John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 62 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 62 of 522)
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L. L. Lost iii 1
W. Tale i 2
. Cvrioldnus ii 3
Tempest ii 2
T. G. of Ver. iii 2
Mer. irirfsii 1
. Richard II. i 2
T. of Athens iv 2
. Cymbeline v 1

Best wlt!""He hath'si'mply the best w'it of any haudicraft'man'in Iwfens'" ' *

nlll I d t man V Y "' Pol 5" lor <>. have proved best woodman^! Cymwlne ill 6
Best worthy. Ponipoy proves the best Worthy j i ;/ ,

S 8 | S T hc '" IjMt '"" OI >. ' tanner of WlnRham ' '2//t'r/lv2

hn 8d mr l " 3 t1 ' 1 " b^taiued cloak With our pure

Bested. I never saw a fellow worse bested,' Or more afraid to fight ' 1/ '"' '*' "



Whu,erh h n ''/"f '' hmiry ' And bestial appetite . Rd'w'm 6
Whether it be Bestial oblivion, or some craven scruple . HamM iv 4

B, h , aVe w 8 ' " l ""'; tal P" rt of myself, and what remains is bestial Oth oil I
Bestir. We run ourselves aground : bestir, bestir 7>m,/ i

Bestirred. And thus hath so bestirr'd thee in thy sleep ! \ l ,, m ft i 3
am ' P



seep m

e '" Catl '' my lord - No marvf>1 - y have P so bestirred your



f miuTart B ' Sto " " P " the 6y " f th ' S y<
""".'"i ""! bmtow your luggagn wlm're you found It .' ] Tm} ' eS ' 'y }
l'i>rh,.hhi,lhlHw 1 Mlh(^m 1 .sallthop m |s,vsU, 1 itlnowl.eUiw T 11 afVtr II 4
\\ hlrl, ,vny I ,, my l,,,sU,w mynlf T,, |, regnrdo,! In her suu-brlght eve 'l 1
OvenvemilMg slave llestow thy fa W ,,ln K smiles on equal mate, . ' i

^ 'ahle^l ,'i f'T K K ' "" V "'""v"' 1 ' boStoW lllm? ' "" ' v 2
It Is a blessiiiR that liu bestows on beasts. rvm, / tv r m.,

That chain will I be.stow-Be it for nothing but to spite n.yWe I ?

Buy a rope's em: that will I bestow Amon|my wife and herronfederates iv

of -our w^hf " * C " W flnU hl " ly he * rt t0 bestow !t a "

They^fkn'mv Hy la'vnurs several" which they did bestow' '. */""* 11 S /v 2
Swet royalty, be,stow on me the sense of hearing . v 2

Silence bestows that virtue on it, madam . , Ma . / ,-. v f

Of feinale favour, and bestows himself Like a ripe sister As I'Litelnl 3
If I bring in your Rosalind, You will bestow her on Orlando here ? . v 4
That is, not to bestow my youngest daughter . T ofKlmwll

""'ment C * tlon of yollr lln "6l't, I here bestow a simple list.

lie wlll'd me In hoedfuirst reservation to' bestow them '. '. All's IIWM I
Whom I know Is free for mo to ask, thee to bestow. I 1

1o renuitfl you further, I will bestow some precepts ' i '>

Por what Is yours to bestow Is not yours to reserve f Xiahl I 5

He says he II come ; How shall I feast him? what bestow of him? ' .11 4
Tell me how you would bestow yourself . g r oll '

How might we see Falstair bestow himself to-night in his true colours?

I will bestow a breakfast to make you friends . " "/% T' ii ?

Destov yourself with speed : The French are bravely in their battles set 'iv 3
We will bestow you m some better place, Fitter for sickness 1 Htn VI iii 2
Bestow your pity on me: tor I am a most poor woman . a"" VIII 4
Come reverend fathers, Bestow your counsels on me 'm 1

\,n' e '} ',',' y P resent I'avings, to bestow My bounties upon you . iii 2

What d ,1 y,,,, swear you would bestow on me? . . y rni . ,( ^ v 2

dn"" 1 l) 7 l {! w " '" -"f "hat you Imvolltllo-ratleiicoawhlle Cori.,1. I 1
Of him that <lld not ask, but mock, bestow Your sucd.for tongues ii 3

I ask your voices and your sulfrages: Will you bestow them? T. Andron i 1
And you must needs bestow her funeral . ,' ,

Give him thy daughter : What you bestow, in him I'll counte'rpolse

't!" 6 ' b "t S b h St ?- W these P"P e r y bade me . , 7 ' ^ s '"r } I
thou bestow thy time with me?



*



87






Lawful espials, Will so bestow ourselves 'that,' seeing, unseen, We^ma'v' ''' **

of their encounter frankly judge. . llamlel iii 1

So please you, Wo will bestow ourselves .

I will bestow him, and will answer well The death I gave him At,

Bestow this place on us a little while
Kill thy physician, and the fee bestow Upon thy foul disease' '. IJnr I 1 ,66



But what praise couldst thou bestow on a'dese'rvtog woman indeed? ii i

' i



r '" t " e ' fttvo ' ur ' 1



BeSt T,ow'd onThi
If she be otherwise, 'tis labour well bestowed '.



t" luuch



' "
' 6




Little is the cost I have bestow'd In purchasing the sembl^nce^'my" " 2 ' 79
That her gifts may hencefortl, be bestowed equally' J, r' in'. ;!'! I '1

^^^Sws^^ssss^s \



r ' Te " ''"' J hold B



97
"



Sa Ihe De r sto 1 TOHmonme faVOUrS ^ ''"' connt ' 8 8ervin l- n 'an than ever
If you knew what pains I have bestoVd to breed this present peace ' '" 2 *

I would have bestowed the thousand pound I borro 1
And on it have bestow'd more contrite tears
Large gifts have I bestow'd on learned clerks

Nor none so nob Whose life we're 111 bestow'd or death imfanfef"' '' /- ' V '
O monument And wonder of good deeds evilly bestow'd 1 ^r.' "'"' ^ " 2 '



I/ jr
' ,,,' VV J J 3 'l

"



^s^^^^S^^^A^j^^ > 5 "



Yoi^cannot, By the good aid that I of you' shall borrow/Err in bestow



'



fefeot^Sufhf : ^SJ^j f

Zd wl?h weed's diSdai " " nd diSC r<I Sha " bMtre ' W "" ion o?"o'ur ""'
Ray thou wilt walk; we will hes'trew'thn ground ' T fSh%S?I,S

si ,' v , r b " al " '''"" fo-lrand Ltrew'd witi, iS '
" Rlri '' t " "' tl10 Wftr " " ml tonk 11 " n ' 1 * to
Iloan Itarb'ary, That horsn that thou so often hast b'ostrld %,1'^T v
Three times to-day I holp him to his horse, Three times bestrid him

He bestrid An o'er-press'd Roman and i' the consul's view Slew three K/ ' T
His' legs bestrid the ocean : his rear'd arm Crested the world ^avdc' v

Bestrtde H', \ ' M' "" V one , tlmt 1 " >cl A rl ' 1( - r lik " '"I* &&*,
Bestride Hal ,f thou see me down In the battle and bestride me, so ;
tis a point of friendship i u jir

He doth bestride a bleeding land, Gasping for iife .' .' 2 "/" ,' IV \

When I bestride him, I soar, I an, a hawk 6 : he trots the air /7 V. ii
Once again bestride our foaming steeds, And once again cry ' Charge 1'

IVstlide the rock ; th. tide will wash you off. Or el, rf you famfsh'"'' "' ' v

n'e"tride ',"/ U i'Tl' T ''" W '' e " ' " r8t "' y WC "' <1Cl1 " M . m * *>*
Bestrides the taVpwl^ clouds' And sails npo'n the bosom of 'the S'"" '"

A lover may bestride the gossamer That idles in the wanfoT'sunn/er'' "

WTiy man, he doth bestride the' narrow world Like' a Colossus j. Omr'i
And like good men Bestride our down-faH'n birthdom . Marbe th iv

Bet. That's the French bet against the Danish . llamlctv

Betake thee to thy faith, for sevenU-en poniards are at thy bosom All ' l>" iv
That defence thou hast, betake thee to't . T Ni atit il

If yon hold your life at any price, betake you to your guard , "

Therefore betake theo To nothing but despair . u> TO e

Ilaso and Ignominious treasons, makes mo betake me to my heels '

And no sooner in But every man belake him to his legs llm'."^M.\

best ' reSt ' To ' lnorTOW "" for "lading do their

Betoem I eould well rieteem them from the tempest of my eyes ll'^nr "

He might not beteem the winds of heaven Visit her face too roughly Ham i
Bethink you of some conveyance . . 3;^. n/v jj

r <?t - h ,"L k . y u", ; Who is jt that hath die<1 for th| s offence? Mu. for Ideas ii
I will bethink me : come again to-morrow i

Twas bravely done, if you bethink you of it . ' M,ich Ado v

For truly would I speak, And now I do bethink me, so ii is /, j? STlv
Bhonld I go to church And see the holy edifice of stone, And not be-

think me straight of dangerous rockn? . . . Her. of Venice I
I will be assured I may ; and, that I may be nnmiriKl, I will bethink me I
Bethink thee of thy birth, Call home thy ancient thoughts T. of Shrew Ind
And now I do bethink me, it was she First told me . . T. Night v



r 12

1 163

2 56
2 39
2 26

1 :o



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1 ^
7 ^

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a

I , 4
i I,
4 Jn
\ %
I ,,



2 J
a !

2 87
9 ,,

1 =Bo
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1 ,i

3 I

2 \
1 356



RETHINK



114



BETTER



Bethink. But I bethink me what a weary way . . . Richard II, 11 3 8
Bothink llioo on her virtue* that surmount, And natural graces 1 Hen. VI. v 3 191
11 o think thoe once again. And in thy thought o'er-run my former time

3 lien. VI. I 4 44
As I bethink mo, yon should not bo king Till our King Henry hail shook

ii.iM.l , with death ........... 14 101

With |ki! lend' calm the storm, While we bethink a means to break it off iii S 39
Madam, bethink you, like a careful mother . . . Ridtard III. li 2 96
Bade him bethink How nice the quarrel was . . . Horn, and Jul. ill 1 158
Nor what Is mine ahull never do thee good , Trust to't, bethink you . iii 6 197
It ML.iy be 1 shall otherwise bethink me ..... J. C&sar iv 3 351

Bethink yourself wherein you may have attended him . . . I^ear i 2 174
If you buUiiiik yourself of any criino Unreconciled as yet to heaven and

grace, Solicit for it straight ...... Othello v 2 26

Bethought. I havu bethought mo of utuithor fault . . Meat, for Mem. v 1 461
Ho lut h !! i.-r huthought him of his quarrel .... T. \ - lit iii 4 327

Marry, wtill bethought: 'Tis told me, he hath very oft of late Given

private lime to you . ...... Hamlet 1 3 90

And am bethought To take the basest and most poorest shape . IMIT ii 3 6
Being here, Bethought mo what was past, what might succeed Pericles i 2 83
'Tis well bethought ........... v 1 44

Bethumped. I was never so bcthump'd with words . . K. John ii 1 466

Betid. Not so much perdition m an hair Betid to any creature Tempest i 2 31



Richard 11. v 1
fyinbettnc |v 3
Rtekard II. iii 2
2 lien. VI. 1 4
3 lien. VI, Iv
lllchunl III. 1 2



.

Let them t.-ll time tales Of woeful ages long ago betid

Noither know I What is betid to Clotcn
Betide. M health and happiness betido my liege ! .

\\ h.it. ih ill i.n i ! tho Dnko of Somerset?

'I . provide A sulv for any soro Unit may butlde . .

Mure ilintfnl lm> betide ih.it hat.id M ).(. h I .

111 i i-ii botidii tlni Hi. mi ITI. whom thoii UuHt !

Ifba werarittd, whab wmild boUdaorinel

And no lirti lo to mu As we.ll I trn.ler you and all of yours 1

Wo lire all undone I Now help, or woo bolide thuouvurmoru I T. Andron. iv 2
Betldeth. And what now* rise Uctidclli hero T. CJ. of Vcr. i 1

Kecking :n little what boiideth mo As much I wish all good befortune

you ............. Iv 8

Betlme. He that drinks all night, and is banged betimes in the morning,

may sleep the sounder all the next day . . . A/tuj. for lfu. Iv 3

I .<! it bo proclaimed betimes i' the morn ....... iv 4



t -'
40

i 1

I i

1 2 iu
I 3 6
II 4 71
56
59

4

49

18

The next morn betimes, His purpose surfeiting v 1 iui

No i Linn bhull bo omitted That will betime, and may by us be fitted

;,. /.. iMst iv 3 382

Lot me say 'amen ' betimes, lest the devil cross my pruyur Mer, of Vcn. Iii 1 22
Not to be a-hod ufter midnight is to be up betimes . . '/. \tj/Af ii 3 2

To go to bod aftor midnight U to go t.. bod Imllmos . . . . II 8 9
Mo cured Of thin diseased opinion, and bellmen ... IK. Tale I 2 397
I'ui up thy sword btillmo ; Or I'll so maul you and your toastlng-lrun

A'. Juhn fv 3 98

He tires betimes that spurs too fast betimes . . . Richard II. ii 1 36
Ho with me betimes in tho morning ; and so, good morrow 1 Hen. IV. il 4 600
Mop the rage betime, Before the wound do grow uncurablo 3 Htn. VI. iii 1 285
I rulhor would have lost my life botimes Than bring a burthon of dis-
honour home Ill 1 397

Away betimes, before his forces join 3 Hen. VI. tv 8 62

Ho should have leave to go away betimes v 4 45

Let us sup betimes, that afterwards Wo may digest our comploU

Richard III. iii 1 199

Let us pay betimes A moiety of that moss of moan to come TV. and Cr. II 2 106
If thoso bu motives weak, break oil' betimes, And every man hence J. C. ii 1 116
Bid him sot ou his powers betimes hcluro, And we will follow . Iv 3 308

I will to-morrow, And betimes 1 will, In tho weird ulsters . Macbeth Iii 4 133
Good God, ho tin in* romove Tho mmui* that makun us strangero ! . . iv 3 162
To-morrow lit &ilnt Valentino's day, All In the morning Wlline Hamld lv 6 49
Hiiice no man has aught of what ho leaves, what Is't to leavo betimes? . v 2 335
We moot 1' tho morning? At my lodging. I'll be with theo betimes uth. I 3 383
Butlmos in the nmruing I will bcM-crti the virtuous Dusdumona . . il 8 335
To bushiest! that wo love wo rlno butime .... Ant. and Cleo. lv 4 20
Like the spirit of a youth That men UK to be of note, begins betimes . Iv 4 97
It Is a day turn'd strangely : or betimes Let's re-lnforco, or fly Cyinleline v 2 17
Betoken. This doth betoken The corse they follow did with desperate

hand Fordo it own life . Hamlet v 1 243

Betook. And, as I am a gentleman, betook myself lo walk . L. L. Lost 1 1 337
Your lord has betook himself to unknown travels . . . Perida I 8 35
Betosaed. What said my man, whun my betossed soul Did not attend

him as wo rode ? Rom. and Jul. v 3 76

Betray. Do not betray me, sir. I fear you love Mistress Page Mer. ll'iies III 3 82
Give him another hopo, to betray him to another punishment . . iii 3 208

We'll betniv him finely v 8 22

Those that betray them do no treachery v 3 24

She did betray me to my own reproof .... Com. of Errors v 1 90

I .lo betray mysolf with blushing L. L. Lost I 2 138

These betray nice wenches, that would be betrayed without these . iii 1 23
To hotruy a sho-hunb of a twolve-nmnth . . . . As Y. Like It iii 2 85
And botniy themstdves to every modem cunsuro worse than drunkards lv 1 6
Iu tho hlghoit compulsion of base fear, oiler to betray you All's ]\'ell til fl 32

A* will bolmy U.H all unto ourselves lv 1 102

Will you undertake to betray tho Florentine? lv 3 326

He does obey every point of the letter that I dropped to betray him

T. Night lit 2 83

How sometimes nature will betray Its folly I .... II'. Tale I 2 151
My name Bo yokod with his that did betray the Best 1 . . . .12 419
The sacred honour of himself, his queen's, His hopeful son's, his babe's,

betrays to slander , ii 3 85

Sleeping neglection doth betray to loss The conquest . 1 Hen, VI. iv 3 49
Hive all Hmod bushes to betray thy wings . . . .2 Hen. VI. ii -l 54
Villain, thou wilt betray me, and get a thousand crowns of the king . iv 10 28
I knotv thoe not; why, then, should I betray thee? . . . . iv 10 34
Her ImsUmd, knavo : wouhlst Until betray mo? . . Ridmnl HI. i 1 K,J
Nor to betray you any way to sorrow, Yuii huvu UKI much, good lady

Hen. VIII. Iii 1 56

Wilt thou betray thy noble mistress thus? ... 7*. Andrun, iv 2 106
Betray with blushing Tho close enacts and counsels of the heart . . iv 2 117
Sliall she live to betray this guilt of ours, A long-tongued babbling

gossip? iv 2 149

Revenge now goes To lay a com plot to betray thy foea . . . . v 2 147
Win us with honest trifles, to betray's In deepest consequence Macbeth f 3 12

Would not betray The devil to his fellow lv 3 ui

Let not the creaking of shoes nor the rustling of silks betray thy poor

heart to woman I^ar Iii 4 98

Yet she must die, else she'll betray more men . . . Othelto v 2 6



Betray. My music playing fur off, I will betray Tawny-llnn'd fishes

Ant. and Clto. ii 5 n

Make him Hwnnr The shes of Italy should not betray Minn Interest <ymb. 1 3 39
Liko the harpy, Which, to betray, dost, with thine angel's face, Seize

with thine eagle's talons fern-It* iv 8 47

Betrayed. These betray nice wenches, that would be betrayed without

these L. L. Lost lit 1 24

Too bitter is thy jest. Are we betray'd thus to thy over-view? . . iv 3 175
Not you to me, but I betray'd by you : 1, that am honest . . . iv 3 176
I am betray'd, by keeping company With men like men of inconstancy lv 3 179
Camillo has betray'd me ; Whose honour and whose honesty till now

Endured all weathers W. Tul v 1 193

Wilfully hutray'd The lives of those that he did load to light 1 Hen. IV. i 3 81
Ho Imth betrayed his followers, \vhoso condemnation Is pronounced

Hen. V. Ill fl 143
I !,ti, bis dastard foumen is betray'd . . . . . .1 Hen. VI. I 1 144

But dies, betray'd to fortune by your strife iv 4 39

Trust nobody, for fear you lw betray'd .... 2 Hen. VI. iv 4 58
Either betray'd by falsehood of his guard Or by his foe surprised

3 Hen. VI. lv 4 8

Poor Clarence, by thy guilo betrayed to death ! . . Richard III. v 3 133
Was by that wretch betray'd, And without trial fell . Hen. VIII. ii 1 no
IVrhdiously He lias betray'd your business .... Coriulaniis v 6 93
Unicorns may be betray'd with trees, And bears with glasses J. Ctrmr ii I so*

Alus I he is betruy'd and I undone Othello v 2 76

<>, never was there quuen So mightily betray'd ! . . Ant. and Cleo. 1 3 35
UiMMtnt that e'er thy toiiguo Hath KO U'trny'd thine act . . . . II 7 84
Tills foul Egyptian hath Wtniyud me: My tluct hulh yiehh-d to the Too lv 12 10

Butray'd I am : O this fulse soul of Egypt" ! tv 1*J 21

IV-aco! Shu hath l.rday'd me and hhu'll dii* tho deal h . . . . lv 14 a6
Do not youixtrlf Much wrong, who are In this Itullovod, but not hutruy'd v '2 41
Some Jay of 1 Uily, Whose mother was her painting, hath Ulniy'd him

t 1,1111,1,111- III 4 53

Thoso that ere betray'd Do feel the treason sharply . . . . HI 4 87
Betrayedst. That thou betray'dst Polixenes, 'twas nothing . IK. Tale in 2 186
Betraying. For, by oppressing and betraying me, Thou mightat have

sooner got another service T. of Athens lv 3 510

Betrtm. Which spongy April at thy hest betrima . . . Tempest iv 1 65
Betroth. What is he for a fool that bctroths himself to nnquiutness ?

Much Ado I 3 49
Betrothed. But she loves you ? Ay, and we are betroth'd 7'. (1. of Vcr. 11 4 179

To whom, thyself art witness, I am If troth \1 lv 2 in

With Angelo to-night bhull lie II is old betrothed but despised

Jl/ttu. fur Muia. ill 2 293

Tn her, my lord. Wad I betroth'd ore I saw llermia . . M. N. I>remn lv 1 177
You are betroth d both to a maid ami man .... T. .W/M v 1 270
1'iidug maidens' gruan*, For husbandM, fathers and betrothed luvors

Hen. V. 11 4 108
You know, my lord, your highness Is betroth'd Unto another lady

1 Hen. VI. v 5 26

By substitute betroth'd To Bona.sisUr to the King of France Richard III. Iii 7 181

Him that justly may Beurhltt butroth'd from all the world away T.Andi-vn.l \ 286

lli-trotli'd and would have married her ]>erforce . . limn, and Jid. v 8 238

Betted. I...\..l him wi-ll, and butted much money on his head 2 Hen. IV. iii 2 50

Bettor. Nought knowing Of whence I am, nor that I am more belter Tempest i 2 19

Here lies your brother, No better than the earth he lies upon . . ii 1 281

Has done little better than played the Jack with us . . . . iv 1 197

excellent device I was there ever heard a letter? . 7*. fi. of Ver. ii 1 145
He wants wit that wants resolved will To loam his wit to exchange tho

bad for better fi 13

Better forbear till Proteus make return II 7 11

Thn . t, u i is tthe hotter than a judo ill 1 276

For thou hast shuwn some &igu of good dcttcrt Makus mo the better

to confer with thee til 2 19

Better, indeed, when you hold your f>cace v 2 18

Hotter liavo none Than plural faith which N too much by one . . v 4 51

1 wishod your venlnon butter ; It was ill kllh-d . . . Mer. n ., , > I 1 84
The council tdiall know this. 'Twere better for yon If it wuro known in

counsel II 121

Simple, you say your name la? Ay, for fault of a better . . . i 4 17
How dost thou 1 Tho better that It pleases your good worship to ask . I 4 144

I like it never the better for that Ii 1 IK

Better three hours too soon than a minute too late ii 2 327

I know not which pleases mo better, that my husband is deceived, or

Sir John Hi 3 189

Heaven make you butter than your thoughts ! . . . . . iii 3 218

They can tell you how things go better than I can iii 4 69

Away with him ! better shame than murder iv 2 45

Better a little chiding than a great deal of heart-break . . . . v 3 10
Do not these fair yokes Become the forest better than the town? . . v 5 112
Come, tell me true : it shall be the better for you . . Meas. fvr Metis, ii 1 333
Let mo be ignorant, and in nothing good, But graciously to know I am

no belter II 4 77

Better It were a brother died at once, Than that a sister, by redeeming

him, Should die for ever ii 4 106

Ho shall know you better, sir, If I may live to report you . . . iil 2 171
[ have been drinking all night ; I urn not lilted for't.- O, tho better, nil iv 3 48
Good mumine to you, fair and gracious daughter. Tho better, given

me by so noly a man iv 3 117

He was drunk then, my lord : it can be no better v 1 189

Not better than he, by her own report v 1 274

For the most, become much more thu better For being a little bad . v 1 445
All, but I think him better than I say .... Com. of Errors iv 2 25
How much better is it to weep at joy than to joy at weeping ! Math Ado i 1 28

A bird of my tongue is better than a beast of yours i 1 140

I say my prayers aloud. I love you thu better il 1 109

Others say thou dost deserve, and I Believe it better than reportingly . iii 1 116

I > t that appear homiltiT, ami nim U-ttt-r at mo til 2 99

TroUi, I tkluk your olhor raUOo voro bettor Iii 4 7

It is proved already that you are little better tlian fulso knaves . . Iv 2 23
Did you ever hear butter V lam much deceived but I rcmcmbur the stylo

L. L. Is>*l iv 1 97

Construe my speeches better, if you may. Then wish me better . . v 2 341
This falls out better than I could devise . . . . M. N. Dream III 2 35

Would you desire lime and hair to spoak better? v 1 167

A mute will turn the balance, which Pyramus, which Thisbe, la the

.better v 1 325

Good sentences and well pronounced.- They would be better, if well

followed ......... Mer. of Venice t 2 12

Ho hath a horse better than the Neapolitan'* 1 2 62



BETTER

Better. When he is worst, he Is little better than a beast Mer. of Vtnice i 2
Tis vile, unless it may be quaintly order'd, And better in my mind not

undertook

Is that my prize? are my deserts no better? .

The villany you teach me, I will execute, aud it shall go hard but I will

better the instruction



115



BETTER



ii 4

ii 9



iil 1 7 <

iii 2 15

iii 5 4 .

Iv 1 117

iv 1 181



v 1 255



i 1

1 2

1 8 116
ii 3
ii 4



iil 8
Iii 6



I would not be ambitious in my wish, To wish myself much better

I shall answer lhat better to the commonwealth ....

You cannot better bo omploy'd, Ijnssanlo, Than to live still and write
inlno epitaph

It [mercy] becomes The throned monarch better limn Ills crown '.

Our husbands' hoallhs, Which speed, wo hopo, Ihe better for our words

Give him this And bid him keep It belter than tho other

His horses are bred better As Y Like It i I

Know you before whom, sir ? Ay, better than him I am before knows me i 1

The courtesy of nations allows you my better, in that you are tho first-
born

Then shall we be news-crammed. All the better ; we shall be the more
marketable .........

Were it not better. Because that I am more than common tall, Thai i
did suit me all points like a man?

Fortune cannot recompense me better Than to die well ....

Who calls? Your betters, sir. Else are they very wretched .

By how much defence is better than no skill

I am not in the mind but I were better to be married of him than of
another ......

I/ook on him hotter, And bo not prou

You area melancholy fellow: I am so; I do love it better than laughing I

I would kiss before I spoke. Nay, you were better speak llrst . . iv 1 73
Good plays prove the better by Ihe help of good epilogues . . Eiiil (
Esteemed him No better than a poor and loathsome beggar T. ofShrewInA. 1 123

The better for him : would I were so too ! i 1 241

Pedasctile, I 'II watch you better yet ! iii 1 sc

Not so well apparell'd As I wish you were. Were it better, I should

rush in thus iii 2 97

Twere well for Kate and better for myself . . . '. '. ! iii 2 122

We will pcrsuado him, bo it possible, To puton better ero he go tochurcli iil 2 128
Better 'twere lhat both of us did fasl, Since, of ourselves, ourselves are

choleric iv 1 176

He that knows better how to tame a shrew, Now let him speak . . iv 1 213
I am no child, no babe: Your betters have endured me say my mind . iv 3 75
Is the adder better Ihan Ihe eel, Because his painted skin contents the

eye? . iv 3 179

Better once Ihan never, for never too late ... v 1 ise

I will win my wager better yet v 2 116

In her they are the better for their simpleness . . . AU'lWcilll 51
Your date is better in your pie ami your porridge than in your cheek . i 1 172

lisa withered pear ; it was formerly belter I 1 177

I'll like a maid the better, whilst I have a tooth in my head . . Ii 3 48

No better, if you please il 3 go

I have spoken better of you than yon have or will to'deserve at my


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 62 of 522)