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(4) George, mentioned (Douglas says) in writs of Longformacus as brother
to Robert of Longformacus, in 1604, married Rachel Hepburn, and had a
son, John, baptised 13th August, 1620, one of the witnesses being John
Sinclair, laird of Stevenson (Haddington Parish Register, Riddell's MS.
" Baronetage") ; (5) John (Sir), of Stevenson (7?. M. S., 29th August, 1606) ;
(6) Thomas, of Over Bulbuster (/?. M. S., 19th June, 1606, No. 288); and
at least one daughter [Elizabeth], married to [John] Boig of Burnhouse
(Register of Deeds). John, the founder of the Sinclairs of Stevenson,
recently extinct in the male line, was a merchant burgess of Edinburgh,
a magistrate of the city, and at one time Dean of Guild. He acquired
Stevenson in East Lothian before August, 1620, and had a charter under the



Dunipace. 12S

Great Seal, ist June, 1624. He was in great favour with Charles I., who
created him a baronet in 1636. Several genealogical authors have thrown
doubt on the descent of the Sinclairs of Stevenson from the ancient stock of
Longformacus. Father Hay, in his books on the genealogies of Hay
of Tweeddale and Sinclair of Rosslyn, is responsible for first starting the
doubt. In his book on the Sinclairs of Rosslyn, he enumerates a number of
landowners of the name of Sinclair as " other families whom I have heard
of," and among those are Sinclair of Longformacus . . . and Sinclair of
Stevenson, " said to have come of a brewer in Leith."

In the " Genealogie of the Hayes of Tweeddale " (p. 42), when treating
of Mr. William Hay of Aberlady, his uncle. Father Hay waxes very bold,
and states that Mr. William Hay married " Helen, the eldest daughter of
Sir John Sinclair of ' Steinstone,' and Mareon MacNath [MacMath], grand-
child to the laird of MacNath." Then follows the statement that " Sir
John's grandfather was a famous brewer in Leith, where the Sinclair's
Society is yet extant," and that " upon him there is a song made, entitled
" The Cloutting of the Caldron." If this song is to be relied on at all, it was
written upon a certain " Sawney Sinclair," who is said to have been one of
the lairds of Rosslyn. There is no printed copy of this song in existence.'

How Father Hay got upon this scent is one of those genealogical puzzles
which will probably never be solved. In Mr. R. R. Stodart's "Scottish
Arms," he alludes to Father Hay's book on the Hays, and from notes left by
him in the Lyon Office he shows that he inclined to Father Hay's view.
Fortunately, however, he states in his notes several reasons to show how he
thought it improbable that the Sinclairs of Stevenson descended from
Longformacus, and these are based on mistakes. Mr. Stodart seems to have
thought that because Father Hay was born "about the time that the first
baronet died," and from his connexion, &c., that he was likely to be well
informed. Sir John Sinclair (I.), first baronet of Stevenson, died in 1650 ;
his will was registered on the 20th March of that year. His eldest son,
John (II.), had predeceased him, leaving by his wife, Isabel, daughter of
Robert, Lord Boyd, a son, also John (III.), who succeeded his grandfather
as second baronet, but died unmarried in August, 165 1, and was succeeded
by his brother, Robert, as third baronet. In the time of the third baronet.
Father Hay was born, as he tells himself, " betwixt eleven and twelve in the

> I am indebted to William Macmath, Esq., tor information about this song.



126 Dunipacc.



morning," i6th August, 1661. Mr. Stodart shows that in a birthbrief of Sir
Robert Sinclair, third baronet of Stevenson, the first baronet's mother is
stated to have been a daughter of Sinclair of Longformacus, and suggests
that this may have been the reason of the pretension of the Sinclairs of
Stevenson to be cadets of Longformacus. But this birthbrief is certainly
wrong. In many other birthbriefs and escutcheons, the mother of the first
baronet of Stevenson is given as Elizabeth Swinton, daughter of John
Swinton of that ilk, which is correct. Douglas, in his " Baronage," has
helped to confuse the issue by making Sir John, first of Stevenson, a son of
George Sinclair (who really was his brother), and grandson of Matthew
Sinclair of Longformacus and Elizabeth Swinton. Mr. Robert Riddell,
referring to this in his MS. " Baronetage," is rather severe on Douglas.
Douglas further adds to the confusion by stating that Sir John Sinclair of
Stevenson, on the death of his cousin, James Sinclair of Longformacus, had
a gift from Charles the First of the ward and non-entry of his heirs, dated
17th September, 1632. The original document is in the Register House,
Edinburgh, and no relationship is stated in it. James of Longformacus
was Sir John's nephew. In a birthbrief of Sir John Foulis, Bart., of Ravel-
ston, whose mother was Joan Sinclair, daughter of Sir John Sinclair, first
baronet of Stevenson, the father and mother of Sir John Sinclair are given
quite correctly as Matthew Sinclair of Longformacus and Elizabeth Swinton.
Sir John Foulis took an interest in his ancestrj-, as anyone can see by
studying the genealogical notes at the beginning of his "Account Book." In
the "Complete Baronetage," edited by G. E. C, 1902, Father Hay's myth
is again repeated in accounting for the origin of the Sinclairs of Stevenson,
and G. E. C. makes the Lyon Office responsible for the information which
is taken from Mr. Stodart's notes.

On 29th August, 1606, there is confirmation of a charter under the Great
Seal (No. 1797), granted by Alexander Boig of Burnhouse to John Sinclair,
merchant, brother-german to Robert Sinclair of Longformacus, his heirs and
assignees whomsoever, of the lands of Utherstoun and Harcarse in the county
of Berwick. (See also 4th July, 1616, No. 1461, wherein John Sinclair is
designed merchant-burgess of Edinburgh.) In a charter under the Great
Seal, dated nth December, 1630 (No. 1677), John Sinclair, now of Steven-
son, and bailie of Edinburgh, is referred to in connexion with the same
lands, and still later on ist March, 1644, there is another charter (No. 1536),
in which Robert Sinclair of Longformacus (grandnephew of Sir John



Dunipacc. I27



Sinclair of Stevenson), Sir John Sinclair of Stevenson, his son, the late Mr.
John Sinclair, fiar of Stevenson, John Sinclair, son and heir of the late John,
fiar of Stevenson, &c., are all mentioned in connexion with the same lands.
An examination of these charters can leave no doubt that the John Sinclair,
merchant, designed brother-german to Robert Sinclair of Longformacus in
1606, is the same man later designed Sir John Sinclair, baronet, of Steven-
son. Other proofs might be brought forward to show the relationship of Sir
John Sinclair with the family of Longformacus.

In his will he names Robert Sinclair of Longformacus tutor to his
grandson and heir and also to his other grandchildren, but, in case he is not
able to take this office, he names Sir John Sinclair of Herdmanston and his
other sons-in-law. Sir John left four hundred merks to the laird of Long-
formacus, "to be putt furth in @ rent to keep ane scool in the Kirk of
Langermacus."

Sir John Sinclair of Stevenson's daughter, Joan, or Jean, was married
to George Foulis of Ravelston, whose eldest son. Sir John Foulis, Bart.,
of Ravelston, married Margaret Primrose, the eldest daughter of Sir
Archibald Primrose, Bart., who purchased Dunipace in 1677, and from
this marriage the family of Foulis-Primrose of Dunipace descended.



Note Z>.— Richard Lawson.

In all the printed pedigrees of the Primrose family, James Primrose,
Clerk of the Privy Council, is stated to have married for his second wife,
Catherine Lawson, daughter of Richard Lawson of Boghall. This is a
mistake. There was no Richard Lawson, laird of Boghall, at this time.
Catherine Lawson was the daughter of Richard Lawson, burgess of Edin-
burgh, a notable citizen there. He appears to have been a bookseller and
publisher, and is frequently alluded to in the Privy Council Records. In
Vol. XL, p. 514°, it is stated that he was summoned before the High
Commission for opening his booth on Christmas Day, and other misde-
meanours. On p. 5931, it is stated that his house was searched by the Guard
for copies of the " Perth Assembly." He was called to account for printing
and selling the Assembly's Catechism. On p. 626, there is a letter from
James VI. asking by what license Richard Lawson and others had printed



Dunipace.



the Catechism? Lawson was banished to Aberdeen for a time. His will
is in the Edinburgh Commissariot and is dated 3rd January, 1623. In it he
mentions his wife, Agnes Mayne, and his "luiffing son, James Primrose."
He also mentions a David Lawson, Notary. This will is printed in the
Bannatyne Miscellany, Vol. III. Richard Lawson probably belonged to the
Boghall family, but I have not been able to connect him. The fact that
James Primrose and his father-in-law took different views of James VI.'s
ecclesiastical policy does not seem to have affected their family relationship
judging from the terms by which James Primrose is alluded to in the will.



Note £.— Foulis-Primrose Pedigree.

The following pedigree of the Primrose and Foulis families only shows
those branches or members more or less connected with Dunipace. For
details of the Primrose family see Nisbet's "Heraldic Plates," and for
the Foulis family, — Introduction to Sir JohnFoulis's Account Book (Scottish
Hist. Society). On page xvi of the Introduction to Sir John Foulis's
Account Book, the editor states, " George Foulis [first of Ravelston] married
first in 1596, Sibilla Gilbert, concerning whose family I know nothing."
Sibilla Gilbert was almost certainly the daughter of Mr. Thomas Gilbert,
advocate, by his wife. Christian Henderson. Mr. Thomas Gilbert was the
eldest son of Michael Gilbert, a wealthy goldsmith of Edinburgh, who sat
in the Scots Parliament, by his wife, Sibilla Wight, (Edin. Com. Rec,
R. M. S., &c.)

From the Edinburgh Commissariot and the Swinton Papers, kindly
shown to me by the Rev. John Anderson, curator of the Record Office,
I am enabled to fill in some names in the ancestry of Sir John Foulis
left blank in the Account Book. James Foulis of Colinton (father of George
Foulis, first of Ravelston) married Anna Heriot, daughter of Mr. Robert
Heriot of Lumphoy, "son of the late John Heriot" (Protocol Book of James
Harlaw in Record Office, under date 25th June, 1550), by his wife, Helen
Swinton, daughter of John Swinton of Swinton ; and Henry Foulis of Colinton,
father of the above James, married Margaret Haldane, daughter of
James Haldane of Gleneagles, by his wife, Margaret Erskine. Margaret
Haldane's will is dated 17th December, 1578. In it she names her brother,



GENE^LIES



(i) Elizabeth Keith (2) Agnes Gray daughter of Sir
Hon. Sir James Keith Wm. Gray of Pittendrum.



grand-daughta
George, fifth Earl f



ROSEBERY.



1. Margaret, 2. Catherine,



b. 1641

II

Sir Jo. FouUs,

Bt. of

Ravelston



. II

Sir Dav.

Carnegie of

Pitarrow



Margaret

Henry Fletcher

of Saltoun,

brother of

Andrew F. of S.,

the Patriot



ZEL,

Bempill,

-Gen.
id.

gham



11. Archibald John,

b. 1 8th December, 1661,

first Earl of Rosebery

II

Dorothea,

only child and heiress of

Evringham Cressy

of Birkin, Co. York



128 Dunipace.



the Catechism? Lawson was banished to Aberdeen for a time. His will
is in the Edinburgh Commissariot and is dated 3rd January', 1623. In it he
mentions his wife, Agnes Mayne, and his " luiffing son, James Primrose."
He also mentions a David Lawson, Notary. This will is printed in the
Bannatyne Miscellany, Vol. III. Richard Lawson probably belonged to the
Boghall family, but I have not been able to connect him. The fact that
James Primrose and his father-in-law took different views of James VI.'s
ecclesiastical policy does not seem to have affected their family relationship
judging from the terms by which James Primrose is alluded to in the will.



Note £.— Foulis-Primrose Pedigree,

The following pedigree of the Primrose and Foulis families only shows
those branches or members more or less connected with Dunipace. For
details of the Primrose family see Nisbet's "Heraldic Plates," and for
the Foulis family, — Introduction to Sir John Foulis's Account Book (Scottish
Hist. Society). On page xvi of the Introduction to Sir John Foulis's
Account Book, the editor states, " George Foulis [first of Ravelston] married
first in 1596, Sibilla Gilbert, concerning whose family I know nothing."
Sibilla Gilbert was almost certainly the daughter of Mr. Thomas Gilbert,
advocate, by his wife. Christian Henderson. Mr. Thomas Gilbert was the
eldest son of Michael Gilbert, a wealthy goldsmith of Edinburgh, who sat
in the Scots Parliament, by his wife, Sibilla Wight, (Edin. Com. Rec,
R. M. S., &c.)

From the Edinburgh Commissariot and the Swinton Papers, kindly
shown to me by the Rev. John Anderson, curator of the Record Office,
I am enabled to fill in some names in the ancestry of Sir John Foulis
left blank in the Account Book. James Foulis of Colinton (father of George
Foulis, first of Ravelston) married Anna Heriot, daughter of Mr. Robert
Heriot of Lumphoy, "son of the late John Heriot" (Protocol Book of James
Harlaw in Record Office, under date 25th June, 1550), by his wife, Helen
Swinton, daughter of John Swinton of Swinton ; and Henry Foulis of Colinton,
father of the above James, married Margaret Haldane, daughter of
James Haldane of Gleneagles, by his wife, Margaret Erskine. Margaret
Haldane's will is dated 17th December, 1578. In it she names her brother,



GENEALOGICAL CHART OF PRIMROSE AND FOULIS FAMILIES.



(i) Elizabeth Keith, daughter (

Hon. Sir James Keith of Benholc

granddaughter of

George, fifth Earl Marischal



Sir ARCHIBALD PRIMROSE, Bt. of Dalmeny
(purchased Dunipace 1677)



(2) Agnes Gray, daughter of Sir
Wni. Gray of Pittendrura.



ROSEBERY.



1


1


1


1




Mil


1 Margaret,


2. Catherine,


4. Sir James,


5. Sir William






b. 1641


11


Kt.of


II






SirDav.


Barnbougle


Margaret,






Sir Jo. FouHs,


Carnegie of


II


dau. of


6.


Alexander






Elizabeth, dau.


Patrick Scott






Ravelston




of Sir Robt.


of


7.


Archibald



9. Mary,
d. young



10. Grizzel,

III

(i) Lord Sempill,

d.s.p.,

{2) Brig.-Gen.

Richd.
Cunningham



Margaret

Henry Fletcher

of Saltoun,

brother of

Andrew F. of S.,

the Patriot



11. Archibald John,

b. 1 8th December, 1661,

first Earl of Rosebery

II

Dorothea,

only child and heiress of

Evringham Cressy

of Birkin, Co. York



VISCOUNT PRIMROSE.



FOULIS AND FOULIS-PRIMROSE.



1. Jean

(i)JohnHuy

of

Linplum

(2) Sir James

Justice



2. Archibald 3. Elizabeth 4. George
(Primrose) || (Primrose)

of Alex. Gibson of

Dunipace
II



DunipacL:
d.s.p.

1684



Durie



\/



/. Margaret

married at

Dunipace,

4th July, 1695,

to
John Glas of

Sauchie,
son of Alex.
Glas of S.,
by his wife,

Marion,
dau. of Col.
John Murray James Rae of
of Touchadam Coltinhove,

and and

Janet Nisbet grand-dau. of
Sir John Sin-
clair, Bart.
ofStevenson



William 12. Grizzell



Ja

Cunninghame,
dau. of Sir
John C. of
Caprington,
by Margaret,
dau. of



of

Woodhall

II

Janet

Cunningham,

John C. of
Enterkine,
by Marie,

John Murray

of
Touchadam



(i) Alexander

Melville

of Murdo-

cairnie

(2) Dr. David
Balfour,



Sir Michael 11. Alex.



""imu

5. James

6. John
8. Cath.



FOULIS-PRIMROSE.



Primrose

Lilly

Eleanor

Campbell,

dau. of James,

second Earl of

Loudoun,

afterwards

wife of John,

second Earl

of Stair



('e"Mj;



James,
second Earl

Mary, d. of
Hon, John

Campbell of
Mamore,

and sister to


10. Lady
Mary


11. Lady

Margaret

Alexr.,
ninth Earl of
Caithness


Sir Arch.

Foulis-
Primrose,

Bart, of
Dunipace,


John,
fourth Duke
of Argyll

1


with issue
See under
Primro.c


Lady
Dorothea


John, Lord

Dalmeny,

d. nth Aug.,

I7S5


1 James,
Neil, Lord second Earl
Primrose Fife

sue. as

third Earl,

8th May, 1756



Sir Archd. = (i) Lady Margt.

of Fleming,

Dunipace, d. of John,

suffered at sixth Earl of

Carlisle, Wigton,

1746 d.s.p.

= (2) Lady Mary

Primrose,

dau. of

first Earl of

Rosebery



Several John of

daughters Sauchie, sold
Sauchie
in 1748

Mentioned
in Sir A.
Primrose's
letter to his



Marion Janet

. II
Robert Hope,



Archibald,


Hugh, third


second


Viscount


Viscount,


11


d.s.p.


Anne, dau. of




Pet T Drelincourt,




Dean of Armagh.




She died in 1775




(the Jacobite




Lady Primrose)



Dorothea,
1 27th July,



II


11




John




Buchanan,


London


M.D.



Fleming, Five other
d. 5th Aug., dWghters



Dunipace.



Robert Haldane of Balwill (part of the Barony of Gleneagles), and her
nephew, Mr. James Haldane. There is the following curious item in
the inventory :—"Awand to Helen Brown, wodwyf [pawnwife] ye [sum] of
ane hundre' sei.x punds for ye qlk she has rested umqi« ladyis ornaments of
her body and silver work stone in ye Inventory above written in pledge
yairfor."

Mr. Henry Foulis of Colinton had a brother, Mr. Adam, omitted
in the pedigrees of the family. This Mr. Adam Foulis's will is in the
Edinburgh Commissariot, and is dated 17th February, 1574. He was "p^sone
of Lamelethame." Among other items in the will there are the following : —
" I leave all my buks c&c. wit ane signet of gold wt my mother's armes on it
[His mother was a Brown of Hartree] ... to Mr James Foulis my
brodyr conform to ane donation of ye said geir maid be me to ye said
Mr James of befoir of ye date at Colinetoun, ye first day of May the zeir
of God [1572]." Item—" I leve my saule to be ressauit into ye eternall glory
of hevin throuch ye merites of ye passioun of Jesus Christ or lord and my
bodie civilie to be erdit in ye Kirkzaird of Ed"^ besyde John Knox sepulture
gif it may be possible."

He leaves his younger brother, Mr. James Foulis, his only executor, &c.,
and instructs him " to caus my bodie be honestlie convoyit ye day of
my sepulture as he will answer in ye pressence of ye eternall qlk sail judge
ye world."

Witness to his signature, Gilber Balfour of Westraw, &c.



TORWOOD.

{Parish of Diinipace.)



THE estate of Tonvood, i.e., the wood on the hill, is one of
the most interesting, both as regards the lands and the
families which have possessed them. The feature of
greatest interest to antiquaries on these lands is the Broch, or
Tapoch, the highest point of the Torwood. The Roman Road,
or Camelon Causeway, passes through the Torwood about
lOO yards from the foot of the rock on which the mound
stands. The late Mr. Gray Dalrymple of Woodhead, F.S.A.
Scot, in a paper written for the Glasgow Archaeological Society
in 1886, gives the following description of the Broch: —

"This edifice was first excavated in August, 1864, by Colonel Joseph
Dundas' of Carron Hall and Torwood, who read an account of his discovery to
the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland on i8th March, 1865. Its appearance
previous to its excavation was that of a conical hill or mound, flat on the top.
On the west side of the mound there is a precipitous crag of about 100 feet
in depth running north and south for about Soo yards ; on the north, east,
and south sides the slope is gradual. At about 70 feet from the centre of the
mound there are the remains of a wall carried round the mound until it
reaches the precipice on each side. Beyond this there are the remains of a
second wall. Both of these walls, on the earth being removed, were found

I See under Carron Hall,



Torwood. 131

to be built of large stones roughly put together without cement. On the
other side there were traces of a third wall extending along the face of the
cliff and filling up those places where the rock is not so abrupt as at the
other parts. These outworks are not an isolated characteristic of the
Torwood Broch, as four of the Caithness and Orkney Brochs are similarly
protected. At the time of Colonel Dundas's excavations the mound was
covered with heather and brackens, and overgrown by a clump of large fir
trees. Operations were first commenced on the south side, and resulted in
the discovery of the staircase, the doorway of which was completely blocked
up with rubble. Work was then begun on the top of the mound, when, after
the removal of an immense mass of large stones, rubble, and earth, which
was thrown over on the east side to the amount of upwards of 200 tons, the
structure was found to be a circular wall 15 feet thick, enclosing an area 35
feet in diameter. At the height of 6 feet from the floor the upper part of the
wall is put back 18 inches, thus forming a sort of shelf The entrance door-
way has two of the massive lintels still upon it. It is about 7 feet high and
3 feet wide at the door-cheeks, behind which are the usual bar-holes. The
whole length of the passage is 18 feet 6 inches. To the left of the doorway
is the staircase, as usual, in the thickness of the wall. There are 11 steps,
and the length of the passage leading into them is about 12 feet. The
height of wall remaining is not sufficient to show any trace of the galleries,
but the presence of the stair implies their former e.xistence. There are no
chambers in the thickness of the wall on the ground floor, but all the other
features of the building are those of the typical Broch."'

There appears to have been a castle on Torwood in the days
when the De Umfravilles possessed Dunipace.^ The ruins of
Torwood mansion, which are still to be seen, and of which an
illustration is given, appear from their architecture to belong to
the middle of the sixteenth century. A description of Torwood-
head mansion will be found in " The Castellated and Domestic
Architecture of Scotland," by Messrs. M'Gibbon and Ross.

1 For full particulars see " Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scot-
land," Vol. VI., pp. 259-265, years 1864-66.
2- "Wallace Book," C. Rogers.



132 Torwood.

The coat of arms of the Forresters is engraved on a stone in
an old wall near the ruins of the mansion. Under the arms is
the date 1565, which is probably the year of the erection of the
mansion.

These lands originally belonged to the Crown, and we find
King Robert II. resigning them in favour of Sir William More,
Knight of Abercorn, in a charter granted 1371-1390.' Robert III.
(1390- 1406) confirms a charter of David More of Abercorn
to David Fleming of Biggar of the forest of Torwood." Soon
after this date, Torwood must have become the property of
the Forresters, as in a charter under the Great Seal, dated
I2th February, 1463, Alexander Forrester of Torwood is
designed son of the late Robert Forrester of Torwood. There
are two charters in the Great Seal, dated 5th July, 1450, in
which Robert Forrester is designed nepoti et heredi, Malcolm
Forrester" of Pettintostate and Elizabeth Nobill, his wife. These
charters are the earliest public records of the Forresters owning
land in Stirlingshire. These Forresters must have been near
relatives of the family of Torwood, though I have not been able
to ascertain the exact connexion. The lands mentioned in
these charters came into possession of the Torwood branch
about 148 1.' The Forrester family had been settled in and
around Stirling for a century at least before this date. A
Robert Forrester was a bailie of Stirling in 1360,° and was alive

> Robertson's Index.
=" Ibid.

3 The MS. pedigree of the Forresters (see description In Appendix) gives a
Malcolm Forrester, in the days of King James, who married the heiress of " Torwood-
heid." His son Malcolm is said to have married Margaret Heron, heiress of
sklne.
E. M. S.
Stirling Burgh Records.



Tor wood. 133

in 1366-7. John Forrester was custumar of Stirling, 1372-3.'
He was dead in 1375, when his widow had a payment made to
her by command of the King (Robert II.) William Forrester
was bailie of Stirling, 1411-13. From this date on to the middle
of the seventeenth century, no other name is so closely identified
with the municipality of Stirling. A list of the various members
of the Forrester family connected with the municipality will be
found in the Appendix.

FORRESTER OF TORWOOD.

In the manuscript pedigree of the Forresters made by R. M.''
(Robert Milne) in 1708, he traces the name in Scotland back
to 1228, when he alludes to an Archibald Forrester, said to
be mentioned in the Cartulary of Ross.

Robert Forrester, who was bailie of Stirling in 1360, and
Adam, burgess of Edinburgh, who was the founder of the family


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