John Bartlett.

A new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) online

. (page 88 of 522)
Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 88 of 522)
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noble breasts. Whall shall I say? i 2 34

Sit my husband's wrongs on Hereford's spear, That it may enter butcher

Mowbray's breast 1 i 2 48

As gentle and as jocund as to jest Go I to fight : truth hath a quiet breast i 3 96
To serve me last, that I may longest keep Thy sorrow in my breast . iii 4 96

1 have a thousand spirits in one breast, To answer twenty thousand such

as you Iv 1 58

His words coino from his month, onrs from our breast . . . . v 3 102
You conjure from the breast of civil peace Such bold hostility 1 lien. IV. iv 8 43
Nothing could have stay'd My father from the breast of Bolingbroke

2 Hen. IV. iv 1 124

Honour's thought Reigns solely in tho breast of every man Hen. V. ii Prol. 4
My breast I'll burst with straining of my courage . . . 1 Hen. VI. I 5 10
I will lock hts counsel in my breast ; And what I do imagine let that rest H 6 118
That engenders thunder in his breast And makes him roar thoso accusa-
tions iii 1 39

Undaunted spirit in a dying breast ! iii 2 99

Most unnatural wounds, Which thon thyself hast given her wofnl breast Iii 8 51
Thy friendship makes us fresh. And doth beget new courage In our

breasts iii 8 87

I would the milk Thy mother gave thee when thou suck'dsfc hnr breast

Had been a little ratsbane for thy sake ! v 4 28

I feel such sharp dissension in my breast, Such fierce alarums . . v 6 84
I fear mo you but warm the starved snake, Who, cherish 1 *! in your

breasts, will sting your hearts 2 lien. VI. ill 1 344

Thinks he tlmt the chirping of a wren, By crying comfort from a hollow

breast, Can chase away the first-conceived sound? . . . . iii 2 43

Hero may his head lie on my throbbing breast iv 4 5

These hands are free from guiltless blood-shedding, This breast from

harbouring foul deceitful thoughts iv 7 109

For selfsame wind that I should speak withal Is kindling coals that

fires all my breast 3 Hen. VI. if 1 83

This may plant courage in their quailing breasts ; For yet is hope . ii 3 54

Both tugging to be victors, breast to breast ii 5 ii

My sighing breast shall be thy funeral bell H 5 117

I stabb'd your fathers' bosoms, split my breast ii 6 30

Her sighs will make a battery in his breast . . . . iii 1 37

Infuse his breast with magnanimity And make him, naked, foil a man

at arms . ; . . . v 4 41

My breast can better brook thy dagger's point Than can my ears that

tragic history v 6 27

Advance thy halberd higher than my breast, Or, by Saint Paul, I'll

strike limn to my foot ; j JHofamJ HI. I 2 40

The which thou onco didst bond against her breast 1 2 95

Look, how this ring oncompasseth thy finger, Even BO thy breast encloseth

my poor heart i 2 205

Why do you wring your hands, and brat your breast? . . . . ii 2 3

Y



Breast. With one hand on his dagger, Another spread on's breast Hen. VI II. I 2 205
Enter'*! me, Yea, with a splitting power, and made to tremble The region

of my breast ............ ii 4 184

Then stops again, Strikes his breast hard ....... iii 2 117

He has a loyal breast, For you have seen him open't . . . . iii 2 200

The sea being smooth, How many shallow bauble boats dare sail Upon

her patient breast I ....... Troi. and Cres. \ 3 36

As if his foot were on bravo Hector's breast And great Troy shrieking . ill 8 140
The breasts of Hecuba, When she did suckle Hector, look'd not lovelier

Coriolanus I 8 43
He never stood To case his breast with panting ..... il 2 126

What his breast forges, that his tongue must vent ..... Jil 1 258

Drawn tuns of blood out of thy country's breast . . . . . iv 5 105

Though I owe My revenge properly, my remission lies In Volscian breasts v 2 91
This poor right hand of mine Is left to tyrannize upon my breast T. And. iii 2 8
Danced thee on his knee, Sung thee asleep, his loving breast thy pillow v 8 163
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast . . . Rom. and Jul. i 1 192
Expire the term Of a despised life closed in my breast By some vile

forfeit ............. i 4 no

As sweet repose and rest Come to thy heart as that within my breast ! , ii 2 124
Sleep dwell upon thine eyes, peace in thy breast I ..... ii 2 187

He tilts With piercing steel at bold Mercutio's breast . , . . iii 1 164
I saw the wound, I saw it with mine eyes, God save the mark ! here

on his manly breast .......... Hi 2 53

Common mother, thon, Whoso womb immeasurable, and Infinite breast,

Teems, and feeds all ....... T. of Athens Iv 3 178

In whose breast Doubt and suspect, alas, are placed too late . . . iv 3 518
This breast of mine hath buried Thoughts of great value . J. Ccesar i 2 49
The cross blue lightning aeem'd to open The breast of heaven . . .1851
There is my dagger, And here my naked breast ..... iv 8 101

Come to my woman's breasts, And take my milk for gall I . Macbeth i 6 48

my breast, Thy hope ends here? ........ iv 8 113

Is it a fee-giief Due to some single breast? ...... iv 3 197

Such love must needs be treason in my breast .... Hamlet iii 2 188

Swords out, and tilting one at other's breast, In opposition bloody Othello ii 8 183
Who has a breast so pure, But somo uncleanly apprehensions Keep leets? iii 3 138
Man but a rush against OthHio's breast, Anil ho retires . . . . v 2 370

In the sculllcs of groat lights hath burst Tho buckles on his breast

Ant. nmlClfo. I 1 8

Dost thou not son my baby at my breast, That sucks tho nurse asleep? v 2 312
HerOj on her breast, There is a vent of blood and something blown : The

like is on her arm .......... y 2 351

On her loft breast A inolo cinque-spotted ..... Cymbeline it 2 37

Under her breast Worthy the pressing lies a mole . . . . ii 4 134

This tablet lay upon his breast ......... v 4 109

Whose naked breast Stepp'd before targes of proof ..... v 6 4

Yon gods that made me man, and sway in love, That have inflamed

desire in my breast ! ........ Ptrit&tt I 1 20

Joy and all comfort In your sacred breast 1 ...... i 2 33

No din but (moron tho house about, Mado louder by tho o'or-fod breast ill Gower 3
Breast deep. Hot him breast-deep in carlh, and famish him T. Andron. v 8 179
Breasted. Ho trod tho water, Whoso enmity ho flung aside, and breasted

The surge .......... Tempest II 1 116

Breasting. Draw the huge bottoms through the fnrrow'd sea, Breasting

the lofty surge ........ Hen. V. iii Prol. 13

Breastplate. What stronger breastplate than a heartuntainted! 2 lien. VI. iii 2 232
Breath. Side-stitches that shall pen thy breath up . . . Tempest i 2 326
Their eyes do offices of truth, their words Are natural breath . . v 1 is?
Gentle breath of yours my sails Must fill, or else my project fails . . Epil.
Here's my mother's breath up and down . . , T. G. of Ver. ii 8

She is not to be kissed fasting, in respect of her breath . . . . iii

She hath a sweet mouth. That makes amends for her sour breath . iii
A breath thou art, Servile to all the skyey influences . Meas. for Meas. iii
Shall we thus permit A blasting and a scandalous breath to fall On him ? v
As there comes light from heaven and words from breath . . . v
They'll snck our breath or pinch us black and blue. . Coin, of Errors ii 2 19,
When the sweet breath of flattery conquers strife ..... iii 2 28

Where Spain ? Faith, I saw it not ; but I felt it hot in her breath . . iii 2 135
Sapphires, declining their rich aspect to the hot breath of Spain . , III 2 139
Fio, now you nin this humour out of breath ...... Iv 1 57

How hast thou lost thy breath? By running fast ..... iv 2 30

Every word stabs : if her breath were as terrible as her terminations,

there were no living near her ...... Much Ado ii 1 256

Rather than she will bate one breath of her accustomed crossness . . ii 8 184
Art thou the slave that with thy .breath hast kill'd Mine innocent child ? v 1 273
Foul words is but foul wind, and foul wind is but foul breath, and foul

breath is noisome ........... v 2 53

The endeavour of this present breath may buy That honour . L. L. Lost I 1 5
Vows are but breath, and breath a vapour is ...... iv 8 68

That tho lover, sick to death, Wish himself the heaven's breath . . Iv 8 108
What are they That charge their breath against us? ....

Tapers they are, with your sweet breaths puff'd out ....

1 implore so much expense of thy royal sweet breath as will utter a

brace of word 8 ..... ...... v 2 524

For mine own part, I breathe free breath . . . .. . v 2 733

If over-boldly we have borne ourselves In the converse of breatli . . v 2 745
Such dulcet and harmonious breath That the rude sea grew civil

M. N. Dream 11 1 151
O, I am out of breath In this fond chose ! ....... ii 2 88

Odours savours sweet : So hath thy breath, my dearest Thisby . . iii 1 87
Why rebuke you him that loves you so? Lay breath so bitter on your

bitter foe ............ } J 44

Never did mockers waste more idle breath ... , . nl 2 168

Most dear actors, eat no onions nor garlic, for we are to utter sweet

breath ............. iv 2 44

In a bondman's key, "With bated breatli and whispering humbleness

Mer. of Venice I 3 125

Besides commends and courteous breath, Gifts of rich value . . ii 9 90

Here are sever'*! lips, Parted with sugar breath ..... in 2 119

One in whom The ancient Roman honour more appears Than any that

draws breath in Italy ........ . . ill 2 298

Thy tooth is not so keen, Because thou art not seen, Although thy

breath be rude ........ -At Y. Like It il 7 179

Complexions. that liked me nnd breaths that I defied not . . Epil. 20
AH many as have good linxrds or good facos or sweet breaths , . . Epil. aa
And Cythorea all In sedges hid, Which seem to move and wanton with

her breath ......... T. o/Khrew Ind. 2

I saw her coral lips to move, And with her breath she did perfume

], e n [ r
Inspired merit so by breath' is barr'd



32

327



122
225



V 2

V 2 267



54
180



AlVt



BREATH



162



BREATHE



Breath. Made a groan of her last breath, and now she slnga in heaven

All's Well iv 8 62
I had rattier limn forty shillings I had such a log, and so sweet a breath

to sing T. Nlyht II 8 21

A contagious breath. Very awect and contagious, I' faith . . . II 8 56

Fly away, il> away, breath ; I am slain by u fair cruel maid . . . 11 4 54
TIM our very pastime, tlrixl out of breath, prompt us to have mercy on

him iii 4 153

If you can bring Tincture or lustre In her lip, her eye, Heat outwardly or

breath within, I'll nerve you W. Tale iil 2 207

Violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's

breath iv 4 123

That Shall be when your first queen's again in breath . . . . v 1 83
Who, liad he himself eternity and could put breath Into hi* work, would

beguile Nature of lior custom v 2 107

What line chisel Could ever yet cut breath? v 8 79

Wluit crackor la thin name that deaf* our ears With this abundance of

superfluous breath T A'. John II 1 148

MiiKi-l by i In- wliuly breath Of soft petitions, pity and remor HO . . II 1 477

For thy word U but the vain breath of a cuinmon man . . . . Ill 1 8
What earthy namo to Interrogatories Cun task tho free breath of a Bacrcd

king? Ill 1 148

The latest breath that gave the sound of words Was deep-sworn faith . Ill 1 330
Holding the eternal spirit, against her will, In the vile prison of afflicted

breath lit 4 IQ

And stop this gap of breath with fulsome dust Iil 4 33

O (air affliction, peace 1 No, no, I will not, having breath to cry . . Ill 4 37
Even the breath of what I mean to speak Bhall blow each dust, each

straw Ill 4 127

EnterUin an hour, One minute, nay, one quiet breath of rest . . . ill 4 134

The breath of heaven hath "blown hid spirit out iv 1 no

Hut with my breath I can revive It, boy Iv 1 112

This kingdom, this confine of blood and breath iv 2 246

That sweet breath Which was einbounded in this beauteous clay . . Iv 8 136

It was my breath that blew this tempest up, Upon your stubborn usage v 1 17

And on our actions set the name of right With holy breath . . . v 2 68

Your breath tirst kindled the dead coal of wars v 2 83

Dut oven this night, whoso black contagious breath Already smokes . v 4 33
Dut lusty, young, and cheerly drawing breath .... Richard It. 1 8 66

In our country's cradle Draws the sweet infant breath of gentle sleep . t 8 133
Which robs my tongue from breathing native breuth . . . .18 173

Such Is the breath of kings 18 315

Dut dead, thy kingdom cannot buy my breath 18 333

Strive not with your breath ; For all In vain cornea counsel to his ear . 11 1 3
Direct not hint whoso way himself will choose ; Tis breath thou hick'st,

and that breath wilt thou lose U 1 30

And sigh'd my English breath in foreign clouds Ill 1 ao

The breath of worldly men cannot depose The deputy elected by the Lord III 2 56

Allowing him a breath, a little scene, To monarchize, be fear'd . . Ill 2 164

Where fearing dying pays death servile breath iil 2 185

Through brazen trumpet send the breath of parley Into his ruin'd ears . ill 8 33

Be judged by subject and Inferior breath, And he himself not present? tv 1 128

With mine own breath release all duty's rites . . . . . . iv 1 210

Speak ; Recover breath ; tell us how near is danger, Th.it we may

arm v 8 47

Giving him breath, The traitor lives, the true man's put to death . . v 8 73
In thy face strange motions have appear'd, Hurh as we see when men

restrain thuir breath On some great sudden host . . 1 lien. 1\ T . II 8 64

for breath to uttor what U liko thee I U 4 273

Hark, how hard lie fetches breath 11 4 579

That no man might draw short breath to-day Dut I and Harry

Monmouth I v 2 49

1 grant you I was down and out of breath ; and ao was he . . v 4 150
He sure means brevity In breath, ahort-winded . . .2 lien. IV. II 2 136
The block of death, Treason's true bed and ylelder up of breath . . Iv 2 123
Dy his gates of breath There lies a downy feather which stirs not . . iv & 31
When I here came in, And found no course of breath within your

majesty, Uow cold It struck my heart I . . . . . iv 6 151
The breath no sooner left his father's body .... lien. V. I 1 25
A night is but small bruuth and little pause To answer matters of this

consequence II 4 145

Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit To his full height . , HI 1 16
O hard condition, Twin-born with greatness, subject to tho breath Of

every fool 1 Iv 1 351

If that my foiling breath permit 1 lien. VI. U 6 61

Vexation almost stops my breath iv 8 41

Pause, and take thy breath ; I gave thee life and rescued thee from death Iv 4

Speak to thy father ere thou yield thy breath ! . . . . . iv 7 34

So am I driven by breath of her renown v 5

And would have kept so long as breath did last . . .2 Hen, VI. I 1 211

His breath stinks with eating toasted cheese iv 7 13

Canst thou quake, and change thy colour, Murder thy breath In middle

of a word 7 Richard 111. Ill 6 a

Give me some breath, some little pause, my lord, Before I positively

speak iv 2 34

Hath he so long held out with mo untlred, And stops he now for breath ? Iv 2 45

A breath, a bubble, A sign of dignity, a garish nag iv 4 88

In the breath of bitter words let's smother My damned son . . . iv 4 133

Fainting, despair ; despairing, yield thy breath 1 v 8 173

Just as I do now, He would kiss you twenty with a breath . lien. VIII. 1 4 30
His curses and his blessings Touch me alike, they're breath I not be-
lieve In H 2 54

That breath fame blows ; that praise, sole pure, transcends Trot, and Ores. 1 3 244

Your breath of full consent bellied his sails 11 2 74

But for your health and your digestion sake, An after -dinner 'a breath . ii 8 121

She fetches her breath as short as a new-ta'en sparrow . . . . lit 2 35

An operation more divine Than breath or pen can give expressure to . iii 3 204

Since she could speak, Hhe hath not given so many good words breath . iv 1 73

Strangles our dear vows Even in the birth of our own labouring breath iv 4 40

With distinct breath and consign'd kisses to them Iv 4 47

Either to the uttermost, Or else a breath iv 6 93

Nor dignifies an impair thought with breath lv 5 103

I have seen thoe pause and take thy breath iv 6 193

Strike not a stroke, but keep yourselves in breath v 7 3

Now is my day's work done ; I '11 take good breath v 8 3

They say poor suitors have strong breaths : they shall know we have

strong arms too Coriolanus i 1 61

What I think I utter, and spend my malice In my breath . . . ii 1 59
Showing, as the manner is, his wounds To the people, beg their stink*

ingfcroatlm U 1 352



Breath. As if I had received them for the hire Of their breath only I

Coriolanus 11 2 154
I am out of breath; Confusion's near; I cannot speak . . . . Ill 1 169

Whoso breuth I hato AH reek o' tho rotten fens Iii 8 120

I loved tho maid I married ; never man Bigh'd truer breath . . . lv & 121
You that stood so much Ui>on the voice of occupation and Tho breath

of garlic-eatere I iv 98

Can you think to blow out the intended fire your city is ready to Hame

in, with such weak breath as this? v 2 50

Coming and going with thy honey breath T. Andron. 11 4 25

Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues, Because their breaths

with sweetmeats tainted are Horn, and Jul. 1 4 76

This bud of love, by summer's ripening breath, May prove a beauteous

flower U 2 i2i

Can you not stay awhile? Do you not see that I am out of breath ?

How art ihou out of breath, when thou hast breath To aay to me

that thou art out of breath? II 6 30

Then sweeten with thy bn-ath This neighbour air 11 26

All this uttorud With gonllo breath, calm look knees humbly bow'd . Ill 1 161
Unless the breath of liourt-slck groans, Mist-like, Infold mo from tho

search of eyes Ill 3 73

No warmth, no breath, hhall testify thou llvont Iv 1 98

That the life-weary taker may fall dead And that the trunk may be dls-

cliarged of breath v 1 63

Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power

yet upon thy beauty v 8 92

And, lips, O you The doors of breath, seal with a righteous kiss I . . v 8 114

Grief or my son's exile hath stopp'd her breath v 8 211

My short datti of breath Is not so long as is a tedious tale . . . v 8 229
Parts bread with him, pledges the breath of him in a divided draught

T. QfAtheM\ 2 49

Give me breath. I do beseech you, good my lords, keep on . . . ii 2 34
Were it all yours to give it in a breath, How quickly were it gone ! . ii 2 162
Whun the means are gone that buy this praise, Tho breath is gone

whereof this praise is made ii 2 179

They have e'en put my breath from me, the slaves. Creditors? devils 1 iii 4 104
Breath infect breath, That their society, as their friendship, uiay Be

merely poison 1 . . iv 1 30

He whose pious breath seeks to convert you Iv 8 140

And lot his very breath, whom thou It observe. Blow off thy cap . . lv 8 212
Thou shouldst desire to die, being miserable. Not by his breath that la

more miserable lv 8 349

And utUred such a deal of stinking breath , J. Ctesur i 2 348

And what seom'd corporal melted As breath into the wind . Macteih i 8 82
Almost dead for breath, had scarcely more Than would make up his

manage 1 & 37

The heaven's breath Smells woolngly here 1 6 5

Words to the heat of deeds too cold breath gives 11 1 61

Shall live the lease of nature, pay his breath To time and mortal custom lv 1 99

Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath v 8 27

Make all our truin|>eU speak ; give them all breath 69

Nor windy suspiratiun of forced breath Samlet I 2 79

Words of so sweet breath composed As made the things more rich . . Ill 1 98
Give it breath with your mouth, and it will discourse most eloquent

music Ill 2 374

If words be made of breath, And breath of life, I have no life to brc&tho 111 4 197
Why do wo wrap the gentleman in our more rawer breath? . . . v 2 129

The king shall drijik t.. Hamlet's better breath v 2 282

Hu's fat, and scant of breath v 2 298

And In this hanh world draw thy breath In pain, To tell my story . v 2 359
A love that makes breath ]>oor, and speech unable .... Lear 1 1 61
Then 'tis like the breath of an unfee'd lawyer ; you gave mo nothing for 't i 4 143
Wliat is your difference? speak. I am scarce in breath, my lord . . ii 2 57

Are they Infonn'd of this? My breath and blood I ii 4 104

You ever-gentle gods, take my breath from me 1 . . . . . iv 6 221
If that her breatii will mist or stain tho stone, Why, then she lives . v 8 262
Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life. And thou no breath at all? v 8 307
And swell his sail with thine own powerful breath I . . Othello ii 1 78
They met so near with their lips that their breaths embraced together . U 1 266
And weigh'at thy words before thou glvest them breath . . . . iii 8 119
And then I heard Each syllable that breath mudu up between them . lv 2 5
Ah, buliny breath, that dontalmost porsuado Justice to break hersword 1 v 2 16
There lies your niece, Whose breath, indeed, thube hands have newly

stopp'd v 2 302

And having lost her breath, she spoke, and panted. That she did mako

defect perfection, And, breathless, power breathe forth Ant.and CUo.\i 2 235
Our fortune on the sea is out of breath, And sinks most lamentably . iii 10 25
Tell him, from his all-obeying breath I hear The doom of Egypt . . iii 13 77
Give him no breath, but now Make boot of his distraction . . . iv 1 8
In their thick breaths, Rank of gross diet, shall we be enclouded . . v 2 211
The cutter Was as another nature, dumb ; outwent her, Motion and

breath left out C'ymbeJine Ii 4 85

Tis slander, . . . whose breath Rides on the posting winds . . Iii 4 37

The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, Out-sweeten'd not thy

breath iv 2 324

So I'll die For thee, O Imogen, even for whom my life Is every breath

a death v 1 37

On either side I come to spend my breath ; Which neither here I'll keep

nor bear again .... v 8 81

He came in thunder ; his celestial breath Was sulphurous to smell . v 4 114
Death remember'd should be like a mirror, Who tells us life's but

breath, to trust it error Pericles I 1 46

And yet the end of all is bought thus dear, The breath is gone . . 1 1 99

Let your breatii cool yourself, telling your haste 11 161

Our eyes do weep, Till tongues fetch breath that may proclaim them

louder 1 4 15

I'll then discourse our woes, felt several years, And wanting breath to

speak help me with tears . . . . . . . . .14 19

And loft me breath Nothing to think on but ensuing death . . . ii 1 6
Let us salute him, Or know what ground's made happy by his breath . ii 4 38
Breathe. The air breathes upon us here most sweetly . . Tempest ii 1 46
It shall be said so again while Stephano breathes at nostrils . . . 11 2 65
Bufore you can say '00006 ' and ' go,' And breathe twice and cry ' so, so ' lv 1 45
Breathe It in mine ear, As ending anthem of my endless dolour

T. 0. of Ver. Ill 1 339

I dare thee but to breathe upon ray love v 4 131

Speak, breathe, discuss; brief, short, quick, snap . . Mer. Wives iv 5 2
O, think on that ; And mercy then will breathe within your lips

Meat, for Meas. U 2 78
For mine own port, I breathe free breath L. L. I^at v 2 732



BREATHE



163



BREECHES



. II 2 40
II'. Tale Iv 4 37 t
K. John III 1 256
Hi 2 4



Breathe. What 's here ? one dead, or drunk ? See, doth he breathe ?

T. of Shrew Ind. 1 31

Here let us breathe and Imply Institute A course of learning . . . i 1 8
A medicine That's able to breathe life into a atone . . . All's Well il 1 76
I think thou wast created for men to breathe themselves upnn thee . H 3 271
Like the sweet sound, Thnt breathes upon a bank of violets . T. Night I 1 6
Alan the day I What thriftless sighs shall poor Olivia breatho I
O, hoar mo broathe my life Before this ancient sir I .
Or lot the church, our mother, broatho hor curse .
Austria's head lie there, While Philip breathes
Now I breathe again Aloft the flood, and can give audience To any tongue iv 2 138

You breathe these dead news in as dead an ear v 7 65

The hopeless word of ' never to return ' Breathe I against thee Richard II. 1 8 153
When the tongue's office should be prodigal To breatho the abundant

dolour of the heart . . , . . . k , , .18 257

Will the king come, that I may breathe my last? il 1 i

For they breathe truth that breathe their words in pain . . . . 11 1 8
Thou diest, though I the sicker be. I am in health, I breathe, and see

thee 111 ii 1 02

Little joy have I To breathe this news ; yet what I say is tme . . iii 4 8z
If I dare eat, or drink, or breathe, or live, I dare meet Surrey . . iv 1 73
Breathe short-winded accents of new broils To be commenced 1 Hen. IV. \ 1 3
When you breatho in your watering, they cry ' hem I' and bid you play

It off li 4 17


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Online LibraryJohn BartlettA new and complete concordance, or verbal index to words, phrases & passages in the dramatic works of Shakespeare, with a supplementary concordance to the poems (Volume 1) → online text (page 88 of 522)