. of Venice v 1 124

Daylight and chain put n discovers not more . . . . T. Kiyht II 6 174

Alas the tluy, how luuth you aru to oflund daylight t . Troi. and Cia. HI 2 51

lxx-.ks fair daylight out And makes hlmsnlf an uilllklul night Ii. and J. I 1 145

Como, wo burn daylight, ho t Nay, llutl'ti nut HO 1 1 .43

The brightness of her cheek would uhamu thu.su stare, As daylight doth

a lamp li 2 20

Yon light U not day-light. I know It, I : It Is some meteor . . . iii 6 12
When) have f been? Where am I? Fair daylight? I am mightily

abused Lear lv 7 53

Dazzle. I will dazzle all the eyes of France .... Hen V. i 2 279

Dazzle mine eyes, or do I see three suns ? .... 3 Hen. VI. H 1 25
Thy sight is young, And thou shalt read when mine begin to dazzle

T. Andron. lii 2 85
Dazzled. Tts but her picture I liavo yet beheld, And that hath dazzled

my reason's light T. G. of Ver. it 4 210

More dazzled and drove back his enemies Than mid-day sun . 1 Hen. VI. I 1 13
Dazzling. Who dazzling so, that eye shall bo his heed And give him light

that It was blinded by L. L. Lost I 1 82

Dead. If he were that which now he's like, that's dead . . Tempest 11 1 282

The mistress which I serve quickens what's dead lii 1 6

My love to her is dead T. 0. of Ver. ii fl 28

Is Silvia dead ? No, Valentine til 1 209

I grant, sweet love, that I did love a lady ; But she la dead . . . iv 2 106

I likewise hear that Valentine is dead. And so suppose am I . . lv 2 113

She is dead, belike ? Not BO ; I think she lives iv 4 So

Would I might be dead If I in thought felt nut her very Borrow 1 . . iv 4 176

I keep but three men and a boy yet, till my mother be dead . Mer. Wives I 1 785

By gar, Jack Rugby, he Is dead already, if he be come . . . . it 3 8

I)e herring is no dead so as I v ill kill him ii 8 12

Is he dead, my Ethiopian? is he dead, my Francisco? . . . . ii 8 27

Hu ! is he dead, bully stale ? Is he dead ? ii 3 30

I think, if your husbands were dead, you two would marry . . . Ill 2 15

Now shall I sin in my wish : I would thy husband were dead . . ill 3 52

So our decrees, Dead to infliction, to themselves are dead Meas. for Mcas. I S 28

The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept 11 2 90

Ginger was not much in request, for the old women were all dead . . lv S 9

KnU'r In And dwell upon your grave whun you are dead Coin, of Errors lii 1 104

How doth tho lady? Dead, I think Mitch Ado lv 1 114

Your daughter here thu pi Incus I'll fur davd tv 1 204



DEAD



333



DEAD



Dead. I "* her awhile be secretly kept in, And publish it that shr is

doad indeed Much Ado iv 1 206

Go, comfort your cousin : I must say she is dead iv 1 339

And she is (load, slander'd to death oy villains v 1 88

Tho lady is dead upon mine and my master's false accusation . . v 1 249

Almost the copy of my child that's dead v 1 298

Graves, yawn and yield your dead, Till death be uttered, Heavily,

heavily . . . . . . . . , . . . v 3 19

Tho former Hero I Hero that is doad 1 . . . . , . . v 4 65

They swore that you were well-nigh dead for me v 4 81

Tho king your father Dead, for my life I Even so . . L. L. Lost v 2 728

On the ground ! Dead ? or asleep ? M , N. Dream ii 2 101

So should a murderer look, so dead, so grim iii 2 57

Nor is he dead, for aught that I can tell . . . . . . iii 2 76

See me no more, whether he be dead or no iii 2 81

What, should I hurt her, strike her, kill her dead ? iii 2 269

And strike more dead Than common sleep of all these five the sense . iv 1 86
Now am I dead, Now am I fled ; My soul is in the sky . . . . v 1 306
He is but one. Less than an ace, man ; for he is dead ; he is nothing . v 1 314
Asleep, my love ? What, dead, my dove ? O Pyramus, arise I . . v 1 332
Quite dumb ? Dead, dead ? A tomb Must cover thy sweet eyes . . v 1 335

Moonshine and Lion are left to bury the dead v 1 356

Whon the players are all dead, there need none to be blamed. . . v 1 364
Through the house give glimmering light, By the dead and drowsy fire v 1 399
Tell me, is my boy, God rest his soul, alive or dead? . Mcr. of Venice, ii 2 75
1 would my daughter were dead at my foot, aud the jewels in her earl iii 1 92

O, then be bold to say Bassanio's dead ! iii 2 187

Some dear friend dead ; else nothing in tho world Could turn so much

the constitution Of any constant man . . . . . . iii 2 248

If killed, but one dead that is willing to be so . . . As Y. Like It i 2 201

llring him dead or living Within this twelvemonth iii 1 6

It strikes a man more dead than a great reckoning in a little room . iii 8 15
The royal disposition of that beast To prey on nothing that doth seem

as dead . iv 8 119

Wliat's horo? ono doad, or drunk? Soe, doth he breathe? T. of Shrew Ind. 1 31

My fiithor doml, my fortune livos for me 12 192

Moderate lamentation is the right of the doad .... All's \\~dl i 1 65
\Vhnn you mo doad, you Blioula bo such a ono An you aro now . . Iv 2 7

Ho had Hwnni to marry mo Whon his wife's doad Iv 2 72

Whon you havo spoken it, 'tis dead, and I am tho grave of it . . . iv 3 16

You must know, I am supposed dead iv 4 n

Tho nature of his great offence is dead v 8 23

Helen, that's dead, Was a sweet creature v 3 77

Thou didst hate her deadly, And she is dead v 3 118

Upon his many protestations to marry me whon his wife was dead . v 8 140
Dead though she be, she feels her young one kick: So there's my

riddle : one that's dead is quick v 8 303

!< gone. How I gone 1 Is dead. Apollo's angry . . . IK. Tale iii 2 146
Tho quoon, the queen, Tho fiweot'st, dear'st creature's dead . . . iii 2 202
I Hay she's dead ; I'll swear 't. If word nor oath Prevail not, po and soe iii 2 20^
1 have hoard, but not bollovcd, llio spirit* o' Uio dead May walk again . ill 3 16
One lining dmd, I nlinll have morn than you can dream of yot . . iv 4 398
Thou stand till ho bo throo quarters and a dram dead . . . . iv 4 815
Would I were dead, but thai, methinks, already What was ho that did

make it? v 3 62

And mako't manifest where she has lived, Or how stolen from the dead v 3 115
I saw her, As I thought, dead, and have in vain said many A prayer . v 3 140

Or add a royal number to the dead A'. John ii 1 347

He will awake my mercy which lies dead iv 1 26

The fire is dead with grief, Being create for comfort . . . . iv 1 106

Your nnclo must not know hut yon aro doad fv 1 128

The suit which you demand is gone and dead iv 2 84

What! mother dead! How wildly then walks my estate in France ! . iv 2 127

My mother dead I iv 2 181

I ha-1 a mighty cause To wish him dead, but thou hadst none to kill

him iv 2 206

If thou but frown on mo, or ntlr thy foot, Or teach thy hasty spleon to

do inn shame, I'll strike theo dead . iv 3 98

Thoy found him dead and cast into the streets . . . . . v
Conduct me to the king ; I doubt he will be dead or ere I come . . . v

Poison'd, ill fare dead, forsook, cast off v

Lament we may, but not revenge thee doad .... Richard II. i
Thy word is current with him for my death, But dead, thy kingdom

cannot buy my breath i

Is not Gaunt dead, and doth not Hereford live? ii

Well, lords, the Duke of Lancaster is dead. And living too . . . ii

'Tis thought the king is dead ; we will not stay ii

Our countrymen are gone and fled, As well assured Richard their king

is dead ii

For all the Welshmen, hearing thou wert dead, Are gone to Bolingbroko iii

Have I not reason to look pale and dead ? iii

In Bushy, Green, and tho Karl of Wiltshire doftd? Ay, all of them . ill

What, aro thoy doad? Thoy aro lit

Why. bishop, is Norfolk dead? As surely as I llvo, my lord . . . iv
Think 1 am dead and that even here thou takest, As from my death-
bed, thy last living leave v

Though I did wish him dead, I hate the murderer, love him murdered v
Was not he proclaira'd By Richard that dead is the next of blood ?

1 Hen. IV. i

All in England did repute him dead v

'Tis [honour] insensible, then. Yea, to the dead V

This earth that bears thee dead Bears not alive so stout a gentleman . v
I am afraid of this gunpowder Percy, though he be dead . . . v
Did you not tell me this fat man was dead? I did ; I saw him dead . v
And saw thee dead. Didst thou? Lord, Lord, how this world is given

to lying 1 v

Let us to tho highest of the field, To see what friends are living, who

are dead v

Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so

woe-begone 2 Hen,. IV. i

Ending with '* Brother, son, and all are dead * 1

But, for my lord your son, Why, he is dead. See what a ready tongue

suspicion hath I i

Yot, for all this, say not that Percy's dead i

IIu doth sin that doth belie the dead, Not he which says the dead is

not: alivo 1

I rniinnt think, my lord, your son Is dowl . . . . i

Tho rudo scono may ond, And darkness bo the burler of the doad ! . 1
llownowl whoso mare's dead? what's the matter? . . . . \\
\ have received A certain instance that Gloudower is dead . . .ill



1 39

44
7 35
3 58

3 232

1 191

ri



4 17
2 73
2 79

2 141
4 54
1 lot

1 38
6 39

3 146
1 54

1 I4O

4 92
4 124
4 135

4 147
4 165

1 71
1 81



Dead, To see how many of my old acquaintance are dead I 2 lien. IV. Iii 2 38

Is old Double of your town living yet? Dead, sir Ill 2 47

Jesn, Jesu, dead I a 1 drew a good bow ; and dead 1 a' shot a flue shoot . iii 2 48

Dead ! a' would have clapped i' the clout at twelve score . . . iii 2 51

And is old Double dead ? iii 2 58

And noble otlices thou mayst effect Of mediation, after I am dead . iv 4 25
And bid the merry bells ring to thine ear That thou art crowned, not

that I am dead iv 6 113

Thinking you dead, And dead almost, my liege, to think you were . iv 5 156

His cares are now all ended. I hope, not dead v2 4

I'll to the king my master that is dead v 2 40

I '11 bear your cares : Yet weep that Harry's dead v 2 59

What, is the old king dead ? As nail in door v 8 126

The man is dead that you and Pistol beat amongst you . . . . v 4 19

Awake remembrance of these valiant dead .... Hen. V. i 2 115

Boy, bristle thy courage up ; for Falstaff he is dead . . . . ii 8 5
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more ; Or close the wall

up with our English dead iii 1 2

Though we seemed dead, we did but sleep . . . . . . iii 6 126

The organs, though defunct and dead before, Break up their drowsy

grave iv 1 21

That being dead, like to the bullet's grazing, Break out into a second

course of mischief iv 8 105

That we may wander o'er this bloody field To look our dead . . . iv 7 76

Bring me just notice of the numbers dead On both our parts . . . iv 1 122

Now, herald, are the dead number'd? iv 8 78

There lie dead One hundred twenty six iv 8 87

The names of those their nobles that lie dead iv 8 96

Where is the number of our English dead? iv 8 107

Let there be sung ' Nou nobis ' and ' Te Deum ; ' The dead with charity

enclosed in clay iv 8 129

News have I, that my Nell is dead i' the spital Of malady of France . v 1 86

Henry is dead and never shall revive 1 Hen. VI. i 1 18

We'll offer up our arms ; Since arms avail not now that Henry's dead . i 1 47

And none but women loft to wall the dead i 1 51

In memory of her when she is dnad I 23

And the very parings of our nails Hhall pitch a field when wo are dead . Ill 1 103
Docomes It theo to taunt his valiant ago And twit with cowardlco a mail

half dead? HI 2 55

These eyes, that see thee now well coloured, Shall see thee wither'd,

bloody, pale and dead iv 2 38

That, Talbot dead, great York might bear the name . . . . iv 4 9

If he be dead, brave Talbot, then adieu 1 . . * . . i . . . iv 4 45

Fly, to revenge my death when I am dead ? iv 6 30

Forbear I for that which we have fled During the life, let us not wrong

it dead iv 1 50

I come to know what prisoners thou hast ta'en And to survey the

bodies of the dead Iv 7 57

O, that I could but call these dead to life I Iv 7 81

For Hlchard, tho first son's heir, being dead, The Issue of tho next son

should havo rolgn'd 3 Urn. VI. II 2 31

Sleeping or waking, 'tis no matter how, So ho bo dead .:,,,,.. . ill 1 264

But I would have liim dead, my Lord of Suffolk iii 1 273

John Mortimer, which now is dead, In face, in gait, in speech, he doth

resemble iii 1 372

Humphrey being dead, as he shall he, And Henry put apart, the next

for me iii 1 382

Have you dispatch 'd this thing? Ay, my good lord, he's dead . . iii 2 7
Dead in his bed, my lord ; Gloucester is dead. Marry, God forfend I . iii 2 29
Help, lords I the king is dead. Rear up his body ; wring him by the

noso iii 2 33

In the shade of death I shall find joy ; In life but double death, now

Gloucester's dead iii 2 55

That ho is dead, good Warwick, 'tis too true 1112130

To survey his dead and earthy Image, What woro it but to mako my

sorrow greater? Ill 2 147

Who Muds tho helfnr dead and bleeding frosh And snos fast by a butcher

with an axe, But will suspect 'twas ho that made the slaughter? . Hi 2 188
Who finds the partridge in the puttock's nest, But may imagine how

the bird was doad ? ill 2 192

If thou bo found by me, thou art but dead Hi 2 387

I fear me, love, if that I had been dead, Thou wouldest not have

mourn'd so much for me iv 4 23

Oft have I struck Those that I never saw and struck them dead . . iv 7 87

If I do not leave you all as dead as a door-nail iv 10 43

Sword, I will hallow thee for this thy deed, And hang thee o'er my

tomb when I am dead iv 10 73

But is your grace dead, my Lord of Somerset? . . . 8 Hen. VI. i 1 18
Not till King Henry bo dead. Your right depends not on his life or

death , I 2 10

How now I Is ho dead already ? or IB It fear That makes him close his

eyon? I 3 10

And, whilst wo breathe, lake time to do him dead 1 4 108

Would I woro dead 1 If God's good will were so ..'.,' II 6 19

And wheresoo'er he is, ho 's surely dead ii 6 41

WhenCliflbrdcannotsparehisfricndsanoath. I know by that ho 's dead ii 6 79

Ay, but he's dead: olf with tho traitor's head ii 6 85

Why, am I dead ? do I not breatho a man ? Ah, simple men I . . iii 1 82

But were he dead, Yet hero Prince Edward stands iii 3 72

Come quickly, Montague, or I am dead v 2 39

Either heaven with lightning strike the murderer dead I Rirliard III. I 2 64
Say that I slew them not? Why, then they are not dead: But dead

they are i 2 89

I did not kill your husband. Why, then he is alive. Nay, he is dead . i 2 92
Thine eyes, sweet lady, have infected mine. Would they were basil-
isks, to strike thee dead 1 i 2 151

If he were dead, what would betide of me? . . . . "" * J |3

That princely novice was struck dead by thee > : j 4 228

Who knows not that the noble duke is dead ? ' ii 1 79

Who knows not he is dead 1 who knows he is ?. ' J- .' . - ; II 1 81

Is Clarence dead ? the order was reversed ii 1 86

Tell me, good grandam, is our father dead? No, boy . . . ll i

Then, grandam, you conclude that he is dead |i 2 12

Edward, my lord, your son, our king, is dead ii 2 40


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 177 of 522)