John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 320 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 320 of 522)
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Further day. Wo adjourn this court till further day . Jfm. VIII. ii 4
Further deed. Without any further duud to havo them at all into their

estimation and report t \trialanits ii 2

Further delay. Without any further delay than this very evening . /,<*// | -2
Further edge. <~Hvo him a further edge, And drive his purpnso on Hamli-l iii 1
Further evil. Is't not to bo damn'd, To lot this canker of our nature

come In further evil? . . . . . . . . . .v2

Further fear. To thy further fear, Nay, to thy mere confusion Cymbeline iv 2
Further gait. To suppress His further gait herein . . . Hanilet i 2
Further good. It is an earnest of a further good That T mean ( 'imibeliiie i .1
Further grief. And for a further grief, (~!.d give you joy 1 . Pericles n fi
Further baiting. Como nearer; No further balling: satisfy mo t'gml>elin?i\\ '.



Further harm. No further harm Than so much loss of time Coriolanvs iii 1
But fur a satisfaction of my thought; No further harm . . Othello iii 3
Furthor leisure. Ere further leisure yield them further means Rii-hurd II. \ 4
Further life. For further life in this world 1 ne'er hope . Hen. VIII. ii 1
Further matter. My thoughts aim at a further matter . 3 Hen. VI. iv 1
Further means. Kin furthor leisure yield them further means Richard II. i -I
Further misery. Lot ua, thai have our tongues, 1'lot somo device of

further misery T. Andron. iii 1

Further necessity. There's no further necessity of qualities can make

her be refused Pericles iv 2

Further off. For my sake, my dear, Lie further off yot . M. N. Dream ii 2
But, gentle friend, for love and courtesy Lie further oil' . . . . ii 2
My lord, fly further oil ; Mark Antony is in your tents, my lord J. Ca'sar v 3
Be you well assured He shall fn strangeness stand no further oil Than

in a politic distance Othrlh iii 3

Further out. His oye-balls further out than whon he lived 2 Hen. Vt. iii 2
Further pleasure, Promptly Attend I.H further pleamiro . Mi'. \\,u ii 4
Come yon this afternoon, To know our further pleasure J!<wi. and Jni, I 1
Further reason. 1 will hmr Inrthor reason !..< i i,h . . . <>!>,. '!,. iv i!
Further recompense. Do not look for further recompense Than thine

own gladness that thou art employ'd .... An Y. Like it iii fi
Further revenge. May wo ... pursue him with any further revenge?

Mer. H'HTS iv 2

Further satisfying. If you seek For further satisfying , . Cymltliut ii 4
Further scope. His coming hither hath no further scope Than for his

lineal royalties Richard II. iii 3

Further search. Let's make further search For my poor son . Tempest ii 1
Further service. No furthor service, doctor, Until 1 send for thee Cyiub. i 5
Further settling. Trouble him no more Till further settling . . Lear iv 7
Further Space. And they are ready To-morrow, or at further space . v 3
Further time. And here commit you to my lord cardinal To keep, until

your further time of trial 2 Hen. VI. iil 1

Further trade. Havo yon any further trade with us? . . Hamlet iii 2
Further travel. Since he went from Egypt 'tis A space for further travel

Ant. and Cleo. ii 1

Further trial. Till further trial in those charges . . Hen. VIII. v 1
He hath resisted law, And therefore law shall scorn him further trial

Coriolanvs iii 1

Further use. Which should, indeed, give us a further use . All's }VM ii 3
Which once attain'd, Your highness knows, comes to no further use

But to bo known and hated 2 Hen. IV. iv 4

Furthor view. Mine eyos did sicken at the sight, and could not Endure

a furthor view Ant. and (.'lea. iif 10

Further warrant. Wonder not till further warrant . . . Much Ado iii 2

Further woe. What further woo conspires against ininongn? 7.*in. ftndJitl. v H

Furtherance. By your furtherance 1 am clothed in stool . . l*eridea ii 1

Omit no happy hour That may give furtherance to our expedition Hen. V. i 2

Cannot my body nor blood -sacrifice Entreat you lo your wonted

furtherance? Then take my soul 1 Hen. VI. v 3

Furtherer. Thy brother was a furtherer in the act . . . Tempest v 1

Furthermore, I pray you, show my youth old Shylock's house Mer. ofVei\. iv 2

And furthermore, we'll have the Lord Say's head . . 2 Hen. VI. iv 2

Furthermore tell him, we desire to know of him, Of whence he is Pericles ii 3

Furthest. Five summers have I spent in furthest Greece Com. of Errors i 1

I will fetch you a tooth picker now from the furthest inch of Asia M. Atlo n I

To the furthest verge That ever was survey'd by English eyo Richard II. \ \

Soon as the all-cheering sun Should in tbo furthest east begin to draw

The shady curtains from Aurora's bed . . . Item, and Jul. i 1
Fury. This music crept by me uiwn tbo waters, Allaying both their fury

and my passion With its sweet air Tempest i 2

Silver ! there it goes, Silver ! Fury, Fury 1 there, Tyrant, there I hark I iv 1
Yet with my nobler reason 'gainst my fury Do I tuku part . . . v 1

The fury of ungovern'd youth T. ft. of Ver. iv 1

He would never have boarded me in this fury . . . Mer. Wives ii 1
A fiend, a fury, pitiless and rough ; A wolf, nay, worse . Com. of Errors iv 2
Sent him home, Whilst to take order for the wrongs I went That here

and there his fury had committed v 1

Her cousin, an she were not possessed with a fury, exceeds her Much Ada i 1

I keep her as a vessel of thy law's fury /,. J,, I<oxt i 1

What zeal, what fury hath inspired thee now? iv 8

I in fury hither follow'd them, Fair Helena in fancy following me

M. N. Dream iv 1

I do oppose My patience to his fury, and am arm'd To suffer Met: of Veil, iv 1
Where two raging (Ires meet together They do consume the tiling that

funds their fury T. tfSknw ii I

A most hideous opinion of his rage, skill, fury and impetuosity T. Xiyht iii I
The fury spent, anon Did this break from her .... W. Tale iii 3
Till the fury of his highness settle, Come not before him . . . iv 1
Against whose fury and unmatched force The aweles* lion could not

wage the fight A'. John i 1

Not Death himself In mortal fury half so peremptory . . . . ii 1
Let belief and life encounter so As doth the fury of two desperate men iii 1

By all the blood that ever fury breathed v 2

Chasing tho royal blood With fury from his native residence RU-hurd if. ii 1
An oath of micUle might ; and fury wball abato . . . Hen. V. ii 1
Toll him my fury shall aliato, and I Tho crowns will take . . . iv 4
The duke Hath banish'd moody discontented fury . . 1 Urn. 17. iii 1
You tempt the fury of my three attendants, Lean famine, quartering

steel, and climbing lire jv 2

Mad ire and wrathful fury makes me weep iv 3

Dizzy-eyed fury and great rage of heart Suddenly made him from my

side to start iv 7

Proud prelate, in thy face I see thy fury 2 Hen. VI. i 1

Do calm the fury of this mad-bred flaw iii i

Like A.jax Telamonius, On sheep or oxen could I spend my fury . . v 1
The sight of any of tho house of York Is as a fury to torment my soul

3 Hen. VI. i 3
I am faint and cannot fly their fury : And were I strong, I would not

shun their fury 14

1 dare your quenchless fury to more rago 14

Like tho nelfsamo sea Forced to retire by fury of Iho wind . . . ii fi
This, in respect, a child : And men ne'er upend their fury on a child . v ft
How now, Thorsites ! what, lost, in tbiOabyrinth of thy fury ! Tr. tuiilt'i: ii 3
The prayers of priests nor times of sacrifice, Embarqucments all of fury

CorioUmva i 10

. T. Andntn. i 1
. iv 1
. iv 4



284
98

40

69

125
40



169

54



221

'34

112

323

44



138
346



268



18
"5

212



l6 9

73
33

275

93



39 2
258
26
45
92
35

M7
'93



482
265

454
3=

127

119
70
S u

123

10
28



M3

354



Whose fury not dissembled speaks his griefs .
And would not, but in fury, fright my youth .
As she in fury shall Cut off the proiul'st conspirator that lives



Welcome, dread Fury, to my wolul house

o, why should wrath bo mute, ami fury dumb?



.138
82

184



I'URV



593



GAINED



Fury. Mcrcutio slain ! Away to heaven, respective lenity, Ami lire-eyed

fury be my conduct now 1 Horn, and Jid. iii 1 129

Thy wild acts denote The unreasonable fury of a brasfc . , . . Hi 3 m

Put not another sin upon my head, Hy urging me to fury . . . v 3 63

With a noble fury ami fair spirit T. of Athens Hi 5 18

In that beastly fury IIo has ucen known to commit outrages . . . iii 6 71

It is a cause worthy my spleen and fury, That I may strike at Athens . iii 5 113

Know you the quality of Lord Thnon's fury? m 6 118

Make largo confusion ; and, thy fury spent, Confounded bo thyself! . iv 3 127

And mako thine own self the conquest of thy fury iv 3 341

Domestic fury and fierce civil strife Shall cumber all tho parts of Italy ;

IJlood and destruction shall be so in use . . . . J. Ca-sar iii 1 263

O, yet I do repent me of my fury, That I did kill them . . Macbeth ii 3 112

Some say he's mad ; others that lesser hate him Do call it valiant fury v 2 14

It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing v 6 27

Which the impetuous blasts, with eyeless rage, Catch in their fury Lear iii 1 9
In the fury of his heart, when the foul llend rages, eats cow-dung for

sallets iii 4 136

lu her prophetic fury sew'd the work . . . . Othello iii 4 72

I understand a fury in your words, But not tbe words . . . . iv 2 32

Thou sliouldst come like a Fury crown'd with snakes . Ant. atid Cleo. ii 6 40
Plant those that have revolted in the van, That Antony may seem to

spend his fury Upon himself iv G 10

Hut better 'twere Thou fell'st into my fury, for one death Might havn

prevented many Iv 12

,oc>k KOI fury not to ho resisted. Thim dnllrd, t thank time Cymbeltne iii 1



I nover s:iw Surh noble fury In so poor a thing
Furze. Ixmg heath, brown furze, any thing ....
Through Toolh'd briers, sharp furzes, pricking goss ami thorns



68

v & 8
Temjvst i 1 70
. iv I i8u



Fust. Sure, he ... gave un not That capability and god-like reason To

fust in us unused Hamlet iv

Fustian. The sorviiig-mcn in their new fustian ... T. n/.S/itri/ 1 iv

A fustian riddle 1 'j\ Nifjht ii

I cannot endure- such a fustian rascal 2 Hen. IV. ii

Swaggnr? swear? and discourse fusliau with one's own shadow? Othello ii
Fustilarian. You fustllarian ! I'll tickle your catastrophe . 2 Hen.' IV. ii
Fusty. At tins fusty slulFTho large Achilles . . . From his deep chrst

laughs out a loud applause Troi. and Crcs. I

A' wore as good crack a lusty nut with no kernel ii

The dull tribunes, That, with tho fusty plebeians, bale thine honours

Coriolamts i

Future. And all the fair effects of future hopes . . T. 0. of Ver. \
Like a prophet, Looks in a glass, that shows what future evils, Either

new, or by remissness new-conceived . . . Mcas. for Mcas. ii
What in time proceeds May token to tho future our past deeds All's Well \v

For present comfort and for future good W. Tide v

And future ages groan for this foul act . . . Richard II. iv

And give me signs of future accidents 1 Hen. VI. v

My heart's on future mischief set 2 Hen. VI. v

Make use now, and provide For thine own future safety lien. VIII. iii

Three talents on tbe present ; in future, all . . T. of Athens i

Tim future comes apace : What shall defend the interim? . . . ii

I frvl now Tho future in tho instant Mwlirth. i

That future strife May bn prevented now Lrnr i

Learn 'd indo'jd wnre that astronomer That know the stain as I his

characters ; IIo 'Id lay the future opun .... CjnnMine iii
Futurity. Nor present sorrows, Nor purposed inorlt in futurity, Can

ransom me into his love ogaiu Othello iii



, 4 39

1 49
0119
4 coj
8 282
1 66

8 id
1 in

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1 5



1 138
8 '4

2 84
2 421

1 141

2 157
5 59
1 45



4 117



G



G. About a prophecy, which says that G Of Edward's heirs tho murderer

shall be .......... Richard III. i

For my name of George begins with G, It follows in his thought that I
am ho ............. i

Gabble. Wouldst gabble like A thing most brutish . . . Temyest i
Choughs' language, gabble enough, and good enough . . All's Well iv
Have you no wit, manners, nor honesty, but to gabble like tinkers? T. N. ii

Gaberdine. . My best way is to creep under his gaberdine . Tempest ii
I hid mo under tho 'lead moon-calf's gaberdine for fear of the storm . ii
And spit u|>on my Jewish gaberdine t Mer, of Venice i

Gabriel. And Gabriel's pumps were all tinpink'd i' tho heel T. ofShrcio iv

Gad. And with a gad of steel will write these words . 7*. Andron, iv
And thfi king gone to-night! subscribed his power 1 Confined to ex-
hibition I All this done Upon the gad I ..... Lear i

Gadding. How now, my headstrong I where have you been gadding?

Rom. and JuL iv

Gadshill. Now shall we know if Gadshill have sot a match . 1 Hen. IV. i
Hy four o'clock, early at Gadshill ! there are pilgrims going to Canter-
bury ....... t ..... i

Gadshil! lies to-night in Rochester ........ i

FalslfifT, Hardulph, 1'eto and Gadshlll shall rob thoso men . . . i
Wlion thou raiment up Gadshill in tltn night to catch my horse . . iii
Your day's sorvico at .Shrewsbury hath n little gilded over your night's
exploit on Gad's-hill ........ 2 Hen,. IV. \

And you knew me, as you did when you run away by Gad's-hill . . ii

Gage. Tale trembling coward, there 1 throw my gage . . Richnrd II. i
Interchangeably hurl down my gage Upon this overweening traitor's
foot ........ .....

Throw down, my son, the Duke of Norfolk's gage .....

Ilage must be withstood : Give me bis gage ......

Take but my shame, And I resign my gage ...... i

Cousin, throw up your gage ; do you begin ...... i

There is my gage, tho manual seal of death, That marks thoooutfor hell iv
There is my gage, Aumerle, in gage to thine ...... iv

There t throw my gage, To prove it on thco to th oxtremest point . iv
Somo honest Christian trust mo with a gage, That Norfolk lies . . iv
Lords appellants, Your differences shall all rest under gage Till wo
assign you to your days of trial ........ iv

Shall it for shame bo spoken . . . That imin of your nobility and power
Did gage thorn both in an unjust behalf/ . . . .1 Hen, IV. i

(live me any page of thine, and I will wear it in my bonnet . Hen. V. iv
'Tis tho gage of one that I should fight withal, if ho bo alive . . . iv

Gaged. Wherein my time something too prodigal Hath left me gaged

Mer. of Venice I
Against the which, n moiety competent Was gaged by onr king Hamlet i

Gagged. Unless you laugh and minister occasion to him, ho is gagged

3'. Night i
Why laugh you at such a barren rascal? an you smile not, he's gagged v

Gaging. IJoth taxing mo and gaging mo to keop An oath . Troi. mul (Yes. v

Gagne. .T'ai gagno deux mots d'Anglois vltement . . .' Hen. V. iii

Gain. If haply won, perhaps a hapless- Rain . . . T. G. nf Ver. i

Ho gains by death that hath such MHMIIIS to dio . . Com. of Errors iii

I will looso his bonds And gain a husband by his liberty . . . v

If study's gain bo thus and this bo so, Study knows that which yot it

doth not know ......... I. L. Lost i

What should 1 gain Hy the exaction of the forfeiture? . Mcr. of Venice i
Who cbooseth me shall gain what many men desire . . . . ii

Laughed at my losses, mocked at my gains, scorned my nation . . iii
Uut I, his brother, gain nothing under him but growth As Y. Like It i
'Twill bring yon gain, or perish on the seas T. of Shrew ii

The gain I seek is, quiet in the match ....... ii

Tf both gain, all Tho gift doth stretch itself as 'tis received . All's Well ii
llnw mightily somo other times wo drown our gain in tears ! Ail's }\'dl iv
For my thoughts, you have them ill to friend Till your deeds gain UHMM v
The loss, the gain, tho ordering on 't, is all I'roperly ours . \V. Tele ii
That for thine own gain shouldst defend mine honour . . K. John i
flnin, be my lord, fur I will worship thee . . . . ' . . . ii

Hut what shall I gain by young Arthur's fall?. . . . . . iii

3 H



1 39

1 58

2 356

1 22
8 95

2 40

2 115

3 113
1 136

1 103

2 26

2 16
2 118

2 139
2 143
2 182
8 43

2 170

4 333
I 69

1 146
1 i6r
1 174
1 176

1 186
1 25
1 34
1 46
1 83



1 105

3 173
1 223
7 127

1 130
1 91

5 94
1 384
1 46

4 14

1 32

2 5?
1 340

1 67

3 165
7 37
1 58
1 14
1 331
1 332
1 3

3 79

5 183
I :6g
1 342
1 598

4 141



Gain. Your care is gain of care, by new care won . . Ricliard II. iv 1 197

And to thy worth will add right worthy gains v 6 12

Tho gain proposed Choked the respect of likely peril fear'd 2 Hen. IV. i 1 183
We offer'd to the king, And might by no suit gain our audience . . iv 1 76
Wherein, to gain tho language, 'Tis neeedful that the most immodest

word Be look'd upon and learn'd iv 4 69

And I had many living to upbraid My pain of it by their assistances . iv 6 194
Didst thou at first, to flatter us withal, Make us partakers of a littlo

gain, That now our loss might be ten times so much? . 1 Hen. VI. ii 1 52

By me they nothing gain on if I stay iv 6 36

Unchain your spirits now with spelling charms And try if they can

gain your liberty v 3 32

With such strict and severe covenants As little shall the Frenchmen gain v 4 115
My mind presageth happy gain and conquest ... 8 lien. J'J. v 1 71

And of our labours thou shalt reap the gain v 7 20

When they are gone, then must I count my gains . . Rii-hard III. i 1 162
Up and down my sons were toss'd, For me to joy and \\eep their pain

and loss ii 4 59

Hopes to find you forward Upon his party for tho gain thereof . . iii 2 47
Not as protector, steward, piinstitute, Or lowly factor for (mother's pain iii 7 134
Murder her brothers, and then marry hor ! Uncertain way of gain I . iv 2 64
Advantaging their Joan with in 1 Treat Of ten Umoa double gain nf happiness iv 4 374
Hut if I thrlvo, tho gain of my ntlempt Tim least of you Hliiill fdmro . v 8 267
Hid him strive To gain the love o' tho commonalty . . . 7/c. VIII. i 2 170

To gnin the popedom, And foe my fi Sends in Homo iii 2 212

Lords, one remain ; So I grow stronger, you morn honour gain . . v 8 182

Our sufferance is a gain to them C'oriolanvs i 1 22

You must think, if we give you any thing, we hope to gain by you . ii 8 78
And might not gain so great a happiness As have thy love T. A-ndron* ii 4 20
Graves only be men's works and death their gain ! . . T. of Athens v 1 225
Hotter be with the dead, Whom we, to gain our peace, have sent to

peace, Than on the torture of the mind to lie In restless ecstasy

JMtirbcth iii 2 20

Now spurs the latcd traveller apace To gain the timely inn . . . iii 8 7
O, well done I I commend your pains ; And every one shall share f tho

gains Iv 1 40

To gain a littlo patch of pruund Thai hath in it no profit bub tho name

Hnmlct\v 4 18

I will win for him an I can ; if not, I will gnin nothing but my slmmo . v 2 184
That sir which serves and necks for gain, And follows but for form,

Will pack when it begins to rain ,'>..:'* . . , Lear ii 4 79

Neglecting an attempt of en so and pain Othello i 3 29

Whether ho kill Cassio, Or Cassio him, or each do kill tho othpr, Every

way makes my gain ... v 1 14

Ambition, The soldier's virtuo, rather makes choice of loss, Than gain

which darkens him Ant. otirf I'lro. iii 1 24

flains or loses Your sword or minn, or mnslorlrss leaves both Ci/w/x-fme ii 4 59
Such gain tho cap of him that makes 'em fine, Yet keeps his book

nncross'd . iii 3 25

To gain his colour I 'Id Irlii parish of such ("Unions blond . . . iv 2 167
View Her countless glory, wttlcll dnscrt must gain . . . 7VnWrs i 1 31
I'll show you those In troubles reign, Losing a mil", n momttmn gnin ii (lower 8
IIo IH a happy king, since hn pains from hit* BUtJoctfl llm nnnm of good . jj 1 109
Never did my actions yet commence A deed might pain h<-r lovo . . ii D 54
You must RPPIM to do that frnrfully which you commit willingly, dCBplfle



profit where you have most gain



If that thy master would gain by me, Proclaim that. I can sins, weave .
ined. Gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder, I gam'd my



iv 2 129
iv 193
Gained. Gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder, I gam'd my

freedom ......... Cim. of Errors v 1 250

Thy grace being gain'd cures all disgrace in me . . - l ' 1'. L. Lost iv 8 67
Yes, I have gained my experience ..... As Y. Like It iv 1 26

Must boas boisterously mainlaln'd as gain'd .... X. i/onn III 4 136

Tho timo was blessedly lost wherein such preparation was gniued Ilex. !'. iv 1 193
And Ibis her casy-held imprisonment Hath gain'd thy daughter princely

liberty ........... 1 "" VI - v 3 M"

F mine own gain'd knowledge shnuld prnfnnn .... OllirHn I S 390

Thanks to you, That call'd mo timelier than my purpose hither ; For I

have gain'd by't ........ Ant. mid Clco. ii C 51



GAINED



594



GALLIA



Gained. Ho served with glory and admired success, So gain'd the sur-

adilitinn Leonatus C'ymbdiucil 3)

Who lialli gain'd Of education all the grace . . . 1'erides iv (lower 8
Gainer. Will thou, after the expense of so much money, be now a gainer?

Good body, I thank then Mer. JKii'cs ii 2 147

Gain-giving, it is such a kind of gain-giving, as would perhaps trouble

a woman Hamlet y 2 226

Gainsaid. You are too great to be by mo gainsaid . . . 2 Hen. 11 . i 1 91
Gainsay. I ne'er heard yet That any of these bolder vices wanted Less

impudence to gainsay what they did Than to perform it first IK. Taleiii 2 57
And whosoe'er gainsays King Edward's right, By this I challenge him

3 VVcii. VI. iv 7 74

What I should nay My tears gainsay v 4 74

If It ho known to him That 1 gainsay my deed, how may ho wound,

And worthily, my falsehood I lieu. Vlll. II 4 06

Hut the Just gods gainsay That any drop thou borrow'dst from thy
mother, My sacred aunt, should by my mortal awoid Ho drain'd 1

Troi. and {'CM. Iv 6 132

Gainsaying. In that I'll no gainsaying IK. Wile 1 2 19

Gait. Orait Jnmic es ; I know her hy her gait . . . I'mjuaMv 1 ioa

Does he not hold up his head, as it were, and strut in his gait? Jlfer. IKirui 4 31
The (Inn lixturo of thy foot would give an excellent motion to thy gait

in a semi-circled farthingale iii 3 68

When shall you hear that I Will praise a hand, a foot, a face, an eye, A

gait? I.. L. Lastly 8 185

His eye ambitious, his gait majestical, and his general behaviour vain . y 1 12
With pretty and with swimming gait . . . Jlf. N. Dream ii 1 130

This palpable-gross play hath well beguiled The heavy gait of night . v 1 375
With this field-dew consecrate, Every fairy take his gait . . . V 1 423
1 know the boy will well usurp the grace, Voice, gait ami action of a

gentlewoman: 1 long to hear him . . . T. it/.S/m-ir 1ml. 1 132

Did ever Ilian so become a grove As Kate this chamber with her princely

gait? ii 1 261

Formal in apparel, In gait and countenance surely like a father . . iv 2 65

There do muster true gait AU'iWettill 56

Therefore, good youth, address thy gait unto her . . . T. Nujht i 4 15
By the colour of his beard, the shape of his leg, the manner of his gait ii 3 171
To go, sir, to enter. I will answer you with gait and entrance . . iii 1 93
Hath not my gait in it the measure of the court? . . . IK. Tiile iv 4 756
Tislike the forced gait of a shuffling nag . . . 1 Hen. IV. iii 1 135
Ho had 110 legs that practised not his gait . . . .2 lien. IV. ii 3 23
In speech, in gait, In diet, in allectioiis of delight, In military rules . ii 8 28
Hhould with his lion gait walk the whole world . . . lien. V. II 2 122
In face, in gait, in speech, ho doth resemble ... 2 lieu. VI. iii 1 373
.Straight Springs out Into fust gait ; then stops again . 22e. Vlll. iii 2 116
Hor eyes, her hair, hor cheek, her gait, her voice . . Troi. and Cres. I 1 5-1
Tis he, I ken the manner of his gait ; He rises on the toe . . iv 6 14

Pass by and curse thy fill, but pass and stay not here thy gait T. of A. v 4 73

I do know him by his gait / Coaar i 3 132

To suppress His further gait herein Hamlet i 2 31

Neither having the accent of Christians nor the gait of Christian, pagan,

nor man, have so strutted and bellowed iii 2 35

Good gentleman, go your gait, and let poor volk pass . . . Lear iv 6 242
Methought thy very gait did prophesy A royal nobleness . . . v 3 175

I know his gait, 'tis he Othello v 1 23

Dull of tongue, and dwarfish! What majesty is in her gait? Re-
member, If e'er thou look'dst on majesty . . . Aut. and Cleo. iii 8 20
Galathe. Now here he lights on Galatho his horse . . Troi. and Crcs. v 6 20
Gale. And promise you calm seas, auspicious gales . . . Tempest v 1 314
What happy gale Blows you to Padua hero from old Verona? T. of Shrew i 2 48
A little gale will soon disperse that cloud . . . . S lien. VI. \ S 10


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 320 of 522)