John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 266 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 266 of 522)
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FASHION



497



FASTED



Fashion. An nil men wcro o' my mind, Wit would be out of fashion

Troi. ami Cres. ii 3 226
Quito out of fashion, like a rusty mail In monumental mockery . . iii 3 152

1 Bn tliou true,' Ray 1, to fashion in My sequent protestation . . . iv 4 67
Still, wars and lechery ; nothing else uolas fasbion . . . . v 2 196
Let's hence, .and hear How the dispatch is made, and in what fashion,

More than his singularity, he goes Upon this present action Coriol. i 1 281
GibhiKly, ungravoly, ho ilid fashion After tho inveterate hato he bears yon ii 3 233
Hat a lair Bullion on our nnlortuliiiiunit .... r. oMWwiw i 2 152
I In will, after his onr fashion, tell yon What hath proceeded J. (,'n-mr I 2 160
Men may eonstrno things aftor their fashion, Clean from the purirose of

the things themselves i 3 34

Since the quarrel Will bear no colour for the thing lie is, Fashion it thus ii 1 30

Send him but hither, and I'll fashion him ill 220

Imitations, Which, out of nse and staled by other men, Begin his fashion iv 1 39
Saucy fellow, hence ! Bear with him, Brutus ; 'tis his fashion . . iv 3 135

Slaying is the word ; It is a deed in fashion v 5 5

Hold it a fashion and a toy in blood Hamlet i 3 6

He hath importuned me with love In honourable fashion. Ay, fashion

you may call it ; go to, go to i 8 in

These are now the fashion, and so borattlo the common stages . . ii 2 357
The appurtenance of welcome is fashion and ceremony . . . . ii 2 3^9
The glass of fashion and the mould of form, Tho observed of all observers iii 1 161
Whereon his brains still beating puts him thus From fashion of himself iii 1 183
HiiMl, Muni think Alexander lonke.l o' this fashion i' tho mrlh? . . vl ->,

All wll.h nm'R nmnt that, I ran fashion lit Lnir 1 '2 200

IH it tho fashion, that discarded fathers Should have thus llttlo mercy

on their flesh? Judicious punishment 1 iii 4 74

I do not like the fashion of your garments iii ("t R.|

I prattle out of fashion, and I dot* In mine own comforts . Othello ii 1 208
Which I will fashion to fall out between twelve and ouo . . . iv 2 242
Lot's do it after the high Roman fashion . . . . Ant. and Clco. iv 15 87
Poor 1 am stale, a garment out of fashion .... Cymbdine iii 4 53

I will begin The fashion, less without and more within . . . . v 1 33
Yes, indeed shall you, and taste gentlemen of all fashions . Pericles iv 2 84
Fashionable. Time is like a fashionable host That slightly shakes his

parting guest by the hand Troi. mwl Crcs. iii 3 165

To promise is most courtly ami fashionable . . . T. of Athens v 1 29
Fashioned. Hero's a paper written in his hand, A halting sonnet of his

own pure brain, Fashion'd to Beatrice .... Much Ado v 4 83
Sway'd and fashion'd by the hand of heaven . . . Mcr. of Venice i 3 94

For putting on so now a fashion'd robe A'. John iv 2 27

Th.it metal, that self mould, that fashion'd theo Made him a man Rich. II. i 2 23
He was the mark and glass, copy and book, That fashion'd others

2 Hen. IV. ii 3 32

And fashion'd thee that instrument of ill . . . 1 Hen. VI. iii 3 65

All men's honours Lie like one lump before him, to be fashion'd Into

what pitch he please lien. nil. ii 2 49

Undoubtedly Was fashion'd to much honour from his cradle . . . iv 2 50
And nature, as it grows again toward earth, Is fashion'd for tho Journey,

dull and heavy T. of Atlirus il 2 228

Fashioning them like rimraoh's soldiers in tho roochy painting MiichAilv iii 8 142
Fashioning our humours Even to tho opposed end of our IntontH L.L.l.ontv 2 767
Fashion monger. These fashion-mongers, these perdona-mi's, who stand

so much on the new form Rom. and Jiil. ii 4 34

Fashion monging. Scambling, out-facing, fashion-monging boys M. Ado v 1 94

Fast. Stand fast, good Fate, to his hanging .... Temiwt i 1 32

Where thou didst vent thy groans As fast as mill-wheels strike . .12281

To fast, like one that takes diet T.G.of Ver. ii 25

Have pnnish'd me With bitter fasts, with penitential groans . . . ii 131
Now can I break my fast, dine, sup and sleep, Upon the very naked

name of love , ........... ii 141

Sir Valentine, whither away so fast? iii 51

Fellows, stand fast ; I see a passenger iv i

Surfeit is the father of much fast ..... Metis, for Metis, i 2 130

You know the lady ; she is fast my wife i 2 151

With profits of the mind, study and fast i 4 61

As fast lock'd up in sleep as guiltless labour iv 2 69

You have no stomach having broke your fast . . . Com. of Errors 1 2 50
We that know what 'tis to fast and pray Are penitent for your default . 12 51

She that doth fast till you come home to dinner i 2 89

Why, how now, Dromio ! where runu'st thou so fast? . . . . iii 2 72

How hast thou lost thy breath? By running fast iv 2 30

Bind him fast And bear him home for his recovery . . . . v 1 40
'Tis but a three years' fast: The mind shall banquet, though the body

pine / I- last i I 24

llancn tasks, too hard to keep, Not to see ladies, study, fast, not sleep I i 1 48
1 will pronounce your sentence : you shall fast a week with bran and

water i 1 33

You must sutler him to take no delight nor no penance; but a' must

fast three days a week i 2 134

Villain, thou shalt fast for thy olTences ere thou bo pardoned . . i 2 151
Let me not bo pent up, sir : I will fast, being loose. No, sir ; that were

fast and loose i 2 160

Your wit's too hot, it speeds too fast, 'twill tire ii 1 120

Whither away so fast? A true man or a thief that gallops so? . . iv 8 186
What you first did swear unto. To fast, to study, and to see no woman iv 3 292

Ray, can you fast? your stomachs are too young iv'3 294

If frosts and fasti, hard lodging ami thin weeds Nip not tho gaudy

blossoms of your love v 2 811

Why Is your cheek so pale? How chance the roses thorn do fade so

hist? Belike for want of rain M. N. Dream i 1 129

Night's swift dragons cut the clouds full fast iii 2 379

Tho villain is much ligllter-heel'd than 1 : I follow'd fast, but faster ho

did lly iii 2 416

Or is your gold and silver owes and rams? I cannot tell ; I make it

breed as fast Mer. of Venice i 3 97

I will make fast the doors, and gild myself With some more ducats . ii 6 49
Who coines so fast in silence of the night? A friend . . . . v 1 25
Fast as she answers theo with frowning looks, I'll sauce her AsY.LikeJtin 5 68
Ay, but when? Why now ; as fast as she can marry us . . . iv 1 134

As fast as you pour affection in, it runs out iv 1 214

We may bfow our nails together, and fast it fairly out . . T. of Shrew i 1 109
And kiss on kiss She vied so fast, protesting oath on oath . . - ii 1 311
And better 'twere that both of us did fast, Since, of ourselves, ourselves

are choleric iv 1 176

To-morrow't shall be mended, And, for this night, we'll fast for company iv 1 180

Not too fast: soft, soft. ! T. Niflht i 5 312

Sir Ilobert might have eat his part in mo Upon Good-Friday and ne'er

broke his fast A'. John I 1 235

3 B



Fast. Standfast! tho devil tempts theo here In likeness of a new un-

trimmed bride K. John iii 1 208

Bind the boy which you shall find with me Fast to the chair . . iv 1 5

I conjure thee but slowly ; run more fast iv 2 269

Ho tires betimes that spurs too fast betimes . . . Richard II. ii 1 36

Within me grief hath kept a tedious fast Ii 1 75

Tho pleasure that some fathers feed upon, Is my strict fast . . . il 1 So
Though [ bo old, I doubt not but to ride as fast as York . . , v2 us
Farewell, and stand fast. Now cannnt I strike him . . 1 lltn. IV. II 2 75
I would give a thousand pound I could run as fast as thou canst . . il 4 163

Do pelt so fast at one another's pate 1 Hen. VI. iii 1 82

1 think the Duke of Burgundy will fast Before he'll buy again at such

a rate iii 2 42

And York as fast upon your grace exclaims iv 4 30

I think I have you fast v 3 30

Whom we raise, We will make fast within a hallow'd verge . 2 lien. VI. i 4 25
Thither go these news, as fast as horse can carry them . . . i 4 78

Whither goes Vaux so fast? what news, I prithee? iii 2 367

With thy brave bearing should I he in love, But that thou art so fast

mine enemy v 2 21

A thousand men have broke their fasts to-day, That ne'er shall dine

unless thou yield tho crown 3 lien. VI. ii 2 127

Now, brother king, farewell, ami sit yon fast iv 1 119

Tim gntos made fust I Brother, I like not thin Iv 7 10

This hand, fust wound about thy coal-black hair V 1 54

For Warwick was a bug that frur'd us all. Now, Montague, sll fast . v 2 3
It is his policy To haste thus fast, to find us unprovided . . . v 4 63
Neighbour, well met : whither away so fast? . . . Ricliard III. ii 3 i
I would not grow so fast, Because sweet flowers are slow . . . ii 4 14
They say my uncle grew so fast That he could gnaw a crust at two

hours old il 4 27

You said that idle weeds are fast in growth : The prince my brother

hath outgrown me far iii 1 103

Forbear to sleep the nights, and fast the days iv 4 118

Whither away so fast? O, God save ye 1 . . . . Hen,. VIII. ii I i
All fast? what means this? Ho I . Who waits there? Sura, you know me? v2 3
To-morrow We must with all our main of power stand fast 7V. and Cr. ii 3 273
Devour'd As fast as they are made, forgot as soon As done . . . iii 3 149
And, Diomed, Stand fast, and wear a castle on thy head I . . . v 2 187
Lay hold upon him, Priam, hold him fast : He is thy crutch . . . v 8 59
If you'll stand fast, we'll beat them to their wives . . . Corialanus i 4 41

Whither do you follow your eyes so fast? ii 1 109

Stand fast ; We have as many friends as enemies iii 1 231

With wine and feeding, we have suppler souls Than in our priest-like

fasts v 1 56

Who is this? my niece, that flies away so fasti . . T. Andron. ii 4 ii

Is he sure bound? look that you bind them fast v 2 166

Sad hours seem long. Was that my father that went hence so fast?

Hnm. nnil Jill. I 1 168

I stand on sudden haste. Wisely ami slow ; they slninhln that run fast tl 8 04
Mistress! what, mistress I Juliell fast, I warrant her, she . . . iv i
Ikinkrunts, hold fast; HaUior than render back, out with your knives I

T.ofAthriu\v 1 8

Stand fast together, lest some friend of Osar's Should chance J. dranr iii 1 87
Had I as many eyes as thou hast wounds, Weeping as fast as they . iii 1 201

Stand fast, Titimus: we must out and talk v 1 22

Let us rather Hold fast the mortal sword .... Mmbeth iv 3 3
Doom'd for a certain term to walk the night, And for the day confined

to fast in fires Hamlet i 5 ii

Well said, old mole ! canst work i 1 the earth so fast? A worthy pioner ! i 5 162
Fell into a sadness, then into a fast, Thence to a watch . . . . ii 2 147
One woe doth tread upon another's heel, So fast they follow . . . iv 7 165
Woo't weep? woo 't fight? woo 't fast? woo't tear thyself? . . . v 1 298
Ingrateful fox I 'tis he. Bind fas.t his corky arms .... Unr \u t 29
Wilt thou be fast to my hopes, if I depend on the Issue? . Othello 1 3 369
Drop tears as fast as the Arabian trees Their medicinal gum . . . v 2 350
I had rather fast from all four days Than drink so much in one

Ant. awl ('lea. ii 7 108

Which he took, As we do air, fast as 'twas mlnister'd . . Ci/mbeline I 1 45
And will continue fast to your allcction, Still close assure . . . 16138
Last night the very gods show'd me a vision I fast and pray'd for their

intelligence iv 2 347

Fast and loose. I will fast, being loose. No, sir ; that were fast ami loose

L. L. Lost i 2 162
To sell a bargain well is as cunning ns fast and loose . . . . iii 1 104

Flay fast and loose with faith K. John iii 1 242

Like a right gipsy, hath, at fast and loose, Beguiled me Anl. niirf (Ire. iv 12 28
Fast asleep. Banding, speaking, moving, And yet no fast asleep 7'nn)>rsf Ii 1 215
This love of theirs myself have often Been, Hnply when Hi") have judged

me fast asleep 7'. (.'. q/ l'cr. Ill

By my halidom, I was fast asleep Iv 2 136

FalstafV! Fast asleep behind tho arras, and snorting like a horse

1 lien. IV. 11 4 577

To the loathsome pit Where I espied the panther fast asleep 7". Anilron. ii 3 194
Fast asleep ? It is no matter ; Enjoy tho honey -heavy dew of slumber

J. Ccrsaril 1 229

This is her very guise; ami, upon my life, fast asleep . . ilacMh v 1 23
Fast helocked This is tho hand which, with a vow'd contract, Was fast

helork'd in thine tlms. /or Hens, v 1 210

Fast bind, fust llnd ; A proverb never stale in thrifty mind Jlfrr. <if Vrn. II 6 54
Fast by. Who finds thn heifer dead and bleeding flesh And sees last by
a butcher with an axe, lint will suspect 'twas he that made tho

slaughter? 2 ""' ''' ' 2 l8 9

Fast-closed. This union shall do more than battery can To our fast-

closed gates * Jo ' in " * 447

Fast enough. He teaches him to hick and to hack, which they '11 do fast

enough of themselves Jlfrr. 11 nw iv 1 69

Fast-falling. Even my foes will shed fast-falling tears . . 3 Hen. V 1. i i4 162

Fast foe to the plebeii -^^'.^ I ' 9 5

Fast gait. Springs out Into fast gait; then stops again . fftn. VILl. m 2 116
Fast growing. Cut off the heads of two fast-growing sprays Richard 11. in 4 34
Whom our fast -growing scene must find At Tarsus . . Pertotoiv Cower 6
Fast Intent. 'Tis our fast intent To shake all cares and business from

ollr a Ke Lear i 1 39

Fast married. But, I pray you, sir, Are yon fast married? . Othello i 2 n
Fast sleep. Yet all this While in a most fast sleep , . . tirictelh v 1

Fast sworn. Friends now fast sworn

Fast upon. It is great morning, ami the hour profix'd Of her delivery to

this valiant Greek Comes fast upon . . . . Tmt. mid I'm. iv 8
Fastod. When you fasted, It was presently aftor dinner . T. (,'.(]/* er. li 1 zo



FASTEN



498



KATK



Fasten your oar on my advisings Mats, fur Klam. in 1 203

Uonio, I will fasten on this slcovo of thine : Thou art an elm, my

husband, I a vino Com. o/ lirrors ii 2 175

Thinking by this face To fasten in our thoughts that they have courage

J. Caaur V 1 1 1
If I can fasten but oue cup upon him, With that which he hath drunk

Othello ii 8 50

Fastened. Had fasten'd him unto a small spare mast . Com. of Errors i 1 So
My wife and I ... Fasten'd ourselves at either end the mast
l''or mine eye, While 1 was speaking, oil was fasten'd to't . All's Well v 3 82
Droop'd, took it deeply, Faston'd and Ilx'd the shame on 't in himself II'. T. li 3 15
This is our doom : Some stay to see him fasten'd in the earth T. Andron. y 3 183

Strong and fasten'd villain I Leur ii 1 79

He fasten'd on my neck, and bellow'd out As he'ld burst heaven . . v 3 212

A lady So fair, and fasten'd to an empery CymMine i 120

Faster. Do not torment mo, prithee ; I'll bring my wood home faster

Tempest ii 2 75
With his had legs, falls into the cinque pace faster and faster Much Ado ii 1 82

I follow'd fast, but faster he did fly M. N. Hmirn iii 2 416

Ten times faster Venus' pigeons fly To seal love's bonds now-made it. ofV. ii 15 5
A golden mesh to entrap the hearts of men Fasler Ihan gnats in cobwebs iii 2 123
Faster than Ills tongue Did mako ollbnco his eye did heal it up As V. I,. It iii 5 1 16
He sings several tunes faster than you'll tell money . . IK. Tale iv 4 184

Faster than thought or time iy 4 565

The camomile, tho more it is trodden on the faster it grows . 1 lien. IV. ii 4 442
Faster than spring-lime showers comes thought on thought 2 lien. VI. iii 1 337
Fettor'd in amorous chains And faster bound to Aaron's charming eyes

Thau is Prometheus tied to Caucasus . . . . r. .1/ufron. ii 1 17
Which tan limns taster glide than the sun's beams . . KOM. and .lid. ii 6 s
If I should bo bribed too, Ihero would bo none loll lo rail upon tin", and

thon thoil wouldst sill tho faster T. of Athens. 1 2 a.|6

To tho tune of flutes kept stroke, and made Tho water which they bcal

to follow faster, As amorous of their slrokos . . Ant. cnulGleo.ll 2 mi

And tyranls' fears Decrease not, but grow faster than the years 1'erides i 2 85

Fastest. He that runs fastest gets the ring . . . . T. of Shrew i 1 145

Grow like the summer grass, fastest by night .... Hen. V. i 1 65

Fasting. She is not to be kissed fasting, in respect of her breath. Well,

Ihat fault may be mended witli a breakfast . . T. O. of Ver. iii 1 326
Fasting maids whose minds are dedicate To nothing temporal U. for M. ii 2 154
That shall express my true love's fasting pain . . . . L. L. Lost iv 3 122
Hut, mistress, know yourself : down on your knees, And thank heaven,

fasting, for a good maii's lovn Is Y. Like It iii u 58

Ten thousand years togolhor, naked, fasting, Upon a barren mountain

W. Tale iii 2 212

Nota ribbon, . . . bracelet, horn-ring, to keep my pack from fasting . iv 4 612
Thou mayst hold ... A fasting tiger safer by the tooth . . K. John, iii 1 260
And therein fasting, hast thou made me gaunt . . Richard II. ii 1 81
Give their fasting horses provender, And after fight with them lien. V. iv 2 58
Struck him down, the disdain and shame whereof hath ever since kept

Hector fasting and waking Troi. and Ores, i 2 37

How one man eats into another's pride, While pride is fasting ! . . iii 3 137
This hand of yours requires A sequester from liberty, fasting and

prayer, Much castigation Othello iii 4 40

Fair youth, come in : Discourse is heavy, fasting . . . Cymbdine iii 91
Fasting-day. We '11 have flesh for holidays, tish for fasting-days 1'erides ii 1 86
Fast-lost. Feast-won, fast-lost [ one cloud of winter showers, These Hies

ure couch'd T.qfAfhmuil 2 180

FastolfO. Horohad time juost fully been soal'd up, If Sir John Faslolfo

had mil pluy'd lliu coward 1 Hen. VI. i 1 131

llul, ()l the Irnacherous li'nslolfii woiimls my heart . . . . I 4 35

Whilhor away, Sir. loliu li'astolfo, in such hasloV iii 2 10.

Fat. By tho bare scalp of Robin Hood's fat friar . . T. G. of Ver. iy 1 31
1 shall think the worse of tat men, as long as I have an eye Mer. Wives ii 1 56

I am glad Ihe fat kuighl is not here iv 2 29

The fat woman of Brentford has a gown above iv 2 77

If they can Hud in their hearts the poor nuvirtuous fat knight shall bo

any furlhor alllielod, we Iwo will slill bo tho ministers . . . iv 2 233

Appoint a meeting with I. his old fat follow iv 4

There's an old woman, a tat woman, gone up ililu his chamber . . iv f>
Hat a fal woman 1 Ihe knight may be rubbed : I 'II call . . . . iv 6
Hero's a Bohemian-Tartar tarries Ihe coming down of thy fat woman . iv 6
There was, mine host, an old fat woman oven now with me ; bul she's



They would molt mo out of my fat drop by dro[

Fat Falstalf Hath a great scene

I have but lean luck in the match, and yet is she a wondrous fat
marriage. How dost thou mean a fat marriage? Marry, sir, she's



iv 5
iv
iv



the kitchen wench and all grease
Tin-re is a fat friend at your master's house
Fat [launches have lean pates ....
Your pennyworth is good, an your goose be fat
Let me see ; a fat 1'envoy ; ay, that's a fat gooso
Well-liking wits they have ; gross, gross ; fat, fat
Whim la fat and bean-fed horse lioguilo .
I will food fat tho ancient grudge I bear him .
Sweep on, you fat and greasy citizens
That good pastuio makes fat sln:ep -
Marian Hackot, the fat ale- wife of Wiucot
Sixscore fat oxen standing in my stalls ....
How say you to a fat tripe finely broil'd ? I like it well .
It is as fat and fulsome to mine ear As howling after music
Cram 's with praise, ami make 's As fat as tame things .
The fat ribs of peace Must by the hungry now bo fud upon
And traders riding to London with fat purses .
'I lin incomprehensible lies that this same fat rogue will tell us



Com. of Errors iii 2 94
. v 1 41.
. L. L. Lost i 1
. iii 1
. iii 1
. v 2 268

M. N. Dream it 1 4;
tier, uf Venice i 3 4!
As Y. Lila It ii 1 s.
. iii 2 2'

T. of Shrew llld. 2 2;
. ii 1 361

. IV 8 2(

T. Night v 1 n

W. 'J'ule I 2 9
K. John iii 3

1 Hen. IV. i 2 14

' 2 an



1 1' i hang, I '11 make a fat pair of gallows ; for if I hang, old Sir John

hangs with me ii 1 7

Hang ye, gorbollied knaves, are ye undone? No, ye fat chuffs . . ii 2 9
Gome out of that fat room, and lend me thy hand to laugh a little . ii 4
One of Ihom is fal and grows old : (lod help thn while I . . . . ii 4 14
Ye fal paunch, an yo call mo coward, by llio I .ml, I 'II stab l.hou . . II 4 15
There Is a dovil haiinl.s I bee In llio likeness of an old lal man . .11-1 49
If to be fat be to bo hatod, then Pharaoh's loan kino are U> bo loved . ii 4 51

A gross fat man. As fat as butter ii 4 56

I'll procure this fat rogue a charge of foot ii 4 51

Let's away; Advantage feeds him fat, while men delay . . . . iii 2 i
Why, you are so fat, Sir John, that you must needs bo out of all compass iii 3 :
Death hath not struck so fat a deer to-day, Though many dearer . . v 4 10
Did you not tell me this fat man was dead? 1 did ; 1 saw him dead . v 4 t



He hut h put all my substance into that fat belly of his



. IV. ii 1



With whose envenomed and fatal sting, Your loving uncle, twenty

times his worth, They say, is shamefully bereft of life . . iii 2

Ah, hark I the fatal followers do pursue ..... 3 Hen. VI. i 4



at. And look, if tho fat villain have not transformed him ape 2 lien. It', ii 2 76
Yon make fat rascals, Mistress Doll. 1 make them I . . . . ii I 45

Then feud, and be fat, my fair Calipolis ....... ii 4 193

How, you fat fool I I scurn you ........ ii 4 322

If you bo not too much cloyed with fat meat ...... Epil. 28

Boalso Harry Monmouth. being in his right witsand his good judgements,

turned away the fat knight ....... lieu. V. iv 7 50

They want their porridge and their fat bull-beeves . . .1 Hen. VI. i 2 9
Your country's fat shall pay your pains the hire . . Itichard III. v 3 258
Would they but tat their thoughts With this crainm'd reason Tr. and Cr. ii 2 48
How the devil Luxury, with his fat rump and potato-finger, tickles

these together I ........... v 2 55

O, how this villany Doth fat me with the very thoughts of it I T. Andron iii 1 204
Let me have men about me that are fat : Sleek -headed men . J. Cu-siir i 2 192
And duller shouldst thou be than the fat weed That roots itself in ease

on Lethe wharf, Wouldst thou not stir iu this . . . Humid I 5 32
We fat all creatures else to fat us, ami we fat ourselves for maggots . iv 3 23
Your fat king and your lean beggar is but variable service . . . iv 3 24
Our son shall win. He's fat, and scant of breath ..... v 2 298

I have heard that Julius Cxsar Grew fat with feasting there A. and C. ii 66
In thy fats our cares bo drown'd, With thy grapes our hairs be crown'd ii 7 122
at already. That were to enlard his fat already pride Troi. and L'res. ii 8 205
atal. Where is that sou That floated with thee on the fatal raft?

Com. of Errors y 1 348
A very dangerous flat and fatal ...... tier, of Venice iii 1 5

The most skilful, bloody and fatal opposite . . . . T. Niijht iii 4 293

Of that fatal country, Sicilia, prithee speak no more . . W. Tide iv 2 22
Thou hast wrought A deed of slander with thy latal hand Richard II. v 35
1 am tho Douglas, fatal to all those That wear lhi.su colours 1 lieu. If. v -1 1:6
Oulul'lale examples l.ot't by tho I'uUil and ncghvlral ICngllsh lltu. I'. II I i i
llohold the ordnance on Ihoir carriages, Wllli fatal moulhs gaping ill 1'rol. -^7
Dost Ihou thirst,, base Trojan. To have me fold up 1'arca's lalal wubV . v 1 ji
Tho fatal balls of murdering basilisks ....... v 2 17

Accursed fatal hand That hath contrived this woful tragedy I 1 lieu. VI. i 4 76
And now I fear that fatal prophecy ........ iii 1 195

Behold, this is the happy wedding torch That joineth Rouen unto her

countrymen, But burning fatal to the Talbotites I . . . . iii 2 28

Place barrels of pitch upon the fatal stake ...... v 4 57

Shameful is this league t Fatal this marriage, cancelling your fame 1

2 lien VI. i 1 99

Tho fatal brand Altlura burn'd Unto the prince's heart of Calydon . i 1 234

enty

267

, . i 4

Tho red rose and the white are on his face, The falal colours of our

striving houses ........... ii 5 98

Bring forth that fatal screech-owl to our house ..... ii 6 56

Stole to Rhesus' tents, And brought from thence the Thracian fatal steeds iv 2 21
To bend the fatal instruments of war Against his brother . . . v 1 87
What Clarence but a quicksand of deceit? And Richard hut a ragged

fatal rock ? ............ v 4 27

Have now the fatal object in my eye Where my poor young was limed . v 16
Cursed bo the hand that mado these fatal holes I . . Kicha.nl 111. .i 2 14

thou bloody prison, Fatal and ominous to noble peers ! . . . iii 3 10
Ready, with every nod, to tumble down Into the fatal bowels of

the deep ............ iii 4 103

As an adder when she dntli unroll To do some fatal execution T. Androu. ii 3 36


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 266 of 522)