John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 403 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 403 of 522)
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dukedoms i

O, let us yet bo merciful. So may your highness, and yet punish too . ii

Your highness bade me ask for it to-day ji

I do confess my fault ; And do submit me to yonr highness' mercy . ii
Which I beseech yonr highness to forgive, Although my body pay the

price of it ii

If your father's highness Do not, in grantofall demands at large, Sweeten

tho bittor mock you sent his majesty ....... ii

So tell your master. I shall deliver so. Thanks to your highness . iii
What your highness suffered under that shape, I beseech you take it for

your own fault and not mine iv

Shall name your highness in this form and with this addition . . v
Wo charge and command you, in his highness' name . . 1 Hen. VI. \

Lets full his sword boforn your highness* foot ill

First, bo tiled by light, And then your highness slmll emimmnd a ponce Iv
It grieves his highness : good my lords, bo friends . . . . . Iv

I have Inform'd his hfghtiom so at largo v

You know, my lord, your highness JH betmth'd Unto another lady . v
And had his highness in his infancy Crowned in Paris . . 2 Hen. VI. i
Tis his highness' pleasure You do prepare to ride unto Saint Alban's . i
To show your highness A spirit raised from depth of under-ground . i
As I was cause Your highness came to England, so will I In England

work your grace's full content

Here comes the townsmen on procession, To present your highness with

the man

Bring him near the king ; His highness 1 pleasure is to talk with him .
Demanding of King Henry's life and death, And other of your highness*

privy-council

It is no policy . . . That ho should come about your royal person Or

bo ndmitted to your highness' council . . ' . . . . m

Well haUi your hlpllllfws seen into this dukn Ml

Slny'd the soldiers pay ; Hy moans whereof his hlKhuowH Imlh lout Knitirn ill

I do arrest yon hi hln highness' name Ill

Foul subornation is predominant And equity exiled your highness' land iii

What, will your highness leavo the parliament? iii

They say, in him they fear your highness' de.ith iii

In care of your most royal person, That if yonr highness should intend

to sleep iii

Jack Cade hath sworn to have thy head. Ay, but I hope your highness

shall have his iv

And humbly thus, with hnltors on their necks, Expect your highness*

doom, or life or death iv

T commend this kind submission : Wo twain will go into his hiphness' tent v
In all submission find humility York doth present himself unto your

highness v

I would your highness would depart tho Held . . . .8 Hen. VI. \\

Your highness shall do well to grant her suit ijj

Ho nhnll you bind mo to your highness' service iii

My mind will never grant what I perrclve, Your highness aims fit . . Ill

Herein your highness wrongs both them and me iii

In sign of truth, I kiss your highness* hand iv

Such like toys as these Have moved his highness to commit me now

Richard III. i

T will not rise, unless Your highness grant. Then speak nt once . . ii
If I may counsel you, some day or two Your highness shall repose you iii

What says yonr highness to my just demand? | v

What is't your highness' pleasure I shall do At Salisbury ? . . iv

Your highness told me I should post before. My mind is changed, sir iv
Tis his highness' pleasure You slmll to the Twor . . . Hen. VIII. i
I would your highness Would give it quick consideration i



2 335

3 41

2 9

4 482
4 538
1 27
1 163

1 544

2 8
2 3
2 36

2 -39

2 152

76
1 14



i s



1 54
1 89
1 127
1 151

52



8 155
8 158

441

2 104

3 23

2 122

4 72
4 89
4 115



2 77
2 36

i 2 92
i 2 126
I 2 133



2 246
2 48
2 63
2 77

2 153

4 120

6 176

5 56
2 366
8 76

4 9
I .17
1 131
1 4;

5 26

1 93

2 56
2 78



i 3 69

ii 1 6g
i 1 73

ii 1 176

1 77
1 v
1 1 1 /i

i i^r.

1 116

1 197

2 249

2 255



12

1 55

1 59

2 71
2 8
2 41
2 68
2 75
8 26

1 61
1 97

1 65

2 97
4 452
4 455

1 206

2 65



HIGHNESS



742



HIMSELF



ii 3 72

ii 4 103

ii 4 in

ii 4 144

ii 4 140

ii 4 216



Highness. Not long beforo your highness sped to Franco . /Mi. nil. i 'J 151
AlU-r your highness had reproved ihu dtiKn About. Sit William Ulmnet' i 2 i8y
May his higlim-ss livo in freedom, And Ihis man out of prison * . I i 2 2w

One of her highness' women, -By heaven, sho is u dainty ono . . i 4 93
Cardinal Campeius ; Whom once more 1 present unto your highness . ii 2 98
To your highness' hand I tender my commission . . . . ii 2 103

His highness having lived so long with her, ami sho Ho good a lady . ii 3 2
Vouchsafe to apeak my thanks and my obedience, As from a blushing

handmaid, to his highness

The which before His highness shall speak in, I do beseech You, gracious

madam, to unthink your speaking And to say so no more
You have, by fort uno and his highness' favours, Gone slightly o'er low

steps .....-

I require your highness, That it shall please you to declare .

Whether ever I Did broach this business to your highness

And did entreat your highness to this course Which you are running .

Peaca to your highness ! Your graces timl me hero part of a housewife iii 1 1-3

Gun you think, lords, Tliut any Englishman daro give mo counsel 'i < r

be a known friend, 'gainst, liis high nous 1 pleasure? . . . . iii 1 85
Heaven forgive mo 1 Evor God bless your highness ! . . . . iii 2 136
Ever may your highness yoke together, As I will lend you cause, my

doing well With my well saying ! iii 2 150

I do profess That for your highness' good I ever labour'd . . .Hi *2 191
To Asher House, . . . Till you hear further from bis highness . . iii 232

A league between his highness and Ferrara iii 3^3

May ho continue Long in his highness' Jiivour ! iii 396

1 humbly do outreal your highness 1 pardon; My Imsto made me

unmannerly iv

How duos II!H highness? Mmhun, in good InmHh. Ho may ho over do . iv

Remember mo In all humility unto his highness iv

And doslivil your highiiosn Most heartily to inity for hoc . . . v 1 65
With genflo travail, to the gludding of Your highneSH with an heir ! . v I 7^
I wish your highness A quiet night; and my good mistress will Itemembur v 1 76
Where'is he, Denny? He att-'iids your highness' pleasure . . . v 1 83

It is my duty To attend your highness' pleasure v 1 91

I humbly thank your highness . . . v 1 108 ; Cymbelinc i 1 175 ; v 5 100
I'll show your grace the strangest sight What's that, Butts? I

think your highness saw this many a day .... Hen. VIII. v 2 21

'Tis his highness' pleasure, And our consent v 3 52

And vow T.O heaven and to his highness, That what we did was mildly

as we might, Tendering our sister's honour . . . T. Andron. i 1 474
Gracious mother ! W r hy doth your highness look so pale and wan? . ii 3 90
They shall ba n-ady at your highness' will To answer their suspicion . ii 3 297
Because I would bo mire to have all well, To entertain your highness . v 3 32
We aro beholding to you, Good Andionieus. An if your highness

knew my heart, you were

Will't please you eat? will 't please your highness feed?

He confess'd his treasons, Implored your highness' pardon .

Your highness' part Is to receive our duties ....

What is theirs, in compt, To make their audit at your highness' pleasure i u"

I'll request your presence. Let your highness Command upon me . iii 1

Please 't your highness To grace us with your royal company

Where? Hero, my good lord. What is't that moves your highness?

Gentlemen, rise ; his highness is not \vell.-Sit, worthy friends .

But, better look'd into, lie truly found It was against your highness

Hamlet ii 2 65

And find I am alone felicitate In your dear highness' love . . Lear i 1 78
I crave no more than what your highness ofler'd, Nor will you tender

less . . i 1 197

Your hlghnosH n not entertained with that ceremonious nflbctfi

yovi woro wont .........

My duty cannot bo silent, when I think your highness wronged
I did commend your highness' letters U> them



v 3
. v 3
Macbeth \ 4
4



iii 4
iii 4

iii 4



Tho very fellow thai ol late Display'd ,so saucily against your highness
I am glad U* see your highness. Regan, I think you are



i -I 6-j

i 4 71

ii 4 8

ii 4 41

ii 4 130

" 83



Will't' please you'r highness walk? You must bear with me . . . iv 7
What's your highness' pleasure? Not now to hear thee sing A. and C. 1 5
He is married? I crave your highness' pardon. He is married? . . ii 5
Here is a rural fellow That will not be denied your highness' presence . v 2 234
The queen, madam, Desires your highness' company . . Cymbeline i 3 38
Have you brought those drugs? Pleaseth your highness, ay . .165
Your highness Shall from this practice but make hard your heart. . i 5 23



89



i

. v 5
. v 5 113

. v 5 340
I'erides \ 1 150
i 1 169



Lconatus is in safety And greets your highness dearly

My request, which I'll make bold your highness Cannot deny

He is a Roman ; no more kin to me Than I to your highness .

My breeding was, sir, as Your highness knows

Who attends us there? Doth your highness call? .

I'll make him sure enough : so, farewell to your highness

Beseech your highness Mcas.for Metis, v 1 ; All's Well ii 3; ir. Tale

ii 1 ; ii 3 ; lien. V. iv 8 ; Cymltelinc iv 3
May it ple-aso your highness 3 lien. \'l. iii 2 ; Hen. VIII. iv 2 ; Mticb.

iii 4

Please your highness jr. Tnlei 2 ; ii 3 ; lien. VIII. i 2; C'.i/mh. i 1
Ho please your highness 2 Hen. VI. ii 3; Hen, Vlll. ii 4; Macbeth

iii 1 ; ('}fiiil>elinc v 5
Eight. This child of fancy that Arinndo bight . . . /.. /.. Lost \ 1 171

Which, as I remumlier, htghf Costard i 1 258

This grisly beast, which Lion bight by name . . M. N. Dream v 1 140

This maid Higbt Philoten 1'ericlcs iv Guwer 18

Highway. It is true, without any slips of prolixity or crossing the plain

highway of talk Mer. of Venice iii 1 13

Like the mending of highways In summer, where the ways are fair

enough v 1 263

Should be buried in highways out of all sanctified limit . . All's Well i 1 152
(.allows and knock aro too powerful on the highway . . II'. Tula iv 3 29
I brought high Hereford . . . Hut to Uio next highway . . Jiitfiard II. i 4 4
Or I'll be buried in the king's highway, Home way of common trado . iii 3 155
He made you for a highway to my bi:d .... Hunt. ami Jul. iii 2 134
Hlldlng. For shame, Hum hi Id ing of u devilish spirit . T. <>f .^lircw ii 1 1:6

If your lordship liml liim not a hilding All's \\~dl iii (i 4

Ho was somo hilding fellow that had stolen The horse ho rode on

2 Hen. IV. i 1 57

Were enow To purge this Held of such a hilding foo . . Hen. V. iv 2 29
Helen and Hero hildings and harlots ; Thiabe a grey eye Rom. and Jitl. ii 4 44
We have a curse in having her : Out on her, hilding ! . . . . iii 5 169
A base slave, A liildin;' for a livery, a squire's cloth . . Gymbelind ii 3 i - 8
Hill. Ye elves ofhills, brooks, standing lakes and graven . Tempest v 1 33
K purred his horse so bard Against the steep uprising of the hill /,. /,. L. iv 1 2
At tho charge-house on the top of the mountain ? Or mons, the bill . y 1 89
Over hill, over dale, Thorough bush, thorough brier . M. _V, Dream it 1 2



tllll And never, sinco thn middle summer's spring, Met we on hill, in

diilo .V. N. yJrmm ii 1 83

Wo camti down a foul bill, my master riding behind my mistress T. t/.S. iv 1 69

At last 1 spieil An ancient angel coming down tin- hill . . . . iv 2 61

Halloo your name to the reverberate bills T. Night i 5 291

And at the other hill Command the rest to stand . , A'. John ii 1 298
These high wild hills ami rough uneven ways Draws out our miles

JHehunl II. ii 3 4

Where's Poins, Hal? He is walked up to the top of the hill . 1 Hen. IV. ii 2 9

There's money of the king's coming down the hill ii 2 57

The boy shall lead our horses down the hill ; we'll walk afoot awhile . ii 2 83

This bed-presser, this horse-back-breaker, this huge hill of flesh . . ii 4 269

That runs o' horseback up a hill perpendicular ii 4 378

How bloodily tho sun begins to peer Above yon busky bill ! . , . v 1 2

And falling from a hill, be was so bruised That the pursuers took him . v 5 21

William Visor of Woncot against Clement Perkes of the bill . 2 Hen. IV. v 1 4 ^

His most mighty father on u hill Ktood smiling . . . Hen. I', i 2 108
What ii'in can lu>l<t licentious wickedness When down the hill ho holds

his liciT-o career? iii 3 23

Hide thou unto the horsemen on yon hill iv 7 60

To .sit upon a bill, as I do now, To carve out dials . . .3 Hen. VI. ii 5 23

I '11 stay above the hill, so both may shoot iii 1 5

To climb steep hills Uequires slow iaco at first . . . lien. VIII. i 1 131
Or pile ten hills on the Tarpeian rock, That the precipitation might

down stretch Below the beam of eight . . . Coriolanua iii 2 3
Gallups the zodiac in his glistering coach, And overlouks the highest-
peering hills 7'. Andron. ii 1 8

The sun's beams, Driving back shadows over louring hills Hum. undJul. ii > (>

Now is the sun upon the highinost hill Of this day's journey . . . if .' <;

Upon a liiglt and pleasant hill Feign'd Fortune to be throned T. uf Athens I I 6j
This tlirono, this Fortune, and this lull, melhinks, . . . would bo woll

express'd In our condition ' ' 7J

You said tho enemy would not come down, But keep tho hills J. Caesar v 1 3

Fly far olf. This hill is far enough v 3 12

Go, Pindarus, get higher on that hill ; My sight was ever thick . . v 3 20

All disconsolate, With Pindarus bis bondman, on this hill . . . v 3 56

Until Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane bill Shall come. Macbeth iv 1 93
As I did stand my watch upon thu hill, I look'd toward Birnam, and

anon, methought, The wood began to move . . . . v 5 33
But, look, the morn, in russet mantle clad, Walks o'er the dew of yon

high eastward hill Hamlet i 1 167

Bowl the round nave down the hill of heaven, As low as to the fiends ! ii 2 518

A station like the herald Mercury New-lighted on a heaven-kissing hill iii 4 59
Let go thy hold wlu-n a great wheel runs down a hill, lest it break thy

neck with following it ; but the great one that goes up the hill, let

him thaw thee alter ......... Lear ii 4 73

When shall we come to tho top of that same hill? You do climb up it

now iv G i

Hough quarries, rocks and hills whoso heads touch heaven . . Othello i 3 141

Let the labouring bark climb hills of seas Olympus-high ! . . . ii 1 189

.Set we our squadrons on yond side o' the hill . . . Ant. and Cleo. iii i

O, that I were Upon Hie hill of Basan, to outroar The horned herd ! . iii 13 127

Our foot Upon the hills adjoining to the city Shall slay with us . . iv 10 5

Nowfor our mountain sport: up to yond hill; Your legs aro young t'ymb. iii 3 10

The blind mole casts (Jopp'd hills towards heaven . . . I'cricks i 1 101
For who digs hills because they do aspire Throws down one mountain

to cast up a higher i 4 5

Hlllo, ho, ho, my lord ! Hiljo, ho, ho, boy ! come, bird, come . Hamlet I 5 115

Hllloa, IIHI ! What, art so near? II'. Title iii 3 80

Hilt to point, heel to head Aft-r. ll'icw iii & n t

An old runty .sword . . . , with it broken hilt, and clmpeless T. I'fSlntn' iii 2 48

Fitur, in Inn l.i.iin wuilH. Sovcn, by tlioso hilts . . .1 Hen, IV. ii 4 220
And hides a sword from hilts unto the point With crowns imperial

Hen. V. ii I'rol. 9

He that strikes the first stroke, I'll run him up to the hilts . . . ii 1 68

With purple falchion, painted to tho hilt In blood . . .8 Hen. VI. i 4 12

Take him over tho costard with the hilts of thy sword . Richard 111. 1 4 160
Take thou the hilts ; And, when my face is cover'd, as 'tis now, Guide

thou the sword J, Civsnr v 3 43

Very responsive to the hilts, most delicate carriages . . Humlt:t v 2 159
Him. Love doth to her eyes repair, To help him of bis blindness

T. G. of Ver. iv 2 47

Better than him I am before knows me . . . . As Y. Like Hi 1 46

Who laid htm down and bask'd him in the sun ii 7 15

Belike, some noble gentleman that means, Travelling some journey, to

repose him here T. of Shrew linl, 1 76

As he that leaves A shallow plash to plunge him in the deep . . i 1 23

I am appointed him to murder you W. Tale i 2 412

But as we, under heaven, are supreme head, tto under Him that great

supremacy, Where we do reign, we will alone uphold . A'. John iii 1 156

Let's away ; Advantage feeds him fat, while men delay . 1 Hen. IV. iii 2 180

Ho that buckles him in my belt cannot live iit less . . .2 Hen. IV. i 2 157

Between two horses, which doth bear hint best . . .1 Hen. VI. ii 4 14
Him that tliou magnilieht with nil thesu titles Stinking und Jl> -blown

lies hem at our feet iv 7 ?s

Liko a gulhmt in tho brow of youth, liopuirs him with occasion 2 Hi n. I'/, v H 5

By him that made us till, I urn rcsolvd . . . , .3 Hen. VI. ii 2 ! - (

First, ho commends him to your noble lordship . . liicliard lit. iii 2 8

Him in eye, Still him in praise Hen. VIII. i 1 31

There's in him stuff that puts him to these ends i 1 58

He stretch'd him, and, with one hand on his dagger . . . . i 2 204

Praise him that got thee, she that gave thee suck . . Troi. and Cres, ii 3 252

Him I accuse The city ports by this hath enter'd . . . Coriolanus v 5

Ho bears him like a portly gentleman .... Kom. and Jitl. i 5 68

He is wise ; And, on my life, hath stol'n him home to bed . . . ii 1 4

After this let Ca_-sar sent, him sum ; For we will shako him . J. (Vr.sur i 2 325

With Him above To ratify the work Macbeth iii G _jj

Let every soldier how him down a bough And bear'l before him . . v 4 4

And damn'd he him that first cries ' Hold, enough !' . . . . v 8 34

Your party in converse, him yuu would sound. . . . Hamlet ii I 4^
Than by our deed Acquire too high :i fame when him wo serve's away

Ant, and Cleo. iii 1 15

Himself. The king's son have I landed by himself . . . Tcw^t i 2 2Ji

Every man shift for all tho rest, and let no man take care for himself . v 1 257

Well of his wealth; but of himself, so, so ... 7'. U. vf Ver. i 2 13

I um tho dog : no, the dog is himself, and I am the dog . . . . ii 3 24

1 Minsflf would loilge where scuxoh^H they aro lying . . . . HI 1 143

Purchased by such sin For which tho pardoner himself is in M.fur At. iv 2 112
Ho is not Hector. No, nor Hector is not Troilus in some degrees.

'Tis just to each of them ; he is himself . . . Troi. and Cres. i 2 75



HIMSELF



743



HIT



Himself! no, bo's not himself: wonM a' were himself . Troi. and Cres, i 2 82

Ami will be led At your request a little from himself . . . . ii 3 191

He that hath a will to die by himself fears it not from another Coriolanmv 2 m

He is not with himself; let us withdraw T. Andron. i 1 368

Let him have a table by himself, for he does neither affect company,

nor is he fit for't, indeed T. of Athens 1 2 30

How he solicits heaven, Himself best knows .... Mm-hcthiv 3 150

IIIuiHolf upbraids ua On evory trifle Lenri 8 6

Hlno. \Vlmt is your accusative cnsoY Accusative, liinc . Afcr. Wives fv 1 47

Hlnckley. About the sack he lost the other day nt Hiuckley fair

2 Hen. IV. v 1 26

Hind. A couple of Ford's knaves, his hinds . . . Mer. Wives iii 5 99

Out upon thepj hind I Com. of Errors iii 1 77

The rational hind Costard L. L, I^ost i 2 123

The mild hind Makes speed to catch the tiger . . M. N. Dream ii 1 232

He lets mn feed with his binds, bars mo the place of a brother As Y. L. It i 1 20

If a Imrt do lack a hind, Let him seek out Rosalind . . . . iii 2 107

The hind that would be mated by the lion Must die for love . AH's Well i 1 102

You are a shallow cowardly hind, and you lie . . . .1 Hen, 21*. ii 3 16

Tis like the commons, rude unpolish'd hinds ... 2 Hen. VI. iii 2 271

Rebellious hinds, the filth and scum of Kent, Mark'd for the gallows . iv 2 130

His army is a ragged multitude Of hinds and peasants . . . . iv 4 33

The tiger now bath seized the gentle hind . . . Richard III. ii 4 50

1'ard to the hind, or stepdame to her son .... Tret, njid Cres. iii 2 201

What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? . Ham. and Jnl. i 1 73

Ho worn nn lion, wore not Romans hinds J. Cccsarl 8 106

Fight I will no more, Hut yield mo to the veriest hind that shall Onco

touch my shoulder Cymbcline v 8 77

Hinder them from what this ecstasy May now provoke them to Tempest iii 3 108

Then let mo go and hinder not my course . . . T, G. of Ver. ii 7 33

Theso be the stops that hinder study quite . . . . L. L. Lost i 1 70

Why, get yon gone : who is't that binders you? . . M. N. Dremn iii 2 318

For the love of laughter, hinder not the honour of his design All's Well iii 6 44

Which to hinder Were in your love a whip to me . . . W. Tale i 2 24

Despair not, madam. Who shall hinder me? . . . Richard II. ii 2 67

Lurking in our way To hinder our beginnings .... Hen. V. ii 2 187

Till then fair hope must hinder life's decay ... 3 lien. VI. iv 4 16

That no dissension hinder government iv C 40

Oh, who shall hinder me to wail and weep? . . . Richard III. ii 2 34

From your affairs I hinder you too long .... Hen. nil, v 1 54
Nor you, my brother, with your true sword drawn, Opposed to hinder

me, should stop my way Troi. and Cres. v 3 57

Let me not hinder, Cassius, your desires ; I'll leave yon . J. Crr-sar i 2 30
Thyself art coming To see perform'd the dreaded act which thou So

sought'st to binder Ant. and Cleo. v 2 335

Hindered. The current, . . . being stopp'd, impatiently doth rage; But
when his fair course is not hindered, He makes sweet music with

the eiuimell'd stnuns T. G. ofVcr. ii 7 27

Hindered by the Hetgi-nnt, to tarry for tlio hoy Delay . Com. of Errors iv 8 39

I am NUITV, sir, that I have hinde.r'd you v 1 i

It seems liis sloops were hinder'd by thy railing v 1 71

Thou say'st his sports were hinder'd by thy brawls . . . . v 1 77

He hath disgraced me, and hindered mo half a million . Mer. of Venice iii 1 57
If we may pass, we will ; if we be hinder'd, We shall your tawny ground

with your red blood Discolour Hen. V. iii G 169

Never desired It to be stirr'd ; but oft have hinder'd, oft, The passages

made toward it Hen. VIII. ii 4 164

Hindering. You minimus, of hindering knot-grass made . M. N. D ream iii 2 329

Hindmost. Tis not his wont to be the hindmost man . 2 Hen. VI. iii 1 2

They all rush by And leave you hindmost . . . Trot, arid Cres. iii 3 160

Hinge. Whose fever- weaken'd joints, Like strengthless hinges, buckle

under life 2 Hen. IV. i 1 141

Hinge thy knee, And let his very breath, whom thou 'It observe, Blow

offtbycap T. of Athens iv 3 211

T df'lt nlwnid pomp, And mink HIM pregnant hlngm of the kncii llmnli't III 1! 66

'Mini ih" piofmUon hwr no hlngn nor loop To hang n doubt on iHhrtln\\{ :i 365

Hint. It In it Mini Thnt wring* mint) nyon to 't . . . Tcnipcut ! 2 134

Uur hint of woo In common Ii T 3

Make them bo .strong and ready for this hint . . . Coriolanus iii 3 23

It was my hint to speak, such was the process .... Othello i 8 142

Upon this hint I spake: She loved me for the dangers I had pass'd . i 3 166

When the best hint was given him, he not took't . . Ant. and Cleo. iii 4 9

Take the hint Which my despair proclaims iii 11 18

This Posthumus, Most like a noble lord in love and one That had a royal

lover, took his hint Cymbeline v 6 172

Hip. Which of your hips has the most profound sciatica? Mcns.for Metis, i 2 58

All <*11 and thrrn quarters will not measure her from hip to hip (.'. of Er. iii '2 n i

No lunger from head to foot than from hip to hip iii 2 116

A Spaniard from the hip upward Much Ado iii 2 36

II* ild I heir hips and laugh, And waxen In their mirth . M. N. Jhrnm ii 1 55
If I can catch him onco upon Urn hip, I will feed jut tlw ancient grudge

I bear him. lie hates our sacred nation . , , Mer, of Venice I 3 47

Now, jntldrl, I have you on the hip . . . . . . , . iv 1 334

The beachy girdle of tho ocean Too wide for Neptune's hips 2 Hen. IV. iii 1 51
Their poor jades Lob down their heads, dropping the hides and hips

lien. V. iv 2 47

The oaks bear mast, the briers scarlet hips . T. of Athens iv 3 422

I'll have our Michael Cassio on the hip Othello ii 1 314

Htpparchus, my enftanched bondman, whom He may at pleasure whip,

or hang, or torture Ant. and Cleo. Hi 13 149

Hipped. His horse hipped with an old mothy saddle . T. of Shrew iii 2 49

Htppolyta. Fair Ilippolyta, our nuptial hour Draws on apace M. JV. Drcanii 1 i

HipjK.ilytn, I \voo'd thro with my sword, And won thy lovo . . i 1 16

Come, my Hippolyta : what cheer, my love? 11 122

How canst thou thus for shame, Titania, Glance at my credit with

Ilippolyta? ii 1 75

We'll hold a feast in great solemnity. Come, Hippolyta . . . iv 1 191


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 403 of 522)