John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 37 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 37 of 522)
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Bo thou assured, good Cassia, I will do All my abilities in thy behalf . Hi 3 i
Be yon well assured II. shall in strangeness stand no further off . . Ill 3 n
But bo you well assured, No more than he'll unswear . . . . iv 1 30
Ue assured you shall not tlnd me, daughter, After the slander of most

stepmothers. Evil-eyed unto you . . Cymbeline 1 1 70

When shall we hear from him? Be assured, madam, With his next

vantage i 8 23

Which she after, Except she bend her humour, shall be assured To tasto of 1 6 Si

Will his tin- hours languish for Assured bondage i 73

The credit that thy ludy huth of thee Deserves thy trust, and thy most

perfect goodness Her assured credit . . . . . . .16 159

Were 1 vvull assured Came of a gentle kind and noble stock . I'ericles v 1 67

Assuredly the thing is to be sold As Y. Like It ii 4 96

This night the siege assuredly I'll raise 1 Hen. VI. i 2 130

Which t feel I am not worthy yet to wear : I shall, assuredly Hen. VIII. iv 2 92

Assuredly you know me. No matter, sir. . . . Ant. and Cleo. v 2 72

Assyrian. O base Assyrian knight, what is thy news? . . 2 Hen. IV. v 3 105

As swift as stones Enforced from the old Assyrian slings . Hen. V. iv 7 65

Astonish. Whoso beauty did astonish the survey Of richest eyes

All's IVellv 3 16

That with the very shaking of their chains They may astonish those fell-
lurking curs 2 Hen, VI. v 1 146

It is the i>;n t of men to fear and tremble, When the most mighty gods

by tokens send .'Such dreadful heralds to astonish us . J. t't&sar 1 3 56

O wonderful son, that can so astonish a mother ! Hamlet iii 2 340

Astonished. Enough, captain : you have astonished him . II, n. V. v 1 40

Thou hast astonish'd me with thy high terms . . . .1 Hen. VI. \ 2 93

Your wondrous rare description, noble earl, Of beauteous Margaret hath

astontsh'd me v52

Astreea. Divinest creature, Astraea's daughter, Huw shall I honour thee

for this success? . . . . . . . . . . .164

Terras Astnva reliquit: Be you remember'd, Marcus, she's gone T.And.iv 3
Astray. Nay : in that you are astray, 'twere best pound you 7*. G. of I'er. i 1 109
Lead tliuso testy rivals so astray As one come not within another's way

M. .Y. l>i\ain iii 2 358



Astronomer. When he performs, astronomers foretell it Troi. and Cres. v 1 too
Learn'd indeed were that astronomer That knew tlie stars as I his char-
actors : Ho 'Id lay the future open Cymbeline iii 2 27

Astronomical. How long have you been a sectary astronomical? Lear i 2 164

Asunder. It appears so by his weapons. Keep them asunder M. Wivts iii 1 74
And will you rent our ancient love asunder? . . . M. N. Dream iii 2 215
Having hold of both, They whirl asunder and dismember me A'. John iii 1 330
Two mighty monarchies, Whose high upreared and abutting fronts The

perilous narrow ocean jiarts asunder Hen. V. Prol. 22

And from my shoulders crack my arms asunder . . .1 Hen. VI. 15 n
A pair of loving, turtle-doves That could not live asunder day or night . ii 2 31

Hew them to pieces, hack their bones asunder iv 7 47

Let them be clapp'd up close, And kept asunder . . .2 Hen. VI. i 4 54
And so he comes, to rend his limbs asunder . . . .8 Hen. VI. i 8 15
To be winnow'd, where my chaff And corn shall fly asunder Hen. VIII. v 1 m
Cracking ten thousand curbs Of more strong link asunder . CorioUinvs I 1 73
Villain and he be many miles asunder .... /torn, and Jul. iii 6 82

Hold off thy hand. Pluck them asunder Hamlet v 1 287

Lot what is hero contain'*! relish of love, Of my lord's health, of hU

conUmt, yet not That wo two are asunder .... 1'innlxlinc 111 2 33

At all. Hero's neither bush noruhrub, to bear oil* any weather at all

2'nujwf tl 2 19

This must crave, An If this be at all, ft most strange story . . . v 1 117
Sir, I could perceive nothing at all from her . . . T. 0. of Ver. I 1 144

They say that Ix>ve hath not an eye at all ii 4 96

It Is no sin at all, but charity Mtas.fur Metu. ii 4 66

ti untlu daughter, fear you not at all. Ho 1s your hutdumd on a pro.

contract Iv 1 71

HI so none ut all in aught proves excellent . . . . /.. /.. /...'.( Iv 3 354
1 wus in-ver curst ; I have no gift at all In shrewishness M. A f . Itrcnm lit 2 301
Do you think ho will make no deed ut all of this? . . . All'* Well iii 103
Which comes to me in name of fault, I must not At all acknowledge

IV. Tale iii 2
What do we then but draw anew the model In fewer offices, or at last

desist To build at all ? 2 Hen. IV. I 8

A third thinks, without expense at all, By guileful fair words peace

may be obtain'd ... 1 Wen. VI. \ 1

Better it were they all came by the father, Or by the father there were

none at all Richard III. 11 3 24

Tills no more dishonours you at all Coriolanns iii 2 58

Come, vial. What If this mixture do not work at all? . Rom. and Jnl. iv 3 21
Without more circumstance at ull, 1 hold it lit that we shake hands Ham. I 5 127

At hand. Captain ofonr fairy bund, Helena is here at hand M. \. Dr. ill 2 in
Signify 1 pray you, Within tint house, your mltttivsH in at hand M. o/V.vl 53

Like a iiou fohler'd up at hand A'. Juhn v 2 75

Like horses hot ut hand, Muke guHunt show . . . . J. tVwir iv 2 23

At it. They are ut it, hark t Trui. and Cres. V 8 95

Ajax hath lost a friend And foams at mouth, and he la arm'd and at it . v 5 36
O, they are at it t Their noise be our instruction . . . CorioUintu i 4 21

At length the sun, gazing upon the earth, Dispersed those vapours

L'om. of Error* i 1 89

With much ado at length have gotten leave . . . llichtml II. v 5 74
My high-blown pride At length broke under me . . Hen. VIII. iii 2 362
At length her grace rose, and with modest paces Came to the ultnr . iv 1 82
And at length How goes our reckoning? T. of Athens ii 2 158

Our griefs are risen to the top, And now at length they overflow I'cridca if 4 24

At onoe. We could ut once put im In readineMt .... T. of Shrew i 1 43
With thy sharp luulh this knot IntrliislcutoOf llfeut onco untlo A . and < '. v 2 308

Atalanta'e butter imit, Sud Lucretla's modetity . . .A* Y. Like It Iii 2 155
LVO a nimble wit : [ titliik *lwM liuile of Atabuita'a lieelH . . Hi 2 294



62
48
76



Ate. You tdiall llnd her thu Infernal Ale In good u_ _
More Alow, moru AUw I Htlr thorn on 1 H!II ilium on I
An Ate, stirring him to blood and utrlfu ....
C.esar's spirit, ranging for revenge, With Ato by his side

Athenian, Stir up the Athenian youth to merriments
To that place the sharp Athenian law Cannot pursue us .
A sweet Athenian lady is In love With a disdainful youth
Thou shalt know the man By the Athenian garments he hath on
Through the forest have I gone, But Athenian found I none .
This is he, my master said, Despised the Athenian maid
Undo mechanicals, That work for bread upon Athenian stalls



iii 2
iii 2
iii 2



iii 2 349



. MH<-hAt1u\\ 1 263
. /,. /,. /,/ v 2 6y 4
. A'. John ii 1 6j
. J. C<c*ir iii 1 271
M. N. Dream i 1 12
. i 1 162
ii 1 260
ii 1 264
ii 2 67
U 2 73

But hast thou yet'latch'd the Athenian's eyes With the love-juice?

I took him sleeping, . . . And the Athenian woman by his side .

This Is the same Athenian. This Is thu woman, but not this the man

I should know the man By the Athenian garments he had on

Blameless proven my enterprise, That I have 'nointed an Athenian's eyes iii 2 351

Take this transformed scalp From off the head of this Athenian swain . Iv 1 70

Without the peril of tha Athenian law Iv 1 158

Ask mo not what ; for if I tell you, I am no true Athenian . . . iv 2 31

To be sung By an Athenian eunuch to the harp v 1

From the Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia . Troi. and Cres. Prol.

Are they not Athenians? T. of Athens i 1

Whither art going? To knock out an honest Athenian's brains

Thou'rt an Athenian, therefore welcome

Itches, blains, Sow all the Athenian bosoms !

The gods confound hear me, you good gods all The Athenians ! .
Is tins the Athenian minion, whom the world Voiced so regard fully ?
It is uiir part and promise to the Athenians To speak with Timon .
Tlie Athenians, By two of their most reverend senate, greet thee .

Spare thy Athenian cradle .

Come, good Athenian. No words, no words : hush
Athens. I beg the ancient privilege of Athens .
Fit your fancies to your father's will ; Or else the law of Athens yields

you up Which by no means we may extenuate . . . . i 1 119

From Athens is her house rvinote hewn leagues t 1 159

llefuro the time I did Lysander see, Seem'd Athens as a paradise to mo I 1 205

Through Athens' gates have we devised to steal 11 213

And thence from Athens turn away our eyes, To seok new friends . 1 1 218
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she. But what of that ? . .11 227
Here is the scroll of every man's name, which is thought lit, through

all Athens, to play 12$

Who is here? Weed* of Athens he doth wear ii 2 71

Ho murder cries and help from Athens calls iii 2 26

Go swifter than the wind, And Helena of Athens look thou find . . iii 2 95
To Athens will I bear my folly back And follow you no further . . iii 2 315

Back to Athens shall the lovers wend iii 2 372

Shine comforts from the east, That I may back to Athens by daylight . iii 2 433

May all to Athens buck ugain rejuir iv 1 72

Our intent Was to l>e gone from Athens iv 1 157

Out purposed hunting shall bo set asidu. Away witli us to Athens . iv 1 180




ATHENS



07



ATTEND



Athens. You have not a mini in nil Athens nblo to discharge Pyramus

, h "t he M. N. Dream iv 2 8

Ho hath simply tho best wit of any handicraft man in Athens . . iv 2 10

Hani-handed men that work in Athens here v 1 72

Tho princes orgulous, their high blood chafed, Have to tho port of Athens

sent their ships Troi. and Cres. Pro]. 3

How this lord is follnw'd I The senators of Athens : happy man ! T. of A. I I 40

WhoTice are you? Of Athens hero, my lord ii 2 17

How does that honourable, complete, free-hearted gentleman of Athens? iii 1 10
I would not, for the wealth of Athens, I had done't now . . . Iii 2 57
If, after two days' shine, Athens contain thee, Attend our weightier

judgement iii 5 10:

It Is a causn worthy my spleen and fury, That I may strike at Athens . iii 6 114
The senators of Athens, together with the common lag of people . . Ill go
Hlnlt, Athnim ! linticufurUi lintel bo Of Tlnum man and nil humanity I . Ill 114

thou wall, That girdlest In those wolves, dive in tho earth, And fence

not Athens 1 . Iv 1 3

Plagues, incident to men, Your potent and Infectious fevers heap On

Athens ! Iv 1 23

Cursed Athens, mindless of thy worth, Forgetting thy great deeds . iv 3 93
When I have laid proud Athens on a heap, Warr'st thou 'gainst Athens ?lv 8 101
Strike up the drum towards Athens I Farewell, Timon . . . . iv 3 169
That the whole life of Athens were in this 1 Thus would I eat it . . iv 3 281
What wouldst thou have to Athens? Thee thither in a whirlwind . iv 3 287
The commonwealth of Athens is become a forest of beasts . . . iv 3 352

To Athens go, Break open shops iv 3 449

Let us first see peace in Athens iv 3 461

You shall see him a palm in Athens again, and flourish with the highest v 1 it
Thou draw'st a counterfeit Best in all Athens . ... v 1 84

The senators of Athens greet thee. Timon. I thank them . . . v 1 130
Tho senators with one consent of love Entreat thee back to Athens . v 1 144
And of our Athens, thine and ours, to take The captainship . . . v 1 163
Shakes his threatening sword Against the walls of Athens . . . v 1 170
Sack fair Athens, And take our goodly aged men by the beards . . vl 174

1 do prize it at my love before The reverend'st throat in Athens . . v 1 185
Tell Athens, in the sequence of degree From high to low throughout . v 1 311

Before proud Athens ho 'H set down by this v3 q

He lessens his requests ; ami to theo suns To lot him breathe between

tho heavens and earth, A private man in Athens Ant. and Clca. ill 12 15
Athol. The Earl of Athol, Of Murray, Angus, and Monteith 1 Hen. IV. i 1 72
Athversary. Th' athversary, you may discuss unto the duko Hen. V. iii 2 65

Th' athvereary was have possession of the pridge iii 6 98

The perdition of th 1 athversary hath been very great, reasonable great Iii 6 103
Athwart. And quite athwart Goes all decorum . . Mean, for Meas. 1 3 30
Whatsoever comes athwart his affection ranges evenly with mine Much Ado il 2 6
Nor never lay his wreathed arms athwart His loving bosom to keep

down liln heart L. L. I<ost iv 8 135

Swears bravo oaths and breaks them bravely, quito travel-no, athwart

tho heart of his lover As Y. Like It III 4 45

When all athwart them came A post 1 lien. IV. 1 1 36

Heave him away upon your winged thoughts Athwart the sea lien. V. v Prol. o
Itrawn with a team of little atomies Athwart men's noses Rmn. and J-ul. i 4 58
Atlas. Thou art no Atlas for so great a weight . . . .3 Hen. 17. v 1 36
Atomies. It is as easy to count atomies as to resolve the propositions of

a 'over As V. Like It iii 2 245

The frail st and softest things, Who shut their coward gates on atomies iii 5 13
Drawn with a team of little atomies Athwart men's noses Rmn. and Jut. I 4 57
Atomy. Thou atomy, thou I Come, you thin thing . . .2 Ken. IV. v 4 33
Atone. Then is there mirth in heaven, When earthly things made even

Atone together As Y. Like It v 4 116

Since we can not atone you, we shall see Justice design the victor's

chivalry Richard 11. I 1 202

He and Aufldius can no more atone Than violentest contrariety Coriolanus iv 6
To atone your fears With my more noble meaning . . T. of Athens v 4



7 2

if Athens v 4 58
Othello Iv 1 244
Ant. antl I'lro. II 2 102



A most unhappy one : I would do much To atono the.
KnnifMiihnr that the present need Speaks to atono you

I was glml I dlil atone my countryman and you . . . Cymlidlne, I 4 42
Atonement. Will be glad to do my benevolence to make atonements

Mcr. Wires 1 1 33
If we do now make our atonement well, Our peace will, like a broken

limb united, Grow stronger for the breaking . . 2 Hen. IV. iv 1 221
Make atonement Betwixt the Duke of Gloucester and your brothers

Rich. III. i 3 36

Atropos. The Sisters Three I Come, Atropos, I say 1 . . 2 Hen. IV. ii 4 213
Attach. Mako present satisfaction, Or I'll attach you . Com. of Errors iv 1 6
Either consent to pay this sum for me Or I attach you by this officer . iv 1 73
Then homeward every man attach the hand Of his fair mistress

L. L. IjOKt iv 8 375

Desires you to attach his son, who has . . . Fled from his father W. Tale v 1 182
If I could, by Him that gave me life, I would attach you all Richard II. II 3 156

Of capital treason I attach you both 2 Hen. If. Iv 2 109

Ilmols n warrant from Tho king to attach Ixml Montacute . lien. VIII. I 1 217
In whoso name myself Attach then as a traitorous Innovator Coriolanus iii 1 175
Go, some of you, whoe'er you find attach .... Roin. andjiil. v 3 173
I therefore apprehend and do attach thee For an abuser of the world

Othello i 2 77

Attached. Who am myself attach'd with weariness . . . Tempest iii 8 5
That I should be attach'd in Ephesus, I tell you, 'twill sound harshly in

her ears Com. of Errors iv 4 6

I had thought weariness durst not hnvo attached one of BO high blood

2 Iten. IV. Ii 2 3

My father was attached, not attainted 1 Hen. VI. ii 1 96

Hath attach'd Our merchants' goods at Bourdeaux . . . Hen. VIII. i 1 95

He is attach'd ; Call him to present trial I 2 210

May worthy Troilus be half attach'd With that which hero his passion

doth express 1 Troi. and Cres. v 2 161

Attachment. Sleep kill those pretty eyes, And give as soft attachment

to thy senses As infants' empty of all thought I . . . . Iv 1 c
Attain. If opportunity and humblest suit Cannot attain It Mcr. Wins Iii 4 ,t
And so may I, blind fortune leading me, Miss that which one un-

worthier may attain Mcr. of Venice II 1 37

In the common courso of alt treasons, we still see them reveal them-
selves, till they attain to their abhorred ends . . . All's Well Iv 3 27
Your presence makes us rich, most noble lord And far surmounts our

labour to attain it Richard II. II 8 64

A ... threatening cloud, That will encounter with our glorious sun,

Ere he attain his easeful western bed 3 Hen. VI. v 3 6

A beastly ambition, which the gods grant thee f attain to I T. of Athens iv 3 330
But when he once attains the upmost round, He then unto the ladder

turns his back J. Ccesar ii 1 24



Attain. I shall have glory by this losing .lay More than Octavlus ami

Mark Antony By this vile conquest shall attain unto . J. Caxar v 5 -.8

My bones would rest, That have but labour'd to attain this hour . . v 5 42

To attain In suit the place of 's bed and win this ring . . Cymbcline v 5 184

Attainder. Stands in attainder of eternal shame . . . /,. L. Lost i 1 158

Mine honour soil'd With the attainder of his slanderous lips Richard II. iv 1 24

Ho lived from all attainder of suspect .... Richard 111. iii 6 32

Attained. Or that tho resolute acting of your blood Could have nttain'd

tho effect of your own purpose Meas. for Meas. ii 1 I3

The green corn Hath rotted ere his youth attain'd a beard Jlf. JV. Dream ii 1 95
Which once nttein'd, Your highness knows, comes to no further use But

to be known and hated 2 Hen. IV. iv 4 71

Those oracles are hardly attain'd, And hardly understood . 2 Hen. VI. 1 4 74
Fame, at the which hn nlms, In whom already ho's well graced, can not
Bolter bo hold nor more nttain'd limn by A place below the first

Coriolamta I 1 269

Attaint. What simple thief brags of his own attaint? . Com. of Errors 111 2 16
Your sins are rack'd, You are attaint with faults and perjury L. L. Lost v 2 829
Freshly looks and over-bears attaint With cheerful semblance

Never yet attaint With any passion of inflaming love . . 1 Hen. VI. v 5 8 1
Nor any man an attaint but lie carries some stain of it . Troi. and Cres. i 2 26
I arrest thee On capital treason ; and, in thine attaint, This gilded

serpent lear v 3 83

Attainted, Corrupted, and exempt from ancient gentry . . 1 Hen. VI. ii 4 92

My father was attached, not attainted ii 4 96

Thou aimest all awry ; I must offend before I be attainted . 2 Hen. VI. Ii 4 eg
Attalnture. Her attainture will be Humphrey's fall . . . . i 2 106
A ttaakod . You are much more attask'd for want of wisdom Than praised

for harmful mildness Lear i 4 366

Attempt. He will never, I think, in the way of waste, attempt us again

Mer. Wives iv 2 226
Our doubts are traitors And make us lose the good we oft might win By

fearing to attempt Meas. for Meas. \ 4 79

The maid will I frame and make fit for his attempt iii 1 267

Neither my coat, integrity, nor persuasion can with ease attempt you . iv 2 205
Either not attempt to choose at all Or swear before you choose M. of Veil, ill 39
That by direct or indirect attempts He seek the life of any citizen. . iv 1 350
Of force I must attempt you further : Take some remembrance of us . iv 1 421
Embrace your own safety and give over this attempt . At Y. Like It i 2 190
A man may, if he were of a fearful heart, stagger in this attempt . . iii 3 49
Impossible be strange attempts to those That weigh their pains in sense

and do suppose What hath been cannot be . . . All's ll'elli 1 239
I '11 stay at home And pray God's blessing into thy attempt . . . i 3 260

I will grace the attempt for a worthy exploit iii 6 71

I know not what the success will be, my lord ; but the attempt I vow . iii 8 87
Redeem it by some laudable attempt either of valour or policy

T. Night III 2 31
I will not return Till my attempt so much bo glorlllod As to my ampin

hope wag promised K.Jolmvt m

Such poor, such bare, such lewd, such mean attempts . 1 Hen. IV. ill 2 13
The quality and hair of our attempt Brooks no division . . . . iv 1 61
In hearty prayers That your attempts may overlive the hazard

2 Hen. IV. iv 1 15

Though we here fall down, We have supplies to second our attempt . iv 2 45
In this haughty great attempt They laboured . . . .1 Hen. VI. ii 5 79
You that will follow me to this attempt, Applaud the name of Henry

with your leader 3 Hen. VI. iv 2 26

To warn false traitors from the like attempts . . . Richard III. iii 6 49
As I intend to prosper and repent, So thrive I in my dangerous attempt ! iv 4 398
For me, the ransom of my bold attempt Shall be this cold corpse on the

earth's cold face v 3 265

If I thrive, the gain of my attempt The least of you shall share . . v 8 267
Never attempt Any thing on him ; for ho hath a witchcraft Ken. VIII. iii 2 17
Tho man was noble, But with his las t attempt he wiped It out I'oiiolainis v 8 146
For which attempt tho Judges have pronounced My everlasting doom of

banishment T. Anilron. Ill 1 50

And what love can do that dares love attempt . . . Rmn. and Jnl. II 2 68
This man of thine Attempts her love .... T. of Athens i 1 126

One incorporate To our attempts J. Caxar i 3 136

That whatsoever I did bid thee do, Thou shouldst attempt it . . v 3 40
The attempt and not the deed Confounds us . . . Macbeth, ii 2 ii

Hath so exasperate the king that he Prepares for some attempt of war iii 6 39

Neglecting an attempt of ease and gain Othello i 3 29

To do this is within the compass of man's wit ; and therefore I will at-
tempt the doing it iii 4 22

I will be near to second your attempt, and he shall fall between us . iv 2 245

If thou attempt it, it will cost thee dear v 2 255

I durst attempt it against any lady in the world . . . Cymbeline i 4 123

I doubt not you sustain what you're worthy of by your attempt . i 4 126

A repulse : though your attempt, as you call it, deserve moro . .14 128

This attempt I am soldier to, anil will nblde It with A prince's courage. Ill 4 185

Attemptable. Chaste, constant-qualilled and less attoiiiptnble . . 1 4 65

Attempted. How can that be true love which is falsely attempted?

L. L. Lost \ 2 177

I have attempted and With bloody passage led your wars . Coriolanus v 6 75
Attempting. I'll venge thy death, Or dio renowned by attempting it

3 Hen. VI. ii 1 88

Got praises of the king For him attempting who was self-subdued . Lear ii 2 129

Attend. Dost thou attend me? Sir. most licivlfiilly . . Tempest I 2 78

Most sure, the goddess On whom those airs attend ! . . . .12 422

One word more ; I charge thee That thou attend inn . . . . 1 2 453

Shall step by step attend You and your ways iii 3 78

If Venus or her son, as thou dost know, Do now attend tho queeu . . iv 1 88
Youthful Valentine, Attends the emperor in his royal court T. G. of Ver. i 8 27

We'll both attend upon your ladyship if 4 121

I'll presently attend you. Will you make Imsto? II 4 189

Tarry I horo, I but attend on death : But, lly I henco, I lly away from

life Ill 1 186

Yourservantand your friend ; One that attends your ladyship's command Iv 8 5
The dinner attends you, sir. I am not a-hungry, I thank you Mer. Wives i 1 279
At the deanery, where a priest attends, Straight marry her . . . iv 6 31
You orphan heirs of fixed destiny, Attend your office and your quality . v 5 44
At what hour to-morrow Shall I attend your lordship? Meas. for Meas. ii 2 160
My stay must be stolen out of other affairs ; but I will attend you awhile iii 1 160

I shall attend your leisure : but make haute iv 1 57

Those, for their parents were exceeding poor, I bought and brought up

to attend my sons Com. of Errors I 1 58

Then let your will attend on their accords ii 1 25

I will attend my husband, be his nurse, Diet his sickness . . . v 1 98



ATTEND



68






We'll make our leisures to attend on you .

Kair thoughts and happy hou }* J 1 .?"* "
The princesses call for you.- 1 attend t : ,,

ttMAaK



A, Y.



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Me It 1



ttends!



<i\ '''\\ it^i 'I ii Lutltr in thy youth 'Ihan HI



- 4'
2^7



2 335



8 57
8 it'

4 54

37



ATTIRE



Could not with graceful eyes attend thoso wars . . '!<

There 1 will attend What further comes . . . .

1 must attend mine ollice, Or would have done t myself .

Adieu, good queen ; I must attend on Oesar . ' g

Our army shall In solemn show attend this iuneral . . " *

,, ', ii.. n. 1..1.I,- lii, rlmi'sH call ( .

"' l . Ill 4

? T. ()fShmt\v 1
,ere . r. Hwlit I 4
. 2 lieu. VI. I 8
Jtfrftnrcl ///. HI 1
lien. VIM. v 2



That had a court no uijwi uuui i - -

Who attends us there ?-l)oth your hlglmess call I



o. a niece of mine Sluill there at



time, I danced attendance on his will



,

calls servants?



3 a
a?

306

367
67

7 8 ? 4



I*

, u ;



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l V 1



166



,Uld attend . ^ ^^ ^^ to atiend '. - i 8 335

J . ,. . "i . ..:4 ,...,1 ntt..iul . . . *"

.Jln.ir.ll 3

Nor to*, not one behind that doll, not wish Success and com,.** to,


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 37 of 522)