John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 78 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 78 of 522)
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dependant on those that war for a placket . . Troi. and Cres. ii 3 20

Limekilns i' tho palm, incurable- bone-acho v 1 26

Boneless. I would, while it was smiling in my face, Have pluck'd my

nipple from his boneless gums Madwth 1 7 57

Bonfire. The MOWS, Itogero? Nothing but bonfires . . . IT. Tale v 2 24
Bonfires in France forthwith I am to make . . .1 Hen. VI. i 1 153

Make bonfires And feast and banquet in the open streets . . i 6 12

Ring, bella, aloud ; burn, bonfires, clear and bright . . 2 Hen. VI. v l 3
That go the primrose way to the everlasting bonfire . . Macbeth ii 3 22
Some to dance, some to make bonfires, each man to what sport and

revels his addiction leads him Othello ii 2 5

Bonfire-light. Thou art a perpetual triumph, an everlasting bonfire-light I

1 Hfin. IV. iii 3 47

Bon Jour, Monsieur Lo Beau : what's tho news? . . As Y. Like It i 2 104

With horn and hound wn'll give your grace Iwnjour . . T. Andron. I 1 494

Bon jour ! (hero's a French Habitation to your French slop Horn, and Jul. 11 4 46

Bonne malson. .In suh gontllhonimo do bonno matsou . . llr.n. V, Iv 4 44

Bonne qualite*. Jo ponse quo vous files gontilhomme do bontio qualftc . iv 4 3

Bonnet. He bought his doublet in Italy, his round hose in France, his

bonnet in Germany Mer. of Venice 1 2 81

Your bonnet unbanded, your sleeve unbuttoned . . As Y. Like It iii 2 398

OH' goes his bonnet to an oyster-wench Richard II. I 4 31

Give me any gage of thine, and I will wear it in my bonnet . Hen. V. iv 1 224
Go to them, with this bonnet in thy hand . . . Coriolanus iii 2 73
Put your bonnot to bis right uso ; 'tis for the head . . . Hamlet v 2



Bonneted. Who, having been supple and courteous to tho poordo,
further deoi"
hem go, Am
Wherefore- urn you gentle, strong and valiant? Why would you bo i



bonneted, without any further deed Corio&miuil 2 30

Bonny. Sigh not sn, but let them go, And bo you blllhoand bonny M.Ailoll 8 69



fond to overcome The bonny pi iser of the humorous duke? ./fs }'. //. /Mi 3 8
You are call'd plain Kate, And bonny Kate . . . 7*. of Shrew ii 1 187

But for my bonny Kate, she must with me iii 2 229

And made a prey for carrion kites and crows Even of the bonny beast

he loved so well 2 Ifen. VI. v 2 12

Shore's wife bath a pretty foot, A cherry lip, a bonny eye Richard III. i 1 94

For bonny sweet Robin is all my joy Hamlet iv 5 187

Bonos dies. Jove bless thee, master Parson. Bonos dies, Sir Toby

T. Night iv 2 14

Bonvllle. The heir Of the Lord Bonville .... 8 Hen. VI. iv 1 57
Book. Knowing I loved my books, he furnish'd me From mine own

library with volumes Tempest \ 2 166

Como, swear to that ; kiss tho book it 2 145

I 'II to my book, For yet ore NUppor I "tm must I perform Much business lit 1 94
Them thou ?nayHl brain him, lluvlnj; llrwt sol ml II!H bookn . . . Ill 2 97
PoMom hla bookd ; for without them Uo 'a but a not, u lain < . . lit 2 no

(turn but bin bookw Ill 2 103

Deeper than did ever plummet Round 1 '11 drown my book . . . v 1 57
( Hi a love-book pray for my success? Upon some book I love T. O. nf Vcr. 1 1 20
I had rather than forty shillings i had my Book of Songs and Sonnets

here Mtr. Wives i 1 206

You have not the Book of Riddles ahnut you, have you? . . . i 1 209

I '11 be sworn on a book, she loves you i 4 156

Keep a gamester from the dice, and a good student from his book . . iii 1 38
My husband says my son profits nothing in the world at hia book . iv 1 15
I '11 be supposed upon a book, his fa- <; is tho worst thing about him

Meas. for Menu, ii 1 162
I see, lady, the gentleman is not in your books. No; an he were, I

would burn my study . Much Ado i 1 79

Thou wilt be like a lover presently, And tire the hearer with a book of

words ..... . i 1 309

In my chamber-window lies a book : bring it hither to mo . . . ii 3 3



Book. Which, with experimental seal doth warrant The tenour of my book

Much Ado iv 1 169

As, painfully to pore upon a book To seek the light of truth L. L. Lost i 1 74
Small have continual plodders ever won Save base authority from others'

books i 1 By

He hath never fed of tho dainties that are bred in a book . . . iv 2 25
Study his bias leaves and makes his book thine eyes . . . . iv 2 113
O, who can give an oath? whoro is a book? That I may swear . . iv 8 250
In that ouch of you Imvo forsworn his book, Can you still dream and

poroand thereon look? Iv 8 297

The hooks, tho acadomen From whence doth spring the true Promethean

fire Iv 3 303

We have, made a vow to study, lords, And in that vow we have forsworn

our books iv 8 319

They [women's eyes] are the books, the arts, the academes, That show,

contain and nourish all the world iv 3 352

Where I o'erlook Love's stories written in love's richest book M. N. Dr. ii 2 122
If any man in Italy have a fairer table which doth ofl'er to swear upon

a book, I shall have good fortune .... Mer. of Venice ii 2 168
Wo turned o'er many books together : ho is furnished with my opinion iv 1 157
Tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, Sermons in stones

As Y. Like It ii 1 16
These trees shall bo my books And in their barks my thoughts I'll

character iii



2 5
4 05
1 &a
Koep hotiso and ply his book, wolrmim his friends, Visit his countrymen 1 1 201



Wo quarrel in print, by the book ; ns yon havn books for good manners
My lw)okn nud inHlrumenlH Hhnll bo my company . . . 7'. o/S/nrw I



K'i'ii hous

Wo



li.'in.l



i very fnlrly bound : All books of love, soo that at Buy



Well read in poetry And other books, good ones, I warrant ye . . i

This small packet of Greek and Latin books ii

Take you the lute, and you the set of books ii

O, put me in thy books 1 ii

Your father prays you leave your books iii

Swore so loud, That, all-amazed, tho priest let fall the book . . .iii
Took him such a cuff That down fell priest and book and book and

Sriest iii
s three or four languages word for word without book . T. Night \
I "have unclasp'd To thee the book even of my secret soul i

An afl'ectioued ass, that cons state without book and utters it by great

swarths il

Lot me bo unrolled and my name put in tho book of virtue 1 . W. Tnle iv
If ... thy princely son, Can in this l>ook of beauty read ' I love' A'. John It

Bell, book, and candle shall not drive mo back iii

If ever I were traitor, My name be blotted from the book of life ! Rich. II. i

Mark'tl with a blot, damn'd in the book of heaven iv

I'll read enough, When I do see the very book indeed Where all my sins

are writ, and that's myself iv

Say no more : And now I will unclasp a secret book . . 1 lien. IV. i
I'll be sworn upon all the books in England, I could find in my heart . ii
I'll sit and hear her sing : By that time will our book, I think, be drawn iii
By this our book is drawn; we'll but seal, And then to horse imme-
diately iii

Thou thiukest me as far in tho devil's book as thou . . 2 Hen. IV. ii
He was the mark and glass, copy and book, That fashion'd others . ii

God 1 that one might read the book of fate, And see the revolution

of the times I iii

Would shut the book, and sit him down and die iii

Turning your books to graves, your ink to blood, Your pens to lances . iv
Seal this lawless bloody book Of forged rebellion with a seal divine . iv
Who hath not heard it spoken How deep you were within the books of

God? iv

In tho book of Numbers is it writ, When the man dies, let tho inherit-
ance Descend unto tho daughter Hen. V. i

Unless my study ami my books bo fnlso, Tho argument you held wan

wrong iu yon 1 Hen. 17. II

I'll note you In my book of memory, To sconrgo you for this appro-

heusion ii

Fitter is my study and my books Thau wanton dalliance . . . v
Blotting your names from books of memory . . . .2 Hen. VI. i
For sins Such as by God's book are adjudged to death . . . . ii
Hero's a villain ! Has a book in his pocket with red letters in't . . iv
Our forefathers had no other books but the scoro and tho tally . . iv
Ijirge gifts have I bestow'd on learned clerks, Because my book pro-

forr'd mo Iv

What, nt your book HO hard? fl Hen, VI, v

Mado him my book, wht'iHn my noul recorded Tho history of lilt lior

flecret thoughts Jlit-hnnl Hi. Ill

A book of prnyor in his hand, True ornaments to know a holy man . iil

A book of prayers on their pillow lay iv

By the book He should have braved the east an hour ago . . . v
A beggar's book Outworths a noble's blood .... Hen. VIII. i
But, I think, thy horse will sooner con an oration than thou learn a

prayer without a book Troi. and Cres. ii

O, like a book of sport thou 'It read me o'er iv

Renowned Rome, whose gratitude Towards her deserved children is

enroll'd In Jove's own book Corioictnw* iii

1 have been The book of bis good acts, whence men have read His fame v
Which made mo down to throw my books, and fly . . T. Andron. iv

Some book there is that she desires to HCO iv

What book Is that she tossoth HO? iv

I'erhaps you have learned It without Ixvok . . . limn, and Jut. 1
TMs prnduMR book of lovo, thin unbound lovor, To beunflfy him, only

lurks a cover ...........

That Injok Iu nmny's nyofl doth share tho glory, That in gold clanpH locks

In tho golden story

You kiss by tlie book

Lovo goes toward love, as schoolboys from their books ....
A rogno, a villain, that fights by the book of arithmetic I ...
AVas ever book containing such vile matter So fairly bound? . . .iii
O, give mo thy hand, One writ with mo in sour misfortune's book I . v
When comes your book forth ? Upon the heels of my presentment

T. of Athens i
He is so kind that he now Pays Interest for't ; his land's put to their

books 1

Bade the Romans Mark him and write his speeches in their books /. C. I
Here's tho book I sought for so ; I put it in the pocket of my gown . iv
Your face, my thane, is as a book where men May read trange matters



2 M7
2 171
1 101
1 107
1 225

1 82

2 163

2 166

3 28

4 14

3 161
8 131
1 485
8 12

8 202
1 236

1 2 74

3 188

4 56
1 224

1 270

2 49
8 3'



2 17



4 56

4 ioi
1 22

1 100
8 4

2 97
7 38

7 77

i

G 27

7 98

8 14
8 278

1 122

1 19

5 239

1 293

2 15
25
31



1
1

1 41

2 62



I fl



I '11 wipe away all trivial fond records, All saws of books



Macbeth i
Hamlet i



B 91
G 112

2 157

1 106

2 83

3 82

1 26

2 206
2 126
8 252

6 63
& 100



BOOK



144



BORN



Book. Thy commandment all alone imiL live Within the book ami

volume of my brain Hamlet i 5 103

limit on tliis book ; That show of such an exercise may colour Your

loneliness lit 1 44

Keep thy foot out of brothels, thy hand out of plackets, thy pen from

landers' books, and defy the foul Hcnd .... Lear iii 4 tot

The bloody bouk of law You shall yourself read In the bitter lottor Oth. I 8 67
Was (In - fuir i'ni"-i, this must goodly book, Made to write 'whore'

upon? iv 2 71

In nature's infinite book of secrecy A little I can read . Ant. and Cleo. i 2 9
Such gain the cap of him that makes 'em tine, Yet keeps his book

uncross'd : no life to ours ....... Cymbeline iii 8 26

A book ? O rare ono I lie not, as is our fangled world . . . . v 4 133

Your neck, .sir, is IHIII, book and counters v 4 173

Her face the book of praises 1'eridea 1 1 15

Who h.i i a Unik of all that inonarchs do, He's more secure to keep it

till u I Hum Hhown I 1 94

Booked. hot it he hooked with the rest of this day's deeds .2 //. . IV, tv 3 50

Bookful. A whole bookful of these quondam car pot -mongers . Mm-h Ado v 2 32

Bookish. Though I am not bookish, yet I can read . . . If. Tale iii 3 73

Whose bookish rule hath pull'd fair England down . . .2 lien. VI. I 1 259

Unless the bookish theoric, Wherein the toged consuls can projxjse As

masterly as he Othello i 1 24

Bookmate. Ono that makes sport To the prince and his bookmatcs

/,. /,. Lost iv 1 102
Bookmen. This civil war of wits were much better used On Navarre and

his book-men ii 1 227

Yon two are book -men : can you toll mo by your wit? . . . . Iv 2 35
Book-oath. I put theu now to thy book-oath: dimy It, if thou canst

2//tfH. jr. II 1 in

Boon. A Bliwllor boon than this I ninnot beg ... 7'. (i. </ TIT. v -I ^4
i '"i your ilanghtor'a wiko, Tn grant mi.- boon that I hhull ask of you . v 4 150
I'll h.- f ; MM.- boon, And thuil Ui gono and trouble you no more lUchanl //.tv 1 JGJ
Hut you will Uko exceptions to my boon .... 8 Hen. VI. lii 'i 46
For divers unknown reasons, 1 beseech you, Grant me this boon Itich. III. I 2 319

A boon, my sovereign, for my aervice done ! II 1 95

Upon my feeble knee 1 beg this boon, with tears . . T. Andron. II 3 289
My boon I make it, that you know mo not Till time and I think meet Lear iv 7 10
This is not a boon ; Tis as I should entreat you wear your gloves Othtllu iii 8 76
Ask of Cymbelino what boon thou will, Fitting my bounty . CymMine v 5 97
My boon is, that this gentleman may render Of whom he had this ring v 6 135
This, my last boon, give me, For such kindness must relievo mo Pericles v 2 268

Boor. What wonldst thou have, boor? Mer. Hfrta iv 6 i

Let boors and franklins say it, I '11 swear it .... W. Tale v 2 173
Boorish. Abandon, which is in the vulgar leave, the society, which

in tho lavish Is company At}'. Like It v 1 53

Boot. You are over booU in love T. G. nf I'ei: i 1 24

Over the boots ? nay, give me not the boota. No, I will not, for it booU

theo not I 1 27

That my leg is too long? No; that it is too little. I'll wear a boot, to

make it somewhat rounder v26

They would melt me out of my fat drop by drop and liquor tlshennpn'a

boots with me Mer. Wives Iv 6 101

My gravity . . . Could I with boot change for an idle plume M. for Man. ii 4 n

A |>;ui nt I., nits I h;tt 1 1. 1". t- I,, ii , lt ] i, Mr i .L i . j' ,' ' , , ' ,

There lies your way ; You may bo jogging whiles your boots are green . hi 2 213

OH" with my boots, you rogues I Iv 1 147

Then vail your stomachs, for it is no boot v 2 176

You have made shift to run inlo't, boots and spurs and all . All't Well U 6 39
He will look u|H>ii his hoot ami sing ; mend tho i nit and HIIIR. . . til 2 6
Thoso clothes aro good enough to drink in ; and HO bo those boota T. Niyltt 18 12
Graoo to boot I Of this make no conclusion .... II', 7'n/r i "2 Bo

It shall scarce boot me To say ' not guilty* lii 2 26

Though tho pennyworth on his side be the worst, yet hold theo, there's

some boot . . . ......... iv 4 651

What an exchange had this been without boot I What a l>oot is hero

with this exchange ! Iv 4 690

Norfolk, throw down, wo bid ; there in no boot . . . llidturd II. I 1 164
It Ifootn i in" 1 not to tif ciiiii|ta>iHfoiiato . . . . . . .18 174

What. I have I need not to repeat; And what I want it boot.i not to com-
plain iii 4 18

Give mo my boots, I say ; saddle my horse v 2 77

Bring mo my boot* : I will unto the king v 2 84

They ride up and down on her and make her their boots. What, tho

commonwealth their boots? ... . . i Hen. iv. ii i 91

Home without booU, and in foul weather too 1 How 'scapes he nguu&? in 1 od

By my sceptre and my soul to boot iii 2 97

Wears his boots very smooth, like unto the sign of the leg . 2 Hen. IV. ii 4 270

With all appliances and means to boot iii 1 .^

Come, come, come, oil with your boots v 1 61

I am fortune's sUward got on thy boota : we'll ride all night . . v 3 137
liuot, I.. ...I , Ma.stnr Shallow : 1 know tho young king Is sick for mu . v 8 141
Anintd in their stings, Make boot upon the summur'b velvet buds lien. V. i 2 194
Thou talk no more of (light, It Is no t>oot .... 1 II, n. I*/, iv 52
And thou (Int. (uL his muto, mako bout of this . . . 2 Hen. I'l. iv 1 13
It needs not, nor it hoot.s theo not, proud qucon . . .3 tl, ,,. I' i i 4 135

It boots not to resist both wind and title iv 3 59

Young York he is but boot Richard III. iv 4 65

This, and Saint George to boot t What think'st thou, Norfolk? . . v 3 301
I warrant, Htilon, to change, would give an oyo to boot . Troi. and Crci. i 2 260

I '11 give you boot, I '11 give you three for ono iv & 40

Wliat boots it tlioe to call thyself a sun? .... 7'. Andron. v 8 18
I would not be tho villain that thou think'st For tho whole space that's

in the tyrant's grasp, And the rich East to boot . . Macbeth iv 3 37

Pull off my boots : harder, harder Lear iv G 177

The bounty and tho benison of heaven To boot, and boot ! . . iv 229

With boot, and such addition as your honours Have more than merited v 3 301
I will bout theo with what gift hasido Thy modesty can bug Ant. ami Cleo. ii ft 71
Give him no breath, but now Mako I wot of his distraction . . . Iv 1 9
Think what a chance thou clmnguttt on, but think Thou hast thy mis-

trosa still, U> boot, in v Mm t'fimMine 1 6 69

Which horae-halra and calvey'-guta, nor tho voice of unpuved onnuch to

loot, can novor amend ii 3 35

All curses madded Hecuba gave the Greeks, And mine to boot, be darted

on thee ! iv 2 314

Nor boots it me to say I honour him, If he suspect I may dishonour him

Pericles I 2 20
Boot-hose. A linen stock on one leg and a kersey boot-hose on the other.

Bartered with a ved and blue list T. of Shrew iii 2 68
Booties. Mho diopH booties in my mouth If. Tulc Iv 4 863



Bootless. You have often Begun to tell me what I am, but stopp'd And

left me to a bootless inquisition Temjtest 1 2 35

And spend his prodigal wits in bootless rhymes . . . L. L. Lost v 2 64
And bootless make the breathless housewife churn. . jlf. N. ZVttiw ii 1 37
Bootless speed, When cowardice pursues and valour flies . . . ii 1 233
I'll follow him no more with bootless prayers . . . Mer. of Venice iii 8 20
But this our purpose now is twelve month old, And bootless 'tis to tell

you wo will go ... 1 //i. IV. \ 1 29

Thrice from the banks of Wye And aand y- hot torn 'd Severn have I sent

him Bootless home ill 1 67

As bootless spend our vain command Upon tho enraged soldiers Hen. V. iii 3 34
As I have seen a swan With bootless labour swim against the tide

3 Hen. VI. i 4 20
Whither shall we fly? Bootless is flight, they follow us with wings . II 3 12

Bootless are plaints, and cureless are my wounds H 93

Clitt'ord, repent in tMnitless penitence . . . . . . . Ii (i 70

(Junto, come, dispaU:1i ; 'tis bootless to exclaim . . Hit-hard III. ill 4 104
It shall bo therefore liootlessThat longer you dcnlrotlio court Hen. Vlll. Ii 4 61
They would not pity me, yet plead I must; And booties unto them

T. Andron. iii 1 36

In lootless prayer have they been held up iii 1 75

Doth not Brutus bootless kneel? J. Ccesar iii 1 75

Vain it is That we present us to htm. Very bootless . . . Lear v 3 294

Ha robs himself that spends a bootless grief Othello i S 209

But bootless is your sight : he will not speak To any . . 1'ehdes v 1 33
Booty. And when they have the booty, if you and 1 do not rob them, cut

this head oil 1 Hen. IV. \ 2 184

So triumph thieves upon their conquur'd liooty , . .3 Hen. I'l. I 4 63
Horn roimw a {turret of our hopoful Uxity. . . . /' Andron. II 8 49
Bo poop. That such a king should play lx.-p.-rp, And go the fools among

Lear I 4 19 \

BvraohlO. What \ your namo, frlimd f Bortchlo . . , Much Ado Iv 2 iii
Border. Whmi tho morning sun shall raise his car Above the bordur of thin

horizon . .8 J/e. 17. iv 7 81

Tho borders maritime Lack blood to think on't . . Ant. and Cleo. i 4 51
Bordered. That nature, which contemns it origin, Cannot be border* d

certain In Hslf j Mr i v 2 33

Borderer. A wall sufficient to defend Our inland from tho pilfering

borderers Hen. V. I 2 142

Bore. !So dear the love my people boro me Tempest i 2 141

They hurried us aboard a bark, Bore us some leagues to sea . . .12 145

O, that you bore The mind that I do ! ii 1 366

11 y wrath shall far exceed the lovo I ever boro my daughter 7'. G. of Ver. iii 1 167
lloro many gentlemen, myself being one, In hand and hope of action

Metis, fur Mcas. i 4 51
Tlmy felt upon mo, Inmnd mo, boro mo tlionco . . . Cum. nf Krnirt v 1 246

;Kniilia What lore theo at u burden two fair sons v 1 343

Thy father's father wore it, And thy father bore it . .As Y. Like It iv 2 17
She bore a mind that envy could not but call fair . . .7'. \itjiit ii 1 30
And with a little pin Bores through his castle wall . . Richard II. ill 2 170
As the soldiers boro dead bodies by, He call'd them untaught knaves

1 Hen. IV. I 3 42

Thou knowest my old ward ; hero I lay, and thus I bore my point . ii 4 216
He bore him in the thickest troop As doth a lion in a herd of m-jit

3 Hen. VI. 11 1 13

Some tardy cripple bore the countermand . . . Itichurd III. ii 1 89
At this instant Ho bores me with some trick .... lit n. Vlll. \ \ ia&
Out of Ills noble nature, Xcal ami obc'diniicn ho .still bore your grace . lit 1 63
Your franchise*, whenxm you stood, confined Into an auger's boro Coriol. iv ft 87
To wreak tho lovo I boro my cousin U[>on his Uly . . liojn. and Jul. iii ft 102
Thoso milk J^ILS, That lhmugh tho window-burs bure ut men's oyon

7'. t>/ Athena iv 3 116
Tho queen tliat bore theo, Oftener upon her knees than on her feet,

Died every day she lived Macbeth iv 3 109

1'hny bore him barefaced on the bier ; Hey non nonny . . Hamlet iv 5 164
Yet aru they much 1..., light for tho )ore of the matUr . . . . iv (( 26

And, mermaid-llko, awhile thoy loru hor up iv 7 177

A' was tho Unit that ever 1* .to arum . . . . , . . . v 1 37
ITo lod onr powttn ; More tho commission of my place and IKJIHOU . J^ir v 3 64
It had U'cn pity you should have been put together with so mortal a

purpose as then each bore Cyinldine i 4 44

She that boro you was no queen, and you Recoil from your great stock . i 127
Ix>ve's counsellor should fill the bores of hearing, To the smothering of

the sense fli 2 59

Your (laughter, whom she bore in hand to love With mich integrity . v 5 43
Whoao towers bore heads so high they kisa'd the clouds . . rericla 1 4 24
Boreas. Let the ruffian Boreas once enrage The gentle Thetis TV. and C'r. 1 8 38
Bored. I'll believe as soon This whole earth may be bored and that the

moon May through tho centre creep . . . M. ff. Dream iii 2 53

Borest. Thou West thy ass on thy back o'er the dirt . . . Lear i 4 176
Boring. The ship luring thu moon with her main-mo-st . . IV. Tale iii 3 93
Born. If ho bo not burn to bo hanged, our cose is miserable . Tctnjifst I 1 35

Whero was she burn'/ H|K-ak , Ml mo | 2 260

A d\il, a born <)uvil, on whusu naturo Nurture can novor stick . . Iv 1 188

Ami a gentleman Iwirn, muster iiarxoii Jlfer. Wives i 1 9

Yut I livo like a |Kxir gentleman born II 387

As my mother WU.H, Die llrst hour I was bom ii 2 39

Whero were you born, friend? Here in Vienna . . Meas.fur Mnis. ii 1 202
New-conceived, And so in progress to bo liatch'd and born . . . ii 2 97
I had rather my brother die by thu law than my sun should be unlawfully

born iii 1 196

Usurp tho beggary ho was never born to iii 2 100

A liohcmian born, but here nursed up and bred iv 2 134

If any born at Kphesus be seen At any Syracusian marts and fairs ;
Again : if any Syracusian born Come to tho bay of Kpbesus, ho dies

Com. of Errors i 1 17

In Syracusa was I Ixirn.and wed Unto a woman i 1 37

lloing, as thou sayc.st thou art, liorn under 'Saturn . . . Jl/m-A Ado i 3 12

I wa.s iKtrn to sp.'.ik all ninth and no mattxtr fi 1 34^

Out of question, you worn born in a merry hour li 1 347

'I In ic waH a hlju dunrrd, and under thai was I iKirn . . . . 11 1 350
I was not born under a rhyming planet, nor I cannot woo In ftwUvtil tmiim v 2 40
For overy man with his affects is bom, Not by might master'd / . /,. L<,*t 1 1 152

You were born to do me shame iv 3 204

Wo cannot cross the cause why we were born iv 3 218

Therefore is uhe born to make black fair iv 3 261

IxingaviUo was for my service born . . . . . . . v 2 284

Wherefore was I to this keen mockery bom? . . M. N. Dream ii 2 123

When I vow, I weep ; and VOWH so born, In their nativity all truth

appears Hi 2 124



BORN



145



BORNE



Born. What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born, I am to learn

Mer. ftf Venice i 1 4

Bring me the fairest creature northward horn ii 1 4

Begot of thought, conceived of spleen and born of madness As Y. L. It iv 1 218
Take thou no scorn to wear the horn ; It was a crest ere thou wast born iv 2 15
Wast born t' the forest here? Ay, sir, I thank God . . . , v 1 24
For I am he am born to tame yon Kate .... T. of Shrew il 1 278
That wo. tho poorer born. Whoso basor stars do shut MS up In wishes,

Might with o llin eta of thorn follow our friends . . . All's Well I 1 196
You woro born under a charitable star. Under Mars, I . . . I 1 204


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 78 of 522)