John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 281 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 281 of 522)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Here is a rural frllow That will not bo denied your highness' presence:

He brings you llgs .......... v

A simple countryman, that brought 1m llgN : This wax MM basket . v
Fight. But ono tleii'l at n time, 1 '11 light their legioim o'er . Tcwjtr*t iii

I elew him manfully in light T. G. of Ver. iv

With all his might For thee to fight Mer. Wives ii

I had rather hear them scold than fight ii

Up with your fights : Give fire ii

To see Ihee fight, to see thee foin, to see thee traverse . . . . ii
If you should fight, you go against the hair of your professions . . ii
I warrant you, lie's the man should fight with him . . . .iii
And yet my nature never in the fight To do in slander . Meas.for Metis, i

Counsel him to light against his passion Much Ado iii

You flare easier be friends with me than fight with mine enemy . . iv
IViicn ! Ho to me and every man that dares not fight I . . L. L. Lost i
A man so breathed, that certain he would fight; yea From morn till

night v

I will not fight with a ]>ole, like a northern man v

We cannot light for love, as men may do . . . M. A'. Dream ii

Thou see'st these lovers seek a place to fight iii

Live thou, I live : with much much more dismay I view the fight than

thou that makest the fray Mer. of Venice iii

There was never any thing so sudden but the fight of two rams As Y. L. It v
You go so much backward when you fight .... All's Well i
Challenge mo tho count's youth to fight with him . . . T. Night iii
There's no remedy, sir; ho will fight with you for's oath sake . . iii
No, my lord, I'll light. You will I why. happy man bn'n dole ! W. Tale I
Blessing Against this cruelty light on thy Blue, Poor thing, coudemn'd

to loss ! ii

You denied to fight with me this other day, because I was no gentleman

born v

Against whose fury and unmatched force The aweless lion could not

wage the light A'. John i

They are at hand, To parley or to light ; therefore prepare . . ii

Then after fight who shall be king? j!

That dost never fight But when her humorous ladyship is by . . Hi
Like a dog that is compell'd to fight, Snatch at bis master . . . iv

The French fight coldly, and retire themselves v

Alive may I not light, If I be traitor or unjustly fight ! .
To Coventry, there to behold Our cousin Hereford and fe

fight i

And as 1 truly fight, defend me heaven I i

As thy cause- is right, So bo thy fortune in this royal fight I . . i

As cuiilldimt ns is tlm falcon's flight Against a bird, do I with Mowbray

fight i

As gentle and as jocund as to jest Go I to tight i

And dares him to set forward to the fight i

Where one on his side fights, thousands will fly ii

Come, lords, away, To tight with Glendowcr and his complices . . iii
Then, if angels fight, Weak men must fall, for heaven still guards the

right iii

And so your follies fight against yourself iii

Fear, and be slain ; no worse can come to fight : And tight and die is

death destroying death ......... iii

Let's light with gentle words Till time lend friends . . . .iii

Under whoso blessed cross We are impressed and engaged to fight

1 Hen. IV. i

To tight Against the irregular and wild Glendower i

If ho light longer than ho sees reason, I 'II forswear arms . i

When the light was done, When I was dry with rage and extreme toil . i
Hath wilfully betray VI The lives of those that he did lead to fight . i

And all the currents of a heady fight ii

To hack thy sword as thou hast done, and then say it was in fight I . if

He would make you believe it was done in fight ii

Thou that art like enough . . . To tight against me under Percy's pay . iii

We'll light with him to-night. It may not bo iv

To savo the blood on either side, Try fmlunn with him in n singlo light v
The Prince of Wales Htrpp'd forth before tho king, And, nephew, chal-
lenged you to singlo fight ......... v

Myself and you, son Harry, will towards Wales, To light with Glendower v
Had only but the corpse, But shadows and the shows of men, to fight

2 lien. IV. \

They did flpht with queasiness, constraint, As men drink potions . i
The very same day did I fight with one Sampson Stockfish, a fruiterer . iii
The manner and true order of the fight This packet, please it you,

contains >*'

While that the armed hand doth fight abroad, The advised head defends
itself at home # ''



'2 171
2 175
2 201



7'



Richard II. i
Mowbray



1 19

4 94

2 383
4 316

4 2IO

4 240
4 262
2 27

2 224
2 43

2 69

i T

i 162

3 124
6 62
3 67

3 322
2 a*

2 335

2 34*

8 103

1 28

1 19

1 240

2 142

3 24

3 41
1

3

1 83

1 301

1 230

2 659
2 700

1 241

2 354

2 62

2 33

1 214

2 37

4 326

2 162

3 191

2 140

266

78
400
118
116

3 ,3

1 83

2 46
8 41
8 56



3 62
3 96
3 109
2 147
I 43



I dare not fight ; but I will wink and hold out mine iron

By the means whereof a' faces it out, but fights not . . .

They will eat like wolves and fight like devils

They have only stomachs to oat and none to light . . . .

And yet I determine to light lustily for him . . . /

Ay, ho said so, to innkn us light cheorfully

Give tholr fast, tug horses provender. Ami after fight with Uieill .

Fight valiantly to-day : And yet I do theo wrong to mind tlieu of It

Ho which hath no stomach to this tight, Let him depart . .



ii



2 183
8 131

1 21

1 39

2 207

3 30
3 82

3 58

4 289
4 338
2 126
8 t
1 loo



2 47

5 40

1 193

1 196

2 35

4 100

2 178

1 7

2 35

7 162

7 166

1 301

1 204

; 59

8 12

35



FIGHT



524



FIGHTING



Fight. Would you mid 1 nlone, Without more help, could tight this royal

battle I //nt. I", iv

If they will light with us, bid them come down, Or void tho Held . . iv
Tis the gago of one that I should light wilhal, if he bo alive .
(iive mo my steeled coat. 1 '11 tight for Franco . . .1 .'/
If thou be slack, I'll light it out. Gloucester, why doubt'at thou t
I must inform you of a dismal flght ;

More than three hours the tight continued

Distrustful recreants 1 Fight till the last gasp ....
We'll fight It out



1 myself light not once in forty year ........

Either renew the light, Or tear the lions out of England's eoiit . .
When the light begun, Roused on the sudden from their drowsy beds .
Ijeave this peevish broil And set this unaccustoni'd light aside . .
We and our wives and children all will tight ......

Will ye, like soldiers, come and tight it out? ......

Let this dissension lirst be tried by tight . . . . . . .

We are well fortilled And strong enough i " issue out and light . .
1'rosper our colours in this dangerous light ! ......

Ho is march'd to liourdoaux with his power, To tight with Talbot. .
York sot him on to light and die in shnino ......

Upon my blessing, I command thee go. To fight I will, but not to lly

the foe ............. v 5

Then both fly. And leave my followers here to tight and die? . . v 5
.Saint George und victory ! light, soldiers, tight ..... v li

And had the maidenhood Of thy llrst light ...... v

If tlion wilt light, tight liy thy father's side ...... v 6

Hushing in the bowels of tli French, He left mo proudly, as unworthy

fight . . ........... iv 7



61

. iv 7 128

VI. i 1 85

i j "

. i 1 105

. i 1 iso

. i 2 127

. i 2 128

. i 3 9 T

. i 5 27

. ii 2 22

. iii 1 93

. iii 1 ioo

. iii 2 66

. iv 1 116

. iv 2 20

. iv 2 56

. iv 3 5

iv 4 8



I cannot light ; for Qod's sake pity my case



56



43



2 lien. Vl.i 8 217



Lord, have mercy upon me 1 1 shall never be able to light a blow . i 8 220

Kirrah, or you must light, or else bo hang'd 18 222

So please your highness U) behold the light ii 8 51

1 never saw a fellow worse bested, Or more afraid to fight . . . ii 8 57
Fear not thy master : light for credit of the 'prentices . . . . ii 3 71
The lives of those which we have lost in tight Be counterpoised with

such a itty sum !

Fight for your king, your country and your lives

Let's go light with them : but tlrst, go and sot London bridge on lire .

My foot shall light with nil tho strength thou bast

O, I could hnw up roi-kn and light with Hint, 1 am so angry .

And tight agninsl that monstrous rebel Cado

('lill'ord, 1 say, como forth and light with mo v2

What ara yon made of 7 you'll nor figut nor fly v U

Let's light It out, i.n. I nc.t sland cavilling thus ... .8 Hen. I'l. I 1



iv 1

iv 5

iv

vlO

1

1



15
53
"4
62
5
74

I 1 160

i 1 10

1 4 40

ii 1 135

ii 1 .41

ii 2 77

ii 2 79

ii 2 ico



lie thy title right or wrong, Lord Clill'ord vows to light in thy defence .

And thrice cried ' Conrftg. , father! light it out I '

Ho cowards llglit when they can fly no further .....
They hail no heart to light, And we in them no hope to win the day
We heard you were Making another head to light again ....

I'll stay. Be it with resolution then to light

Cheer these noble lords And hearten those that tight in your defence .

For God's sake, lords, give signal to the light

This in HI, whom hand to hand I slew in light, May be possessed with

some store of crowns ii 5 56

Let them fight that will, For I have murdered where I should not kill . ii 5 121

Fight closer, or, good faith, you'll catch a blow iii 2 23

Why shall wo light, if you pretend no title! iv 7 57

By this I challenge him to single light iv 7 75

What, Warwick, wilt thou leave the town and light? . . . . v 1 107
Have arrived our coast, And, as wo hear, march on to light with us . v a 9
llo that will not light fur ani'li a hope, Gu homo to bed . . . . v 4 55
Kdward is at hand, Heady lo tight ; therefore bo resolute . . . v 4 61

Hive signal to the fight, and to it, lords ! v 4 72

You tight in justice : then, in God's name, lords, lie valiant and give

signal to the tight V 4 81

Forswore himself ... To light on Edward's party for the crown

Richard III. i 8 138
Thou didst receive tho holy sacrament, To light in quarrel of the houso

of ljuicastor , . . .14 aoy

Who told me how tho poor soul did forsake Tin) mighty Warwick, nnil

did light forme? ii 1 110

My prayers on tlnuidvevse parly light iv 4 190

If not to light with foreign enemies, Yet lo boat down these rebels here iv 4 531
Kvcry man's conscience is a thousand swords, To light against that

bloody homicide . . . . . . . . . . . v 2 18

The wronged souls Of bntcher'd princes tight in thy behalf .'
Awake, awake 1 Arm, tight, and conquer, for fair England's sake !

(Jod and good angels fight on Richmond's sido

Yet remember this, God and our good cause tight upon our side .
Richard except, those whom we tight against Had rather have us win .
Then, if you light against God's enemy, God will in justice ward you .
If you do light against your country's foes, Your country's fat shall pay

your pains the hire v 8 257

If you do light lu sal'ngniud of your wives, Your wives shall welcome

homo the conqueror* ......

Fight, gentlemen of England 1 light, bold yeomen I Draw, archers I .
His horse is slain, and all on foot ho lights, Seeking for Richmond
To rank our chosen truth with such a show As fool and light is

lien. VII!. Prol. 19
Ihose remnants Of fool and feather that they got in France, With all

their honourable points of ignorance Pertaining thereunto, as fights

and fireworks i 3 27

Youths that thunder at a playhouse, and fight for bitten apples .' . v 4 64

I cannot fight upon this argument jlVoi.niiiltVBi.il 95

Can Helenus tight, uncle? Helenus? no. Yes, he'll light indifferent

well i 2 241

Let blockish Ajax draw The sort to light with Hector . . . . i 3 376
Has not so much wit ... As will stop the eye of Helen's needle, for

whom he comes to fight ii 1 88

Such things as might ollend the weakest spleen To light for ami

maintain il 2 129

Then, 1 say, Well may wo light for her whom, we know 'well,' The

world's large sjKices cannot parallel ii 'j X 6i

You must prepare to tight without Achilles ... ii 3 238

But he that disciplined thy arms to fight, Let Mars divide eternity in

twain, And give him half 11 3 255

Nay, you shall tight your hearts out ere I part you . iii 54

O virtuous tight, When right with right wars who shall he most right ! iii 2 178
You know my mind, I'll light no more 'gainst Troy . . . . iii 3 56



v 3 122
v 3 150
v 8 ,75
v 3 240
V 3 243
v 3 253



v 3 259
v 1) 338
v 4 4



Fight. .Shall Ajax light with Hector? Ay, und pnhitp.i veeclvo much

honour by him Tif. tind Cm. Hi ;t 3J $

lie must light singly to-morrow with Hector iii 1) 247

<'onsont upon the order of their light, So bn it Iv 5 90

I am not warm yet ; let us fight again. As Hector pleases . . . iv 5 118

By this whit? beard, I 'Id light with thee to-morrow . . . . iv 5 209

Within my soul there doth conduce a tight Of this strange nature . v 2 147

Unarm, unarm, and do not light to-day v 8

How now, young man ! mean at thou to tight to-day ? . . . . v 3

Troilus, I would not have you light to-day v 3

We'll forth and fight, Do deeds worth praise and tell you them at night v 3

Now here he lights on Galathe his horse, And there lacks work . . v ft

Art thou there? I'll tight with him alone v 9

Turn, slave, and tight. What art thou? v 7 13



3

29

5

92



If the son of a whore fight for a whore, he tempts judgement
I'll lean upon one crutch and fight with t'other, Ere stay behind
And fight With hearts more proof than shields
Ere yet the light he done, pack up : down with them ! .
Thy exercise hath been too violent For a second course of light
To Aulidins thus I will ap]ear, and light .....
The rest .-lull bear the business in some other light
I fight will
breaker .



v 7
. i 1 246
i 4 24



i 5
i



Ight .

I 'U fight with none but thee ; fur I do hate thee Worse than a promise



Know, Rome, that all alone Marciua did fight Within Corioli gates
Our then dictator Whom with all praise I point at, saw him tight.
'



i 8 i
ii 1 179
ii -2 9 ^



,
For 1 will light Against my canker'd country with the -spleen Of all the

under llonds ............ iv 5 96

Fights dragon-like, and does achieve as soon Aa draw his aword . . iv 7 23
I'll run away till I am bigger, but then I'll light ..... v 3 128

And, Homans, light for freedom in your choico . . . T. Aiuiruii. i 1 17
Homo's best champion, Successful in the battles that he tights . I 1 66

If to tight for king and commonweal Were piety in thine, it is in these . i 1 114
He lights aa you sing prick -song, keops time, distance . Jtuui. and Jiil. ii 4
ogue, a villain, that lights by the book of arithmetic



1 106



9'
37

iv 1! 10
iv 3 187
V 3 32
v 6 8
v 7 2



v 1
v 8



A braggart, a rog>

Lord, they tight ! I will go call the watch v 3

Has done fair service, And slain in tight many of your enemies T. of A. iii 5 64
It is a creature that I teach to tight, To wind, to stop . , J. (Vrswr iv 1 31
If you dare light to-day, come to tho Held ; If not, when you have

stomachs v 1 65

And, HomaiiH, yet ero night We shall try fortune In a second light . v 3 no
When he reads Thy personal venture in tho rebels' tight, Ilia wonders

and his praises do contend Atuvbcth 1 3

Against the undivnlged pretence I light Of treasonous malice . . U 3
Though you untie the winds and let them light Against the churches . iv
The poor wren, The most diminutive of birds, will light ....
Your eye in Scotland Would create soldiers, make our women light
I'll tight till from my bones my flesh bo hack'd .....
Let us be beaten, if we cannot tight

1 ran not fly, But, bear-like, I must light the course ....
The castle's gently render'd : The tyrant's people on both sides do

tight

I'll not fight with thee. Then yield thee, coward

Fight for a plot Whereon the numbers cannot try the cause . Hamlet iv 4
1 will tight with him upon this theme Until my eyelids will no longer

wag v 1

Woo't weep? woo't light? woo't fast? woo't tear thyself? Woo't drink

up eisel ? v 1

To fear judgement ; to fight when I cannot choose ; and lo eat no fish Lctir i 4

Before you light the battle, ope this letter v 1

Were it my cue to tight, I should have known it Without a prompter Oth. i 2
His capta in'a heart, Which in the sen tiles of gieat lights hath burst The

buckles on his breast Ant. und f'/oi. 1 1

Were we before our armies, and to light, I should do thus . . . ii 2
Your hostages I have, so have you mine ; And we shall talk before wo

tight ii

I have seen thee tight, When I have envied thy behaviour . . . ii (i
We came hither to tight with you. For my part, I am sorry it is turned

to a drinking

We Will tight with him by sea. By aoa ! what else? ....
l-'or that ho dimis us to't. Ho halh my hud dared him to single light .
I'll light at sea. I hiivn sixty sails, Osar none better ....

iioblu emperor, do not light by sen ; Trust not to rotten planks .
How appears tho light V On our sido liko the tokon'd pestiloncu .

I' the midst o' the light, When vantage liko a pair of twins appeared
And, like a doling mallard, Leaving tho light in height, Hies after her

1 will be treble-sinew'd, hearted, breathed, And light maliciously .

The next time I do tight, I'll make death love me

>Vhen valour preys on reason, It eats the sword it lights with

Know, that to-morrow the last of many battles We mean to light .
He will not tight with me, Domitius.-~No.~Why should he not? .

To-morrow, soldier, By sea and land I '11 light

Woo't thou light well? I'll strike, and cry 'Take all' .

You that will tight, Follow me close ; I '11 bring you to't

That he and Cu-sar might Determine this great war in singlo light !

Would i IK MI and those thy scars had onee primiil'd To make me light at

land I Iv r 3

Hegiu the tight : Our will is Antony be took alive ; Make It so knoun . iv i
1 light against thee I No : I will go seek Some ditch wherein lo die . iv 37
I would they'ld light i' the lire or i' the air ; We 'Id fight there too . iv 10 3
Or, like the Parthian, I shall flying fight ; Bather, directly fly Cymbeline i (i 20
They dare not light with me, because of the queen my mother . . ii 1 21
I am brought hither ... to fight Against my lady's kingdom . . v 1 18

So I'll tight Against the part I come with v 1 24

Stand, stand, and light ! Away, boy, from the troops, and save thyself v 2 13
Fight I will no more, But yield me to the veriest hind that shall Once,

touch my shoulder . . . . . . . . . . v 3 76

Fighter. You have yourself been a great tighter, thou now a man of

peace Mer. Wires ii 3 44

I am no lighter. I have heard of some kind of men that put quarrels

purposely on others, to taste their valour . . . .7'. A T i<y7j( iii 4 265
1 am no lighter : I am false of heart that way .... If. Talc iv 3 116
To Jhe latter end of a fray and the beginning of feast Fits a dull

lighter and a keen gue.st 1 Hen. IV. Iv 2

Tightest. Tlmu art an Amazon And lightest with sword of Deborah

1 Hen. VI. \ 2

See, then, thou flght'st against thy countrymen
Then, nobly, York ; 'tis for a crown thou llght'st

Flghteth. He flghteth as one weary of his life .

Fighting. Wronging the ancientry, stealing, fighting



ii 76

Ii 6 107

. iii 7 20
. til 7 ji

. in 7 j.j

. Ill 7 6.'
. ill lo H
. iii 10 ii
. iii 10 21
.iii 13 179
. iii 13 192
. iii 13 200
. iv 1 12
. iv 2 i
. iv 2 5
. iv 2 7
. iv 4 33
iv 4 17



HI 3

. 2 He n. VI. v 2

1 Hen. VI. i 2

IK Tale iii 3



When wilt thou leave lighting o' days und Coining o' nights? . 2 Hen. 71'. ii 4 251



TWITTING



525



FILL



Fighting. Thrice within this Jiour I saw him down ; thrice up again, and

fighting Hen. V. iv 6 5

Some among you have behold me fighting: Come, try upon yourselves

what you have seen me ...... Coriolanus iii 1 224

The servants of your adversary, And yours, close fighting Rom. and Jitl. i 1 1 14
O, step between her and her fighting soul .... Hamlet iii 4 113

In tny heart them WIIH n, kind of lighting, That would not lot HIM sleep . v 2 4
I '-'M l<> r. .II-JMI i , standing on tlm i-iu Hi, And fighting foot to foot

Ant. tt ml On. Iii 7 67
Kvory Jack-slave halh his bellyful of lighting .... CttiMinf ii 1 23

Fighting men. Thou shall have twelve thousand fighting men! Itich. II. iii 2 70
Of fighting men they have full three score thousand . . Hen. V. iv 3 3
Fig-leaves. These fig-leaven Have slime upon them, such as the aspic

leaves Upon the caves of Nile Ant. and Cleo. v 2 354

Flgo. Die and be damn'd ! and figo for thy friendship ! . . Hen. I', iii 60
Art thou his friend ? And his kinsman ton.- The llgo for thee, then I . iv 1 60
Fig's-end. She's full of most blessed condition. Blessed fig's-end I Olh. ii 1 256
Figure. Bravely the figure of this harpy hast thou Perform d, my Ariel

TVmjvst iii 3 83
She wooes you by a figure. What figure? By a letter, I should say

T. G. of Ver. ii 1 154

This weak impress of lovo is as a figure Trenched in ice . . . . iii 2 6
She works by charms, by spells, by the figure, and such daubery M. W. iv 2 185
If it bo but to scrape the figures out of your huslwind's brains . . iv 2 231
What figure of us think you ho will hear? . . . Mnr.i. fur Menu, i 1 17
Lot there bo some morn test made of my metnl, Before so noble and so

great a figure Be Ktamp'd upon it i 1 50

Doing, in the figure of a lamb, the feats of a lion . . . Much Arf# i 1 15
A most line figure ! To prove you a cipher . . . . L. L. Lost \ 2 58
A foolish extravagant spirit, full of forms, figures, shapes, objects . iv 2 68

What is the figure? what is the figure? Horns v 1 67

Three-piled hyperboles, spruce affectation, Figures pedantical . . v 2 408
Within his power To leave the figure or disfigure it . . Jlf. A". Dream i 1 51

Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste i 1 237

A coin that bears the figure of an angel Stamped in gold Mer. of Venice ii 7 56
In the brook: look but in, and you shall see him. There I shall see

mine own figure. Which I take to be either a fool or a cipher

As Y. Lite It iii 2 307
II. is a llgnro in rhetoric . . . . . . . . . v 1 .(5

lln will throw a figure in her ftirn and so disfigure her with it 7'. n/.S'/nrtc i 2 114
That the great figure of arntincll frames By self-unable motion All's Well iii 1 12
Kvon as a form of wax Hosolveth from his llgnro 'gainst the II ro A". John v 4 25

Tin; figure of Ood'fl majesty Richard II. iv 1 125

Ho apprehends a world of figures here, But not the form . 1 lien. IV. i 3 209
When \ve see the figure of the house, Then must we rat* the cost

2 Hen. IV. i 3 43
Wo fortify in paper and in figures, Using the names of men instead of

men i 3 56

Whose white investments figure innocence iv I 45

A crooked figure may Attest in little placo a million . . lien. V, Prol. 15

For there Is figures in all tilings iv 7 35

I speak but in the figures and comparisons of it iv 7 46

In this the heaven figures some event 3 Hen. 1*1. ii 1 32

Poor key-cold figure of a holy king! Ridutrd III. i 2 5

Whose figure even this instant cloud puts on . . . . Hen. mi. i 1 225
That unbodied figure of the thought That gave't surmised shape 7*. and C. i 3 16
The baby figure of the giant mass Of things to come at large . . . i 3 345
Like a gate of steel Fronting the sun, receives and renders back His

figure and his heat iii 3 123

While Verona by that name is known, There shall no figure at such rate

be set As that of true and faithful Juliet . . . Rom. and Jnl. v 3 301
These pencill'd figures are Even such as they give out . T. of Athena i 1 159
And write in thee the figures of their love, Ever to read them thine . v 1 157
Our captain hath in every figure skill, An aged interpreter, though

young v 3 7

Thou hast no figures nor no fantasies, Which busy cam tlmWH In the.

brains of men ; Therefore thou Hlrcp'nt so ROUltd



J. Ctavtrll 1 231

Hnmlrt I 1 IT
. I 1 109
. 1 2 199
. ii 2 98
iii 4 104



In the same figure, like the king that's dead
This portentous figure Comes armed through our watch .
A figure like your father, Armed at point exactly, cnp-a-po
A foolish figure ; But farewell it, for I will use no art

What would your gracious figure?

Now thou art an O without a figure : I am better than thou art now Lear i 4 212
My outward action doth demonstrato The native act and figure of my

heart In compliment extern ....... Othello i 1 62

A fixed figure for the time of scorn To point his slow umnoving flngerat 1 iv 2 54
Ho ! hearts, tongues, figures, scribes, bards, poets, cannot Think, speak,

cast, write, sing, number, ho 1 His lovo to Antony . Ant. and Cleo. iii 2 16

Figures, Why, such and such ; and the contents o' the story Cymbcliiie ii 2 26

Never saw I figures So likely to report themselves ii 4 82

In as like a figure iii 3 96


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 281 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522

Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 281 of 522)