John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 179 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 179 of 522)
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Of hair-breadth 'scapes i' the imminent deadly breach . . . Othello i 3 136
It is a deadly sorrow to behold a foul knave uncuckolded Ant. and Cleo. I 2 75
Most poisonous compounds, Which are the movers of a languishing

death ; But though slow, deadly ..... Cymbeline I 6 10

Deadly-handed. The deadly-handed Clifford slow my steed . 2 Hen. VI. v 2 9
Deadly -standing. What signifies my deadly-standing eye? T. Andron. ii 3 32
Deaf. You have a quick ear. Ay, I would I were deaf . T. G. of Ver. iv 2
My dull deaf ears a little use to hear ..... Com. of Errors v

What cracker is this same that doafs our cars? .. . . A". John ii

Tho sea nnrngod Is not half HO deaf, Lions moro confident . . .11
Full ofirn, In ragn ilnnf an tho HOO, hasty rvn flro . . . Ricltard II. I
And bid his oars a little whMn bo deaf, Till I have told this Rlnmlor . i
Tell him lam deaf. You niimtspnak louder ; my master iwdeaf 27/e. IV. 1 2 77
Art tlion, like tho addor, waxen deaf 7 .... 2 Hen. VI. iil 2 76

To tell my love unto his dumb deaf trunk ...... iii 2 144

Wrath makes him deaf ........ 3 Hen. VI. i 4 53

Have ears more deaf than adders to the voice Of any true decision

Troi. and Cres. ii 2 172
The gods are deaf to hot and peevish vows
Peace is a very apoplexy, lethargy ; mulled, deaf, sleepy
The woods are ruthless, dreadful, deaf, and dull . .
Bo not obdurate, open thy deaf ears . . . - . .
Were his heart Almost impregnable, his old ears doaf, Yet should both

ear and heart obey my tongue . . . . . . . . iv 4 98

Why dost not speak ? what, deaf? not a word ? ..... v 1 46

The unruly spleen Of Tybalt deaf to peace . . . Rom. and Jul. iii 1 163

1 will be deaf to pleading and excuses ....... iii 1 197

O, that men's ears should be To counsel deaf, but not to flattery 1

T. of Athens i 2 257

Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf J. Casar i 2 213

Infected minds To their deaf pillows will discharge their secrets Macbeth v 1 81

Bo deaf to my unpitiml folly, And all tho gods go with you t Ant. and Cleo. i 8 98

Deafd with tho clamours of their own dear groans . . . L, L. Lout v 2 874

Deafened. Make a battery through hte dnatbn'd parts . . Pericles v 1 47

Deafening. With doaronlng clamour ..... 2 Hen. IV. iii 1 24

O, B till Thy dimfnnlng. drmilful thumlnrs I .... J'criclcs lit 1 5

Deafness. Your tale, sir. would euro doafnosa .... TetApett i 2 106

I have read the cause or his effects in Galon : it Is a kind of deafness

2 Hen. IV. i 2 134



64
316
147
451

19
112



v 8 16

.Coriolanus iv 6 239
.T. Andron. it 1 128
it 3 160



DEAL



336



DEAR



Deal. Ami deal in her command without hor power . . . r. .,-,. -,t v 1 271

I will lm oii'Mi I'.I^M to 'li .il Will) poison Mfi . ll'ivc* 13 liu

It. I I ! u h I I !< i liiillH,; I I, .HI u j;i i-iit tli-til uf lnun I limtk . . . , V U 1 1
I will dual In UilH AM swiutly und Justly us ) uui auul tthould with yuur

body Muck Ailo iv 1 249

< 'Him', 'IK jut iiiiiiln : Do nut you meddle ; lut inu di'nl In thin . . V 1 101
i mil Linn ,.|ic;ika ;ui luliiiiio deal of mH lung, more tlum any mini In all

Venice Mer. of Venice 1 1 114

I will il r.il in (Kiisim with thee, or In lust imtdo, or in steel As Y. Like It v 1 59
That like a father you will dual witli him T. of Shrew iv 4 44

The fellow has a deal of that too much All's Weil iii 2 92

And for a week escape a great deal of discoveries iii 6 100

Let it be forbid, sir ; so should I be a great deal of his act . . . iv 8 55

Hut greater a great deal In evil iv 3 321

(>, what a deal of acorn looks beautiful In the contempt and auger of his

lip I T. Kiyht Iii 1 157

Wo must deal gently with him Iii 4 106

You pay a great dual too dear for what's given freely . . I!'. Tale i 1 18
Hucli a doat of woudor Is broken out within this hour . . . . V 2 26
We cannot deal but with the very hand Of stern injustice . A'. John v 2 22
What a deal of world I wander from the jewels that 1 lovo . Richard U, 1 3 269
Deal mildly with his youth ; For young hot colts being raged do rage

the moro li 1 69

What a candy deal of courtesy This fawning greyhound then did proffer

me I 1 Hen. IV. \ 8 251

A weasel hath not such a dual of spleen As you are toss'd with . . il S 81
Hut one hair-pennyworth of bread lo this intolerable deal of sack 1 .1.1 59*
Hucli a dual of Hklmblo-ukuiublu stnir Aa puts mo from my faith . . iii 1 154
Out Of ft great deal of old Iron 1 chose forth .... 1 Hen. VI. 1 2 101
lint God in mercy no deal with my soul, As I In duty love my king and

country ! . . \ 2 Hen. VI. 1 S 160

I am never able to deal with my master, he hatli learnt ao much fence

already ii 3 78

I will deal with him That henceforth he shall trouble us no more . . iii 1 323
And doubt not so to deal As all things Khali redound unto your good . iv 46
And, for I should not deal in bur soft laws, 81m did corrupt frail nature

with some bribe 3 lien. VI. lil 2 154

Foes to my rest and my sweet sleep's disturbers Are they that I would

havo 1 1" < diral upon Richard III. iv 2 ?-,

Men shall dual unadvisedly sometimes iv 4 29 j

So deal with him as 1 prove true to you . iv 4 4.^

Ho privily Duals with our cardinal Hen. Vlll. I 1 184

A great dual of your wit, too, lies in your alnewa . . Trui. ami Cm. 11 1 tod
A lit! I" proudly, and a (.'real d<ml misprizing The knight opjwsod . . Iv 6 74
A vury llttlu thief of oci union will rub yuu of a gruat deal of jtatloiico

( 'ortWunuj 11 1 33
To weep with them that wocp doth ease some deal . . T. AnJrvn. Ill 1 245

bhow me a murderer, I '11 deal with him v 2 93

What a dual of brine Hath wash'd thy willow cheeks I . Rom. und Jul. if 8 69
Therefore, If you should deal double with her, truly It wore an 111 tiling 11 4 178
Metliiuks, I could deal kingdoms to my friends, And ne'er be weary

T. oSAtheiul 2 226

And undo a great dual of honour iii 2 5 i

As rich men deal gifts, Expecting In return twenty for one . . . iv 3 516
And uttered such a dual of slinking breath ... J. Caaar 1 2 247

Hut God above Deal between thco and me 1 .... Alucbeth Iv 8 121
Is it a fain visitation ? Conm, deal justly with me . . . Hamlet ii 2 284
And put upon him such a deal of man, That worth led him . . Lear 11 2 137

Let us dual justly ill 43

That I am wretched Makes tlu-o the happier : heavens, deal so still I . Iv 1 69

Thou away she started To deal with grief alono Iv 3 34

To deal plainly, I feitr I iim not iii my ]>] i, ri mind . . . . Iv 7 62
Words him, I doubt not, a great deal from the matter . . Cymbeline i 4 17
You are a great deal abused in too bold a jMirsuasioti . . . .14 124
Live, And deal with othurs better. Nobly dooin'd 1 . . . . v 6 420
What a man cannot got, ho may lawfully deal for his wife's soul J'crida il 1 121
Have you that a man may deal withal, and defy the surgeon ? . . iv 6 29
Dealer. Thou didst conclude hairy men plain dealers without wit

Com. of Error* II 2 88

Doalest. I do not find that thou dealest justly with mo . . Othello Iv 2 173
Donllng. In plain dealing, 1'ompoy, I shall havo you \vbipt Mai*, for Alea*. 11 1 264

If tlie duke avouch thu justice of your dealing Iv 2 201

What HITS. i Christians are, Whose own hard dealings tenches them

mispect Thu thoughU of others ! .... Mer. of Venice 1 8 163
Wore my worth 03 Is my conscience linn, You should llnd butler dealing

T. Xi$ht ill 8 18

There la no honesty In such dealing 2 lien. IV. il 1 40

Dealing with witched and with conjurors 2 Hen. VI. ii 1 172

This is close dealing li 4 73

The benefit thereof is always granted To those whoso dealings havo

deserved the place Richard III. ill 1 49

All will come to nought, When such bad dealing must bo scon iu thought III 6 14
Out with It boldly : truth loves open dealing . . . Hen. VIII. iii 1 39

lx>, Jupiter Is yonder, dealing life 1 Troi. and Cra. iv 6 191

And very weak dealing Rom. and Jul. 11 4 181

Alack, alack, Edmund, I like not this unnatural dealing . . /.ear iii 3 2
And kuowsall qualities, with a learned spirit, Of human dealings Othello iii 8 260
Dealt. I come, to learn how you have dealt for him ... A'. John v 2 121
I never dealt better since I was a man ; all would not do . 1 Hen. IV. \\ 4 188
Marriage is a matter of more worth Than to be dealt in by attorneyship

1 Hen. VI. v 5 56
Urge neither charity nor shame to me : Uncharitably with me have you

dealt Richard III. i 8 275

They have dealt with me like thieves of mercy . . . Hamlet iv 6 20
I protest, I have dealt most directly in thy atl'air . . . Othello iv 2 211
Dealt ou lieutenantry, and no practice had In the brave squares of war

Ant. and Cleu. ill 11 39

Mi" nobleman would have dealt with hor like a nobleman . 1'erwles iv 6 147
Deanery. At the deanery, where a priest attends, Straight marry her

Mer. Wives iv 6 31

Take her by the hand, away with her to the deanery . . . . v 3 3
She is now with the doctor at the deanery, and there married . . v 5 216
Dear, they durst not, So dear the love my people bore me . Tempest i 2 140
To one so dear, Of such divine perfection . . . . T. G. of Par. ii 7 12
I hold your dainties chnap, sir, and your welcome dear . Com. of Errors iii 1 21
You shall buy this sport as dear As all the metal in your shop will

answer iv 1 81

Is it possible that any villany should be so dear? . . . Much Ado iii 3 118
As prodigal of all dear graco As Nature was in making graces dear

L. L, Lust ii 1 10



Dear. I never knew man hold vile stulf so dear . . . L. L. /.<*( iv 8 276
Ami then the king will court theo fur bis dear ..... v 'J 131

llo swore that hu did bold me diuir A.t precious eyesight . . . v li , M
And I ..'! HI run, 1 thank him, Is my di-ar ...... v 2 457

My lover dear 1 ihy Thlsby dtuir, and ludy dtyir I . M, N. Dream I 2 55

In thy eye that shall appear Wlwn thou wakost, It Is thy dour . . li 2 33
For my sake, my dear, Lie further oft' yet ...... 11243

Odours savours sweet : Ho hath thy breath, my dearest Tbisby dear . iii 1 87
With sighs of love, that costs the fresh blood dear ..... lit 2 97



Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it dear ........ iii 2 175

Hi 2 176



es, o y er, ou ay ear
Ix>ok, where thy love comes ; yonder is thy dear

Thou shalt buy this dear, If ever I thy face by daylight see . . . iii 2 426
How can it be '( O dainty duck I O dear I ...... v 1 286

Since lion vile hath here deflower'd my dear ...... v 1 297

Your worth is very dear in my regard .... Alcr. qf Venice 1 1 62

Since you are dear bought, I will love you dear ..... iii 2 315

I am married to a wife Which is as dear to mo as life itself . . . iv 1 283
As secret and as dear As Anna to the queen of Carthage was T. of Shrew i 1 158
Youngling, thou canst not love BO dear as I ...... 11 1 339

While you, sweet dear, prove mistress of my heart I . . . . iv 2 10

A cmmsellor, a traitress, and a dear ...... All's Well i 1 184

lie bade me store up, as a triple eye, Safer than mine own two, more

dear . . .......... ii 1 112

Thy life is dear , for all that life can rate Worth name of life in thue hath

estimate ............ 11 1 182

To buy his will, it would not seem too dear, Howu'er repented after . iii 7 27
Qivu me that ring. I'll lend it thoo, my dear ...... Iv 2 40

Time was, I did him a desired olllce, I >< .u almost as his life . . . lv 4 6
Praising what is lost Makes the romombitincu dear . . . . . v 8 20

I have been dear to him, lad, Home two thousand strong, or BO T. Kiijht iii 2 58
If I bo lapsed in this place, I shall i*ay dear ..... lit 8 37

Whom thou, in terms BO bloody ana so dear, Hast made thine unumios v 1 74
You pay a great deal too dear for what's given freely . . M'. Tale i 1 18
Let what is dear in Sicily be cheap ........ i 2 175

But shall 1 go mourn for that, my dear? ....... iv 8 15

Golden quoifs and stomachers, For my lads to give their dears . . lv 4 227
Will you buy any tape, Or lace for your ca|>c, My dainty duck, my

duar-a? ............. iv 4 324

Yet sell your face for live jwuco and 'tis dear . . ' . . K. John 1 1 153
Thy uncle will As dear IK> to thue as thy father WRH . . . . ill 8 *

What thy soul holds door, Imagine it To lie that way thou go'st Richard 11. i 8 286
Ho loves you, un my life, and holds you dear ...... li 1 144

The cheapest of us is ten groats too dear ....... v 6 68

Hero Is a dear, a truo industrious filund ..... 1 Hen. IV. 1 1 62

The Lord of Hlanunl dear to-day hath bought Thy llkonesu . . . v 8 7
A borrow'd title hust thou bought loo dear ...... v 8 23

1 liad forcstuU'd this dear and deep rebuke ... 2 Hen. IV. lv 6 141
Whon flesh is cheap and females dear, And lusty lads roam hero and

there ............. v82o

God forbid, my dear and faithful lord, That you should . . lint. V. i 2 13
Bull every man his life as dear as mine, And they shall llnd dear deer of

us ........... 1 lien. VI. lv 2 53

And bought his climbing very dear ...... 2 Hen. VI. il 1 100

If hu revenge it not, yet will his friends ; So will the queen, that living

hold him dear ........... lv 1 147

Ah 1 uan eta majesUs. who would not buy thco dear? . . . . y 1 5

He loves me, and ho holds mo dear : Go you to him from me Richard III. 1 4 239
Who, as thou know'st, are dear To princely It ic hard and to Buckingham iii 2 69
I hold my life AS dear as you do yours ....... Ill I 80

So dear I loved the man, that I must weep ...... ill 6 24

I know your majesty lias always loved her So dear in heart Hen. Vlll. li 2 in
She now begs, That little thought, when she sot footing horo, She should

have bought hor d ignition so dear ....... iii 1 184

Let heaven Witness, how dear I bold this confirmation . . . . v 3 174

Loss of time, travail, expense, Wounds, friends, and what else dear

Troi. and Ores, ii 2 5
Every tithe soul, 'mongst many thousand dismes, Hath been as dear as

Helen .- ............ ij 2 20

Troy holds him very dear .......... iii 8 19

Nature, what things there arc Most abject in regard and dear In uso I

What lldngs again most <luar in theosUom And pour in worth t . ill 8 128
Dear, trouble not yourself: the morn in cold ...... lv 2 i

l.ifo every man holds dear ; but the brave man Holds honour fur moro

precious-dear than life ......... 827

They think wo ore too dear ....... Goriolanu* 1 1 20

Kaeli in my love alike and nono less dear ....... i 3 25

That kiss I carried from thee, dear ........ v 3 47

If thy sous were over dear to Uice, O, think my sou to be as dear to me !

T, Andron. 1 1 107
Purchased at an easy price ; And yet dear too, because I bought mine

own ............. iii 1 200

My noble aunt Loves me as dear as o'er my mother did . . . . iv 1 23

And that moro dear Than hands or tongue, her spotless chastity . . v 2 176
Heauty too rich for use, for earth too dear I ... Rum. and Jul. I 5 49
Ruinoo 1 My dear? At what o'clock to-morrow Shall I send to thee? . ii 2 168
Is Itosalino, whom thou didst love so dear, So soon forsaken? . . ii 8 66

God's lady dear 1 Are you so hot? .... ... li 6 63

A.s tlrnr to mo as are the ruddy drops That visit my sad heart /. Caxar 11 1 289
My thanks are too dear a halfpenny ...... Hamlet ii 2 282

And by what more dear a butter proposer could charge you withal . il 2 296
For tbou dost know, O Damon dear, This realm dismantled was . . iii 2 292
Ijiertes, was your father dear to you ? ....... iv 7 108

Three of the carriages, iii faith, are very dear to fancy . . . . v 2 159

When she was dear to us, we did hold her so ; Hut now her price b fall'n

J.ear i 1 199
His breeches cost him but a crown ; He held them sixpence all too dear

Othello 11 8 94
Minion, your dear liea dead, And your unblest fate hies . . . . v 1 33

Uncle, I must come forth. If thou attempt it, it will cost thee dear . v 2 255
The merchandise which thou hast brought from Rome Are all too dear

for me ..... ..... Ant. and Cleo. li 5 105

Welcome to Rome ; Nothing more dear tome . . . . . . ill 6 86

Cold-hearted toward me ? Ah dear, if I be so ...... iii 13 158

1 dare not, dear Dear my lord, pardon, I dare not, Lest I bo taken . iv 15 21
But he does buy my injuries, to be friends ; Pays dear for my offences

Cymbeline i 1 106
I will wage against your gold, gold to it : my ring I hold dear as my

linger ............. I 4 145

That's more Than some, whoso tailors are as dear as yours, Can justly

boast ............. it 8 84



DEAR



337



DEAR OFFENCE



Dear. For Imogen's dear life take mine ; and though 'Tis not BO dear, yet

'tis a life Cymbeline v 4 22

And yet the end of all is bought thus dear, The breath is gone, and the

sore eyes see clear Pericles i 1 98

I have one myself. Who shall not be more dear to my respect Than yours iii 3 33
Whither wilt thou have me? To take from you the jewel you hold so

dear iv 6 165

A baboon, could he speak, Would own a name too dear . . . . iv 6 190

Dear boy /,. L. last 1 2 ; K. John iii 1 ; 1 Hen. VI. iv o

Dear brother 7'. Night ill 4 ; 8 Hen. VI. Iii 8 ; Richard III. II 1 ; Hen. VIII.

v 4 ; J. Ccesar iv 3 ; Hamlet I 2
Dear cousin Hen. V. iv 6 ; Richard HI. ii 2 ; Iii 1

Dear daughter /.ear ii 4 156 ; iv 6 193

Dear father Tempest I 2 ; iii 1 ; T. of Shrew v 1 ; All's Well ii 1 ; 2 Hen. IV.

Iv 6 ; 2 Hen. VI. v 2 ; T. Andron. I 1 ; Rom. and Jnl. iv 1 ; Hamlet

1 6 ; ii 2 ; iv 5 ; Lear ii 4 ; iv 4 ; Iv 7

Dear knight T. Night i 3 95 ; ii 3 156

Dear lady Tempest i 2 ; Much Ado i 1 ; /,. L. Last ii 1 ; Mer. of Venice

iii 2 ; v 1 ; T. Night iii 1 ; Hamlet ii 2 ; Ant. and Cleo. II 8 ; v 2 ;

Cymbeline i 1

Dear liege L. L. Lost i 1 34 ; Hen. V. i 2 130

Dear lord Meas. for Meas. v 1 ; All's Well i 8 ; Richard II.il; 12;

2 Hen. IV. iii 1 ; Hen. V. iv 8 ; 1 Hen. VI. iv 7 ; Richard III. 112; iv 1 ;
Trai. and Cm. ii 3 ; Iii 1 ; T. of Athens I 1 ; ill 4 ; Hamlet ii 2 ; Lear
il 4 ; Othello I 3 ; CymMlne iii

Dear madam T. G. of Ver. i 2 ; Richard III. Iv 1 ; Ant. and Cleo. ill 6 ;

iv 15

Dear master . . . . As Y. Like It ii 11 i ; Ant. and Cleo. iv 14 89
Di>ar mother All's Well v 8 ; K. John v 2 ; Richard III. ii 2 ; Coriolanus

v 3 ; Hamlet iv 8

Dear my lord Much. Ado iv 1 ; Hen. V. Iv 6 ; Troi. and Cres. iii 3 ; J.
Cirsnr ii 1 ; Hamlet iii 3 ; l^ear v 1 ; Othello iii 3 ; A. and C. iv 15

Dear niece At Y. Like It v 4 153 ; T. Andron. ill 1 138

1 (par princess L. L. Lost ii 1 150 ; Lear Iv 7 29

Uear queen W. Tale v 3 ; Troi. and Cres. Iii 1 ; Ant. and Cleo. i 6 ;

lit 1 1 ; v 2

Dear sir fleas, for Meas. Ill 1 ; Mer. of Venice Iv 1 ; y(' Well II 1 ; II'.
Tale \v t; K. John i 1 ; Troi. atul Cres. v 8 ; Lear i 1 ; Cymbdine 1

Dear sister Hamlet I 8 33 ; tear iii 7 13

Dear son Temfest v 1 ; Jlfudiyttto il 1 ; All's Well ill 4 ; T. Andron. I 1 ;

III 1 ; Rom. and Jul. Iii 3 ; l*ar iv 1 ; Cvmbeline ii 3
Dear sovereign As Y. Like It i 3 ; All's Well v 3 ; T. Andron. Ii 3

Dear uncle As Y. Like It i 3 52 ; Hen. V. iii 8 54

Dear a loss. Was never widow had so dear a loss ! . . Richard III. ii 2 77
Dear a lover. How dear a lover of my lord your husband Mer. of Venice iii 4 7
Dear a show. I should not make so dear a show of zeal . . 1 Hen. IV. v 4 95
Dear a trust. Nor did he think it meet To lay so dangerous and dear a

trust On any soul removed iv 1 34

Dear abide. If it be found so, some will dear abide it . J. C(vsar iii 2119

Dear absonco. And I a heavy interim shall support By his dear absence

Othello i 8 260
Dear account. Clandlo shall render me a dear account . . Much. Ado Iv I 337

Uj>oti remainder of a dear account Richard II. \ 1 130

O dear account ! my life Is my foe's debt .... Rom. and Jul. 16 120
Dear actors. And, most dear actors, eat no onions . . M. N. Dream iv 2 43

Dear alliance. In love and dear alliance Hen. K. v 2 373

Dear amity. Wo swore to you Dear amity K. John v 4 20

Dear-beloved. To see the nuptial Of these our dear-beloved solemnized

Tempest v 1 309

Dear blood. With that dear blood which it hath fostered . Richard II. I 8 126
I'll empty all those veins, And shed my dear blood drop by drop

1 Hen. IV. I 3 134

By Christ's dejir blood shed for our grievous sins . . Richard 111. i 4 195
He slew Mercutio : Who now the price of his dear blood doth owe?

Ram. and Jul. Ill 1 188
Dear bought. Since you are dear bought, I will love you dear

Mer. of Venice 111 2 315

With his new bride and England's dear-bought queen . . 2 Hen VI. i 1 253
Dear Brutus. The fault, dear Brutus, Is not In oui-stars, But In'ourselves

J. Ca'Sar t 2 140
Dear Oeesar. Hall, Caesar, and my lord I lull, most dear Ceesar I

Ant. and Cleo. Ill 39
Dear care. In their dear care And tender preservation of our person

Hen. V. 11 2 58
Dear cause. Their dear causes Would to the bleeding and the grim alarm

Excite the mortified man Macbeth v 2 3

Some dear cause Will in concealment wrap me up awhile . . Lear iv 8 53
Dear oonoernlnga. Would from a paddock, from a bat, a gib, Such dear

concernings hide Hamlet iii 4 191

Dear conjunction. And this dear conjunction Plant neighbourhood and

Christian-like accord Hen. V. v 2 380

Dear countryman. Then forth, dear countrymen II 2 189

Dear countryman, Bring In thy ranks, but leave without thy rage

7'. of Athens v 4 38
Know we this face or no? Alas, my friend and my dear countryman I

Othello v 1 89
Dear creature. Teach me, dear creature, how to think and speak

Com. of Errors iii 2 33

Dear daughter. Your most dear daughter No rescue? . . Lear iv 6 193
Dear deer. Sell every man his life as dear as mine, And they shall dud

dear deer of us ' 1 Hen. VI. iv 2 54

Dear degree. How canst thou urge God's dreadful law to us, When thou

hast broke It in so dear degree? Richard III. I 4 215

Dear discretion. O dear discretion, how his words are suited I

Mer. of Venice iii G 70

Dear divorce Twist natural son and sire ! . . . T. of Athens Iv 3 382

Dear Duff, I prithee, contradict thyself, And say It is not so . Macbeth il 3 94
Dear earth, I do salute thee with my hand . . . Richard II. iii 2 6
Dear employment. A ring that I must use In dear employment

Rom. and Jul. V 3 32
Dear encounter. Let rich music's tongue Unfold the imagined happiness

that both Receive in either by this dear encounter . . . . Ii 6 29
Dear eille. The sly slow hours shall not determinate The dateless limit

of thy dear exile ... Richard II. I 8 151

Dear expedience. Our council did decree In forwarding this dear

expedience 1 Hen. IV. I 1 33

Dear expense. If I hove thanks. It is a dear expense . M. N. Dream I 1 249
Dear faith. Surprise hor with discourse of my dear fnlth . 7'. NigM I 4 25
Dear friend. Thy case, dear friend, ShnM be my precedent . Tempest II 1 290

There is a gentleman my dear friend Mer. Wires 111 9 129

2 P



Dear friend. Hath he not. lost much wealth by wreck of sea? Buried

some dear friend ? Com. of Errors v 1 50

That have gone about To link my dear friend to a common stale Much Ado iv 1 66
The death of a dear friend would go near to make a man look sad

M . N. Dream v 1 293
Some dear friend dead ; else nothing in the world Could turn so much

the constitution Of any constant man . . . Mer. of Venice iii 2 248

I have engaged myself to a dear friend Iii 2 264

Is it your dear friend that is thus in trouble? 1112293

Even he that did uphold the very life Of my dear friend . . . v 1 215
Arthur ta'en prisoner? divers dear friends slain? . . . A'. John ill 4 7
Letters came last night To a dear friend of the good Duke of York's

Richard II. ill 4 70
Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more . . Hen. V. ill 1 i

He is my dear friend, an please you Iv 7 174

Shall grow dear friends And interjoin their issues . . Coriolanui iv 4 21
Oft have I digg'd up dead men from their graves, And set them upright

at their dear friends' doors T. Andron. v 1 136

Speak, Rome's dear friend, as erst our ancestor v 8 80

If there beany in this assembly, any dear friend of Csesar's . J. Crnar iii 2 19
I drink to the general joy o' the whole table, And to our dear friend

Banquo, whom we miss Macbeth iii 4 90

Sure, dear friends, my thanks are too dear a halfpenny . . Hamlet ii 2 281
He that lies slain here, Cusslo, Was my dear friend . . . Othello v 1 102

)ear general, I never gave you cause v 2 299

)ear gentlewoman, How fares our gracious lady? . . . W. Tale il 2 20

3ear God. Withhold revenge, dear God ! 'tis not my fault 3 Hen. VI. ii 2 7

Be satisfied, dear God, with our true blood . . . Richard III. iii 3 21

Cancel his bond of life, dear God, I pray iv 4 77

)ear goddess. Hear, nature, hear ; dear goddess, hear ! . . . Lear i 4 297
Dear goddess, hear that prayer of the people I . . Ant. and Cleo. i 2 73

Dear good will. Thou art not ignorant what dear good will I bear

T. G. of Ver. iv 8 14
)ear grace. Be now as prodigal of all dear grace As Nature wns In


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 179 of 522)