John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 453 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 453 of 522)
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iv 1
iv 2
iv 2



Inspired with the spirit of putting down kings and princes

And when 1 am Jung, as king I will bo, God save your majesty 1 . iv 2



Sir Humphrey Station! and his brother aro hard by, with tho king's
forces



iv 2



i king is

Toll tho king from me, that, for his fathcr'n sake, Henry tho Fifth, in
whose time boys went to span-counter for French crowns, I am

content ho shall rpjgn iv 2 164

Fellow kings, I toll you that that Lord Say hath gelded tho common-
wealth iv 2 173

Seeing gentle words will not prevail, Assail them with tho army of the

king iv 2 185

Yon that be the king's friends, follow mo iv 2 igi

Fight for your king, your country and your lives iv 6 12

Contrary to the king, his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-
mill iv 7 40

When havo I aught exacted at your hands, But to maintain the king? . iv 7 75
Large gifts have I bestow'd on learned clerks, Because my book preferr'd

me to the king iv 7 77

This tongue hath parley 'd unto foreign kings For your behoof . . iv 7 82
We come ambassadors from the king Unto tho commons . . . iv 8 7
Who loves tho king and will embrace his pitidon, Fling up his cap . iv 8 14

<lod sru-n tho king ! iv8i9;iv022; MuiMhl Z 47

A Clillord ! a Clillord I we'll follow th" king and Clillord . 2 Hen. VI. iv 8 56
lie that brings his head unto tho king Shall havo a thousand crowim . iv 8 69
Wn'll dovisn a mean To reconcile you all unto tho king . . . . Iv 8 72
Was over king that joy'd an earthly throne. And could command no
more content than I? No sooner was I crept out of my cradle But

I was made a king, at nine months old iv i

Was never subject long'd to be a king As I do long and wish to be a

subject iv 9 5

Thou wilt betray me, and get a thousand crowns of tho king . . . iv 10 29
Thy most ungracious head ; Which I will bear in triumph to the king iv 10 89
Burn, bonfires, clear and bright, To entertain great England's lawful

king vl4

Whom havo we here? Buckingham, to disturb me? The king hath

sent him, sure v 1 13

I am far better born than in tlio king, More liko a king, more kingly . v 1 1-9
Why I have brought this army hither Is to remove proud Somerset

from tho king v 1 36

The king hath yielded unto thy demand : The Duke of Somerset la In

the Tower v 1 40

3 z



King. ITone so rudo and of so menu condition May pass into the pres-
ence of a king '2 Hen. VI. v

A poor esquire of Kent, that loves his king v

False king 1 why hast thou broken faith with me? . v

King did I call thee? no, thou art not king, Not tit- to govern . . v

I arrest thee, York, Of capital treason 'gainst the king and crown. . v

Health and all happiness to my lord tho king ! I thank theo . . v

This is my king, York, I do not mistake ; But thou mistakost . . v
A bedlam and amhitlous humour Makes him oppose himself against hi*



1 75
I gi

1 93
1 107
1 124
1 129



I am thy king, and thou a false-hoait traitor ......

The king m (led to London, To call a present court of parliament .

I wonder how tho king escaped our hands . . .3 Hen. VI,

This is the palace of the fearful king, And this the regal seat

When tho king comes, offer hira no violence, Unless lie seek to thrust

you out ..... .........

The bloody parliament shall this be call'd, Unless Plantagonot, Duke of

York, be king ...........

Neither the king, nor ho that loves him best, Tho proudest ho that hokln

up Lancaster, Dan's stir a wing ........

lie means, Back'd by the power of Warwick, that false peer, To aspiro

unto the crown and reign as king .......

Whom should ho follow but his natural king? ......

Be Duko of Lane/is lor ; let him be king. He is both king and Duke
Hound drums and trmupnls, and the king will My .....

Why faint you, lords? My title's good, and better fur than his. Trove

it, Henry, and thou shalt bo king .......

Henry the Fourth by conquest got the crown. "Twas by rebellion

against, his king ...........

Tell me, may not a king adopt an heir? What then? An if he may,

then am I lawful king ..........

My conscience tells me he is lawful king .......

Let me for this my life-time reign as king ......

Farewell, faint-hearted and degenerate king ......

To cease this civil war, and, whilst I live, To honour me as thy king
You cannot disinherit me : If you bo king, why should not 1 succeed?
Art thou king, and wilt bo forced? I shamo to hear thee speak .
Uichard, enough ; I will bo king, or die .......

And yofc the kin^ nut privy to my drift, Nur any uf tho IIOUHO ol'

Lancaster ............

Warwick, Cubhmn, mid the renl, Whom wo havo loft protectors of Mio

king .............

What ! was it you that would bo England's king? .....

Now looks he like a king 1 Ay, this is ho that took King Henry's chair
You should not be king Till our King Henry had shook hands with

death .............

I, then in London, keeper of the king, Muster'd my soldiers .
To intercept the queen, Bearing the king in my behalf along .
'Twas tho coldness of the king, Who look'd full gently on his warliko

queen .............

No hope to win tho day ; So that wo fled ; tho king unto the queen
Many moo proud birds Have wrought the easy-melting king like wax .
He, but n duke, would have his son a king, And raise his issue, like a

loving sire; Thou, being a king, blest with a goodly son, Didst

yield consent to disinherit him .... ...

And in the towns, as they do march along, Proclaims him king
Becomes it thee to be thus bold in terms Before thy sovereign and thy

lawful king? I am his king, and he should bow his knee
You, that are king, though he do wear the crown .....
Give no limits to my tongue : I am a king, and privileged to speak
Bears the title of a king, As if a channel should be call'd the sea
' '



1 MJ
1 M3
3 24
1 i
i 1 25



i 1 40

I 1 45

i 1 S3

i 1 8:;

i 1 8fi

i 1 118

i 1 iv



1 135
1 150
1 171
1 183
1 198
1 227

1 230

2 35



I 2



4



I 2 57
4 70

: 4 96

4

i 1
1



And ne'er was Agamemnon's brother wrong'd By that false woman, as

this king by thee ...........

Tamed tho king, and made tho dauphin stoop ......

We, in pity of thn gentle king, Had slipp'd our claim until another age
Not willing any longer conference, Since thou dcniest tho gontlo king

to speak ............

Thou setter up and plucker down of kings . . . . ii 3 37 ;

Gives not the hawthorn-bush a sweeter shade To shepherds looking on

their silly sheep, Than doth a rich cmbroidcr'd canopy To kings

that fear thoir subjects' treachery? .......

From London by tho king was I press'd forth ......

Ilmv will the country for those woful chances Mistliink the king !
Wan over king so grievod for subjects' woe? ......

Sad-hearted men, much overgone with care, Here sits a king more wofnl
Hadst thou sway'd as kings should do, Or as thy father and his

father did ............

Some troops pursue tho bloody-minded queen, That led calm Henry,

though he were a king, As doth a sail, lill'd with a fretting gust,

Command an argosy to stem the waves . . .
To London with triumphant march, There to be crowned England's

royal king ............

This is the quondam king ; let's seize upon him .....

Warwick Is thither gone, to crave the French king's sister .

And in conclusion wins tho king from her, With promise of his sister .

Men may talk of kings, and why not I ? Ay, but thou talkVt as if thou

wert a king. Why, so I am, in mind ; and that's enough
But, if thou be a king, where is thy crown? . . . My crown is call'd

content: A crown it is that seldom kings onjoy ....
If you he a king crown'd with rontenl., Your crown conlonl and you

must bo contented To go along wll.li UH ......

As wo think, You aro the King King Kdwrnd hath deposed .

I was anointed king at ninn months old ; My falhnr and my gnindluUior

were kings ............

Wo wcro subject* but while you wero king. Why, am I dead?

Tho king shall be commanded ; And be you kings, command, and I'll

obey .........

We are true subjects to the king, King Edward. So would you be

again to Henry, If ho were seated .......

And what God will, that let your king perform .....

The lady hath a thing to grant, Before tho king will grant her humble

suit ....... .....

Shall I not hear my task? An easy task ; 'tis but to love a king .
One way or other ; she is for n king ; And she shall bo my love, or else

my queen ............

MargaiH Must strike her will ami learn awhilo to sorvo Whoro kings

command ....

Henry, sole possessor of my love, Is of a king beconiflft tanMiiu man .
Edward Duke of York Usurps the regal title and tho scat Of England's

true-anointed lawful king .........



2 21
2 71



2 90

2 120
2 140

2 149
2 151
2 161

2 172

3 157



G 45

5 64

6 108

5 1 1 1

6 124



ii 6



i I



ii (i 34

ii ii 88

iii 1 23

iii 1 30

iii 1 50

iii 1 58

iii 1 61

iii I f,6

iii 1 69

iii I 7 C,



1 94

1 100

2 13
2 53

iii 2 87

iii 3 6

iii 3 25

iii 8 29



KINO



834



KING



King. <irant 'I'liat virtuoUM Uuly liona, thy fuir histor, To England's king

in lawful marriiigo M lien. I'/, fii U 57

In our king's behalf, I am coiuiiulltdud, with your leave and favour,

Ilinnbly to kiss your band Iii 3 59

For shame 1 leave Henry, and call Edward king. I 'all him my king? . iii 3 100
Toll mo, men upon thy conscience, Is Edward your true king? . . iii 3 114
When I have heard your king's desert recounted, Mine car hath tempted

judgement to desire iii 3 132

Shall articles bo drawn Touching the jointure Unit your king must make iii 3 136
Ue a witness That Bona shall be wife to the English king. To Edward,

but not to the English king iii 3 139

What! has your king married the Lady Grey? . . . . iii 3 174

No more my king, for he dishonours me, But most himself . . . iii 3 184
Tell false Edward, thy supposed king. That Lewis of France is sending

over masquers To rovel it with him and bis now bride . iii 8 223; iv 1 93
Go fiair thy king withal. Tell him, in Impn ho'll prgvo a widower

shortly, I '11 wtsar tho willow garland I'm 1 his sake . . . . iii 3 226
Forbii.ir this Uilk ; line, come.i thu king. -And his well-Hiosi-n bride . iv 1 6
1 am Kdward, Your king and Warwick's, and must havo my will.- And

Hhali havo your will, beraiiso our king iv 1 16

IM v,,u.l will bo king. And not be tied into Ids brother's will . . . iv 1 65

Now, brother king, farewell, and sit you fast iv 1 119

The king by this is set him down to sleep. What, will he not to bed V iv 3 2
What nobleman is that That with the king hure resteth in his tent?

Tis the Lord Hastings, the king's chiefest friend . . . . iv 3 10
But why commands the king That his chief followers lodge in towns

about him? iv 3 12

Why, Warwick, when wo parted, Thou call Vis t nio king. Ay, but the

case is alter'd: When you disgraced mo iu my emha.ssade, Then I

degraded you from bring king iv 3 31

1'Mwiird will always bear himself us King iv 3 45

Thou, for his mind, Im I'M ward Kngland's king ; But Henry now shall

wear M. Knglish crown, And bo truo king Indeed, thou but I he

shadow iv 3 .,8

You know our king, my brother, Is prisoner to tho bishop here . . iv & 4
If Henry bo your king, Yel Edward at tho least is Duke of York . . iv 7 20
I will hence again : I came to serve a king and not a duke . . . iv 7 49
If you'll not here proclaim yourself our king, I'll leave you to your

fortune iv 7 54

Speak gentle words and humbly bend thy knee, Call Edward king . v 1 23
And thou shall still remain the Duke of York. I thought, at least, bo

would have said the king v 1 29

And Henry is my king, Warwick his subject. But Warwick's king is

Edward's prisoner v 1 38

But, whiles he thought to steal tho single ten, The king was slily

llngm-'d from the dee.k I v 1 . M

To bend tho fatal instruments of war Against bis brother mid his lawful

king? v 1 88

For who lived king, but I could dig his grave? v 2 21

Excuse me to tho king my brother ; 1 '11 benco to London on a serious

matter v 5 46

See bow my sword weeps for tho poor king's death 1 . . . . v 63
To sot my brother Clarence and the king In deadly halo liidtard 111. i 1 34

'Tis not the king that sends you to the Tower i 1 63

Night- walking heralds That trudge betwixt the king ami Mistress Shore i 1 73
It is our way, If we will keep in favour with the king, To bo her men . i 1 79
The king Is wise and virtuous, and his noble queen Well struck in years i 1 90
Tho king is sickly, weak ami melancholy, Ana his physicians fear him . i 1 136
1'oor key-cold llguro of a holy king! Palo aslics of tho house of

Lancaster I i 2 5

Eat him quick, As thou dost swallow up this good king's blood ! . . i 2 66
Didst thou not kill this king? I grant ye. Dost grant me, hedgehog? i 2 iui
After 1 have solemnly interr'd At Chertsey monastery this noble king . i 2 215
It is determined, not concluded yet: But so it must be, if the king

miscarry i 3 16

Saw you the king to-day, my Lord of J)nrby? i 3 30

Who are they that complain unto tin: king, That 1, forsooth, am stern? i 3 43
Tho king, of his own royal disposition, And nut provoked by any suitor i 3 63
Wind., many, may who 1 marry with u king, A uaeliulur, a hamisomo

stripling i 3 iu

Threat you mo with telling of the It Ing? Tell him. and spare not . . 13113
What 1 have said 1 will avouch in presence of tho king . . . . i ;) 115
10 rn yiu were queon, yea, ur your husband king, I was a pack-horse . i U 121
\Vu I,.lluw'd then our lord, our lawful king: So should wo you, if you

should bo our king. If I should bo ! I had rather bo a pedlar . i 3
As little joy. my lord, as you suppose You should enjoy, were you this

country's king, As little joy may you suppose in me . . i 3

If not by war, by surfeit die your king, As ours by murder, to make

him a king 1 i 3



Say it is the queen and her allies That stir the king against the duke .
I '11 to tho king ; and signify to him That thus I have resign'd my

charge .............

My voiro in now tho king's, my looks mine own .....

llavu I L.lii'M.i. .; you? i i ! n.li .1 us you have not, but tlin lling . .
What ui' will do, wo do upon command. Ami In- that hath conmiandud

itHlmkliiK ............

Tuko heed you dally not brloni your king ......

He rescued me, And said, ' Dear brother, live, and bo a king' . .
Clarence' death? O, they did urge it still unto the king ! . . .
You mistake mo much ; I do lament the sickness of the king .



i 3



ii 2
ii 2
ii 2



Tin; king my nncle is to blame for this : God will revenge it . . .
Pcarc, children, peace ! the king doth love you well . . . .
Tho king, provoked by tho queen, Devised impeachments to imprison

him ............. ii 2

Edward, my lord, your son, our king, is dead ...... ii 2

If die, be brief, That our swift-winged souls may catch the king's . . ii 2
Though we have spent our harvest of this king, We are to reap tho

harvest of his sou .......... ii 2

The young prince bo fetch 'd Hither to London, to bo crown'd our king, ii 2 122
I hi)|io the king made peace with all of us , And the rnmpar.t is llrni . ii 2 i j2
Hnar you tho imws abroad ? Ay, that the king is dead. Had news . il 3 3
Then tho king Had virtuous nudes to pmtiT.t, bin graco . . . . il li 20

I'll win our ancient right iu Franco again, Or die u soldier, as 1 lived a

king ............. iii 1

And, look, when I am king, claim thou of me The earldom of Hereford,

and the moveables Whereof the king my brothoi stood possess'd . iii 1
Pronounced your part, I mean, your voice, for crowning of the

king ............. iii 4

Cry '<1<>d save Hicliard, Englaml'n royal king !' . . , . iii 7 22 ;
Accept our suit or no, Your brother's son ahull nuvor reign uur king , iii 7



115



King. The king liath sliailly diarged HID contrary. - -Tin King! why,

who'H Unit? /.'lY/iim/ III. I

I would lio king. -Why, MO you aro, my thrice reiiownod lu:;;e. - I la ! am

I king? i

Tin- king is angry : see, ho biles Ihu lip i

llnnry Uu: Sixth Did prophesy that Kiehmond should bo king, When

Uiclnnond was a litth- peevish boy. A king, perhaps, perhaps . i
Made 1 him king for this? (>, let me think on Hastings, and be gone ! i
Ami so I left them both, To bring this tidings to the bloody king. . i
Then liery expedition be my wing, Jove's Mercury, and herald for

a king 1 i

I lovo thy daughter, And mean to niako her queen of England. Say

then, who dost thou mean shall be her king? i

The loss you have is but a sou being king, And by that loss your

daughter is made qiu'im ......... i

The king, that calls your beauteous daughter wife, Familiarly shall call

thy Dorset brother ; Again shall you be mother U) a king^ . . i
.Say that the King, which may roinmand, entreats. That at lier hands

which tho king's King forbids i

Tho unity tho king thy brothuv made Had not been broken , . . i
Is thu sword nnsway'd V Is Um king dead? the rmpiro unpoasoss'd Y . i

And who is England's king but great York's heir? i

Kings it [hoptO makes gods, and meaner creatures kings . . .
Lies half a mile at least South from the mighty power of the king .
Harry, that prophesied thou shouldst be king, Dotb comlort theo .

Live, and beget a happy race of kings I

The king enacts more wonders than a man

The two kings, Equal in lustre, were now best, now worst . lien. VLIL
A gift that heaven gives for him, which buys A place next to tho king .
Why the devil, Upon this French going out, U>ok bo upon him, Without

the privity o' the king, to appoint Who should attend on him? .
I IT'S gone to tlin king ; I 'II follow and uutsUmi him
1 '11 to the king ; And from a mouth of honour quitu cry down This

Ipswich fellow's insolence

To the king 1 '11 say 't ; and make my vouch as strong As shore of ruck

Suggests the king our master To this last costly treaty

Tho emperor thus desired, That he would please to alter the king's

course

Let the king know, As soon bo shall by me

1 Arrest tliee of high treason, in tho name Of our most sovereign king

The king Is pleased you shall to the Tower, till you know

The will of heaven be done, and the king's pleasure By me obey'd I .

Hero is a warrant from The king to attach Lord Montacute .

Yet tho king our master Whose honour heaven shield from soil ! even

ho escapes not Language unmannerly

Lot thuro bo letters writ to every shiro, < >f Um king's grace ami pardon
If tho king Should without iwsuo dio, ho '11 curry it so To maku Ihu

sceptre his

Men fear'd the French would prove perfidious, To tho king's danger .
Neither the king nor's heirs, Tell you the duke, shall prosper . .
Had the king in his last sickness fail'd, The cardinal's and Sir Thomas

Lovell's heads Should have gone oft' .

The king's attorney on the contrary Urged on tho examinations . . i
Whoever the king favours, Tho cardinal instantly will liud employment,

and far enough from court too i

Nor will I sue, although the king have mercies More than I dare make

faults i

My vows and prayers Yet arc tho king's; and, till my soul lorsako,

Shall cry for blessings on him i

A buzzing of a separation Between the king and Katharine . . . i
When the king once heard it, out of anger Ho sent command to tho Ion I

mayor straight To stop the rumour i

Fresher than e'er it was; and held for certain The king will venture

at it i

His master would be served before a subject, if not before the king . i
How is the king employ'd? I left him private, Full of sat! thoughts . i
The king will know him ono day. Pray God he do ! he'll never know

himsdfelso i

Jin dives into the king's noul, and lhe.ru scatters Dangi is, doubts . . i
Ami out of all UIOHU to rrsloro tho king, lie rouiiM-ls u di\nreo . . i
< II liri That, when the greatest stroke of lortium (alls, Will MI-NS 11 10 king i
All that daro Look into these atlaJrs sen this main end. The French

king's sister. Heaven will one day open Thu king's eyes. . . i
As 1 am made without him, so I'll stand, If Iho king ph-asn . . i
And with some other business put the king From these sad thoughts . i
You'll bear us company ? Excuse me; The king has sent me other-
where i

Who am I? ha? A gracious king that pardons all offences . . . i

Thou art a cure fit for a king i

Much joy and favour to you ; You are the king's now . . . . i
I shall not fail to approve tho fair conceit The king hath uf you . . i
Beauty and honour in her aro HO mingled That they have caught

Um king i

I'll to thu king, And Kay I npokn willi you i

Tho king, your fat her, was rnputml lor A prinru most prudent, . . i
AM wull For your own ipilut, UH to ivrlily What lh uiiHuUlnl in llmklng i
Wo are a quoen, or long havu divjim'd HO, certain Tim daughter ol a king i
Tho king is present: if it bo known to him That 1 gainsay my deed,

how may ho wound, And worthily, my falsehood ! . . . . i
He might the king his lord advertise Whether our daughter wero

legitimate i

llow you stand minded in the weighty difference Between the king and

you ii

Madam, you wrong the king's love with these fears . . . .ii
Put your main cause into the king's protection ; He's loving and most

gracious ii

Heaven is above all yet ; there sits a judge That no king can corrupt . ii
Have I with all my full affections Still met tho king? . . - .ii
You may hurt yourself, ay, utterly Grow from the king's acquaintance ii

The king loves you ; Beware you lose it not ii

If you cannot liar his access to the king, never attempt Any thing on

him ii

He halli a witchcraft Over the king in's longuo ii

The king hath found Matter against him that for ovur mars Tho buiu'y

of his language .ii

Tho cardinal's letters to the pope miscarried, And came to tho eye o'

the king ii

My king is tangled in affection to A creature of tho queen's . . .ii

Has tho king this? Believe it. Will this work ? ii

Tlio king m (bis pwvoivus him, how lit 1 coasts And hedj-.i'S his own way ii



KING



835



KING



King. But, will tlioklnpDIgont HitB letter of thocnrillmil'n? llcn.VIll.\\\2

'



I Mil h ta'en no leavo ; 1 las left tho cunso o' thn king nnh.uudlod

Tho king ei inl Ha I at this. Now, God incense- him, And let him cry

Ha! Inuder!

He is retnrn'd in his opinions; which Have satisfied tho king for his

divorce in

A worthy fellow, and hath ta'en much pain In the king's business . iii
The packet, Cromwell, Oavn't you tlm king? To his own Imnd . . iii
Thn Duchess of Alenc.on, The French king's sister : he shall marry her . iii
M.iy he, ho hears the king Does whet his anger to him . . . .iii
And not wholesome to Our cause, that she should lio i' tho bosom of

Our hard -ruled king iii

Cranmer ; One Hath crawl'd into the favour of tho king, And is his

oracle iii

What cross devil Made me put this main secret in the packet I sent tho

king?



Hear tho king's pleasure, cardinal ; who commands you To render up
al



iii

the great ^seaf . ". iii

Who dare cross 'em, Bearing the king's will from his month expressly? iii
That seal, You ask with such a violence, the king, Mine and your

master, with his own hand gavo me iii

Now, who'll take- it? Tho king, that gavo it. It must bo himnnlf, then iii
Km' from II!H HiUT.onr, from t.lm king, IVum all That might have mnrcy . Ill
In tlm way uf loyally and truth Tmviml Urn king, my ever rnvnl mauler III
Vimr Inlmrnptml piirltnU Yon writ In Urn popn ngiiliwt tho king . . Hi
TliouM in tlHeH, my lord, urn In HIM klliK'fl IllUtil I ' lllt . UIHH mm-h, Ihoy

urn fotil Ill

Arid s|>( less shall mine innocence arise, Whon tho king knows my truth HI
Without lh" king's assent or knowledge, You wrought to be a legato . iii

In which you brought tho king To bo your servant iii

Without the knowledge Either of king or council iii

Without the king's will or the state's allowance . . . . .iii

And to bo Out of the king's protection. This is my charge .

The king shall know it, and, no doubt, shall thank you .

The king has cured mo, I humbly thank his grace .

Tim heaviest and tho worst Is your displeasure with the king

1-i'ly Anne, Whom tho king hath in secrecy long married . . . in

Tho king has gono beyond mo: all my glories In that ono woman I

have lout fur ever iii

iSfn-k tlm king ; That sun, I pray, may never set I iii

The king shall have my service ; but my prayers For ever and for ever

shall be yours iii

Serve the king ; And, prithee, lead me in : There take an inventory of

all I liavp, To thn last penny ; 'tis the king's . . . . .iii
Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king . . iii
For not appearance and The king's late scruple, by the main assent Of

all these learned men she was divorced iv


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 453 of 522)