John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 464 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 464 of 522)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


My brother shall know of it : and so I thank you for your good counsel

If you desire to know the certainty Of your dear father's death

None but his enemies. Will you know them then? ....

I do not know from what part of the world I should be greeted

If your name be Horatio, as I am let to know it is

High and mighty, You shall know I am set naked on your kingdom

Know you tho hand ? 'Tis Hamlet's character

! know him well : ho is the broocli indeed And gem of all tho nation .
Why ask you this? Not that I think you did not love your father; But

that I know love is begun by timo

Hamlet return'd shall know you are come home

Whose [skull] do you think it was? Nay, I know not . . . . v 1 195

Hern hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft . . . v 1 208

Lot us know, Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well . . . v 2 7

Wilt thou know The effect of what I wrote? Ay, good my lord . . v 2 36
Dost know this water-fly? No, my good lord. Thy state is the moro

gracious ; for 'tis a vice to know him v 2 83

1 know you are not ignorant I would you did, sir . . . . v 2 139

Hut, to know a man well, were to know himself v 2 147

Ho Hnnds to know If your pleasure hold to piny v 2 205

ThiH prnnoiu-0 knows, And you must needs havo heard, how 1 am

punish 'd With sore distraction v 2 239

Cousin Hamlnt, You know tho wager? Very well, my lord . . v 2 271

Do you know tills noblo gentleman? Isar i 1 25

I must lovo you, and mio to know you bettor. Sir, I shall study

deserving J 1 30

Know that we havo divided In lln-en our kingdom 1 1 38

She's there, and she is yours. 1 know no answer 11 204

I know you what you nrn ; And liko a sister am most loath to call Your

faults as they are named i 1 272

I know no news, my lord. What paper were you reading? . . . i 2 29

You know tho character to bo your brother's? i 2 66

AVhcre is ho? I do not well know, my lord i 2 85

Dissipation of cohorts, nuptial breaches, and I know not what . i 2 162

Let him to our sister, Whose mind and mine, I know, in that are one . i 3 15

Who wouldst thou servo? You. Dost thou know me, fellow? . i 4 28

Ho would not My lord, I know not what the matter is . . . i 4 61
Dost tliou know the difference, my boy, between a bitter fool and a

sweet fool ? i4i5i

For wise men are grown foppish, They know not how their wits to wear i 4 183

Mukn use of that good wisdom, Whereof I know you arc fraught . . i 4 241

May not an ass know when tho cart draws tho horse? . . . . i 4 244
Doth any hero know me? This is not Lear: Doth Lear walk thus?

speak thus? i 4 246

Surh men as may bosort your age, And know themselves and you. . i 4 273

Men of choice and rarest parts, That all particulars of duty know . . i 4 286

Whereof comes this? Never afflict yourself to know the cause . . i 4 313

I know his heart. What he hath utter'd I have writ my sister . . i 4 353
Acquaint my daughter no further with any thing you know . . .163

How comes that? Nay, I know not ii 1 7

Hark, the duke's trumpets I I know not why he comes . . . . ii 1 81

You know not why wo came to visit you ii 1 120

I know theo not. Fellow, I know thee. What dost thou know me for? ii 2 ii

One that is neither known of thce nor knows theo Ii 2 29

Know you no reverence? Yes, sir ; but, nn^rr hath a privilege . . ii 2 75
These kind of k tin VPS 1 l<im\v, which in I hln plain nuns Ilnrhour moro craft H 2 107

I lam iv, Hir, I am no MntUnm 1 il 2 116

Whoso disposition, all tho world well knowH, Will not bo rubb'd nor

Stopp'd il 2 160



Know. You know the fiery quality of the duke ; How unremoveable Lear ii 4 93



ii 4 131
ii 4



iv 5



iv 6
iv 6



.

I think you are ; I know what reason I have to think so
You less know how to value her desert Than she to scant her duty .
What trumpet's that? I know 't, my sister's : this approves her letter
I have good hope Tliou didst not know on't ......

But she knows what she does. Is this well spoken? . . . .

I will do such tilings, What (hoy nro, yot I know not . . . .

WldUier in hn golng?-l In cnllH to horHO ; but will I know not whither,
1 do know yon ; And dnro, upon tho warrant of my noto, Commend a

dear thing to you ........... iii 1

She will toll you who your follow is That yet you do not know . . iii 1
This courtesy, forbid theo, shall tho duke Instantly know . . . iii 8
Bo simple answerer, for we know the truth .. . -. . iii 7
Dost thou know Dover? Ay, master ....... iv 1

Knows he the wickedness ? Ay, my good lord ..... iv 2

Why the King of France is so suddenly gone back know you the reason ? iv 3
Those happy smilets, That play'd on her ripe lip, seem'd not to know

What guests were in her eyes . . . . . . . . iv 3

What might import my sister's letter to him? I know not . . .
Might not you Transport her purposes by word? Belike, Something

I know not what ...........

I know your lady dors not lovo her husband . . . . . .

I know you are of her bosom. I, madam? 1 Rponk in understanding ;

you are, I know't ..........

And yet I know not how conceit may rob Tho ticnsmry of lifo . .
CJivo tho word. Sweet marjoram. Pass. I know (hat voice . .
Dost thou know me? I remember thine eyes well enough . . .
I am a king, My masters, know you that. You are a royal one . .
I know thee well : a serviceable villain .......

To know our enemies' minds, we'ld rip their hearts . . . .

My boon I make it, that you know me not Till timo and I think meet .
Sir, do you know me? You are a spirit, I know : when did you die? .
I should e'en, die with pity, To see another thus. I know not what

to say .............

Methinks I should know you, and know this man ; Yet I am doubtful .
And all the nielli I havo Remembers not these garments ; nor I know

not Where I did lodge last night .......

I know you do not lovo mo ; for your Rlstorw Have, ns I do roniombor,

dono mo wrong : You have Homo caiine ......

Know of tho duko If his last pm pono hold ......

Now, Rweot lord, You know tho gondnoss I intend upon you . . .
Go with us. O, ho, I know tho riddle. I will go .....

Know thou this, that men Are as the timo is
'



ii 4 186
ii 4 192
ii 4 239
II 4 284
ii 4 300



17
49
23
43
74
92



iv 5

iv (i



23

26

42
96

iv 138
iv 204
iv 6 257
iv (i 265
iv 1
iv 7



iv 7
iv 7



48



iv 7 67



7
I
1
1
v 8



Know, my name is lost ; By treason's tooth bare-gnawn and canker-bit v 3 121

Read thine own evil : No tearing, lady ; I perceive you know it . v 3 157

Know'st thou this paper? Ask me not what I know . . . . v 3 160

If ever I Did hate theo or thy father I Worthy prince. I know't . . v 3 178

I know when one is dead, and when one- lives ; She's dead as earth . v 3 260

lie knows not what ho says : ami vain It is That wo present us to him . v 8 29 1

You lords nnd noblo friends, know our intent v 8 296

I tnko it much unkindly That thou . . . shouldst know of this Otlutto i 1 3

By tho faith of man, I know my price, I am worth no worse a place . 1 11

Nor the division of a battle knows More than a spinster ... 23

Do you know my voice? Not I : what are you? 93

If you know not this, my manners toll mo Wo have your wrong rebuke 130
I do know, the state, However this may gall him with some check,

Cannot with safety cast him 148

How didst thou know 'twas she? O, she deceives me Past thought I . 166

Do you know Where we may apprehend her and tho Moor? . . . 1 177
'Tis yet to know, Which, when I know that boasting is an honour, I

shall promulgate ........... 2 20

For know, lago, But that I lovo the gentle Desdemona, I would not . 2 24
Fetch Desdemona hither. Ancient, conduct them ; you best know the

place i3i2i

I know not if 't be true ; But I, for mere suspicion in that kind, Will do

as if for surety

He is not yet arrived : nor know I aught But that he's well .
The Moor I I know his trumpet. 'Tis truly so. Lot's meet him.



> 3 394
ii 1 89
ii 1 180
ii 1 273
ii 3 179



Cassio knows you not. I'll not be far from you

.Speak, who began this? on thy lovo, I charge theo. I do not know

lago can Inform you, Whilo I spnro spuei-h, which something now

offends mo, Of all that 1 do know : nor know I might By mo thnt'e

said or dono amiss this night ii 3 200

Give mo to know How this foul rout began, who net it on . . ii 3 209

I know, lago, Thy honesty and lovo doth minco this matter . . . ii 3 2,j6
What had ho dono to you? I know not. In't posnible? . . . ii 3 287
Awny, I wiy ; thou nhnlt know moro horoaftor : Nay, gut theo gone . It 8 387
Whereby lmngs n tnlo, sir? Marry, sir, by many a wliid-lnntnimont

that I know . . . . . . iii 1 u

He's never any thing but your true sorvnnt. I know't; I thank you . iii 8 10
What dost thou say T -Nothing, my lord : or if 1 know not whnt . iii 3 36
Did Michael Cassio, when you woo'd my lady, Know of your lovo? . iii 3 95
Is he not honest? Honest, my lord ! Honest I ay, honest. My lord,

for aught I know iii 3 104

My lord, you know I love you. I think thou dost iii 3 117

I know thou'rt full of love nnd honesty, And weigh'st thy words . . iii 3 118
It were not for your quiet nor your good, Nor for my manhood, honesty,

or wisdom, To lot you know my thoughts jit 3 154

I'll luiow thy thoughts. You cannot, if my heart wore in your hand . iii 3 162

I>ook to't : I know our country disposition well iii 8 201

Farewell, farewell : If more thou dost perceive, let me know more . iii 3 239
Thin honest creature doubtless Sees and known more, much more, than

he unfolds . . iii 3 243

And knows all qualities, with a learned spirit, Of human dealings . iii 3 259
And givo't lago : what ho will do with It Heaven knows, not I . . iij 3 298
I swear 'tis better to bo much abused Than but to know t a little . . iii 3 337
He that is robb'd, not wanting what is Btol'n, Let him not know't, and

he's not robb'd at all .... iii 3 343

Do you know, sirrah, where Lieutenant Cassio HOB? . . . . iii 4 i

I know not where he lodges iii 4 u

Where should I lose that handkerchief, Emilia? I know not . - i 4 24

But to know so must be my benefit iii 4 119

Nor should I know him, Were he in favour as in humour nlter'd . . iii 4 124
Whose is it? I know not, sweet: I found it in my clmmbnr . . . iii 4 188
Whnt hath he said? 'Faith, that ho did I know not what, he did . iv 1 32
No, lot mo know ; And knowing whnt I nm, 1 know wlmt tilte nliall be . iv 1 73
A likely ploro of work, that you should llnd It hi your chamber, and

not know who loft, It tlmrn I



hull



i doth truly know It. Heaven truly knows that thou art false as



Iv 1 158
iv 2 38



KNOW



854



KNOWKST



Know. Why did he oV I do nut know ; 1 am twro 1 am nono uucli

Uthdlolv a 12,1

How comes MUM trick upon him V Nay, hiuvtw doth knuw . . . lv L' i-^y

By tills light of heaven, I know not how I lost him . . . . iv 2 151

Jh) knows nut yet ol liis honourable toiluno iv *J i^o

1 know a lady in Venice would havo walk'd barefoot to Palestine lor a

touch of his nether lip iv 8 38

Let husbands know Their wives have sense like them . . . . iv 3 94

Hut so : I hear him coming, I know his gait, 'tis he . . . v 1 23

Whoso noise is this that cries on murder? Wo do not kuow . . . v 1 49

Know we this face or no? Alas, my friend and my dear countryman ! . v 1 88
Uoderigo. What, of Venice? Even he, tiir: did you know him? Know

him 1 ay v 1 92

What malice was between you? None in the world ; nor do I kuow tho

man v 1 103

f!o know of Cassio where ho Biipp'd to-night v 1 117

1 know not where in that Promethean hunt That ran thy light relume . \ _ iv

Why I III.I.M i> .1 I know nol. Hhico guiltiness I know not . . . v '

Why, how idioiild lio bo muidor'd? Ainu, who Known? . . . v 2 i.:6

Ik Hiiyn thon told'Mt him that his wife was false: I knuw thou didst not v "2 174

I scarce did know you, uncle : there lies your niece . . . . V 2 :-ui

I know this act shows horrible and grim v 2 ^03

But yet lago knows That she with Cassio hath tho act of shame A

thousand times committed v 2 210

Demand mo nothing : what you know, you know v 2 303

You shall understand what hath befall'n, Which, as I think, you kuow not v 2 308

I havo done tho sUite some service, and they know't . . . . v 2 339
Who knows If the scarce- bearded Ciesar have not sent His powerful

mandate to you, 'Do this, or this' .... Ant. and Cleo. i 1 20
Is't you, sir, that know things? In nature's inlinite book of secrecy A

little 1 can read 128

We'll know all our fortunes. Mine, and most of our fortunes, to-night,

Khali be drunk to bed i 2 .|.|

Her length of sickness, with what else mure serious Impui tuth theo to

know 12

Ten thousand harms, more than tho ills I know, My idleness doth hatch i 2

What's the matter? I know, by that sumo oyo, there's some good news i 3

I h.ivi) no power upon you ; hers you are. Tho goils best know . i !J
I would 1 had thy inches ; thou shouldst know There woie a heart in

Egypt IB

Quarrel im more, but bo proparod to know The purposes 1 bear . .13

Sn , you and t have loved, but there's not it ; That you know well . 1 8
Know, It is not 1'iusar's natural vice to hale Our great competitor .1-1 i

Know, worthy Pompey, That what they do delay, (hey nut deny . . il 1

1 knuw they are in Homo together, Looking lur Antony . . . . ii 1 iy

1 know not, Munas, How lesser enmities may give way to greater . . il 1 42
But how the fear of ns May cement their divisions and bind up Tho

petty difference, we yet not know ii 1 49

Not so, not so ; I know you could not lack, I am certain on't . . ii 2 57
If thou hast considered, let us know If 'twill tie up thy discontented

sword ii 5

I do not know Wherefore my father should revengers want . . . ii 10

Know, then, I camo before you here ft man prepared To take this offer . ii li 40

You must know, When Oiesar and your brother wore at blows . . ii U 44

\\Y11, I knuw not What counts harsh fortune casts upun my face . . ii 54
I know theo now: how farest thou, soldier? Well ; And well am like



to do



! 72



They kuow, By the height, the lowness, or the mean, if dearth Or foison

follow ii 7

Thou must know, 'Tis nut my profit that does lead mine honour . . ii 7
The man hath seen some m;tjesty, and should knuw . . . . iii 3
The people knuw it; and have now received His accusations . . . iii

Y'ou did know How much you were my conqueror iii 11

Fortune knows Wo scorn her most when most she oilers blows . . iii 11
Let him appear that's come from Antony. Know you him? . . iii 12

For us, you know Whose he is we are, and that is, Ca-sar's . . .iii 13
lit' knows that yon embrace not Antony As you did luvo . . .iii 13
He is IL god, and known What IH most light: mine honour was not

yielded Ill la

Though you ran gnuHH what temperance should l"\ You Know not what

It In Ill 13

Not know mo yet? Cold-hrartod toward me? Ah, dunr, if 1 be wo . Ill 13
Lot the old rulllan know 1 1m vo many other ways to die. . . . iv 1
Lot our be.st heads Know, that to-morrow the last of many battles We

mean to light iv 1

Know, my hearts, I hope well of to-morrow iv 2

Welcome : Thou look'st like him that knows a warlike charge . . iv 4
Ran one before, And let the queen know of our Bests . . . . iv 8

The augurers Say they know not, they cannot tell iv 12

She soon shall know of us, by some of ours, How honourable and how

kindly we Determine for her v 1

Have comfort, lur 1 know your plight is pitied Of him that caused it . v 2
Know, sir, that I Will not wait piniun'd nt your master's court . v 2

Whut thou hast done thy master Cirniir knows, And he bath Bent for

theo v '2

You have hi'itid dfmeV 1 cannot tell. -AHKiirodly you know nm . . v 2
Know you what (Jiesar inoan.s to do with mo? 1 nm loalh to tell you . v 2
He'll lead me, then, in triumph? Madam, ho will; I know't . . v 2
Cleopatra, know, We will extenuate rather than enforce . . . v 2
I know the devil himself will not eat a woman : I know that a wunmn

is a dish for the gods

I will from hence to-day. You know the peril
I .shall incur 1 know not How much of his displeasure



But, you know, strange fowl light upon neighbouring ponds .
1 do know her spirit, And will not trust one of her malice
I do not know What is more cordial .



i



But, heavens know, Some men are much to blame

You do seem to know Something of me, or what concerns me

1 havo spoke this, to know if yonr affiance Were deeply rooted

iii. nut lit your lordship should undoittiKo every coni]>anion that you

glvooH'mico to. No, I know that

A stranger, and I not know on't ! He's a strange fellow himself, and



. v 2

Cymlcline i 1
1
4
5
5
C
G
G



11 1
ii 1



knows it not

I know her women are about her : what If I do line one of their hands? ii 3
Ami learn now, for nil, That I, which know my heart, do here pro-

nounce, By the very truth of it, I care not for you



I hopi! you know that wo Must not continue friends. Good air,



il 3

ii 4
Who knows If ono of her women, being corrupted, Hath utol'n it from

her? ii -1



Know. That most venerable man which 1 Did call my father, was I

know nut whelo When 1 was slnmp'd .... t'ymlit'linc ii

All faults that may lie named, nay, that hell knows, Why, hers,

in part or all ; but rather all ii

1 know your mas te r'& pleasure and ho mine: All the remain is 'Wel-
come 1' iii

We, poor unfledged, Have never wing'd from view o' the nest, nor know

not What air's from home iii

Did you but know the city's usuries And felt them knowingly . . iii

These boys know little they are sons to the king iii

Heaven and my conscience knows Thou didst unjustly banish me . iii
Know, if you kill me for my fault, I should llavo died had I not

made it iii

1 know not why I love this youth ; and I have heard you say, Love's
reason 's without reason



27
86

28
45
80
99

57



Thus did he answer mo : yet said, hereafter I might know more .
1 partly know him : 'tis Cloten, the uun o' the queen . . .
1 saw him not these many years, uud yet 1 know 'tis 1m. . .
To thy more confusion, tnou nhalt know 1 KIM HUH to Urn f|iirnii .
Thou blessed thing 1 Jove knows what man thou mlghUt havo made

1 know the shape of 'H leg : tins Is his hand ; Hiu foot Mercurial . . v

Who needs must know of her departure and Dost seem so ignorant . iv

I nothing know where she remains, why gone ...... iv

Neither know I What is betid to Cloten ; but remain Perplex'd in all . iv

They will waste their time upon our note, To know from wln-nce we uce iv

Let mo make men know More valour in me than my habits show . . v
If he'll do as he is made to do, 1 know he'll quickly tly my friend-

ship too . ...... - v

I know you are more clement than vile men ...... v

Whoso bult, you know, Sky-planted batters all rebelling coasts . '. V

No care of yours it is ; you know 'tis ours. Whom best 1 love I cross . v

1, That have this golden chanco and know not why . v

You know not which way you shall go. Yi-s, indeed do I, fellow . . V
You must either bo directed by some that take upon them to know, or

to take upon yourself that which I am sure you do not know . . v
I know not why, wherefore, To Kay 'live, boy: 1 ne'er thank thy

master ; live ............ v

1 do nut bid theo bog my lift), good hid ; And yut 1 know thuu wilt . v

Her son Is gouo, wo know not how nor where ...... v

What became of him 1 further know nut ....... V

Indeed a banish 'd man ; I Know nol huw a traitor ..... v

1 know not how to wish A jmir uf worthier sons ..... v

I Kuow nut huw much mure should be domandnd . v

Who hath taught My frail mortality to know itsplf . . . 1'cridc* i

As sick men do Who know the world, nee ho-avon, but, feeling woo . i

If Jove stray, who diiros bay Jove doth ill? It is enough you know . i

One sin, 1 know, another doth provoke ....... i

That, being bid to ask what he would of the king, desired he might

know none of his secrets



42
64
67
QJ
1:07

39
10
M
39



4 187



62



95

IO2
273

=86

320

.155

8p

48
105
137



Anliuchus on what cause I know not Took some displeasure at him .

nd what he craves i
What I have been I have forgot to know



To know for what he conies, and whence he comes, And



Hark you, sir, do you know where ye are? Not well. Why, I'll Ujll

you ..... ....... ii

It was sometime target to a king ; 1 know it by this mark . . . ii
Wo desire to know of him, Of whence he is, his name and parentage . ii
It is too late to talk of love ; And that's the mark I know you level at. ii
No, Eseanes, know this of me, Antiochus from incest lived not free . ii
Know that our griefs are risen to the top ....... ii

Let us salute him, Or know what ground's made happy by his breath . ii
Your nuble self, That best know how to rule and how to reign . . ii
Knights, from my daughter this I let yon know ..... ii

Who, for aught 1 know, May bo, nor can I think the contrary, As great

in blood as I myself .......... ii

Know you the character? It is my lord's ...... iii

Come, come, I know 'tis good for you. Walk half an hour . . . iv
Do you know the French knight that cowers i' the hams? ... 1 know

be will come in our shadow, to scatter his crowns in tho nun . . tv
Yet none dims know, but you, how she came cloud, Nor none can know iv
Hut yut 1 know you '11 do as I advise ....... iv

You honour Knows what 'tis to wiy well enough ..... iv

Hut how bonoural'ln ho Is in that, 1 know not ...... iv

Do yon know thin house to be a place of wuch resort, and will como

into't? ............. iv

Seeing this goodly vessel ride before vis, 1 made to it, to know of whence

you are ............. v

Let me entreat to know at large tho cause Of your king's sorrow . . v
If you did know my parentage, You would not do me violence . . v
Now I knuw you better .......... v

Hail, madam, and my queen 1 I know you not ..... v

I know it well 2'. G. of Vcr, i 3 ; ii 4 ; iii 1 ; Com, of Errors iii 2 ;

3 lien. VI. ii 1
Know you of old. Yon always end with a judo's trick : I know you of

old ....... .... Mi\chAdn\

Knowur. What's thynuir/- Thy Kmnvm 1 , rul.mr.hm . . 7 Vol. tnnl t'na, ii
Knowost. Hycorax . . . from Arglt-r, Thou know'nt, was banltih'd Ti-m^t-t i
Thou bust know'st What torment 1 did llnd theo In . i

Dost thou kuow her by my gazing on her, and yet knowest her not?

T. G. ofl'er. it

And I must after, For love, thou know'st, is full of jealousy . . . ii
O, know'st thou not his looks are my soul's food? ..... ii

The current that with gentle murmur glides, Thou know'st, being

stopp'd, impatiently doth rage ........ ii

Thou know'st how willingly I would effect The match . . . . iii

Dispose of them as thou know'st their deserts. . . . . v

Let him continue in his courses till thou knowest what they are

Metis. for Mcas. ii
Friar, thou knowest not the duke so well as I do ..... iv

By heaven, fond wretch, thou know'st not what thou upeak'st . . y
.Siiy, didst thou spi'uk with him? Know'st thuu his mind? Ctnti, o/Knwj* ii
These emu of mine, thou Kuow'st, did hear thnu ..... V

But seven years since, In Syracusa, boy, Thou know'st wo jwirtcd . . v
Thou knuwest that the fashion of a doublet, or a hat, or a cluak, is

nothing to a man. Yes, it is ap]>arel ..... Much Ado iii
Thou knowest not what it is. 1 shall knuw, sir, when I have done it

L. /,. Lost iii

Thou know'st that all my fortunes are at sea . . . Mer. of Venice i
Away I make haste : thou know'st where I will tarry . . . . iv
Kuow'st thou not, the duke Hiilli Imnisli'il me, his daughter? As Y, L. ]t \
Know'dt thou the youth thut spoke to mo erowhileV . . . . ill



ICKJ

M4

73

114

i

23
28

33



3
15

'"3
=9
5'
31
bi



85



146



li 286



15
26

22

'59

197

169

105

47
321
125

158
177



KNOWEST



855



KNOWLEDGE



? 5
i 25

1 181



Knowost. I would not wod her for a mine of gold. Hortensio, peace I

thou know'st not gold's e fleet . . . . . . T. of Shrev) i 2 93

But, thou kuoweat, winter tamos man, woman, and boast . . . iv 1 24
But what at full I know, thou know'st no part . . , All's Well ii 1 135
Know'st thou not, Bertram, What she has done for mo? . . . il 3 115
Thou know'st sho has raised me from my sickly bed . . . . ii 3 118

I know moro than I'll speak. But wilt thou not speak all thou

knownst? v 8 257

KiiDw'Ht thou thin country? Ay, nmdam, woll . . . T. Night 1 2 21

Thou know'nt no less but all ... I 4 13

Ami 'diluculo surgere, 1 thou know'st. Nay, by my troth, I know not. ii 3 3
1 prithee, vent thy folly somewhere elso ; Thou know'st not mo . . iv 1 ir
Bo that thou kuow'st thou art, and then thou art As great as that thou

fear'st v 1 152

No more ; cease ; thou know'st He dies to me again when talk'd of W. T. v 1 119


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 464 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522

Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 464 of 522)