John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 201 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 201 of 522)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


i MI, pui IMMKH i i.d Justly hath .1 nr, ,\ , , d ; And I inponl my fault Hen. V. II 2

Uy your iiHpluls worn discovered Two mightier troojw . 1 Hen. VI. Iv 8
What good is covor'd with Hie fucu of heaven, To be dlscovur'd, that can

iKiiiuiffomlr liirhnrd UI. Iv 4

Most wisely buth Ulysses here discover'd The fever whereof all our

power is sick Troi. and Cres. i 8

wondrous thing ! How easily murder Is discovered ! . T. Andron. ii 8
And here display, at last, What God will havo discover'd for rovenge . iv 1
Pardon me, And not impute this yielding to light love, Which the dark

night hath so discovered limn, and Jul. H 2

Thou hast painfully discover'd : are his liles As full as thy ir|>i l '

T. of Athens v 2

1 fear our pur|>ose is discovered J. Ctesar iii 1

And swore, If 1 discover'd not which way she was gone, U was my

Instant death t'ymbelint v &

Where what is donu In action, more, If might, Shall IHJ dlscovorM

I'ericles v Oower
Discoverer, bend discoverers forth To know tho numbers of our enemies

2 Hen. IV. iv 1

Discoveries. Pretending in her discoveries of dishonour Meas. for Meas. iii 1
He will steal himself into a man's favour and for a wet-k escape a great

deal ofdiscoveries All > Well iii ti

Take and take again such preposterous discoveries ! . Troi. and Cres. v 1

Discovery. That oven Ambition cannot pierce a wink beyond, Hut doubt

discovery there ......... Tetnycst ii 1

Do it so cunningly That my discovery be not aimed at . T. (1. vf Ver. iii 1

Tin an ofHce of discovery Mer. of Venice ii 6

One inch of delay more is a South-sea of discovery . . As Y. Like It iii 2
The heavens have thought well on thee, Ijifeu, To bring forth this

discovery All's Well v 3

For myself, 1 'II put My fortunes to your service, which are here Uy this

discovery lost W. Talc i 2

Never did faithful subject more rejulce At the discovery of most

dangerous treason Hen. V. ii 2

Uy tho discovery We shall be shortvn'd in our aim . . . t'uriolnntts i 2
So secret and so close, So far from sounding and discovery Hom. and Jul. i 1
A discovery of the infinite flatteries that follow youth and ojuilency

7 .'/Athens v I
Thereby shall we shadow Tho numbers of our host and make discovery

Krr in report of us Macbeth v 4

I will tell you why ; so sliall my anticipation prevent your discovery

H'nnl.t ii 2
Here Is tho guess of their true strength nnd forces Hy diligent discovery

Amr v I

Discredit. Ho will discredit our mystery . . . .Mcaa.fur Mat*, iv 2
It wuuld not huvo relished among my other discredit* . . W. Ttde v 2
As patches set upon a little breach Discredit more in hiding of the fault

Than did tho fault beforo it was so patch'd . . A'. John iv 2

To weakoii and discredit our exposure .... Troi. and Cres. i 8

It would discredit the blest gods, proud man, To answer such a question iv 5

Did he not nithor Discredit my authority with yours? . Ant. and Cleo. ii 2

Discredited. Which I by my good leisure have discredited to him

Metis, fur Metis, iii l!
Which not to have been blest withal would have discredited your travel

Ant. und Cleo. i 2
Discreet. Nor no railing In a known discreet man . . . T. Xiyht i 5

With .such a smooth, discreet and stable bearing iv 3

lli.vds no bate with telling of discreet stories . . . .2 Hen. IV. n l
You that will be less fearful than discreet . . . Coriulunus iii 1
A madness most discreet, A choking gall and a preserving sweet

i;< ->n. and Jul. i 1

That then necessity Will call discreet proceeding .... Lear i 4
Will she love him still for prating? let not thy discreet heart think it

Othello ii 1

Discreetly. We will afterwards ork \\\*ni the cause with as great dis-
creetly as we can Mer. Wives i 1

1 advise You use your manners discreetly in all kind of companies

T. of Shrew I 1

Discretion. I will not adventure my discretion so weakly . Tetiijxst ii 1
A youth That can with some discretion do my busings . T. <:. of Ver. iv 4
Which ]>entdvGnture prings goot discretions with it . . Mer. Wires i 1

it is a fery discretion answer i 1

Old folks, you know, have discretion, as they say, and know tho world ii 2
"l'is our of the IM - .L discretions of a 'oman as over 1 did look u|m . . iv 4
Nor do I think tho man of safe discretion That does allect it Mean, fur Mats, i 1
Avoids them uith great discretion, or undertakes them with a most

Christian-like fear Much Ado ii 3

Thou halfpenny purse of wit, thou pigeon-egg of discretion . L. L. Lost v 1
I have seen the day of wrong through the little hole of discretion . . v 2
They would have no more discretion but to hang us . M. A". Itwin i 2
A very fox fur Ids valour. True ; and a goose for his discretion . . v 1



98
95
130



i \t
5>



38
287
74



i

ICO

28

'43
45
43

207

'5'
44'
162

22
1 5 6

37

6

35

5J
3
'33

33
"95
*47

49



161

">3

'9

272



'99
=33

227
48



7"


'35



7B
734



IMSOUKTION



1 206

2 5

1 ,, 7

2 489

2 ,9

4 151

3 3
3 34
7 ii

3 5
3 104

5 2



: 2 65

1 37

is

1 20

2 112

4 162

1 121



Discretion. His vnluur cannot carry his discretion . . M. N. J) remit v 337

Ills discretion, I am sure, cannot carry his valour v 339

I .leave it to his discretion, and let us listen to the moon . v 241

It appears, by his small light of discretion, that he is in tlio wane. . y 257

dear discretion, how his words are suited I . . . Mcr. of Venice ill 70
Therefore use thy discretion ; I had as lief thou didst break his neck

As Y. Like It I 152

The bettor part of valour is discretion 1 Hen. IV. v 121

Covering discretion with a coat of folly Hen. V. il 38

You do not use me with that aflability an in discretion you ought to

uso me iii 2 139

Your discretions betler can persuade Than I am able to instruct

1 77eu. VI. iv 1 158
All this was oider'd by the good discretion Of the right reverend

Cardinal of York He,n. VIII. \ \ 50

Was it discretion, lords, to let this man, This good man, few of you

deserve that title, This honest man, wait like a lousy footboy At

chamber-door? v 3 137

His valour is crushed into folly, his folly sauced with discretion

Troi. and Crcs. i 2 24
Have you any discretion? have yon any eyes? do you know what a

man is ? . . . . . . , . . . . . , i

Though abundantly they lack discretion, Yet are they passing cowardly

Yd so far hath discretion fought, with imtnro .... Hamlet i
11, is common for tho younger sort To lack discretion . . . .11

Well spoken, with good accent and good discretion ii

Bo not too tamo neither, but lot your own discretion bo your tutor . iii
You should be ruled and led By sonin discretion .... Lear ii
Let's leach ourselves that honourable stop, Not to outsport discretion

Othello ii

Well, do your discretion iii

It raises the greater war between him and his discretion Ant. o,nd Clco. ii

Well, I perceive ho was a wise fellow, ami had good discretion Pericles i

Discuss. I will discuss the humour of this love to Page . . Mer. Wives i

Speak, breathe, discuss ; brief, short, quick, snap iv

Til' atliversary, you may discuss unto the duke, look yon, is digt him-
self four yard under the countermines .... Hen. V. iii
Discuss unto me ; art thou ofllcer? Or art thou base, common ? . . iv
Art thou a gentleman? what is thy name? discuss ....

Discuss the samn in French unto him iv

Disdain. Barren hate, Sour-eyed disdain and discord . . Tempest iv
Trampling contemptuously on thy disdain T. G. of Ver. \

Growing proud, Disdain to root the summer-swelling flower . . . ii
I'll knock elsewhere, to see if they'll disdain me . . Com. of Errors iii
What, my dear Lady Disdain ! are you yet living? . . . Much Ado i
Is it possible disdain should die while sho hath such meet food to

feed It? i 1 i2!

Cum trsy itself must convert to disdain, if you come in her presnneo . 1 1 123
Disdain ami scorn rido Hparkllng In her eyes, Misprising what they

look on iii 1 51

The red glow of scorn and proud disdain . . . . As Y. Like It iii 4 57
To nmkn a bondmaid and a slave of me ; That I disdain . T. of Shrew ii 1 3
Whose apprehensive senses All but now things disdain . . All's Well i 2 61

Disdain Itather corrupt me ever ! ii 3 122

Believe not thy disdain ii 3 166

Nature might have made me as these are, Therefore I will not disdain

W. Tale iv 4 774

Pride, haughtiness, opinion and disdain .... 1 Hen. IV. iii 1 185
Holding In disdain tho German women For some dishonest manners of

their life Hen. V. \ 2 48

It shall be so, disdain they ne'er so much 1 Hen. VI. v 3 98

The false revolting Normans thorough tlu-o Disdain to call us lord

2 Hen. VI. iv 1 88
Kxempt from nnvy, but not from disdain .... 8 Hen. VI. ill !) 127

Tlu'so worn her words, nller'd wllh mtld disdain Iv 1 98

Who saw tho sun to-day? Not I, my lord. Then ho disdains to shine

Richard III. v 3 278
The disdain and shame whereof hath ever since kept Hector fasting and

waking Trot, and Cres. i 2 35

1 do disdain thy courtesy, proud Trojan v 15

Disdains the shadow Which he treads on at noon . . . Coriofanu* 1 1 264

They do disdain us much beyond our thoughts i 4 26

Against those measles, Which wn disdain should tetter us . . ill 1 79

Where one iirt does disdain with cause, the other Insult without all

reason iii 1 143

His semblablo, yea, himself, Timon disdains ... 7". of Athens iv 3 22
What safe and nicely I might well (Hay By rule of knighthood, I dis-
dain awl spurn Lrnr v 3 145

Hnlirlt'Hf, IHMM a lady that disdains Tlu-o and tho dovll alike . Ti/wMnic I tl 147
Uevenges, hois (woman's]; Ambitions, rnvollngH, chungo of prides,

disdain il 5 25

Tho buy disdains mo, Ho loaves mo, scorns me v ft 105

Disdained. II better fits my blood lo he disdained of all than to fashion

a carriage to rob love from any Much Ado i 3 30

My heart disdained that my tongue Should so profane the word

Richard IL 1 4 12

Ho proudly as if he disdain'd the ground v fi 83

Hevengo the jeering ami disdain'd ecu tempt Of thin proud king 1 Hen. 1V.\ :i 183

Itohold yourself so by a son disdain'd 2 Hen. IV. v 2 95

I disdain'd It, and did scorn to fly Richard 111. iii I 85

Tho general's disdain'd By him one step below, he by the next

'7,'rot. and Cres. i 3 129

To assume a semblance That very does disdain'd .... 7/fcrr v 3 188
You shall find me, wretched man, a thing The most disdain'd of fortune

Cymbclinc ill t 20
If I should tell my history, it would (term Like lies disdain'd in the

reporting Pericles v 1 120

Dlsdainest. 'Tis only title thou disdaiu'st in her . . . All's Well \\ a 124
Disdalneth. And now, like Nilus, it disdaineth bounds . T. Andron. iii 1 71
Disdainful. That I was disdainful, and that I had my good wit out of the

'Hundred Merry Tales' Much Adn ii I 134

She is too disdainful; I know her spirits are as coy and wild As

haggerds iii 1 34

A sweet Athenian lady Is in love With a disdainful youth M. N. Dream ii 1 361
You do me wrong, good sooth, you do, In such disdainful manner mo

to woo ii 2 130

Praising the proud disdainful shepherdess . . As Y. Like It iii -1 53
I have loved this proud disdainful haggard . . T. ofShrcir iv 2 39
Abused in disdainful language . Hen. V. ill i n8



Disdainful. Stubborn to justice, apt to ncenno it, and Disdainful lo bo

tried by't Hen. VIII. ii 4 123

lie makes me angry with him ; for ho seems Proud and disdainful

Ant. and Cleo. iii 18 142
Disdainfully. Either greet him not, Or else disdainfully, which shall

shake him more Than if not look'd on ... Troi. and Cres. iii 3 53
Disdaining. Which I disdaining scorn'd and craved death . 1 Hen. VI. \ 4 32

Disdaining duty that to us belongs 2 Hen. VI. \\\ 1 17

Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel, Which smoked with
bloody execution, Like valour's minion carved out his passage

Macbeth i 2 17

Disdaining me and throwing favours on The low Posthumus . Cymbeline iii 5 75
Disease. And make him By inch-meal a disease ! Tempest ii 2 3

His dissolute disease will scarce obey this medicine . Mer. Wives iii 8 204
I have purchased as many diseases under her root" as come to M. for M. i 2 46
Thou art always figuring diseases in me ; but then art full of error; I

am sound i 2 53

He will hang upon him like a disease Much Ado i 1 87

Washes all the air, That rheumatic diseases do abound . Af. N. Dream il 1 105
Subject to the same diseases, healed by the same mwuis Mcr. of Venice iii 1 64
According to the fool's bolt, sir, and such dulcet diseases As Y. Like It v 4 68
And that his lady mourns at his disease . . . . T. of Shrew Ind. 1 62
Though sho have as many diseases as two and fifty horses . . i 2 81

I think it would bo tho death of tho king's disease . . . All'a H'rlll 1 26
Tho king's disease my projwl may doeoivo JIM-, But. my InlrntH aro Mx'd i 1 34 ]
Many Ihousand OH'H Have tho disease, and feel'l not . . W. Tale I 2 207
I cannot name the disease ; and it is caught Of you that yl are well . I 2 386
Before thn curing of a strong disease, Even in Iho Instant of repair and

health, Tho lit is strongest K. John iii 4 112

A good healthy water ; but, for tho parly that owed 11, ho might Imvo

more diseases than ho knew for 2 Hen. IV. i 2

It is a kind of deafness. I think you are fallen into the, disease .
It is the disease of not listening, the malady of not marking .
Borrowing only lingers and lingers it out, but tho disease is incurable .
A good wit will make use of any thing: I will turn diseases to com-
modity

Gluttony and diseases make them ; I make them not ....
If the cook help to make tho gluttony, you help to make the diseases . 11 4 49
What rank diseases grow, And with what danger, near tho heart of it . HI 1 39
1 am a diseased man. What disease hast thou? A whoreson cold



2 5

i 2 136

i 2 138

i 2 266

i 2 278

ii 4 46



iii 2



Of which disease Our late king, Richard, being infected, died . . iv 1 _.
This part of his conjoins with my disease, And helps to end me . . Iv 5 64
Either wise bearing or ignorant carriage is caught, as men take diseases v 1 85
And, in that ease, I'll tell thee my disease, . . . .1 Hen. VI. ii 5 44
Long sitting to determine poor men's causes Hath made me full of sick-
ness and diseases 2 Hen. VI. Iv T 94

That's tho appliance only Which your disease rofpiiifR . . Hen. VIII. i 1 125
'Tis time to give 'em physic, their diseases Aro grown so catching. . i 8 36
Tim-rotten diseases of tho south, tho guts-griping, ruptures, catarrhs

Troi. and Cres. v 1 ^t

Ami at that lime boquealhn you my diseases v 10 57

As sho is now, she will but disease our better mirth . . Coriolanns 18117
Those cold \vays ? That seem like prudent helps, are very poisonous Where

the disease is violent iii 1 222

He's a disease that must be cut away. O, he's a limb that lias but a

disease iii 1 295

Thou disease of a friend, and not himself ! ... 7". nf Athens iii 1 56

O, may diseases only work upon 't 1 iii 1 63

A dedicated beggar to the air, With his disease of all-shunn'd poverty . iv 2 14
They love thee not that use thee ; Give them diseases . . . . iv 3 84
Bo men like blasted woods, And may diseases lick up their false bloods ! iv 3 539
What's the disease he means? 'Tis call'd the evil . . . Macbcthiv 3 146

This disease is beyond my practice v 1 65

Find her disease, And purge it to a sound and pristine health . . v 8 51
Likn thn owner of a foul disease, To keep It from divulging, lot il feed

Kvtm on Iho pith nf lifn Hamlet Iv 1 21

Disi-Hsps dosperato grown By desperate appliance nro relieved, Or not

at all iv 8 9

Kill thy physician, and the fee bestow Upon thy foul disease . Lear i 1 167
Five days we do allot thee, for provision To shield thee from diseases of

the world i 1 177

Thou art my flesh, my blood, my daughter ; Or rather a disease that's

in my flesh, Which I must needs call mine . * . . . ii 4 225

We do lance Diseases in our bodies Ant. and Cteo. v 1 37

Diseases have been sold dearer than physic .... Pericles iv (5 105
Diseased. Be cured Of this diseased opinion, and betimes . W. Tale i 2 297
Diseased nature oftentimes breaks forth In strango eruptions 1 Hoi. IV. Mi 1 27
I am a diseased man. What disease hast thou? A whoreson cold

2 Hen. IV. iii 2 191

Wn nro nil dlsonsod Iv 1 54

Thy Mfttinrm-B yul wrnr silk, drink whin, lln noCt ; Hug limit 1 diseased

perfumes T. nf A thru* Iv 8 207

Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased? .... MticMh v 8 40
My wit's diseased : but, sir, such answer as I can make, you shall com-

mand Hamlet iii 2 334

Diseased ventures That play with all infirmities for gold ! . 1'umbeline i (i 123
Dlsedged. I grieve myself To think, when thou shall be disedged by her

That now thou tirest on iii 4 96

Disembark. I must unto the rond, to disembark Konio necessaries

T. 11. nf Ver. il 4 187

Go lo Iho bay and disembark my coders : Bring thou tho master Othello il 1 210
Disfigure. And vows, if he can take you, To Hcorch your face and to dis-
figure you Com. of Errors v I 183

Disfigure not his slop L. L. iMst iv 3 59

You are but as a form in wax By him Imprinted and within his power

To leave the figure or disfigure it (. M. JV. Dream I 1 51

And say he comes to disfigure, or to present, tho person of Moonshine . iii 1 62
He will throw a figure in her face and so dinflgurn her with it T. of Shrew i 2 114
Disfigured. In this the antique and well noted face Of plain old form is

much disfigured K. John iy 2 22

By you unhappied and disfigured clean .... Richard II. iii 1 10
Disfurnish. My riches are these poor habiliments, Of which if you should

here disfurnish me, You take the sum and substance that I have

T. G. of Ver. iv 1 M
What a wicked beast was I to disfurnish myself against such a good time !

T. of Atlie.ns iii 2 49

Or she'll disfurnish us of all our cavaliers .... I'ericles iv 6 iz
Dlsgestions. Your appetites and your diHgestions doc's not agree with it

Hen. V. v 1 17
Disgorge. Wouldst Ihon dlsgorgo Into tho goncrnl world . An ]'. Like It il 7 6y



DISGORGE



380



MS1IONOUK



Disgorge. Mo, so, thou common dog, didst thou disgorge Thy glutton

bosom 2 Hen. IV. i 3

The deep-drawing barks do there disgorge Their warlike Iraughtago

Troi. ana t'rea. Pro!.

The pilsled north Disgoi-ges such a tempest forth . . I'cru-ie* iii Oower
Disgrace. There is not only disgrace and dishonour in that, munster, but

an Infinite loaa Tnupeat Iv 1

Lest my Jealous aim might err And so unworthily disgrace the man

T. G. of Ver. iii I
Appoint a meeting with this old fat fellow, Where we may take him and

disgrace him for It Mer. Wives IY 4

I will join with theo to disgrace her. I will disparage her no farther

Much Ado iii 2

To disgrace Hero before the whole assembly, ami not marry her . . iv 2
And then grace us in the disgrace of death . . . . L. L. Lout i I
Ilia disgrace is to be called boy ; but his glory is to subdue men . .12

Thy grace being gain'd cures all disgrace m mo iv 8

Like tears that did their own disgrace bewail . . M. N. Drettin iv 1
That either you might stay him from hislntendment or brook such dis-
grace welt as ho shall run into An Y. Like It i 1

If I hou dost him any slight disgrace or if ho do not mightily grace

himself on theo, he will practise against thee by poison . . i 1

To disgrace my man's apiarel and to cry like a woman . . . . 11 4
Well, thou hast a son shall take this disgrace utl mo . . All'* ll'cll ii 3
Disgraces have of lato knocked too often ut my door . . . . iv 1
To my own disgrace Neglected my sworn duty in that case . HfvJuinl II. 1 1
My i . . 1 1. shall tear The slavish motive of recanting (oar, And spit il

blooding In Ids high dUgmtHi 11

Nor my own dfsgnic.o 1 lavn < <. n made mo sour my jwillont chouk . .HI

1 will take It as a nweut disgrace 2 Hen, IV. 1 1

What a disgrace Is It to mo In romumber thy name t or to know

thy face !

Which must proportion . . . tho disgrace we have digested . lit > V. iii li
And for our disgrace, his own person, knuoling at our feet, but a wnk

and worthless satisfaction iii

We shall much disgrace With four or ttvo most vile and ragged foils,

Uight ill-disposed in brawl ridiculous, Tho name of Agincourt iv Prol,
Let It not disgrace me, If 1 demand, before this royal view . . v 2

Oome, come, tis only i that must disgrace thee . . .1 Hen. VI. i 5
I quickly shed dome of his bastard blood ; and in disgrace Ik-spoke him



thus

A dower, my lords I disgrace not so your king.
From top of honour to disgrace's foot
Till wo luivo brought Duko Humphrey in disgrace
Causeless have laid disgraces on my head .



Iv

. v

2 Wen. 17.1 2
. i 8
. Ill 1

And spread they shall bo, tn thy foul disgrace And ull<-r ruin 3 Hen. VI. i 1
This deep disgrace in brotherhood Touches me dre|T than you can

imagine JCfcAani III. i 1

riant somo other in the throne, To the disgrace and downfall uf your

house ill T

I cannot promise Hut that you shall sustain moo now disgraces Hen. VIII, iif 2

How eagerly ye follow my disgraces, As if it fed ye I in -

I'ray heaven, he sound not my disgrace I . . . . . . . V 2

Thieves, . . . That in their country did thorn that disgrace, Wo fear to

warrant in onr native place I Troi. and Ow H 2

Disgrace to your great worths and shamo to me Ii 2

You must not think to fob utlour disgrace with a tale, . . Coriolnmia I 1
I have forgot my pail, and I am out, Even to a full disgrace . . . v 8
Our empress' shame, and stalely Home's disgrace I . . T. Andion, Iv 2
I will bite my thumb at thorn ; which is a disgrace to them limn. and. I til, i 1

I hear Mai-dull lives in disgrace MmUth iii

Should I stay longer, It would bo my disgrace and your discomfort . iv 'J
No disgrace Mull fall you for refusing him at sea . . Ant. and Cleo. ill 7
Doliiud me Tho inevitable prosecution of Disgrace and horror . . iv 11
That mine own servant should Parcel the sum of my disgraces by

Addition of his envy ! . . v 2

Disgraced. Your grace is welcome to a man disgraced . T. G, of Ver. v 4
You disgraced her, when you should marry her . . . Much Ado v 1
He hath disgrace*! me, tuid hindered mo half a million . Mer. of Venice Hi 1
Hut indeed words are very rascals since bonds disgraced them T. Niyht in 1

And I Play too, but so disgraced a jiart IV. Tale i 2

1 am disgraced, Impeach'd, and battled here, Pierced to the soul Itich. II. i 1
Disgraced me, lu my happy victories, bought to entrap me 1 Jlen. IV. Iv 3
Who was shot, who disgraced, what terms the enemy aloud on Hen. V. Ill ii

To be disgraced by an inkhoin mate 1 it, n VI. Ill 1

When yuu disgraced me in my ombassade, Then I degraded you from

being king 8 Hen. VI. Iv 8

Our brother is imprlson'd by your means, Myself disgraced Richard III. i 3

The crown, usurp d, disgraced his kingly glory iv 4

If the trial of tho law o'ertako ye, You'll ]iart away disgraced Hen. VIII. in 1

Has much disgraced mo in 't ; I'm angry at him . . T. vfAthenaiii 3

Disgraceful. Away with these disgraceful wailing robes ! . 1 Hen. VI. 1 1

Disgracing of these colours that I wear lit 4

Dlsgraclous. 1 have done some oll'unce That seems tlisgniciuu* in the

city's eyes }i\chard III. iii 7

If I bo so dUgraciouM in your sight, Lot me march on . . . iv 4

Disguise. If shame live In a disguise of love T. (!. of Ver. v 4

[nave a disguise to sound Fa 1 stall' Mer. IVires ii 1

How might we disguise him? Alas the day, I know not I . . . iv 2
lu which disguise. While other jests are something rank on foot . . iv 6
Mo disguise shall, by the disguised, Pay with falsehood falso exacting

Metis, for Meas. iii 2

I will assume thy part in some disguise Much Ado i 1

A fancy that ho hath to strange disguises ill 2

Disguise us at my lodging and return, All in an hour . Mer. of Venice ii 4
Hub one that scorn to live in this disguise . . . T. of Shrew iv 2
When his disguise and he is parted, tell me what a sprat you shall find

him All's ll'dl in I.

In this disguise I think 't no sin To cozen him that would unjustly win iv 2
Ito my aid For mich disguise us haply hlmll bucomo Tho form of my

Intent T. Kiyht I l>

Disguise, I Bee. thou art a wickedness ii 2

My uesb Camillo 1 Wo must disguise ourselves . . . IV. Talc iv 2
Ned, where are our disguises? Here, hard by : stand close . 1 Hen. IV. ii -2
Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage .... Hen. V. iii 1
Disguise the holy strength of their command . . , 7Yin. and ( Vi .<. ii 3
Who in disguise Follow d his enemy king, and did him service . Ltar v 3
The wild disguise hath almost Antick'd us all . . . Ant. and Clco. il 7
Dub disguise That which, to appear itself, must not yet be But by self-
danger CymMiuc iii 4



Disguised. You die, Kir John. Unless you go out disguised Met: I! - iv


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 201 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522

Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 201 of 522)