John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 51 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 51 of 522)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Ho curriTl Their proud conloinpl thai beals Ills peace U) heaven A'. John II 1
How cornea il then llial lliou url call'd a king, W lion living blood dolh

In Iheso temples beat?

Thou dosl usurp aulhorily. Kxcuse ; II is lo beat usurping down . n 1
Whose rocky shore beaU back Iho envious siege Of watery Nentuno

Kicliard II. ii 1
I 11 irlvo Iheo scope lo bcal, Since foes have scope lo beal bolh thce and

, I10 . iii 8 140

Bland iii narrow lanes, And beal our watch, and rob our passengem v8 9
Heat Cut's saddle, put a few Hocks In the jiuint . . .1 Hen. II . il 1
If 1 do not beat theo out of thy kingdom with a dagger of lath
Whoso swift wralh bcal down The never-dannlcd Percy . . 2 Wi-ii. 11 . i 1
Wilh what loud applause llidst lliou bcal heaven wilh blessing Bollllg-

brokol

Your pnlsldgo beaU as extraordinarily as heart would desire .

I saw il, and lold John a Gaunt ho beat his own name .

The inun is dead that yon and Pistol Will amongst you .

The French may lay twenty French crowns lo one, they will Ixal us

Urn. V. iv 1 243
Nor the tide of pomp That beats upon the high shore of this world . iv 1 282

A rope 1 a rope f Now bcal Ihem hence 1 Hen. VI. 1 3

To beat assailing death from his weak legions ... . . Iv 4

I r.i.li n age, Ouicken'd with youthful splceu and warlike rage, Ueal down

Alcncon 'V M

Thine eyes and Ihoughts IJcat on a crown, the treasure of thy heart

2 lieu. VI. ii 1 20

A staff is quickly found lo beal a dog iii 1 171

As the butcher lakes away the calf And binds Iho wretch and beats il . iii 1 211
When from thy shore the U-mpesl beat us back . . ... . ill 2 102

O, beat away the busy meddling Uend 'I I, at lays strong siege unto Ihis

wretch's soul I . Ill 8 ai

At unawares may beat down Edward's guard ... 3 Hen. VI. Iv 2 23
Jx.-ave the lown and flghl? Or shall we Deal Ihe slones about thine ears? v 1 loii
Why do you wring your hands, and b<at your brcasl? . Itichard III. II 2 3
O, cut my lace In sunder, thai my jicnt heart May liavo some SCOIHJ lo

beat! Iv l 35

Hollow-hearted friends, Unarm'. I, and unresolved lo bcal them back . iv 4 436
If nol lo light with foreign enemies, Yet to beat down these rebels hero Iv 4 532
No way lo euro Ihls? No new device to beal Ihis liom his brains?

lien. VIII. ill 2 217



(iivo me thy hand : I am sorry 1 beat thee
Beat the ground For kissing of their feet .



27
14

2 160
iii 2 93
iii 2 119
Iv 1 173



01

ua



108

"9



150
109



I 8 92

il 4 36

iii 2 349

V 4 ly



54
16



Vinewcdsl leaven, speak : I will bcal Iheo Into handsomeness

Troi. and tVw. il 1



16



If thon use to beat me, 1 will begin al thy heel, and tell whal thou art

by inches ............ Ii 1 52

I liave bobbed his brain more lhan he has beat my bones . . . ii 1 76
Whoso present courage may beat down our foes ..... ii 2 201

He beats me, and 1 rail at him : O, worthy satisfaction I would it were

otherwise ; that 1 could beat him, whilst he railed at me . . . ii 3 3
My hearl beals thicker Ihau a feverous pulse ...... iii 2 38

Unl our great Ajax bravely beat down him ...... iii 3 213

What's tho matter? will you beat down thedoorj ..... iv 2 44

11. .il lud the tabourines, let the trumpets blow ..... iv 5 275

The llercc Polydamas Halh beal down Menon ...... v 6 7

He 'II beat Aulldius' head below his knee ..... Carivlanus i 8 49

Il.'W have you run From slaves lhal apes would beal I . . . . I 4 36

Come ou ; If you'll stand fast, we'll beat them to their wives . . I 4 41
Where is thai slave Which told me they had beat yon to your trenches? i 6 40
Bo often hast thou beat me, And wouldst do so, 1 think, should we

encounler As often as we cat . . . . . . . . i 10 8

Dogs that are as often beal for barking As Iherefore kepi to do so. . ii 8 224
On fair ground I could beat forty of them ...... ill 1 243

Tliuu hast beat me out Twelve several times ...... iv 5 127

I-cat you shall chance to whip your information And beal Ihe messenger iv 6 54
Ikat thou the drum, Ihat it .speak mournfully ...... v B 151



BEAT



93



BEAUTIES



Beat. When thy poor heart beats with outrageous beating T. Aiulron. iii 2 13
I bang the head As flowers with frost or grass beat down with storms . iv 4 71
Cast us down, And on the ragged stones beat forth our brains . . v 3 133
Beat them down 1 Down with the Capulets 1 down with the Montagues !

litun. nnd Jul. \ 1 80

Be rough with lovo ; Prick love for pricking, and you beat lovo down . i 4 28
What a head have I 1 It beats as it would fall in twenty pieces . . ii 5 50
And, with a martial scorn, with one hand beats Cold death aside- . . iii 1 166
Swifter than his tongue, His agile arm beats down their fatal points . iii 1 171
That is not the lark, whose notes do beat The vanity heaven . . . ill 6 21
He gave me a jewel th 1 other day, and now ho has beat it out of my hat

T. of Athens iii 123
Pluck tho lined crutch from thy old limping sire, With it beat out his

brains ! iv 1 15

I prithee, beat thy drum, nnd get thee gone iv 8 96

I'll beat thee, but I should infect my hands |v 8 369

Lie where the light foam of the sea may beat Thy grave-stone daily . iv 8 379

Our enemies have beat us to the pit J. Ccrsar v 5 23

There are liars and swearers enow to beat the honest men . Macbeth iv 2 57
We might have met them dareful, beard to beard, And beat them back-
ward home v5?

Hems, and beats her heart ; Spurns enviously at straws . . Hamlet iv 5 5
Beat at this gate, that let thy folly in, And thy dear judgement out ! Lear i 4 293

Ono whom I will bent into clamorous whining ii 2 24

Is it two days ago inco I tripp'd up thy heols, nnd beat thee before tho

king? II 2 32

At their chamber-door I'll beat Hi") drum Till It cry sleep to death . ii 4 119
The tempest in my mind Doth from my senses lake all reeling else Save

what beats there iii 4 14

A knave teach me my duty ! I'll beat the knave into a twlggen bottle

Othello ii 3 152
Even so as one would beat his ofl'enccless dog to affright an imperious

lion ii 3 275

In Aleppo once, Where a malignant and a turban'd Turk Beat a Venetian v 2 354
Made The water which they beat to follow faster, As amorous

Ant. and Cleo. ii 2 201
Of that natural luck, He beats thee 'gainst the odds . . . . ii 3 27

His quails ever Beat mine, inhoop'd, at odds . . . . . . ii 3 38

From the head of Actium Beat the approaching Cresar . . . . iii 7 53

And chides, as ho had power To beat me out of Egypt . . . . iv 1 2

We'll beat 'cm into bench-holes iv 7 9

We have- beat him to his camp iv 8 1

My nightingale, We have beat them to their beds iv 8 19

In our salt-water girdle : if you beat us out of it, it is yours . Vymbdine iii 1 81
When we shall hear The rain and wind beat dark December . . . iii 3 37

Thou art some fool ; I am loath to beat thee iv 2 86

To beat us down, the which are down already .... I'cricles i 4 68
Beaten. You have beaten my men, killed my door . . . Mer. Wives i 1 114

I have boon cozoned and beaten too Iv 5 96

Is boaten black and blue, that you cannot seo a white spot about her . iv 6 115
Hlacknnd blun ? I was beaten myself iritoull the colours of the rainbow . iv 6 118

1 know not whnt 'twas to be beaten till lately v 1 28

Why am I beaten ? Dost thou not know ? Nothing, sir, but that I am

beaten Com. of Krrors ii 2 40

Was there over any man thus beaten out of season? . . . . ii 2 48
Beaten the maids a-row and bound the doctor, Whose beard they have

singed olf v 1 170

We are high-proof melancholy and would fain have it beaten away M. Ado v 1 124
If a man will bo beaten with brains, a' shall wear nothing handsome . v 4 104

1 did think to have beaten thee v 4 in

So is Alcides beaten by his page Mer. of Venu-e ii 1 35

Yet would you say ve wero beaten out of door . . . T. of Shrew Ind. 2 87
Was over man so beaten? was ever man HO rayed? was evor man no

wwry? Iv 1

Itnalmi In tlnly for picking it kernel mit of a pomegranate



3

Alt'* ll'rll H fl 275
34



'-ii "ill bn once hotud nnd thrice boaUm ii ft

I HIM robbml, sir, and bonten ; my money nnd apparel ta'on . H'. Tnle. Iv 8 6,
Aro wo not beaten ? Is not Anglers lost ? . K. John ill 4

Indeed, your drums, being beaten, will cry out ; And so shall you,

being beaten . . v 2 166

Hath beaten down young Hotspur nnd his troops . . 2 Hen. IV. Ind. 25
Thus is the shepherd beaten from thy side ... 2 Hen. VI. iii 1 191
Mine eyes should sparkle like the beaten flint . ... iii 2 317

Whom our fathers Have in their own land beaten, bobb'd, and thump'd

Richard III. v 8 334
An honest country lord, as I am, beaten A long time out of play

Hen. nil. i 3 44

Her foes shako like a field of beaten corn, And hang their heads . . v G 32
"I'wafl not voluntary : no man is beaten voluntary . . Trni. and Cre*. ft 1 105
lid hiive beaten him llko a dog, but for disturbing tho loidn within

CoHo/ttHt/9 iv ft 56
Nor stony towor, nor walls of beaten brass, Nur alrloss dungeon J. Cnwr 1 8 9:

Lot us bn beaten, If we cannot tight Macbeth v 8

But, in the beaten way of friendship, what make you at Elsinore? Hamlet H 2 277
I 'Id have thee beaten "for being old before thy time .... Lear i 5 46

Far off, methinks, I hear the beaten drum iv 6 292

When thou once Wast beaten from Modena . . . Ant. and Cleo. i 4 57

The iop was beaten gold ; Purple the sails ii 2 197

They are beaten, Kir ; and our advantage serves For a fair victory . . iv 7 11
He was carried From oft' our coast, twice beaten . . . Cymbeline iii 1 26

Beaten for loyalty Excited me to treason v 5 344

Beating. For still 'tis beating in my mind, your reason . . Tempest 1 2 176
A turn or two 1 '11 walk, To still my beating mind . . . . iv 1 163

Do not infest your mind with beating on The strangeness of this

business v 1 246

Back, slave, or 1 will break thy pate across. And ho will bless that

cross with other beating Com. of Krron il 1 79

When I am cold, bo heats me with beating ; when I am warm, lie cooln

mo with baiting ' v 4 34

No woman's aides Can bide the beating of so strong a passion T. Night ii 4 97

Beating and hanging are terrors to me W. Tale iv 8 29

Alas, poor man ! a million of beating may come to a great matter . . iv 8 62
Beating your officers, cursing yourselves, Opposing laws with strokes

Coriolanus iii 3

That Must bear my beating to his grave v 6

When thy poor heart beats with outrageous beating . T. Andron. iii 2
The bell then beating one, Peace, break theo olf ; look, where it conies

again I Hamlet i 1 39

Whereon his brains still beating puts him thus From fashion of himself iii 1 182
Your dull ass will not mend his pace with beating v 1 65



ieatrice. Get you to heaven, Beatrice, get you to heaven ; here's no place

for you maids Much Ado ii 1 48

But that my Lady Beatrice should know me, and not know me I . . it 1 210
It is the base, though bitter, disposition of Beatrice that puts the world
into her person . , , . >.*...
The Ijady Beatrice hath a quarrel to you .



Heigh-ho for a husband 1 Lady Beatrice, I will get you one .

To bring Signior Benedick and the Lady Beatrice into a mountain of



affection



In despite of his quick wit and his queasy stomach, he shall fall in love



with Beatrice



ii 1 215

ii 1 243

it 1 334

ii 1 382

ii 1 400



What was it you told me of to-day, that your niece Beatrice was In love

with Signior Benedick? il 3 93

She found Benedick and Beatrice between the sheet . . . . ii 8 143
Hero comes Beatrice,. By this day 1 she's a fair lady . . . . ii 8 253
I am sent to bid you come in to dinner. Fair Beatrice, I thank you . ii 3 258
There shalt thou find my cousin Beatrice Proposing with the prince . iii 1 2
My talk to thee must be how Benedick Is sick in love with Beatrice . iii 1 21
Beatrice, like a lapwing, runs Close by the ground, to hear our conference iii 1 24
So angle we for Beatrice ; who even now Is couched in the woodbine

coverture iii 1 29

But arc you sure That Benedick loves Beatrice so entirely? . . . iii 1 37
Wish him wrestle with affection, And never to let Beatrice know of it . iii 1 43
Doth not tho gentleman Deserve as full as fortunate a bed As evor

Beatrice shall couch upmi? ill 1 46

Nature novor framed a woman's heart Of prouder stulf than that of

Beatrice iii 1 50

Not to bo so odd and from all fashions As Beatrice is, cannot bo coin

inendable

For my life, to break with him ubout Beatrice. 'Tis even HO .



iii 1
iii 2
iii 2



Hero and Margaret have by this played their parts with Beatrice .
Lady Beatrice, have you wept all this while? Yea, and I will weep a

while longer iv 1 257

By my sword, Beatrico, thou lovest me. Do not swear, and eat it . iv 1 276

Why, then, God forgive me I What offence, sweet Beatrice? . . . iv 1 284

Tarry, sweet Beatrice. I am gone, though I am here . . . . iv 1 294

Beatrico, In faith, I will go. We'll be friends first . . . . iv 1 297

I '11 tell thee how Beatrice praised thy wit the other day . . . v 1 160

nost profound earnest ; and, I '11 warrant you, for the love, of Beatrice v 1 199



Deserve well at my hands by helping me to the speech of Beatrice

I will call Beatrice to you, who I think hath legs. And therefore will



v 2
v 2



v 2

v 2

v 4

v 4



Sweet Beatrice, wouldst thou come when I called thee ! Yea, signior,

ami depart when you bid me

An old instance, Beatrice, that lived in the time of good neighbours
Which is Beatrice? I answer to that name. What is your will? .
A halting sonnet of his own pure brain, Fashion'd to Beatrice
I had well hoped thou woulust have denied Beatrice . . . J *

Beau. Hero comes Monsieur Lo Beau. With his mouth full of news

As Y. JAJtf It \ 2

Beaufort. Hero's Beaufort, that regards nor God nor king . 1 lien. VI. \ 8

Fie, unclo Beaufort 1 1 have, heard you preach iii 1

Beaufort and myself, With nil the learned council . . .2 Hen. VI. i 1



Beaufort The imperious churchman

Wink at tho Duke of Suffolk's insolence, At Beaufort's pride .

York and impious Beaufort, that false priest, Have all limed bushes

Beaufort's red sparkling eyes blab his heart's malice

Traitorously is murder'd By Suffolk and the Cardinal Beaufort's means



v 4 115



97
60

"7
88

7 r
7'
53



i 3
ii 2
ii 4

iii 1 154
124



ill 2

Myself and Beaufort had him in protection iii 2 180

Is Beaufort term 'd a kite? Where aro his talons? iii 2 196

Cardinal Beaufort, is at point of death iii 2 369

How fares my lord? speak, Beaufort, to thy sovereign . . . . iji 8 i

Beaumond, nnd Willoughhy, With all their powerful friends Ji'n-htird //. ii 2 54

Beaumont, (Immlpie, llmmsl, nnd Fauronhoig . . Hi . I', Iif f> 44 ; Iv 8 105

BoixutoouB. Mow beauteous mankind Is I O nravn now world . 7'niijvff v 1 183

Klack i mm nro peurls In bcauleouN Indies' oyt's .,.'!', G. t]f\'tr. v 2 12

Tho beauteous Iielr Of Juqnes FntconbrHgo . . . > L. L. Lost II 1 41

True, that tluni art beauteous ; truth it-self, that thou nit lovely . . Iv 1 61

More fairer than fair, beautiful than beauteous, truer than truth itself . iv 1 63

The superscript: -*To the snow-white hand of the most beauteous Lady

Rosaline' iv 2 136

Beauteous as ink ; a good conclusion. Fair as a text B in a copy-book . v 2 41

I am beloved of beauteous Hcnnia M. N. Dream i 1 104

This beauteous lady Thisby is certain v 1 131

The beauteous scarf Veiling an Indian beauty . . . Mer. of 1'enice iii 2 98
A wife With wealth enough and young and beauteous . . T. of Shrew i 2 86
The ono as famous for a scolding tongue An is the other for beauteous

modesty i 2 255

Kindness In women, not thnlr Ixvuitooilfl looks, Shall win my lovn . iv 2 41
Natum with n beauteous wnll Doth nil rlosc in pollution . 7'. Night \ 2 48
The bounteous ovll Aro empty trunks o'erllourlsn'd by tho dovil . . ill 4 403
With taper-light To seek tho beauteous eye of henven to garnish A*. John iv 2 15
That sweet breath Which was embounded in this beauteous clay . . iv 8 137
Most beauteous inn, Why should hard-favour'd grief be lodged in thee?

Riclutrd II. v I 13
Your wondrous rare description, noble earl, Of beauteous Margaret hath

astonish'd me I Hen. VI. v 5 2

Given me in this beauteous face A world of earthly blessings . 2 Hen. VI. i 1 21
The king, that calls your beauteous daughter wife . . Richard III. iv 4 315

1 tender not thy beauteous princely daughter iv 4 405

You having lands, and blest with beauteous wives . . . v 3 321
Sweet blowse, you are a beauteous blossom, sure . . T. Audron. iv 2 72
County Anselme and his beauteous sisters - . . Rom. and Jul i 2 68
This bud of love, by summer's ripening breath, May prove a beauteous

flower il 2 122

Beauteous nnd swift, tho minions of their rncn . . . Macbeth U 4 15

Whoro is Mm beauteous majesty of Denmark? .... Hamlet tv 6 21

Urutus, With the nrm'it rest, courtiers of bt'nutnoUM freedom Ant. and Ctfo. 11 rt 17

Beautled. Tho harlot's cheek, beatitied with plastering art . Hamlet HI 1 51

Beauties. All hail, the richest beauties on the earth ! Beauties no richer

than rich taffeta . . . , L. L. Lost v 2 158

To you your father should be as a god ; One that composed your beauties

M. N. Dream i 1 48

I might in virtues, beauties, livings, friends, Exceed account Mer. of Ten. iii 2 158
Good beauties, let me sustain no scorn ; I am very comptfble T. Right, i 6 186
By giving liberty unto thine eyes ; Examine other beauties Horn, and Jul. i 1 234

With all tho admired buautios of Verona i 2 89

Ix>vers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties . . lit 2 9
That your good beauties be the happy cause Of Hamlet's wild ness Ham. iii 1 39
Loveliuesb in favour, sympathy in years, mauuera nnd beauties Othello ii 1 233



BEAUTIFIED



94



BEAUTY



Beautified, hewing you uiu beautified With goodly shape . T. G. ofVci. iv 1 55
* To tho celestial and my soul's idol, tho most beautified Ophelia,' Thut 'ti

an 111 phrase, a vilo phraso ; * bejuttillcd ' Is a vile phntso . Hamlet it 2 no
Beautiful. I luive loved her ovur Hlnce, I auw hur; and still I MOO her

beautiful T.O.of Vcr. 11 I 73

A virtuous gentlewoman, mild and beautiful 1 iv 4 185

More fairer than fair, beautiful than beauteous . . . L. L. Lost iv 1 63
Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful . . . M. N. Dream iii 1 151

Most beautiful pagan, most sweet Jew ! . Met: of Venice ii 3 it

Far more beautiful Than any woman in this waning age . T. of Shrew lud. 2 64

His youngest daughter, beautiful Bianca 12 120

Is the jay moru precioua thun tho lark, Because hia feathers are more

beautiful? .... iv 8 178

She much resembled me, was yet of many accounted beautiful T. Night ii 1 ^7
What u deal of scorn looks beautiful In the contempt and anger of

his lip! iii 1 157

Hhe'a beautiful and therefore to be woo'd ; She Is a woman, therefore to

be won 1 Hen. VI. v 8 77

Beautiful tyrant t fiend angelical ! Dove-feather'd raven ! Rom. and Jid. iii 2 75
You have . . . , fair ladies, Set a fair fashion on our entertainment,

Which waa not half so beautiful and kind . . . T. of Alheia 1 2 153
Mine eyea Were not in fault, for she was beautiful . . . Cymbcliite v 5 63
Beautify. No'or returneth To blush and beautify tho cheek again

2 Hen. VI. ill 2 167

We are brought to Home, To beautify thy triumphs and return T, Andron. 1 1 no
Tins unbound lover, To beautify him, only lacks a cover Rum. and Jid. i 3 83

To grace thy marriage-day, I '11 beautify Pericles v 3 76

Beauty. He 'a something stain'd With grief, that's beauty's canker Tempest 1 2 415
Thai moat douply to consider la Thu lieanty of his daughter . . . iil 2 i ;
An April day, Which now shows all Urn beauty of thu sun T. O. of Vcr. 1 8 86
1 mean that her beauty is exquisite, but her favour inllnit-o . . . H 1 59
So painted, to make hur fair, that no man connU of her buiiuty. How

ostoomost thou me? I account of hur beauty II 1

Let her beauty bo her wedding-dower iii 1

Say that upon the altar of her beauty You sacrifice your tears, your sighs iii 2
When to her beauty I commend my vows, She bids mo think how I have

been forsworn iv 2

In she kind as she is fair? For beauty lives with kindness . . . iv 2
What, have 1 scaped love-letters in tho holiday-time of my beauty?

Mer. Wive* il 1

Thou hast thu right arched beauty of the brow that becomes the ship-tire ill 3
These black masks Proclaim an enshiuld beauty . . Meat, for Mem. ii 4
Hast neither heat, atl'ection, limb, nor beau ty, To make thy riehea pleasant ill 1
Tho goodness that la cheap in beauty makes beauty brief In goodness . Iil 1
Hath homely ugu tho alluring beauty took From my [mor chook?

Cow. oj I'.rrun II

I see the jewel best onumolhul Will loso hlH beauty H

Since that my beauty cannot please his eye, I '11 weep what's left away . H

First he did praise my beauty, then my speech iv

There's her cousin . . . exceeds her as much in beauty as thu Ilrst of

May doth tho last of December M. Ado i

Thou wast ever an obstinate heretic in tho despite of beauty . . . I
Heauty is H witch Against whose charms faith melteth into blood . . 11
On my oyelids shall conjecture hang, To turn all beauty into thoughts of

harm iv

Will you then write mo a sonnet In praise of my beauty ? , v

My beauty, though but mean, Needs not the painted flourish of your

praise: Boavity is bought by judgement of tho eye . . L. L Lost Ii 1 13

I thank my beauty, I am fair that shoot lv 1 it

My beauty will be aaved by merit ! O heresy in fair ! . . . . Iv 1 21
Shall I teach you to know? Ay, my continent of beauty . . . Iv 1 nt

Never faith could hold, if not to beauty vow'd 1 iv 2 no

Ur.mty doth varnish age, as if nuw-born iv 3 244

Where is a hook r That 1 may swear beauty doth beauty lack . . iv 3 251

And beauty's crest becomes the heavens well iv 3 256

When would you . . . Have found tho ground of study's excellency

Without the beauty of a woman's facer iv 3 301

Where is any author in tho world Teaches auch beauty aa a woman's eye? Iv 8 313
As the prompting eyea Of beauty's tutors have enrich'd you with . . iv 3 323

A light condition in a beauty dark v 2 20

Your beauty, ladies, Hath much deform'd us . .... v 2 766

No fault of mine. None, but your beauty : would thut fault were mine I

J/. A". Itrcam i I 201

The lover, all as frantic, Sees Helen's beauty in a brow of Egypt . . v 1 1 1
Look on beauty, And you ahull see 'Us purcltaaed by the weight

Mer. of Venice \\\ 2 88

Tho beauteous scarf Veiling an Indian beauty iii 2 99

lleauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold . . .Is V. Like Hi 3 112

Honesty coupled to beauty is to have honey a sauce to sugar . . . iii 3 30

What though you have no beauty iii 5 37

Sweet benuty in her fuer Such as the daughter of Agonor had 1'. of Shrew i I 172
Her beauty Hud her wit, Her ullubility nnd bashful nmdusty . . . ii 1 48
Pmlsed In every town, Thy virtues spoke of, and thy beauty sounded . ft I 193
I MOO thy bounty, Thy beauty, that ddh muko mo like theo wtOI . . 11 1 375
What stars do Hiuinglo liejivon with such beauty, As UIOMU two tyon

bucomo that neavenly fuco? Iv 6 31

Sweet Kate, embrace her for her beauty's sake iv 5 34

It blots thy beauty as frosts do bite the meads v 2 139

Like a fountain troubled, Muddy, ill-seeming, thick, bereft of beauty . v 2 143
In thee hath estimate, Youth, beauty, wisdom, courage, all That happi-
ness and prime can happy call ...... All's H'ell ii 1 184

He wooes your daughter, I<ays down his wanton alege before her beauty lit 7 18
Whose beauty did astonish the survey Of richest eyes . . . . v 8 16

As there ia no true cuckold but calamity, so beauty's a flower T. Night i 6 57

Moat radiant, exquisite nnd uumatchable beauty 1 15 182

'Tis buauty truly blent, whuso red and white Nature's own sweet and

cunning hand laid on 15 257

I will give out divers schedules of my beauty 16 263

Though you wore crown'd The noninueil of beauty 16 273

Virtuu is beauty, but tho beauteous evil Are empty trunks o'erHourish'd

by the devil iii 4 403

Their transformations Were never for a piece of beauty rarer . }V. Tale iv 4 33
Daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds uf

March with beauty iv 4 120

I '11 have thy beauty scratch'd with briers, and made More homely . iv 4 436
Your verse Flow'd with her beauty once : 'tis shrewdly ebb'd . . v 1 102
Sorry Your choice is not so rich in worth us bounty . . . . v 1 214
If lusty love should go in quest of beauty, Where should he find it fairer

than in Blanch? A'. Jvhn ii 1 426

Such aa sho is, in beauty, virtuo, birth, Is tho young Dauphin . . ii 1 432



1 8,

1 110

1 114

2 15

1 194
1 =n 7

1 186

1 108

a s



Beauty. If that the Dauphin there, thy princely son, Can in this book of


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 51 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382 383 384 385 386 387 388 389 390 391 392 393 394 395 396 397 398 399 400 401 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 415 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 455 456 457 458 459 460 461 462 463 464 465 466 467 468 469 470 471 472 473 474 475 476 477 478 479 480 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 489 490 491 492 493 494 495 496 497 498 499 500 501 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 512 513 514 515 516 517 518 519 520 521 522

Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 51 of 522)