John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 345 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 345 of 522)
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Will you UNO him kindly? Ho will linn your apron with gold
Hero u gnld fur thoo : l'ernover in that clear way thou goest .
Ijot us bosouch you That for our gold wo may provision havo .
And give you gold for such provision As our intents will need
Gold-bound. Thy hair, Thou other gold-bound brow, is like the first. A

third is like the former Macbeth iv 1 114

Golden. I would with such perfection govern, sir, To excel the golden

age Tempest ii 1 168

Whoso goldon touch could soften steel and stones . . 7". (7. of Ver. iii 2 79
Sail like my pinnace to these golden shores .... Mcr. ) Tires i 3 89
Spread o'or tho silver waves thy goldon hairs . . . Com. of Errnrs iii 2 48
I sco a man here needs not live by shifts, Whon in tho streets ho meets

such golden gifts iii 2

To see the fish Cut with her golden oars the silver stream . Much Ado iii 1
But, for the elegancy, facility, and golden cadence of poesy, caret

L. L. Lost iv 2 126

So sweet a kiss the golden sun gives not To those fresh morning drops, iv 3 26
Let me not die your debtor, My red dominical, my golden letter . . v 2 44
By Cupid's strongest bow, By his best arrow with the golden head

M. N. Dream i 1 170

By thy gracious, goldon, glittering gleams v 1 279

A golden mind stoops not to shows of dross . . . Mcr. of Venice u 7 20

But here an angel in a golden bed Lies all within ii 7 58

What says the golden cnost? ha ! let me seo ii 9 23

Those crisped snaky golden locks Which make such wanton gambols

with tho wind iii 2 92

A golden mesh to entrap tho hearts of mon Iil 2 122

And (loot tho timo earolossly, as they did In tho goldon world An Y. L. It I 1 125
With sillam coats and caps and goldon rings, With mils, T. of Shrew iv 8 55
How will she lovo, when thn rich goldon shaft Hath kill'd tho fiock of

all affections else That live in her ! T. Night i 1 35

His counsel now might do mo golden service iv 8 8

When that is known and golden time convents, A solemn combination

shall be made Of our dear souls v 1 391

And tho fire-robed god, Golden Apollo, a poor humble swain . 1C. Tale iv 4 30
Golden qnoifs and stomachers, For my lads to give their dears . . iv 4 226
And with hor [Fortune's) golden hand hath pluck'd on Franco A'. John, iii 1 57
What hath it done, That it in golden letters should bo set? , . . iii 1 85
And embrace His golden uncontroll'd enfranchisement . . Rirfwrd II. i 8 90
His goldon beams to you hero lent Shall point on mo and gild my

banishment 13 146

To lift shrewd steel against our goldon crown iii 2 59

Now is this goldon crown like a deep well iv 1 184

Toll mo, swoot lord, what Is't that lakes from thoo Thy stomach,

pleasure ami thy golden sleep? 1 Hen. IV. ii 3 44

Thy golden sceptre for a leaden dagger ii 4 419

The hour before the heavenly-harness'd team Begins his golden progress iii 1 222

Glittering in golden coats, like images iv 1 100

Pages folio w'd him Even at the heels in golden multitudes . . . iv 3 73

polish 'd perturbation I golden care ! That keep'st the ports of slumber

open wide To many a watchful night I ... 2 Hen. IV. iv 5 23
A sleep That from this goldon rigolhath divorced So many English kings iv 5 36
Tidings do I bring and lucky joys And golden times and happy news . v 3 100
A fout.ro for the world and worldlings basel I speak of Africa and

goldon joys v 3 104

And from his coffers Received the golden earnest of our death Hen. V. ii 2 169
Standing, Up in the air, crown 'd with the golden sun . . . . ii 4 58
Let us banquet royally, After this golden day of victory . 1 Hen. VI. i 31
To put a golden sceptre in thy hand And set a precious crown upon thy

head v3n8

Set this diamond safe In golden palaces, as it becomes . . . . v 8 170

That's the golden mark I soek to hit 2 Hen. VI. i 1 243

The golden circuit on my head, Like to the glorious sun's transparent

beams iii 1 352

See how tho morning opes her goldeu gates, And takes her farewell of

the glorious sun 1 3 Hen. VI. ii 1 21

His viands sparkling in a goldon cup, His body couched In a curious bod ii 5 52

To cross mo from tho goldon time I look fnr Ill 2 127

And morn unlikely Than to accomplish twenty golden crowns ! . . Ml 2 152

1 was, I must coiifofiN, Groat Albion's (jucitn In fonnor goldmi days . Ill II 7
That cropp'd tho goldon prime of this swent prince. . Richard JJf. \ 2 248



Golden. A,s if the golden fee for which 1 plead Were for myself Rich. III. iii 6 96

To bear the golden yoke of sovereignty iii 7 146

I would to God that the inclusive verge Of golden metal that must round

my brow Were red-hot steel ! iv 1 60

Never yet one hour in his bed Havo I onjoy'd the golden dew of sleep . iv 1 84
Ilidost thou that forehead with a golden crown? . , . , . iv 4 140
Put In hor louder heart thn aspiring fiamo Of golden Kovoivlgnly . . iv 4 329

The weary sun hath made a golden set v 8 19

To be perk'd up in a glistering grief, And wear a golden sorrow lien. VIII. ii 8 22
Too flaming a praise for a good complexion. I had as lief Helen's golden

tongue had commended Ttoilus tor a copper nose . Troi. and Crcs. i 2 114
As when the golden sun salutes the morn ... T. Andrnn. ii 1 5
Each wreathed in the other's arms, Our pastimes done, possess a golden

slumber ii 3 26

For I can smooth and 1)11 his aged ear With golden promises . . . iv 4 97
An hour before the worshipp'd sun Peer'd forth the golden window of

the east, A troubled mind drave me to walk abroad Rom. and Jid. i 1 126
That book in niany's eyes doth share the glory, That in gold clasps locks

in the golden story . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 92

Where unbrnised youth with unatufTd brain Doth couch his limbs,

there goldon sleep doth reign il 8 38

Thou cutt'st my head off with a golden axe, And smilostnpon thn stroke iii 3 22
The learned pate Ducks to tho goldon fool : all JH oblique T. of Athens iv 8 18
And chastise with tho vnluur of my longuo All that Impedes thoo from

tho golden round M<icln-fk\ fi ft)

1 have bought Golden opinions from all SOI!H of people . . . i 7 n

Hero lay Duncan, His silver skin laced with his golden blood . . ii 3 118
Hanging a golden stamp about their necks, Put on with holy prayers . iv 8 153
This majestical roof fretted with golden fire .... Hamlet ii 2 313
As patient as the female dove, When that her golden couplets are disclosed v 1 310
His purse is empty already ; all's golden words are spent . . . v 2 136
Thou hadst little wit in thy bald crown, when thou gavest thy golden

one away Lear i 4 179

And golden Phoebus never be beheld Of eyes again so royal ! A. and C. v 2 320
And winking Mary-buds begin To ope their golden eyes . . Cymbdine ii 3 27
The roof o 1 tho chamber With golden cherubins is fretted . . . ii 4 88
Who was tho first of Britain which did put His brows within a golden

crown Ill 1 01

Goldon lads and git IH nit must, AM clilliliioy-HWOQporfi, oomo to diiHl . Iv Ii vfa
Ho am I, That havo this golden chance ami know not why . , . v 4 132
Before theo stands this fair HoRporldos. With gulden fruit . Pericles 1 1 28
Should at these early hours Shako oil the goldon slumber of repose . iil 2 23
Hor epitaphs In glittering golden characters express A general praise toher iv 8 44
Golden fleece. Her sunny locks Hang on her temples like a golden fleece

Mer. of Venice i 1 170

Worthy Saint Michael and the Golden Fleece ... 1 Hen. VI. iv 7 69
Goldenly. My brother .Taques he keeps at school, and report speaks

goldonly of his profit An Y. Like Hi I 6

Goldsmith. While- 1 go to tho goldsmith's house, go thou And buy a

rope's end Com. of Errors iv I 15

But, soft 1 1 sec tho goldsmith. Get theo gone ; Buy thou a rope . iv 1 19

But neither chain nor goldsmith came to me iv 1 24

I see, sir, you have found the goldsmith now iv 3 46

Thou hast suborn'd the goldsmith to arrest me iv 4 85

Whose suit is lie arrested at? One Angelo, a goldsmith . . . iv 4 135
Bring mo whore the goldsmith is : I lone to know the truth hereof at large iv 4 145
That goldsmith there, were he not pack'd with her, Could witness it . v 1 219

There did this perjured goldsmith swear me down v 1 227

You say he dined at home ; the goldsmith here Denies that saying . v 1 273
Have yon not been acquainted with goldsmiths' wives? An Y. Like It iii 2 288
Golgotha. This land bo call'd The field of Golgotha . . Richard II. iv 1 144
Except they meant to bathe in reoking wounds, Or memorize another

Golgotha, I cannot U'll Macbeth i 2 40

Goltases. None but Samsons ami Goliases It Bcmlcth forth to skirmish.

One to ten ! 1 Jlcn, VI. I 2 33

Goliath. For in tho nlmpo of man, Master Brook, I fear nut Goliath with a

weaver's beam Mer. Wives v 1 23

Gondola. In a gondola wore seen together Lorenzo and his amorous

Jessica Mcr. of Venice \i 8 8

I will scarce think you havo swam in a gondola . . As Y. Like It iv 1 38
Gondolier. With a knave of common hire, a gondolier . . . Othello i 1 126

Gone. But 'tis gone. No, it begins again Tempest i 2 394

I not doubt He came alive to land. No, no, he's gone . . . . ii 1 122
Take his bottle from him : when '.liat's gone lie shall drink nought but

brine iii 2 73

Let us not burthen our remembrance with A heaviness that's gone . v 1 200
Wilt thou bo gone? Sweet Valentino, adiou ! T. <i. of Ver. i 1 it

Will yo bo gone ! That you may ruminate 1 2 49

Go got ynu gone, ami let the papers lie 12 100

What, gone without a word? Ay. so true lovo should 'do: it cannot apeak ii 2 16
My foolish rival ... Is gone with her along, and I must alter . . ii 4 176
But, Valentino being gone, I'll quickly cross By some sly trick blunt

Thurio's dull proceeding if 6 40

No matter who's displeased when you aro gone ii 7 66

For which the youthful lover now is gone And this way comes he . iii 1 41

If she do chide, 'tis not to have yon gone iii 1 98

Take no repulse, whatever she doth say ; For ' get you gone,' she doth

not mean 'away!' iii 1 ior

Is your countryman According to our proclamation gone? Gone, my

good lord iil 2 12

Where is Launce? Gone to seek his dog iv 2 78

I will follow, more to cross that lovo Than hate for Silvia that is gone

for love v 2 56

You may be gone ; it is not good you tarry here . . . Mer. Wives i 4 117
I would have sworn his disposition would havo gone to tho truth of his

words ii 1 6 1

BP gone, and come when you are called iii 3 19

There's an old woman, a fat woman, gone up into his chamber . . iv 5 13
There was, mine host, an old fat woman oven now with me ; but she's gone iv 6 26
They are gone but to meet the duko, villain : do not say they bo fled . iv 5 72
They had gone down too, but that a wise burgher put in for them

Men*, for Mcas. i 2 102

This is the point. The duke is very strangely gone from hence . i 4 50

All hope is gone, Unless you have the grace by your futr prayer . . i 68

Got you gone, and let me hoar no more of you ii 217

What's your will, father? That now ynu are romo, yon will bo gono . lit 180
I know you'ld fain bo gone, | An olllror I To prlmm with Imr ! . v i;-a

Tuesday night lust gotm In 's giudon-lionuo Ho know inn HH u wlfo , . v 729
Tin m foolish filar, and Hum pornleloiiH woman, Compact with her that's

gono v 1 243



GONE



638



GONE



Gone. M tin- dukn gono? Tlnm j yuur riuiKO guno too . Mam. f"i' .'/
If ft prove so, I will bn gniin thn snonnr . . . Com. "J /iVi

And Iron i (.hi! mart IIO'H HO wlmrn g<>nn to dinner ....

lin gi:t I line gonn ; hitch inn an lion crow

'Tin thiiii, 1 think, to trudge, pack and bo gono

No evil lost is wuil'd when it is gono

'Tis time that 1 wern gone : It was two ero I left him
Is there any ship puts forth to-night? may we be gone V
I conjure thee to leave me and be gone

-Come, stand by me



1 301



iv 2

iv 2
iv 3



I conjure time to leave me and be gone
And I'll be gone, sir, and not trouble you
Hark, hark ! I hoar him, mistress: iiy, b gon




K ,,no '<'' MW II I 12*

Wnol lhon,<lo you BOO? Ay f onrwaytobogono. Youiiratooluinlftiriiiu ii 1 258

Will tlmso turtles ho goim? Hence, MIS; away! . - . . jv :i *u

Is thin your pnrfuctiinssY bo gnno, yon rogiui I ' v -

Hid them tsu be gone. Who says, you have it, ami yon may be gone . v '2




yon? speak

If e'er I loved her, nil that lovu is goi
'



it o er I lovoii her, ail mat love is goim in j 17

Why, gut yon gone, : who is't that hinders yon? -A foolish heart . . iii '-' ji

(iot yon gonn, yon dwarf ; You minimus, ol hindering knot-grass madu lit 2 32
Damned spirits all, That in cross ways and Hoods have burial, Already

to their wormy beds are uono . iii 2 38



to their wormy beds are gono

And still dares me on : When I come where he calls, then lie is gono

Fairies, be gone, and be all ways away ....

Our intent Was to be gono from Athens ....

If our sport had gono forward, we had all been made men

How clmnco Moonshine is gone before Thisbe comes kick? . . . v i 31

This chorry noso, These yellow cowslip cheeks, Are gono, aro gone . v I 34

DocuASOd. or, as you would say in plain terms, gone to hoaven

Mcr. o/ rente 1 1 2 6



384

414

iv 1 46
iv 1 157
iv 2 17
1 318



jm i . iy i

I deslro no morn dnllght Than to bo under Hall and gonn to-night . . ii (1

Without murospnoeh, my lord, You munt hogono from humiulnimndlittuly ii it

It I do tail in fortune of my choice, Immediately to leave yon und bo gono i 1)



,

I will ever be your head ; So be gone : you are sped ....
A diamond gone, cost me two thousand ducats in Frankfort !
Loss upon loss ! the thief gone with so much, and so much to llnd the thief
O love, dispatch all business, and be gone !



Waste no time in words, But get thee gone ....
Well, you are gone botli ways. I shall bo saved by my hubl>and
Kidid tho dew' "
ny



97
i 2 325
4 55
i 5



ii 2 15
ii 7 3
iii 5 126



i 8
1 8



y,



on are gone DOLII ways. i snail uo saved uy my nuHoanu . . i i o 20
he deed after me, And I will sign it. Get thee gone, but do it . iv 1 397
But you seo my linger Hath not the ring upon it ; it is gone . . . v 1 188
She robs tlioe of thy name ; And thou wilt show more bright and seem

more virtuous When she is gone .... As Y. Like It i 3 84

Wherever they are gone, That youth is surely in their company . a *> -,*

He is but even now gone hence : Here was he merry, hearing of a song
Would have gone near To fall in love with him ....
Sirrah, bo gono, or talk not, I advise you . . . . T. o/.S/n.,, . _ .,

excellent motion I Fellows, let's bo gone. The motion 'sgood indued i 2 28

1 must be gone. Faith, mistress, then I have no eausr; to stay . . iii 1 85
You may be jogging whiles your boots are green ; For me, I'll not be

gone till I please myself iii 2 214

Go, get thee gone, thou false deluding slave iv 3 31

liu take it hence ; be gone, and say no more iv 3 167

Itally not with the gods, but got theo gone iv 4 68

lie's gono, and my idolatrous fancy Must sanctify his ruliquns All's \\'dl \ 1 108
What does this knavo hern? (Jet you gone, MI uh . . . . . i :; .,

< .> I you gono, mr ; I'll talk with you nmrn anon

N on '11 bo gone, sir knave, ami do as 1 command you ....
Mo gono to-morrow ; and bo suro of thin, What I can help thou to thou

Hhalt not miss ...........

Is she gone to tho king? Hho is. Will she away to-night? .
Madam, my lord Is gone, for ever gone. Do not say so .
Madam, he's gono to servo tho Duke of Florence
I will bo gone ; My being here it is that holds theo henco
1 will bo gone, That pitiful rumour may report my flight

I am Saint Jaqucs* pilgrim, thither gono

When haply he shall hear that she is gone, He will return

We have lost our labour ; they are gone a contrary way ....

My lord that's gono made himself much sport out of him

I do beseech you, whither is be gone?

Crying, "That's good that's gone.' Our rash faults Make trivial prico

of snn'ous tilings wo have

If you bo not mad, bo gono ; if yon have reason, bo brief

Farewell, dear heart, since I must needs be gono . . . . . n a no
I prithee, be gone. I am gone, sir, And anon, sir, I'll be with yon again iv 2 129
Gone already ! Inch-thick, knee-deep, o'er head and ears a fork'd one !

IT. Tale i 2 185

Tis far gone, When I shall gust it last i 2 218

May that she were gone, Given to the fire, a moiety of my rest Might

come to me again ii 3 7

Away with her ! I pmy yon, do not push me ; I '11 be gono . . , ii 8 125
Your favour I dogive lost; for I do feel it gono, But know not how it went iii 2 96
The prince your son, with more conceit and fenr Of tho queen's speed,

is gone. How! gono ! Is dead iii 2 146

What's gone and what's past help Should be past grief . . . . iii 2 223

This is the chase : I am gone for ever iii 3 58

I'll go seo if the bear begone from tho gentleman and how much he

hath eatnn jjj 8 n t

fs it not too far gone? 'Tis time to part thorn .... '" J -

Will't please you, sir, bo gonn? I told yon what would come of this
He is gone aboard a new ship to purge melancholy and air himself



. i 3 261

. ii 5 22

. iii 2 48

. iii 2 54

. iii 2 125

. iii 2 120

. iii 4

. iii 4

. iii 5

. iv 5
1



35



v36o
T. Niyht i 5 212
ii 3 no



iv 4 789



e s gone aoar a new sp to purge meancoy and air imself . iv 4 78
Ho must know 'tis none of your daughter nor my sister ; we are gone else iv 4 85
There is none worthy, Respecting her that's gone ..... v 1 3
As ever reent im d



ere s none wory, especng er as gone

As every present lime doth boast itself Above a better gone . . . v 1

Thither with all greediness of affection are they gono . . . . v 2 n

Legitimation, name, and all is gone ...... }\. John i 1 24



Gono. Gonu to be married ! gum: lo sui-ai a peace ! False blood to false

blood joih'd 1 gonn lo )>n friends ! A'. .Urn iii I i

Follow, bo gonn: I cannot bniol, UiynlgH ill 1 36

(Jut then gono And leave those woes iiloiin which 1 tiloiio Am bound to

iniilor-buttp IH 1 63

And bloody England into Kngland gone, O'e.rbearing Interruption. . iii 4 8
If that young Arthur be not gono already, Even at that news hi: dies . iii 4 163
Although my will to give is living, The suit which you demand is gone

and dead iv 2 84

A vaunt, thou hateful villain, gut tlu'o gone ! 1 am no villain . . iv 8 77
Your nobles will not hear you, but are gone To oiler service to your

enemy v 1 33

Art thou gone HO? I ilo but stay behind To do the olllce for thee of

revenge v 7 70

What is six winters? they are quickly gone .... Richard II. i 3 260

Well, he is gone ; and with him go these thoughts i 4 37

York is too far gone with grief, Or clso he never would compare between ii 1 184
Ho !s gone to save for Off, Whilst others come to makti him losnathome ii 2 80
My lord, your son was gono bclojn I cimm. Ho uus? Why, ho 1 . . ii 2 86
Our countrymen are gone and Ih'd, As wnll assuml Uicliuru their king

is dimil . ii 4 j(>

For till the Welshmen, hearing thou wert dead, Arc gone to llolhtgbroko iii 2 74
And Salisbury Is gone to meet the king, who lately landed . . . iii 3 3
I'll beg one boon, And then be gono and trouble you no more . . iv 1 303
So, now I have mine own again, be gone, That I may strive to kill it

with a groan v 1 99

Get thee gone ; for I do see Danger and disobedience in thine eye

I lien. IV. i 3 15

Who struck this heat np after 1 was gone? 13 139

Is (iilliams with the packet gono? He is, my lord, nn hour ago . . ii U 68
Khali wo bo gone? Tim moon shines fnir ; you may a\vuy by night . iii I i.) i
Su, bo gono ; We will not now be troubled with reply . . . . V 1 na
Whore's liardolph ?- lie's gono into Kmithllcld to buy youi \vnrslnpn

horso 2 .Wen. IV. j 2 56

We are time's subjects, and time bids be gone i 3 no

Didst thou not, when she was gone down stairs, desire me to be no more

so familiarity with such poor people? ii 1 107

Be gone, pood ancient : this will grow to a brawl anon . . . . ii 4 186

I pray thee, Jack, be quiet; the rascal's gone ii 4 225

Thou 'It forget me when I am gone. Iiy my troth, thou 'It set me

.vweeping, an thou sayest so ii 4 300

'Tis not ten years gonn Sinco iii 1 57

Shu has nobody to do any thing nbout her whun 1 am gono; und uhn

is old ill li 247

Tim dangers of tho days but iimvly gono iv 1 i:.

Tho army is dlKchaigi'd nil ami gi>e. - Let thnm go . . . . Iv U 137
Where is tho piinco >mii hruthci '( - I think hu's gone to limit . . iv -1 14
I.ut me see him : He is not here. This door is open ; ho is gone this way iv 5 56

Then get thee gone and dig my grave thyself iv 5 in

My father is gone wild into his grave, For in his tomb lie my a flections v 2 123
Well, the fuel is gone that maintained that fire . . . Jleu. V. ii 3 45
Shall we sling? the king will be gone from Southampton . . .11847
When I am dead and gone, Remember to avenge me on the French

1 lien. VI. i 4 93

Unbidden guests Are often welcomest when they are gone . . . ii 2 56
Let us now persuade you. Not to be gone from hence . . . . iii 2 94
Thou shalt escape Ity sudden flight : come, dally not, be gono . . iv 5 1 1
Where is my other life ? mine own is gone ; O, where 's young Talbot? . iv 7 i
Theghobtof Talbot is not there: Now he is gone, my lord, yon nt-ed not



j ghO!

fear



Be gone, I say ; for, till yon do return, I rest perplexed .

And say, when I am gone, I prophesied Fiance will bo lost ero long



v 2 17
v 5 94

2 7/cu. VI. i 1 145
The state of Normandy Stands un a tickle point, now they are gone . i 1 216

Still revelling like lords till all be gone i 1 224

The wind was very high ; And, ten to one, old Joan had not gone out . ii 1 4
When I am dead and gone, May honourable peace attend thy throne ! . ii 3 37

What, gone, my lord, and bid me not farewell 1 ii 4 85

Ait tlion gone too ? all comfort go with thee ! For none abides with me ii 4 87
So, get thoo gone, that I may know my grief ... . . iii 2 346

(Jo; speak not In me ; rveu now be gono. O, go not yet 1 . . . iii 2 352
Ood.onrlmpn, will .succour us. My hope is gone, now Snllolk is deceased iv 4 56
Now thou art gono, wo have no stall', no ntoy . . . .3 lien. VI. ii 1 69

And now to London all tho cruw urn gono ii 1 174

My queen and son am gono to Fmuco for aid iii 1 -^8

The great commanding Warwick Is thither gone iii 1 30

Clarence and Somerset both gono to Warwick 1 iv 1 127

1 '11 leave you to your fortune and Ui gone To keep them back . . iv 7 55

Where's Hinhard gono ? To London, all in post v 6 83

King Henry and the prince his son are gone : Clarence, thy turn is next v 89
Clarence still breathes ; Edward still lives and reigns : When they are

gone, then must I count my gains .... Richard III. i 1 162

His soul thou canst not have ; therefore, be gone i 2 48

Tho heavens have blessed you with a goodly son, To bo your comforter

when he is gone i 3 10

Why wither not the leaves the Mip being gono? ii 2 41;

What stay had 1 but Kdward ? ami bo'a gone. What stay had we but

Clarence? and he's gone? What stays had I but they? and they

are gone ii 2 74

Is Catesby gone? He is ; and, see, lie brings the mayor along . . iii 5 12
O, let me think on Hastings, and be gone To Brecknock, while my

fearful head is on 1 . . . . . . . . . . iv 2 125

Thus both are gono with conscience and remorse iv 3 20

Thou wouldst be gone to join with Richmond : I will not trust yon, sir iv 4 491
He's gone to the King ; I Tl follow and outstare him . . Hen. VIII. i 1 128
For me, I have no further gono in this than by A single voice . . i 2 69
You have, by fortune and his highness' favours, Gono slightly o'er low

steps ii4ii2

Cromwell, The king has gone beyond me iii 2 408

Are ye all gone, And leave me hen 1 in wretchedness behind ye? . iv 2 83

Avoid thfl gallery. Ha ! T have said. Be gone v 1 86

f!ot yon gono, And do as I bavo bid you v 1 155

Was Hector armed and gono ere ye came to Ilium ? , . Tnd. (intl (Yes. i 2 49
Helen was not np, was she? Hector was gone, but Helen wits not up . i 2 51
Ne.'or look, ne'er look ; the eagles are gone : crows and daws, ciows and

daws ! 12 265

What, are you gone again? you must be watched ere you be made tame iii 2 45

1 would bo gone : Where is my wit? I know not what I speak . . iii 2 157
Why sigh you so profoundly? while's my lord? gone ! Tell me . . iv 2 84
What's the matter? Thou must bo gone, wench, thou must bo gono . iv 2 y$



GONE



039



CJONZALO



Gone. Thou must to thy father, and bo pone from Troilus Troi. and Crcs. iv 2 97

He gone, I say : the gods have heard me swear v 3 15

Hector is gone : Who shall tell Priam so, or Hecuba '{ . . . . v 10 14

Hence to your homes, be gone ! Nay, let them follow . . Coriolanus i 1 252

Tig not four days gone Since I heard thence 426

lie gone, away 1 All will be naught else. Get you gone . . . iii 1 230


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 345 of 522)