John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 336 of 522)
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Like the sun 'gainst glass, Or like an overcliarged gun, recoil 2 Hen. VI. iii
A brood of traitors have we here ! Look in a glass, and call thy

linage so v

Shine out, fair sun, till I have bought a glass, That I may see my

shadow as I pass Richard 111. i

And I for comfort have but one false glass, Which grieves me . . ii

My kingdom stands on brittle glass iv

And likn a gla^s Hid break i' tho rinsing Hen. VIII. i

Hut muni in Troilun thousand fold I see Than in the glass of Pandar's

praise may be ; Yet hold I off Troi. and (.'res. i

Pride is his own glass, his own trumpet, his own chronicle . . . ii

Pride hath no other glass To show itself but, pride iii

And schoolboys' tears take up The glasses of my eight ! . Coriofrmus iii
I, your glass, Will modestly discover to yourself That of yourself which

you yet know not of J. Coz&ar i

That unicorns may be betray'd with trees, And bears with glasses . ii
Yet the eighth appears, who bears a glass Which shows me many more

Macbeth iv

The glass of fashion and the mould of form, The observed of all Hamlet iii
You go not till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part

of you iii

There was never yet fair woman but she made mouths in a glass . Lear iii
(let thee glass eyes; And, like a ucurvy politician, seem To seethe

things thou dost not iv

To the mnre mature A glass that feated thorn .... Cymldine i
It is not vain-glory for a. man and his glass to confer in his own chamber iv
Fair glass of light, I loved you, and could still . . . 1'ericles i
Whose men and dames so jetted and adorn'd, Like one another's glass . i

To me ho seems like diamond to glass ii

Crack the glass of her virginity, and make the rest malleable . . iv
Glassed. Who, tendering their own "rth from where they were glass'd,

Did point yon to buy them, along as you pass'd . . L. L. I^ost ii
Glass-faced. From the glass-faced flatterer To Apemantus T. of Athens i

Glass gazing, superserviceable, finical rogue Lear ii

Glassy. Most ignorant of what he's most assured, His glassy essence,

liko an angry upo, Plays such fantastic tricks . . Meas.ftir Mc"s. ii
AH plays the sun upon the glassy stream* . . . .1 Hen. VI. v
That shows his hoar leaves in the glassy stream . . . Hamlet iv
Glazed. Sorrow's eye, glazed with Minding tears, Divides one thing

entire to many objects Richard II. ii

Gleam. By thy gracious, golden, glittering gleams, I trust to take of

truest Thisby sight M. N. Dream v

Glean. I shall think it a most plenteous crop To glean the broken ears

after the man That the main harvest reaps . . As Y. Like It iii
Which is a wonder how his grace should glean it . . Hen. V, i

What harm can your bisson conspectnities glean out of this character?

Coriolanus ii

And to gather, So much ris from occasion you may glean . Hnmlft ii
Gleaned. How much low peasantry would then be glean 'd From the

truo seed of honour !....... Mer. of Venice ii

Not for Bohemia, nor the pomp that may Be thereat glean'd . W. Talc iv

(tailing the gleaned land with hot assays lien. V. i

When he needs what you have gleaned, it is but squeezing you Hamlet iv
Gleaning. Yes, that goodness Of gleaning all the land's wealth into one,

Into your own hands, cardinal, by extortion . . Hen. VIII. iii
Gleeful. Wherefore look'at thou sad, When every thing doth make a

gleeful boast? T. Andron. ii

Gleek. Nay, I can gleek upon occasion . . . M. N. Dream iii

Now where's the Bastard's braves, and rharles his gleeks ? 1 Hen. VI. iii

What will you give us ? No money, on my faith, but the gleek R, and J. iv

Gleeklng. 1 have seen you gleeking and palling at this gentleman Urn. V. v

Glendower. Come, lords, away, To fight with Glendower Richard II. iii

To fight Against the irregular and wild Glendower . . .1 Hen. IV. i

Betray'd The lives of those that he did lead to fight Against that groat

magician, damn'd Glondower i

Hand to hand, II * did confound the liest part of an hour In changing

hardime?it with great Glendowt-r i

Thou dost b^lle him ; He never did ru-ountcr with Glondower . . i



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Glendower. He durst as well have met the devil alone As Owen Glen-
dower for an enemy i l Hen. IV. I

When time is ripe, which will be suddenly, I'll steal to Glendower . i
Ix>rd Edmund Mortimer, my lord of York, and Owon Glendower . . ii
Wli.it a plague call you him? O, Glendower. Owen, Owen, the same . ii
Could the world pick thee out three such enemies again as that fiend

Douglas, (hat spirit IVrry, and that devil Olendowirr? . . . ii
I/ml Mortimer, and cousin Ulondmvpr, Will yon flit down ? . . .iii
lie wiHhrlh you in heaven. And you in hull, ns oft as ho hears Owen

Glendower spoke of jii

All westward, Wales beyond the Severn shore, And all the fertile land

within tliat bound, To Owen Glendower ; .iii

My father Glendower is not ready yet, Nor shall we need his help . iii

that Glendower were come ! iv

My father and Glendower being both away, The powers of ns may serve iv
With Owen Glendower's absence thence, Who with them was a rated

sinew too . iv

Myself and you, son Harry, will towards Wales, To fight with Glendower v
One power against the French, And one against Glendower . 2 Hen. IV. i

1 have received A certain instance that Glendower is dead . . .iii
This Edmund, . . . but for Owen Glendower, had been king. 2 Hen. VI. ii

Glib. I had rather glib myself than they Should not produce fair issue

IV. Talf ii

O, these encounterers, BO glib of tongue ! . . . . Troi. find ('res. iv
As wnll of glib ami slippery creatures ns Of giavo . . T. of Athtun \
I want that glib mid oily ittt, To Hpcak and purposo not. . . Lear I
Glide. The current that wilh gen tin murmur glides . . T. C. of Ver. il
Every one lets forth his sprite, In the church-way paths to glide M.N.D.v
It unlink'd itself, And with indented glides did slip away As Y. Like It iv
O, she is lame ! love's heralds should be thoughts, Which ten times

faster glide than the sun's beams .... Rom. and Jitl. ii
If one of mean affairs May plod it in a week, why may not I Glide

thither in a day? Cymbeline iii

Glided. Were there a serpent seen, with forked tongue, That slily glided

towards your majesty 2 Hen. VI. iii

Glldeth. More water glideth by the mill Than wots the miller of 7'. An. ii

Gliding. Why all these fires, why all these gliding ghosts . J. ttrwr i

Glimmer. My wasting lamps some fading glimmer left . Com. of Errors v

So evident That it will glimmer through a blind man's eye . 1 Hm. VL ii

The west yet glimmers with some streaks of day . . . Marheth iii

Glimmering. Didst thou not lead him through the glimmering night

From Perigenia? M. N. Dream ii

As bright, as clear, As yonder Venus in her glimmering sphere . . Hi

Through the house give glimmering light, By the dead and drowsy fire v

Glimpse. Whether it be the fault and glimpse of newness Metis, for Meas. i

There is no man hath a virtue that he hath not a glimpse of Tr. and Cr. i

In complete steel Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon . Hamlet i

Glister. AH that glisters is not gold ; Often have you heard that told

Mer. of Venire il

How he glisters Thorough my rust ! 1C. Tale ill

Away, and glister like the god of war K. John v

Glistering. And make stale The glistering of this present . ir. Tale iv
Like glistering Phaethon, Wanting the manage of unruly jades Rich. II. iii
With forms being fetch'd From glistering semblances of piety Hen. V. ii
To be perk'd up in a glistering grief, And wear a golden sorrow Hen. VIII. ii
Gallops the zodiac in his glistering coach .... T. Andron. ii
Glittering. By thy gracious, golden, glittering gleams . M. N. Dream v
Plays the alchemist, Turning with splendour of his precious eye The

meagre cloddy earth to glittering gold K. John iii

His glittering arms he will commend to rust . . . Richard II. iii
Never brandish more revengeful steel Over the glittering helmet of

ray foe ! iv

My reformation, glittering o'er my fault, Shall show more goodly and

attract more eyes 1 Hen. IV. i

Glittering in golden coats, like images . . . . . . Jv

What is bore? Gold? yellow, glittering, precious guld? T. of Athens Iv
llnr epitaphs In glitterijiK golden characters .... I'rricles lv
Globe. The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it

inherit, shall dissolve Tempest iv

She is spherical, like a globe ; I could find out countries in her C. of Er. iii
We the globe can compass soon, Swifter than the wandering moon

M. N. Dream iv

When the searching eye of heaven is hid, Behind the globe Richard II. iii
Thou globe of sinful continents, what a life dost thou lead ! . 2 Hen. IV. ii
Wheresoe'er thou art in this world's globe, I'll have an Iris that shall

find theft out 2 Hen. VI. iii

And make a sop of flll this solid globe .... Trid. und Cres, 1

H<! (hy wagK"u p r, And whirl along with tlino about the globe T. Andron. v

While memory holds a seat In this distracted globo . Hamlet i

The warm sun ! Approach, thou beac<m to this under globe ! . Lear ii

The affrighted globe Should yawn at alteration . . . Othello v

Glooming. A glooming peace this morning with it brings Rom. and Jnl. v

Gloomy. Darkness and the gloomy shade of death Environ you ! I Hen. VI. v

In the ruthless, vast, and gloomy woods .... 7'. Andron. iv

Glorified. I will not return Till my attempt so much be glorified As to

my ample hope was promised K. John v

Glorify. O, two such silver currents, when they join, Do glorify the

banks that bound them in il

Death's dishonourable victory We with our stately presence glorify

1 Hen. VI. I
Tell us hero tho circumstance, That wo for then may glorify tho I/ml

2 Hen. VI. II

Glorious. In that glorious supposition think He gains by death C. of Er. iii
So the life that died with shame Lives in death with glorious fame

Much Adn v

Study is like the heaven's glorious sun L. L. Lost i

Of sovereign parts he is esteem 'd ; Well fitted in arts, glorious in arms . ii

This is the air ; that is the glorious sun T. Night iv

And kiss him with a glorious victory K. John ii

To solemnize this day the glorious sun Stays in his course . . .iii
By the glorious worth of my descent, This arm shall do it . Richard II. \
God for his Richard hath in heavenly pay A glori'mia angel . . .iii
Banish'd Norfolk fought For Jeau Christ in glorioun Christian field . iv

In the closing of some glorious day 1 Hen. IV. Iii

I shall make this noi them youth exchange His glorious deeds for my
indignities. Percy is but my factor, good my lord, To engross up
glnri'His dredH on my behalf . * .... Ill

The eiifnrprise whereof Shall b to yon, CIH tin, Hkn glni IOUN . Ifm }'. il
In tli in gtorluns and wl I Tough ten Held Wit Veitt (ogoMmr in our chivalry fv
A far nmro glorious Htat thy MOII! will timkr Tlian Julius f>'wir 1 Ihx, VI. I



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GLORIOUS



GLOUCESTER



Like (o the, glorious sun's tnuiMpuruul bourns .
Now, by my faith, lords, 'twas a glorious day .
And cried ' A crown, or else a glorious tomb ! '



(UorlouH. I'V.-incn, 1 1 1, mi j>h In bhy glorloiiH nronhotOHH I llocovnr'd Is Mm

Imvnnrorlean* .... .... 1 //< ''/. I H 8

Never ((lorloim nun rollnx his heanm Upon tho country wlmrn you iimkil

uhodnl v t 87

I fur lather is no better than an earl, Although in glorious titles ho excel v . r > 38

Put forth thy hand, reach at tho glorious gold . . . '-' lti. VI. i '1 ^\

\ will remedy this gear ore long, Or soli my title for ft glorious giuvn . iii 1 ya

iii 1 353

. v 3 ^9

t __ 3 lien. VI. i 4 16

Set) how the morning opes her'goldeu gates, And takes her farewell of

the glorious sun I ii 1 as

Do I seo three suns? Three glorious suns, each ouo a perfect sun . ii 1
Until my mis-shupcd trunk that bears this In-ad Be round impaled with

, glorious crown

1 spy u black, suspicious, threatening cloud, That will oucuuntor with

our glorloiiH aim v 3 5

Nnw i* Hi" winter ul'our discontent Made glnrlmifl summer l.y this sun

( Ymk Wiluud III. i 1 a

i Lei ri.ne is tho glorious planet Sol In noble eminence onthroned

Troi. and (Vr-*. i 3 89
Whoso glorious deeds, but in these fields of late, Made emulous missions

'inongst the gods themselves iii 3 188

Let all untruths stand by thy stained name, And they'll seem glorious v 2 180

No, by the llame of yonder glorious heaven, He shall not carry him . v 23
The glorious gods sit in hourly synod about thy particular prosperity !

Coriolanits v 2 74

A better head her glorious body llts T. And fan. i 1 187

Thou art As glorious to this night, being o'er my head, As is a winged

messenger of heaven J&H. atulJid. ii 2 27

Would in action glorious I had lost Those legs that brought mo ! Uthello ii 3 186

All quality, Prido, pomp and circumstance of glorious war! . . . iii 8 35,1

But must misomblo Is tho dosiro that's glorious . . . Oymldine i (J 7
Tho purehu.se is to make men glorious ; Kt bonum quo antiquius, eo

uielius Perides i Gower g

I loved you, and could still, Were not this glorious casket stored with ill i 1 77

Not an hour, In the day's glorious walk, or peaceful night . . . i 2 4

Against the face of death, I sought the purchase of a glorious beauty . i 2 72

To remember what ho does, Build his statuo to make him glorious ii Gower 14
Gloriously. When his love ho doth espy, Lot her shine us gloriously As

tho Venus of tho sky AI. N. Drwm iii 2 106

Glory. Tho uncurtain glory of an April day . . . T. 0. ofVa: I 3 85

Him dntarmliiUH Herself I lie glory nl a creditor . . . JfOM./or Jl/u. i 1 j>

That young start-up hath all Urn glory of my overthrow . Muc/i Aih I 8 fiy

Cupid is no longer im archer : his glory tdml! be ours . . . . ii 1 401

Maiden pride adieu ! No glory lives Iwhlud the back of such . . ill 1 iu>

His disgrace is to be called boy ; but his glory is to subdue men L. L. Lost i 2 186



26



171



iii 8
iii 3



So it is sometimes, Glory grows guilty of detested crimes

Do but behold the tears that swell in me, And they thy glory through

my grief will show iv 3 38

That have I told my love, In glory of my kinsman . . M. N. Dream v 1 47
So doth the greater glory dim tho less .... Mer. of Venice v 1 93
Ha, majesty I how high thy glory towers, When the rich blood of kings

is set on fire ! K. Juhn ii 1 350

What have yon lost by losing of this day ? All days of glory, joy . . iii 4 117
Till I have sot a glory to this hand, By giving it the worship of revenge iv 3 71
Thus have I yielded up into your hand Tho circle of my glory . .viz
Happily may your sweet self put on Tho lineal stato and glory of tho

hind 1 v 7 102

I see thy glory like a shooting star Fall to the base earth Richard II. ii 4 19

Arm, arm, my namo 1 ii puny subject strikes At thy groat glory . . iii 2

To dim his glory and to sUiin the track Of his bright passage

And threat the glory of my precious crown ....

You may my glories and my state depose, But not my griefs ; still am

I king of those

Made glory base and sovereignty a slave, Proud majesty a subject

A brittle glory shineth in this face : As brittle as the glory is tho face .

1 will call him U> so strict account, That ho shall render every glory

up, Yea, twen tho slightest worship .... 1 Hen. ./I', ill 2 150
Think not, I'orey, To Hliunt with me In glory any moro . . . . v 4 64
I will rise there with so full a glory That I will dazzle all the oyon Hen. V. I 2 278
li vest yourself, and luy apart Tho borrow'd glories that by gift^of heaven,

lly law of nature ami of nations, 'long To him and to his heirs . . ii 4 79

Let him cry ' 1'raiso and glory on his head 1' iv Prol. 31

What! shall we cnrso the planets of mishap That plotted thus our

glory's overthrow? 1 Hen. VI. i 1 24

In complete glory she reveal'd herself i 2 3

Glory is like a circle in the water, Which never ceaseth to enlarge itself i 2 133
She hath behold the man Whose glory lllls the world with loud report . ii 2 43

Before whose glory I was great in arms ii 6 24

Yet heavens have glory for this victory 1 iii 2 117

Ascribes tho glory of his conquest got First to my God and next unto

your grace Ill 4 u

Tills is Mm Intent glory of thy praise That I, thy enemy, duo theo withal iv 2 33
.Sun;ly, by all tho glory you have won, An if I lly, I am not Tulbot's son Jv 50

Whose lil'o was England's glory, Gallia's wonder iv 7 48

Tu the Duuphiii's tent, To know who hath obtained the glory of thoday iv 7 52
I shall be well content with any choice Tends to God's glory . . . v 1 27

Now, France, thy glory droopeth to the dust y 8 29

Will you pale your head in Henry's glory, And robins temples? 3 Hen, VI. i 4 103
Illume me not: 'Tin love I bear thy glories makes mo speak . . . ii 1 158
Had he match'd according to his state, He might have kept that glory ii 2 153

Lo, now my glory smear'd in dust and blood I v 2 23

l.nii^ mayst thou livo To bear his image and renew his glories ! . . v 4 54

outlive thy glory, like my wretched selfl . . . liichard III. i 3 203

Trinces have but their titles for their glories, An outward honour I'm an

inward toil ............

Your due ..f birth, The lineal glory of your royal house ,

And in the vapour of my glory smother'd

Go, go, i>oor soul, I envy not thy glory

Farewell, thou wofid welcomer of glory I

Tho high imperial typo of this earth's glory

The crown, usmp'd, disgraced his kingly glory

When Those suns of glory, those two lights of men, Met . He,
Then you lost The view of earthly glory .



Iv 1 192
iv 1 251
iv 1 287



I heartily forgive 'em : Yet let 'em look they glory not in mischief
I'Yom that full meridian of my glory, I haste now to my setting .
lit a unit of glory, But i'ar beyond my depth
in pomu
opou'd



i 4 78

. iii 7 121

iii 7 164

jv 1 64

iv 1 90

iv 4 244

iv 4 371

nil. i 1 6

i 1 14

. ii 1 66

. iii 2 224

iii 2 360

Ill 2 365



Glory. AH my glmiiw In Unit mm wmimu 1 IUIVH hmt for ovor licit, mi. Ill 2 .|.>8

Wulnny, that onn> (.rod HIM wayn ol'gloiy Ml '-? | r.

Tlin greaUiHi. monarch now alivo may glory In mirh an honour . . v It if-(
What glory unr Achilles shares from Hector, Wore ho not proud, wo all

should share with him Troi. and (".'*. i 3 367

Wero it nut glory that wo moro affected Thau the performance of our

heaving spleens H 2 195

Would not lose Bo rich advantage of a promised glory . . . . ii 2 204
Let Jineas livo, If to my sword his fatn b not tho glory, A thousand

complete courses of tho sun 1 iv 1 26

The glory of our Troy doth this day lie On his fair worth . . . iv 4 149
And, in the last, When he had carried Home and that we look'd For no

less spoil than glory Conolautts v i> 44

And jatient tools, Whose children ho hath slain, their base throats tear

With giving him glory v il 54

Let it bo your glory To see her tears T. Andi-on. ii 3 139

That bunk in many's oyun doth wliuro tho glory, That in gold clasps

locks in thognldrn (dory Horn. itndJtil. I It yi

When wo I'M' rccompuiiHo Imvo praised tho vile, It hlainn Urn glory In

that happy vrr.su Which aptly sings the ginnl . . T. of Athens i I 16
Like madness is tho glory of this life, As this pomp shows to a lit Ho oil

and root i 2 139

O, the lierce wretchedness that glory brings us! iv 2 30

Who would be so mock'd with glory V or to livo But in a dream of

friendship? iv 2 33

Dost thou lie so low? Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils,

Shrunk to this little measure t . . . . . J. Ctestir Hi 1 149

His glory not extenuated, wherein he was worthy iii 2 42

Do grace to Ciesar's corpse, and grace his speech Tending to Ca-sar's

glories iii 2 63

1 shall havo glory by this losing day V fi 30

Let's away, To part tho glories of this happy day y 5 81

Was never call'il to bear my part, Or show tho glory of our art Afacbctit iii 5 y
Would nut lot him partake in the glory of tho action . Ant. and I7c'. iii & 9

False-pi ay 'd my glory Unto an enemy's triumph iv 14 19

Their story is No less in pity than his glory which Brought them to be

lamented . . .* v 2 365

He served with glory and admired success .... Oymbeline i 1 32
Emboldcn'd with tho glory of her praise, Think death no hazard reridc* i 1 4
Her face, like heaven, onticeth theo to view Her countless glory . . 1131
And make u conquest of unhappy mo, Whereas no glury'a got to

overcome 1 I 711

As jewels lu*n their glory Jf llflgloctod, Ho princes their IOHOWJIH . . ii -J i _
Von king's to nm like to my lather's pir.turu, Wlilrh tells me In (hut

glory once bit was II 3 38

Kven in tho height and prldoofall his glory ii 4 6

Glosa. Our garments, boing, ns they were, drenched in the sea, hold

notwithstanding their freshness and glosses . . . Ttinjvst ii 1 6j
That would be as great a soil in the new gloss of your marriage as to

show a child his new coat and forbid him to wear it . Much Ado iii 2 6
The only soil of his fair virtue's gloss, If virtue's gloss will stain with

any soil, Is a sharp wit L. L. Lost ii 1 47

'Tis [virginity] a commodity will lose the gloss with lying . All's Wdl i 1 167
With forged quaint conceit To set a gloss upon his bold intent 1 lien,. VI. iv 1 103
Sullied all his gloss of former honour By this . . . wild adventure . iv 4 6
For all this nattering gloss, He will be found a dangerous protector

2 Hen. VI. i 1 163
That's tho plain truth : your painted gloss discovers, To men that

understand you, words and weakness .... Hen. VIU. v 8 71
Vet all his virtues, Not virtuously on his own part beheld, Do in our

eyes begin to loso their gloss ..... Ti'ui. and Ores, n il 128

Ceremony was but devised at lirst To set a gloss on faint deeds T. of A. i 2 16

Worn now in their newest gloss, Not cast aside so soon . . Madn-fh i 7 34

Bo content to slubber tho gloss of your new fortunes . . . Othi-llo i y 227

Gloater. Umuvomit Gloslor I Thuu art reverent Touching thy spiritual

function, not thy life 1 lien. VI. iii 1 49

Gloucester. In the county of Gloucester, justice of peace . Mer. Wives i 1 5
That he did plot the Duke of Gloucester's death . . . Richard 11. i I 100
For Gloucester's death, I slew him not; but to my own disgrace Neg-
lected my sworn duty in that case ... . . . I I 13-j

But Thomas, my dear lord, my lil'o, my Gloucester I 2 16

The best way is to vengo my Gloucester's death i 2 36

My brother Gloucester, plain well-meaning soul, Whom fair befal in

heaven 'mongst happy souls 1 il 1 128

Not Gloucester's death, nor Hereford's banishment, Not Gannt's rebukes ii 1 165
To my sister Gloucester ; Bid her send me presently a thousand pound ii 2 90

What dost thou know of noble Gloucester's death? iv 1 3

In that dead time when Gloucester's death was plotted . . . iv 1 10

Vanntingly thou spakcst it, That thou wert cause of noble Gloucester's

death iv 1 37

Humphrey, my son of Gloucester. Where is tho prince your brother?

2 Hen. IV. iv 4 i?

Warwick I QloncoHlor! Olaronco! Duth tho king call V . . . . fv f> 4^
Tim Duku of Gloucester would speak with yon . . . lien. \'. iii 2 sy
Tint Duke of Gloucester, to whom the unler of the siege is given . . iii 2 69

Gloucester, 'tis true that we are in great danger iv 1 i

My brother Gloucester's voice? Ay ; I know thy errand, I will go with

theo iv 1 323

My dear Lord Gloucester, and my good Lord Exeter . . . . iv a 9

Warwick and Ttilbot, Salisbury and Gloucester iv 3 54

My Lord of Warwick, and my brother Gloucester, Follow Fluellen

closely iv 7 178

Gloucester, whate'er we like, thou art protector And lookost to com-
mand the prince and realm 1 lint. I'l. i 1 37


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 336 of 522)