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ments. Second, Arguments that respect God the
Father ; six arguments on this head. Third, Those
arguments that respect thyself ; two reasons.
Fourth, Arguments that respect the world ; two
I'easons 52G

What iniquity they must depart from that religiously
najie the name of Christ — First, From all iniquity.
Second, From their constitution sin. Hard,
From the iniquity of the times. Fourth, From
FAMILY iniquity. Fifth, From the iniquity of their
closet. Sixth, From the iniquity that cleaveth
to opinions. Seventh, From hypocrisies ; helps
against this sin 531

Use and Application — Use First, Examine thyself;
take heed of Satan's flattery ; dangers of neglect ;
nettles and thorns will arise and scratch thee ; God
will put a sting into them; Christ will deny you.... 540

Use Second, A use of terror and alarm 542

Use Third, To those that desire to depart from
iniquity ; bless God for grace in your heart ; be

watchful; be not ashamed of being singular 544

Why do men name Christ that love not to depart
from iniquity ; five reasons 647

CHRISTIAN BEHAVIOUR : being the fruits of
true Christianity ; teaching husbands, wives, parents,
children, masters, and servants, how to walk so as
to please God.

Advertisement by the Editor 548

The Author to the Reader. Those that are justified
l)y grace, must justify that grace before the worid

which justifies them before God 549

' That they which have believed in God might be
careful to maintain good works.' — Tit. iii. 7, 8.

I. Good works flow from faith; there is no other source;
faith only represents things in their right colours ... 550

II. Every true believer careful of good works, in doc-
trine and in worship, in the family, in the church ;

the husband, children, servants, wife, neighbours 553'

Sins which interfere with these duties ; covetous-
ness, pride, uncleanness ggC

III. The believer must maintain good works 570i

IV. The best way of provoking to good worte; the
fruitless must be disappointed ; the conclusion 570



CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLITME.



vu



A CAUTION TO STIR UP TO WATCH

AGAINST SIN: A Poem.

Advertisement by the Editor., 575

Beware of first sins ; sin a bold and impudent

bef^ar; the worm of hell ; not to be mocked 575



A DISCOURSE OF THE BUILDING, NA-
TURE, EXCELLENCY, AND GOVERNMENT
OF THE HOUSE OF GOD, with counsels and
directions to the inhabitants thereof ; A Poem.

' Lord, I have loved the habitation of thy house.'
— Ps. xxvi. 8.

Advertisement by tlie Editor 577

The church the house of God ; by whom built ;
its beauty, conveniences, strength, and defence ;

delicately situated 573

Its inmates, and how they are received 579

The governors of this house, and under officers.... 580
Order and manner of the government ; punishment

of what is amiss 583

Care to restore runaways or backsliders 589

' Tarn again, sinner, do not maie a doubt;
Conn, tki Lord Jesus will not cast thee out.'



BUNTAN ON THE TERMS OF COMMUNION,
AND FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIANS, AT
THE TABLE OF THE LORD ; comprising, I.

His CONFESSION OF FAITH, AND REASON OF HIS PRACTICE.

II. Differences about water baptism no bar to com-
munion ; and III. Peaceable principles and true.
Advertisement by the Editor 591

I.— A CONFESSION OF MT FAITH, AND A
REASON OF MY PRACTICE ; or. With who,
and who not, I can hold church-fellowship, or the
communion of saints. Showing, by divers arguments,
that though I dare not communicate with the openly
profane, yet I can with those visible saints that differ
about water baptism.

Bunyan's Preface ; he had been imprisoned almost
twelve years, and sentenced to be banished or hanged
for not going to common prayer ; will persevere tiU
the moss grows on his eyebrows, rather tlian violate
his faith or conscience 593

His belief in God, in the Trinity, a world to
come, Christ the Saviour, God manifest in the flesh 594

Of justification, election, calling, faith, repentance,
love, the Scriptures, magistrates 597

A reason of my practice in worship G02

A short application. (315

II.— DIFFERENCES IN JUDGMENT ABOUT
WATER BAPTISM NO BAR TO COM-
MUNION; being an answer to Messrs. Paul, Kif-
fin, and D'Anvers' Reply to Mr. Bunyan's confession.

Water baptism not an initiating ordinance GIB

Baptism of the Spirit the great baptism. C24:

Water baptism is not regeneration ; Christ was
not regenerated by it ; the want of it does not un-
christianize us ; edification greater than water
baptism; infant baptism a sin ; fourteen arguments

answered 626

Mr. H, Jesse's judgment 642

III.— PEACEABLE PRINCIPLES AND TRUE ;
A brief answer to the short Reply of Mr. D'Anvers
and Mr. Paul to the Confession and Difi'erences in
judgment about baptism no bar to communion 648



ON THE LOVE OF CHRIST: A short Poem.



657



A CASE OF CONSCIENCE RESOLVED ;

whether in the church it is the duty of women



page
to separate themselves, and worship without their
men.
Editor's Advertisement 658

The dedication to godly women 659

The case stated; Mr. K.'s arguments for female
prayer meetings ; Mr. Bunyan's answer, denying
the i-ight or propriety of such separate stated assem-
bling for Divine worship 660

Objections as to Mh'iam ; Esther; Zee. xii. 11,
13; Ac. xvi. 13; Mai. iii. 16 ; the 'two or three,'
Mat. xviii. 20, considei'ed and answered 666

Six cautions ; application ^ 671



JOHN BUNYAN'S CATECHISM, called IN-
STRUCTION FOR THE IGNORANT; being
a salve to cure that gi-eat want of knowledge which
so much reigns both in young and old. Presented in
a plain dialogue, fitted to the capacity of the weakest.
' Mj people are destroyed for lack of knowledge.'
—Ho. iv. 6.

Advertisement by the Editor 675

Dedication to the Church of Christ in and about

Bedford 675

Objects of faith, or, what we must believe 676

Confession of sin ; belief in the Word ; prayer ;
self-denial ; the conclusion , 681



SEASONABLE COUNSEL; or, Advice to Sufferers.

from 1 Pe. iv. 19.
Advertisement by the Editor 691

Bunyan's address to the Christian reader, showing
that we need those bitter pills that make us wince
and shuck 692

' Wherefore let them that suffer according to
the will of God commit the keejnng of their soul
to Mm in well-doing, as unto a faithful Creator.' —
1 Pe. iv. 19.

Peter writing to afflicted believers, gives, I. A
direction to a duty of absolute necessity. II. A
description of the persons to whom this duty is
directed. III. The good effect of following this
blessed advice

I. Inquire what is meant by ' the soul ;' how to be com-
mitted to God. — 1. Persecution is intended to ruin
the soul. — 2. Be not negligent. — 3. Persecution some-
times so hot as to leave them nothing but a soul to
care for. — 4. The devil and wicked men cannot touch
the soul. — 5. Only safe in God's keeping. — 6. God is
willing to keep our souls. — 7. God is able. — 8. The
reason of the exhortation 695

II. Who it is that are directed to commit their souls
to God's keeping. — 1. They who suffer according to
HIS will, his law ; what it is thus to suffer ; cautions
and directions to sufferers 704

Christians may suffer for righteousness ; the call

to suffer 709

The will of God means his designment 722

III. The good effect of committing the soul to God. —

1. He is a creator. — 2. Faithful. 727

Some closing words ; Christ alone can save us from
allurements, and in sore temptations ; will you bring
your wife and children to beggary for religion ; he
will make a way for escape ; he will support us in
the blasts and battering storms that beat upon us ;

the soul shall not be destroyed 733

Uses — 1. The people of God are sufferers for their
religion. — 2. Seek grace to prepare for sufi'ering. —
3. Religion is none the worse for the world's coarse
entertainment. — 4. Suffering for religion a token of
God's love. — 5. Take it with meekness. — 6. God is
all-sufficient. — 7. The grave the only bound of suffer-
ing. — S. If the enemy wrap thee in a bear's skin, and
set the dogs at thee, no marvel. — 9. Study to be ,

quiet 7-36

Seven considerations for an unquiet professor 733



CONTENTS or THE SECOND VOLTOIE.



AN EXHORTATION TO PEACE AND UNITY. ^^^

AdvertiiemeiU hii th^ Editor. :: ••••;;;■: CniV-irin '

' Endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spiut m ^^^
the bond of peace.'— Ed. iv. 3 *

BUNYANS LAST SERMON.

• Whic'i were born , not of blood . nor of tlie vrill ot
the flesh nor of the will of man, but of Cod. —
Jn. i. 13.'



The text explained ; not of blood, nor of the will

"^ Ste^cStrine V"they"aV;'born to'see"and believe ;
before birth thev are in darkness ; the signs ot lite ;
new-born babe must be fed.comforted ; has its father s
likeness; trained up ; dependence upon its fa.her...
The application ; am I born of God ? r.sen with
Chri'^t « if so, live lovingly with your brethren; gird
up the loins of your mind; be obedient to the holy
God whom you hope is your Father



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THE SAINTS' KNOWLEDGE OF CHRIST'S LOVE;



OK,



THE UNSEARCHABLE RICHES OF CHRIST.



By JOHN BUNYAN.



PHEFATOKY REMAEKS EY THE EDITOR.



Tins Treatise is one of those ten distinct works,
which the author had prepared for the press, when
lie was so suddenly summoned to the Celestial City.
Well did his friends in the ministry, Ehenezer
Chandler and John Wilson, call it * an excellent
manuscript, calculated to assist the Christian that
would grow in grace, and to win others over to
Jesus Christ.'

It was first puhlishcd, M'ith a selection of Bun-
yan's Works m a foHo volume, in 1692, ahout four
years after the author's decease; and although it
is a treatise exhibiting very deep research and
calculated for extensive usefulness, it does not ap-
pear ever to have heen published as a separate
volume. Like all other of his works, it is original;
no one before him treated this subject Avith such
profound depth of thought, nor Avith such clear
Christian philosophy.

The revered John Bunyan proves in this, as in
all other of his works, that he was a real and not
a pretended descendant from the apostles, — he
breathes their spirit — ^lie knew his Master's work,
and faithfully discharged his solemn requirements.
His object was as pure as it was apparent; to
preach not himself, but Christ Jesus his Lord.
One desire appears to have influenced him in
writing all his Avorks — that of shrinking back and
hiding himself behind his Master, Avhile exhibiting
the unsearchable, Divine, eternal riches of His
grace.

This treatise is admirably adapted to warn the
thoughtless — ^break the stony heart — convince the
wavering — cherish the yoimg inquirer — strengthen
the saint in his pilgi'image, and arm him for the
good fight of faith — and comfort the dejected,
doubting, despairing Christian. It abounds Avith
ardent sympathy for the broken-hearted, a cordial
suited to every Avounded conscience; Avhile, at the
same time, it thunders in aAvful judgment upon the
impenitent and the hypocritical professor: Avon-
ders of grace to God belong, for all these blessings
form but a small part of the imsearchable riches.
vol,. II.



The reader should keep in his recollection, that
this treatise was originally conceived for the pul-
pit; and afterAvards, probably with great additions,
Avritten for the press. This Avill account for the
divisions and sub-diA'isions, intended to assist a
hearer's memory; or to enable a ready Avriter, by
taking notes of each part, to digest prayerfully in
private, what he had heard in the public ministry
of the word, — a practice productive of great good
to individuals, and by Avhich families may be much
profited while conversing upon the truths publicly
taught in the chm-ch ; instead of what Bunyan
Avould have justly called, frothy couA^ersation about
the dress or appearances of their felloAA'-worshippers.

This discourse has been published in every edi-
tion of the Avorks of our great author, but, most
strangely, the references to Scripture are omitted
in aU the editions since that of 1737. Bunyan's
anxiety at every step of this momentous inquiry
is to shew a * thus saith the Lord, ' in proof of
every assertion. In this treatise only, there are
nearly four hundred and forty distinct references
to the holy oracles. These are all carefully re-
stored, and have been collated Avith the standard
text, for want of Avhich some imperfections had
crept in, CA^en to the old editions; and Avhere the
author preferred the Genevan or Puritan version,
it is sheAA-n by a note at the foot of the page.

To point out beauties in such a discourse, is to
point to the whole treatise — it is aU admirable; a
solemn earnestness is fomid in every sentence;
even where Bunyan modestly differs with many
excellent diA'ines, Avhen treating upon the sufiier-
ings of the Saviour, between the period of his cru-
cifixion and of his resurrection: this is worthy of
our prayerful consideration; eA'er keeping in re-
membrance those deeply impressive — those aAvfidly
triumphant Avords of our Lord, ' It is fiiiishcd.'

The catholic spirit, Avhich so pervaded the mind
of Bunyan, appears conspicuously in this discourse;
and whatever bitter controversy this spirit occa-
sioned him, it ought to be impressed upon the heart

A



THE SAINTS' KNOWLEDGE OF CHRIST'S LOVE.



of every Christiau professor. It is a liberality
which shines more brightly, as reflected by one,
whose religious education was drawn solely from
the pure fountain of truth — the holy oracles; and
however unlettered he was, as to polite literature
or the learned languages, his Christian liberality
can no more he enlightened by the niggard spirit
of learned sectarians, than the sun could he illu-
minated by a rush-light. The inquiry was then,
as, alas, it is too frequent now, Are there many
that be saved? forgetful of the Saviour's answer
and just rebuke, What is that to thee, follow tliou
me, seek thine aimi salvation. The inquiry is pur-
sued a step farther, ' Can those who differ with me
be saved?' Hear the reply of one so honest and
so fully enibued with the Scriptures, into the truths
of which his spirit had been baptized, ' A man,
through unbelief, may think that Christ has no
love to him; and yet Christ may love him, with a
love that passeth knowledge. But Avhen men, in
the common course of their profession, will be al-
ways terminating here, that they know how, and
how far, Christ can love; and Avill thence be bold
to conclude of their own safety, and of the loss and
ruin of all that are not in the same notions, ojnnions,
formalities, ov judgment, as they. This is tlie ivorst
[pride] and greatest of all [delusions]. The text,
therefore, to rectify those false and erroneous con-
clusions, says, [the love of Christ] is a love that
passeth knov.ledge.' Page 33.

Throughout the whole, there is a continued ef-
fort to comfort the sincere, but doubting, Christian.
' Does Satan suggest that God will not hear your
stammering and chattering prayers? Does Satan
suggest that thy trials, and troubles, and afflictions,
are so many that you shall never get heyond them?
— relief is at hand, for Christ loves thee with a love
that passeth knowledge. This is a weapon that
will baffle the devil, when all other weapons fail.'

Pa^'C 33, 31.

The practical application of these soul-encoura" -



ing truths is, ' To walk in love — filled with all the
fulness of God.' Bunyan has, in enforcing this
duty, a very remarkable expression, ' these are the
men that sweeten the churches, and bring glory to
God and to religion. Why shovdd anything have
my heart but God, but Christ? He loves me, ho
loves me with love that passeth knowledge, and I
will love him. His love stripped him of all for
my sake; Lord, let my love strip me of all for thy
sake. I am a son of love, an object of love, a
monument of love; of free love, of distinguishing
love, of pecidiar love, and of love that passeth
knowledge: and why should not I Avalk in love —
in love to God, in love to man, in holy love, in love
mifeigned ? ' Page 39.

And will our ministering elders bear with me in
respectfidly and affectionately commending to them
John Bimyan, as an example of clevotedness to his
Master's service; of humble walking with God,
of tender faithfulness to the souls of men, of holy
fervour ? Under such a course of sermons as this
treatise would make, how attentively would our
children listen with reverence to the voice of truth,
and with a Divine blessing our earthen vessels
would be replenished with heavenly treasure. It
is delightful to read the testimony of Bunyan 's
ministerial friends, of various denominations, when
recording his extensive usefulness. His works do
follow him. And upon reading of them, we can-
not wonder when we hear, that on a week-day
morning, in the depth of winter, long before day-
light, the inclemency of frost and snow was braved
by crowded assemblies of hungry and thirsty souls,
who eagerly listened to hear him proclaim * The
Saints' liJnowledge of Christ's Love, or the un-
searchable riches of Christ — which passeth know-
ledge.'

May the effectual blessing of the Holy Spirit
attend the reading, as it did the preaching, of
these soul-saving truths.

Hacknet, Oct., 184S. Geo. Offor.



THE SAINTS' KNOWLEDGE OF CHRIST'S LOYE.



' TUkT YB M.\Y BE ACLE TO COMPREHEND WITH

ALL SALVTS, WHAT 75 THE BREADTH, AND LENGTH,
AND DEPTH, AND HEIGHT; AND TO KNOW THE LOVE

OF CmilST, WHICH PASSETH KNOWLEDGE.' EPH.

III. 18, 19.

The Apostle having, in the first chapter, treated
of the doctrine of election, and in the second, of
the reconcihng of the Gentiles with the Jews to the
Father, by his Sou, through the preaching of the



gospel; comes in the third chapter to shew that that
also was, as that of election, determined before the
world began. Now lest the afflictions that attend
the gospel should, by its raging among these Eplie-
sians, darken the glory of these things unto them;
therefore he makes lacre a brief repetition and
explanation, to the end they might be supported and
made live above them. He also joins thereto a
fervent prayer for them, that God would let them
see m the spirit and faith, how they, by God and



THE SAINTS' KNOWLEDGE OP CHRIST'S LOVE.



by Clii'ist, are secured from the evil of tlie -worst
that might come upon them, ' For this cause 1
bow my knees imto the Father of our Lord Jesus
Christ, of whom the whole family in heaven and
earth is named; that he would grant you, accord-
ing to the riches of his glory, to he strengthened
v\-ith might hy his Spirit in the inner man; that
Christ may dwell in yom* hearts hy faith; -that ye,
heing rooted and grounded in love, may he ahle to
comprehend with all saints, what is the hreadth,
and length, and depth, and height; and to know
the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge,' Sze.
Knowing, that their deep understanding what good
hy these were reserved for them, they would never
he discom-aged, whatever trouhles should attend
their profession.

Breadth, and length, and depth, and height, are
words that in themselves are hoth amhiguous, and
to wonderment; amhiguous, hecause unexplained,
and to vrondcrment, hecause they carry in them an
unexpressihle something; and that something that
which far out-goes all those things that can be
foimd in this world. The Apostle here was under
a spiritual surprize, for wliile meditating and writ-
ing, he was caught: The strength and glory of the
truths that he was endeavouring to fasten upon the
people to whom he wrote, took him away into their
glory, heyond what could to the full he uttered.
Besides, many times things are thus expressed, on
pm-pose to command attention, a stop and pause in
the mind ahout them ; and to divert, hy their great-
ness, the heart from the world, unto which they
natm-ally are so inclined. Also, truths are often
dehvered to us, hke wheat in full ears, to the end we
should riih them out hefore we eat them, and take
pains cdjout them, hefore wehave the comfort of them.

Breadth, length, depth, and height. In my
attempting to open these words, I wUl give you,
some that are of the same kind. And then show you,
First, The reasons of them ; and then also, Secondly,
Something of theu* fulness.

Those of the same kind, arc used sometimes to
shew us the power, force, and suhtilty of the ene-
mies of God's chm'ch, Dan. iv. 11. Rom. viii. 38, 39. But,

[Sometimes] Most properly to shew us the infinite
and imsearchahlc greatness of God, Job xi. 7,8, 9. Rom.

.\i. 33.

They arc here to he taken in tliis second sense,
that is, to suggest unto us the imsearchahle and
infinite greatness of God; who is a hreadth, heyond
aU hreadths; a length, heyond all lengths; a. depth,
heyond all depths; and a height, heyond all heights,
and that in aU his attributes; He is an etei'nal
being, an everlasting hemg, and in that respect he is
heyond aU measures, whether they he of breadth,
or length, or depth, or height. In all his attri-
hutes he is heyond all measm'e: Avhether you
measm-e hy words, hy thoughts, or hy the most



enlarged and exquisite apprehension; Ills greatness
is unsearchable; His judgments are unsearchable;
Jot) V. 9. He is infinite in wisdom. '0! the depth
of the riches hoth of the wisdom and knowlcd"-e of
God! ' Rom. xi. 33. ' If I speak of strength, lo, he is
strong;' Job ix. 19. yea, ' the thunder of his power who
can understand?' JobjcxvLU. 'There is none holy
as the Lord: ' 1 Sa. ii. 2. ' and his mercy is from ever-
lasting to everlasting, upon them that fear him.'
Ps. ciii. 17. The greatness of God, of the God and
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, is that, if rightly
considered, which wiU support the spirits of those
of his people that are frighted with the greatness
of then- adversaries. For here is a greatness
against a greatness. Pharaoh was great, hut God
more great, more great in power, more great in
wisdom, more great every way for the help of his
people ; wherein they dealt proudly, he was ahovo
them. These words therefpre take in for this
people, the great God who in his immensity and
infinite greatness is heyond all heings. But, to
come

First, to the reason of (lie words. They are
made use of to shew to the Ephesians, that God
with what he is in himself, and with what he hath
in liis power, is aU for the use and profit of the
believers. Else no great matter is held out to
them therehy. 'But this God is our Godi' there
is the comfort: For this cause therefore he pre-
senteth them with this description of him. To
wit, hy hreadth, and length, and depth, and height:
As who should say, the High God is j-ours; the
God that fills heaven and earth is yours; the God
whom the heaven of heavens cannot contain, is
yom-s; yea, the God whose works are wonderful,
and whose ways are past finding out, is yours.
Consider therefore the greatness that is for you,
that taketh part Avith you, and that will always
come in for your help against them that contend
with you. It is my support, it is my relief; it [is]
ni}" comfort in all my tribulations, and I would
have it yours, and so it wiU when we live in the
hvely faith thereof. Nor should we admit of dis-
trust in this matter from the consideration of our
own unworthincss, either taken from the finiteness
of our state, or the foulness of over ways. Ps. xivi.
For now, though God's attributes, several of them
in then- o^vn nature, are set against sin and sinners;
yea, vrere Ave righteous, are so high that needs
they must look over us, for 'tis to hun a conde-
scension to hehold things in heaven : How much
more then to open his eyes upon such as we: yet
hy the passion of Jesus Christ, they harmoniously
agree in the salvation of our souls. Hence God is
said to he love, iJo.iv. God is hve; might some
say, and justice too: hut his justice is turned with
Avisdom, power, hohness and truth, to love; yea.
to love those that he foui.d in his Sou; forasmuch



TlIE SAINTS' KNOWLEDGE OF CHRIST'S LOVE.



as there Is notliing faiilt - wortliy in Lis righteous-
ness which is put upon us. So then, as there is in



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