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John Collins Warren.

Genealogy of Warren, with some historical sketches online

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"


8


J. Gaiiibier


D'Estaing-s Fleet


America


177.8


8


Lt. W. Smith


.< •>


"





Combinetl Fleet Channel 1779

Capt. Butchart French Shii-s 'West Indies, retaken 17>-.i

soon after by the
Invincible 74



Ships of War Taken from the French during the War.



Ville de Paris

Glorieux

L' Hector

L^ Pcgase

L'Ardent

L'Cator

IjC Jason

Minazare

L'Actionaire

Ld- Prothi

Le Compte D'Artois

Solitare

Name unknown

Ld! Concord^

L'Artois
La Fayette

L Eelleforest

L'Uel>e

L'Aigli

L'Lyon
L Fortune
Imporieux
Belle Ponle
Lc I'rudente
L-e Blanchi
1^ Monnieur
Le Nymjih



GuDS By >Vhom



10-1 1
74 j. Lord Rodney


12th April 1782


!■ West Indies


74 J






74 &■ Jno. Jervis




1782 '


Of! Bre - t.


M Lord Rodney


12^^ April 1782


West Indies


^ } Lord Hood


19 April


1782


Jlona Passage, West

Indies


64 Capt. Luttrell




1762


Bay


6-1 Hon. F. Maitland






Channel


&4 Adm. Digby




1760


Off Brest


6-1 Capt. McBride






Off Caix; Clear


6-i Capt. Collins




1761


West Iiidies "


64 Capt. Butchart




1782


"


40 R. Linzee




1783


Off St Kitts Wc-il
Indies


44 R. Howe




1780


Coast of Porttigal


42 P. Carteret




1781


Banks of Newfound-
land


40 Privateers




1781




40 H. Trollope




1782


Channel


40 K. Elphiston




1782


Near the Delaware
America


40 A. Gardner




1779


America


3» Adm. Rowley




"


West Indies


3S Adm. Graves




1781


North America


36 Sir Jas Wallace




1779


Bay Biscay


36 M. Everitt




1779


West Indies


30 Adm. Rowley




'•


"


3f5 Ld Longford




1780


British Channel


3C W. P. Williams




"


Off Brest



20:



Military ojid Naval L<}sst'3 i7i the Iicvoh'.tion.



N'ames Guns By \\'h..m

L'Amazoue 36 E. Salter



I. Licorne
L'PulUvs
L Dana
Bireau

Alcmene

Saitine

L'Esperance

L'Ainericaine

I.e Jra^'oiene

Cologni

L Amiable



'i~ I L^irJ Kcpple

32 S. J. Wallace

32 P. Po\N-nall

32 G. A. Byron

32 S^ Edwi Vernon

32 G. Montaarue

32 Hon. W. Waldegrave

32 A. S. DouKla.<5

32 Patton <t Stewart

32 LonJ Hood



L Sybil 3(5

Duguessaau 30

L Erin 28

Lc Menagere 2S

Le Mamonde 23

Due D'Coigney 2S

Le Xeckar 2S

Le Franklin 23

Ix? Coquette 28

Lc Robecque 20

Le Ilercule 26

Le Audacieuse 24

Rohan Soubise 24
Le Compte D'Artois 20

Jean I5art 20

Le Com pas 20

Le Charlotte 20
Princess D'Kobecq 20
Marquise deLejua- 2i)

lay

L Aventure 20

Du Guay Tniin 20

Le Due D'Estioac 20

Le Perli IS

Reynard 18

Le Senegal 13

L' Abundance 13

Alert 18

Ceres 18

L'Espion IS

Le Revenge IC

Hussard 16

Due de Chartres 16

Royal Louis 16

Le Frederic 16

Harlequin 10

Lamea 16

Anti Briton 16

Le Mutine 14

Le Pilote 14

Le Victoire 14

Le Bamardine 14

Coureur 14

Le Temeraire 10

Le Gloire SO 8



Capt Rujsell

T. Boston

Adm. Rowley

Adm. Parker

G. A. Byron

Sir \V. Buraaby

W. Grant

J. Cowlins

Capt. King

Capt Pellew

Hon F. Maitland

Hon. T. Cadogai

J. Brown

M. Robinson

J. Douglass

Adm. Parker

C. Fcrtescue

M. Squire

T. Lloyd & E. Everitt

Adm. Arbuthnot

P. Reeve

R. Man

R. Home

J. Hartwell

I. Ingliss

Adm. Kempenfeld

J. Lutridge

Lord Hood

E. Dod

J. Montague

Sir J* Wallace

J. Peyton

Adm. Digby

Adm. Darby

S. Reeve

A. Courtney

R. P. Cooper

P. Pownall

Reynolds

P. P. Cooper

H. S. Conway

Lord Kepf'le

J. Melcombe

Adm. Darby



When


Where


1732


North America, after




retaken


1773


Channel


1779


Coiicale Bay


"


Channel


"


West Indies


"


East Indies


1780


North America


1781


Channel


"


North America


"


North Seas


19 April 17 S2


Mona Passage West




Indies


Feby 1783


Off New York


17S0


Channel


.,


West Indies


.,


Channel


1731


F^t Indies


"


Near Jamaica


178;?


West Indies


1731


Off Ireland


1779


V.'est Imlies


"


Bay


1731


North Sea


1779


Channel


.'■'


West Indies


1780


Channel


'■


North Sea


"


Channel


..


Charleston


"


Channel


1731


"


1780


Coast of Portugal


"


West Indies


"


River Gambia K L


1781


Oil Brest


'•


North America


1782


Mona Passage


"


OS St Chriitophers


1781


Channel


1779


Bay


1781


"


1781


North America


"


Channel


"


Off Newfoundland


1782


Channel


"


Irish Channel


1779


Channel


1782


Irish Channel


"


Channel


1778


"


1782


"


1731





Milifar)/ and Navol Losses in the lia-ohnion. 203



Spanish Ships of War Capturi:



Phoenix, now Gib-


SO-




raltar






Dili^entc


70




M on area


70


Lord Rodney


I'rincessa


70




Guiniiscuano, now


61




P. William






St Michael


72


Sir Roger airtL^


San Carlos


50


C. Inglis


Santa Monica


36


G. MontagTie


Santa Marganta


36


Com. Johnston


Santa Lucadio


36


Sir Geo Collier


San Carlos


32




San Raphael


30




San Buono


26




Santa Teresa


24


y Lord Rodney


San Firmin


16




San Vincente


11




Le Grana


28


R. Man


Santa Cat«lina


22


Capt. Stoney



Off Cape St Vincent



Febry



17S3


Europa Point. Gib-




ralUr


1"9


Near Jamaica, Pi<inL-.h




Main


"


In the Bay


"


Coast of I'urtupal




Bay


17S0


Car>e St Vincent


17>il


Bay


1783


Jamaica



Dutch Ships Captured.



Names


Guns By VThova


When


Whero


Mars (now Prince


60 Lord Rodney


1781


Near St Eusfatias Wo.n


Edward)






Indies


Princess Carolina


50 Com. Stewart


'<


OfT the Downs


Rott<-rdam


50 G. K. Elphinston


"


The British Channel


Castor


36 vv. R. WilUams


"


Off Gibraltar


Mars

St Eustatia


^ } Lord Rodney


..


St Eustatia


Hercules (now


21-






Orestes)


• Artois, McBride


•■


North Sea


Mars (now Pylades


21.







American Ships Captured.



Names


Gang


By what Ship and Commander


When


Wh<>n<


Charles town


40


Diomede Astrea &


T. L. Frederick


17S2


Off the IV lA-






others


M. Squires etc




ware


Confederacy


36


Orpheus & Roe-
buck


Capt. Col pay
&. A. S. Douglass


1781


America


Hancock (late


32


Rainbow


Sir Geo. Collier


1777


Off Halifax


Iris)










America


Raliegh


32


Experiment etc


Sir Jos Wallace


1778


Near Virginia


Providence


32




Adm. Arbuthnot


17S0


Charleston S. C.


Trumbull


32




Adm. Digby


1781


North Amc.-ira


Delaware


23


Troops at Phila-
delphia




1777


Off Philadelphia


Virginia


28


Emerald etc




1773


In the Chc.^e-
pcak


Boston (now


28




Adm. Arbuthnot


1780


Charleston S C


Charleston)













204



Military and Navid Losses in the JRcvolution.

Guus By what Ship and Commander When WTicro

Eoebuck li Merlea Douglass <i Duncan 17S0 America



U. Duncan 17S1

Gordon

J. Jones 1"77

A. Berkley

J. Ferguson

J. MoBridc

gir J. Wallace 1778

J. Cummings

Sir Geo. Collier

Adm. Barrington

T. Cadogan 1779

S. Reeve "

Sir John ChiTemy "
W. Waldegrave

J. Hawkes 17!-:0

Thomj^cn 1781

J. Bazely 1777

Adm. Arbuthnot 17S0



IVf uctor (r.ow


26


Eoebuck i y


liussar)






Belisarius


24


Medea


Gen. \Ya*hingtou


22


Chatham


Oliver Cromwell


20


Beaver


Cabot


20


Cabc't


Trumbull (now


20


Venus


Tol«eo)






Am. TarUir(lIin-


20


Bienfaisant


chinbrooke)






I'orUniouth


26


Exf eriment


i^t Fetor


20


Aurora


llft!ni«len


20 1


' Rainbow


Monmouth




PunJcer Hill (now


20




Surprise)






Gen. Sullivan


20


Licorne


Ja*on


20


Surprise


Oliver Cromwell


20


Daphne etc


CumK-rlaiid (late


20


Pomona


Rover)






Uttty


20


Iris


Gen. Mifflin


20


Hyena


lAxineton


18


Alert


Kanger (late


18




Halifax)






\N'j«j;hiiit:ton (late


18




Gen. Mack)






Aurora (cow


18




Mentor)






Duke Cumberland 16




Kattk-snake (now


16




Cf-rmorant)






Beamnout


14




Morning Star


14




Veni:s


14


Belisarius



At Penobscot
■\Vest Indies



Channel
North America



"SVest Indies
North America



Channel

Charleston



Adm. Graves

Adm. Edwards "

Adm. Digby "

Adm. Arbuthnot 1780

Adm. Edwards 1781
R. Graves



1781 North America



Newfoundland
America

Charleston
Newfoundland
North America



French Ships of the Lint: and Frigates Lost or Destroyed.



Le Diadem


74


Le Casar


74


Le .Scij.io


64


Le Palmier


74


Le Meguifique


74


L .^r^'onauth


70


L-J Eurgoyne


74


Let ere


36


lut Voleur


26


Le Recluse


24


La Caprieieuse


36



Sunk 12i> Apl. by L<5rd Rodney, West Indies

Blown up after the action

Stranded in Samana Bay

Foundered on her passage from West Indies

Lost in Boston Ilarbour

Lost at St. Jago

Lost on her passage from America to the West Indies

Nonsuch, Sr Jo Wallace 1779 in the Bay

Experiment & others " Concale Bay

Le Prudente & Licorne 1760 Bay



Spanish Ships of the Line and Frigates Lo.st or Destroyed,



Ean Julian 70 '

St Domingo 70 •

Santa Catalina 20



Lord Rodney January 17K)

Success, C. M. Pole 1782



At the Relief of Gibraltar
Near Gibraltar



MiUtrmj and Ktuol Losses in (he Jicvoluthn.
Dutch Ships of the Lixe Lost or Destroyed.

Honiiidia Cri Sunk by Adm. Parker oil the Doeger Bank

rni:.n &1 North Sea 17S-2 Dogger Bauk

Prince William 61 Lost at the Texel

JosrCfli 60 Lost

L<:'ydenbourg (A Lost, East Indies



205



Warren

V.'ii^hington

Eilincham

Pjindolph

Kattk*nake

Bricoli

Queen of Franc? 2S

Trusty 26

Gen. Moultrie



Americax Ships Destroyed.

By a Squadron under Sir Geo. Collier at Penobscot ittt

By the troops on the Delaware

Under Capt. Nicholas Biddle. blown up by the Yarmouth. KTS
og Charleston
20 ^ By the Swift, Capt. Tathwell. of! Cape Henry Virginia

y the Squadron under Admiral Arbuthnot, at Charleston :r-.J



20



KUled
Brig. Genls
Cols. & Lt. Cols.
Majors
Captains
Lieuts
Comeu? & EnsisoLS



Naval Capts
" Lieuts



Lost at Sea



Admirals
Commodores
Captains
Lieuts





Wounded


2


Generals


12


Cols & Lt Cols


11


Majors


55


Capts


94


Lieuts


24


Ensigns


198


Staff


23




26


Naval Capts


>47


" Lieuts




Killed in duels


1




1


KiUed


26


" in duels


16


Wounded



5

13

19

107

192

43

8

387
13
51

451
29

291

29

451



291



Total



771



206 A London Tavern in 1699.

■ *•

If
*.

A LOXDOX TAVERN IX 1GP9.

[The following account is reprinted from tte London Spy for Febru-
ary, 1G99. Thi.> uiairazine was a kind of plebeian Spectator which ap-
pciircd from 1G9S to 1700. It was quite popular in the first half of the
eighteenth contun.-, and the fourth edition, from which we are copying,
bears date 1753. The author was Edward Ward (1G67-1731), of
whom a full account will be found iu the Dictionary of National Biog-
raphy, lie is mentioned in Pope's Dunciad. There is also an account
of liim, with extracts from the Spy, iu The Gentleman' s Magcuine for
October, 1S57, pp. 355-365. The copy of "Ward's magazine used by
us was presented to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in 1891 by
William Middleton Bartram, and came from the library of John Bar-
tram the botanist. The edition is apparently unique in Philadelphia,
but the University of Pennsylvania possesses that of 1703.

Although written on a low plane, Ward's magazine is valuable to the
antiquarian as a picture of London life at the end of the seventeenth
century. The extracts in The Gentleman's Magazine were made with
this view. Several points on costume may be seen, — e.g., the bon-
grace or umbrella, a name for the broad-brimmed hat. What we now
call umbrellas were not used in England until about 1750. The
" flapping umbrellas" of our Quaker drinkers were the wide hat-brims
of the time, allowed to hang and flap, instead of being looped or
"cocked" in the fashion. (See Amelia Mott Gummere's Quaker, p.
C3.) Another fact worth noting is the expression that Friends had
been "allowed of late to be good judges of the comfortable creature."
George Fox died in 1G91, so that our scene dates from eight years after
his death, when the stern presence which loose livers were so justly
afraid of was no longer present to rebuke.]

THE LONDON SPY. PART IV.

A Dcscrriptlon of a Quaker's Tavern in Finch-Liine. The

Qwihers method of drinking. A Song. A Character of

the Vintner. . . .

Being uow well tired witla the Day's Fatigue, our thirsty

Veins and drooping Spirits call'd for the Assistance of a

cordial Flask. In order to gratify our craving Appetites

v/ith thiri Refreshment, we stood a while debating what

Tavern wo t-hould cliuse to enrich our Minds with unadid-



A London lavcrn in 1G99. 207

UraUdJui-c. My Friend recollected a little sanctified Amhi-
adah in Finch-Lane, whose Futylc Xict'.rr had acquired a
singular Reputation among the staggering Zealots of the f^oltr
Fraternity, who are allowed of late to be as good Judges of
tlie comfortable Crtatare, as a Frotcstant Fricst, or a Laiitodi-
narian Faddlc-Cap, who (as Looks play) drink wine on *V^//(-
days.

To this salutiferous Fountain of Nature's choicest Juleps,
our Inclinations led us, though we knew the httle IJuler of
the Mansion intended it chieily for watering the Lambs of
Grace, and not to succour the ecd Onspring of a rtprobate
Generation.

AVhen we had entered our Land of Promise, whicli ovcr-
tiow'd with more healthful Riches than either Milk or
Honey, we found all Things were as silent as the mourning
Attendants at a rich Man's Funeral ; no ringing of Bar-
bell, bawling of Drawers, or rattling of Pot-lids ; but a
general Hush ordered to be kept thro' the whole Family, as
a "Warning to all Tipplers at their Entrance, how they make
a iN'oise to awake the Spirit, lest it move the Masters and
Drawers to stand still when you call them, and refuse to
draw you any more Wine, for fear the Inward Man should
break out into open Disorder.

In the Entry we met two or three blushing Saints, who
had been holding forth so long over the Glass, that had it
not been for their flapping Urnbrella's, Faritanical dats,
and diminutice Cravats, shap'd like the Rose of a Forson's
JLitband, I should have taken them, by their scarlet F<iet:s,
to be good Christians. They pass'd by us as upright and as
stiff as so many Figures in a Raree-show ; as if a Touch of
the Hat had been committing of Sacrilege, or a ceremoni-
ous Xod a rank Idolatry.

A drunken-look'd Drawer, disguis'd in a sober Garb, like
a Wolf in Sheep's Cloathing, or the Devil in a Fryar's Habit,
shew'd us into the Kitchen, which we told him we were
desirous of being in, as Cricket's covet Ovens, for the sake
of their Warmth: Several of Father Ramsey's slouching



208 -A. London laveni in 1699.

Disciples sat hovering over their Half-pints, like so many
coy Gossips over their Quarterns of Brandy, as if they were
afraid any body should sec them ; they cast as many fro-
ward Looks upon us Swordsmen, as so many Misere would
be apt to do upon a Couple of spunging Acquaintance ;
staring as if they took us for some of the Wild-Irish, that
should have cut their Throats in the beginning of the
Revolution.

However, we bid ourselves welcome into their Company;
and were forced for want of room, the kitchen being well
fill'd, to mix I{iggle-d€-pifjgle-di\ as the Books among the Jaek-
Daii's upon tlie Battlements of a Church Steeple : They
Leering at us under their Bon-graces, ^^■ith as much Con-
tempt as so many Primitive Christians at a Couple of
Pagans.

We, like tnie Brofestant Topers, scorning the Hypocrisy of
Tippling by Half pints, as if we drank rather to wash away
our Sins than our Sorroirs, appear'd bare-fac'd, call'd for a
Quart at once, and soon discover'd our Religion by our
Drinking ; whilst they, like fn/^ Buritans, gifted "svith abun-
dance of holy Ch.eats, were unwilling to be catch'd over
more than half a pint, though they'll drink twenty at a
Sitting.

The "Wine prov'd extraordinary, which indeed was no
more than we expected, when we found ourselves sur-
rounded with so many spiritual 3Ium-chances, whose religious
Looks shew them to be true Lovers of what the Bighteous
are too apt to esteem as the chiefest blessing of Brovidence.

"We had not sat long, observing the Humours of the
drowthy Saints about us, but several ajnongst them began
to look as chearful, as if they had dro^^nied the terrible
Apprehensions of Futurity, and thought no more of Dam-
nation than a of a Twelvemonth's standing.

The Drawer now was const<antly employ'd in replenishing
their scanty Measures ; for once warm'd they began to drink
so fast, 'twas the business of one Servant to keep them
doincr. iSrotNvithstauding their great Aversion to external



A London larern in 1099. 209

Ceremony, one pluck'd off liis Ilat, and ask'd liis next
Neighbour, What dost think, Fi'iend, this cost me? But before
thou teU.est me, let me drink ; and I hope thou imdcrstmuV st imj
Mtoning. This I suppose was the canting Metliod of paying
more than ordinary Veneration to some particular Thought.^,
wliich, by this Stratagem, was render'd iutelHgible to each
other: For I took Notice this alltr/orical Method of drinking
some obliging Health was observ'd through the whole
Society, with the Reverence of uncover'd Heads, under a
crafty Pretence of examining into the Price of each other's
Hats; and when they were desirous to elevate their let]"ir-
f/'ek ^Spirits with the Circulation of a Bumper, one fills it and
offers the prevailing Temptation to his Lefi-liand Com-
panion, in tliese "Words, saying. Friend, does the Spirit move
thee to receive the good Creature thus plentifulbj ? The other
replies. Yea, do thou take and enjoy the Fi'uits of thj own
Labour, a7id by the Help of Grace I will drink another as full.
Thus did the liquorish Saints quaff it about as merrily,
atl;er their precise canting Manner, as so many Country
Parsons over a Tub of Ale, when freed from the remarks
of their censorious Parishioners ; till, like reprobate Sinners,
who have not the Fear of Providence before their Eyes,
thej^ were deluded by Satan into a wicked State of Drunk-
enness.

By this Time the subtile Spirits of the noble Juice had
given us a fresh Motion of the Wheels of Life, and corrol)-
orated those Springs which impart Vigour and ActiN'ity to
the whole Engine of Mortality; insomuch that my Friend
muf^t needs be so frolicksome to tune his Pipes, and enter-
tain us with a Song ; in order to try whether those who
were deaf to Reason and good Manners, had any Ears to-
wards Musick \\dtli their Wine, which are usually held to
be Buch inseparable Companions, that the true Relish of the
one can never be enjoy'd without the Assistance of the
other : And because the VTords happen'd in some Measure
applicable to that present Juncture, I have thought it not
amiss to insert them.

VOL. XXYII. — 14



ojo A London Tavern in 1699.

SOXG.

"Why bliould Christians ho reJtrain'd

From the brisk enliv'ning Juice,
Heaven only has ordain' d

(Thro' Love to Man) for human Use?
Should not Chrd be deny'd '

To the Turl-.', they'd wiser grow ;
I^jiv their Alcoran aside,

And soon believe as Christians do.

Chorus.

For Wine and Religion, like Musick and Wine,
As they're good in themselves, do to Goodness incline ;
And make both the Spirit and Flesh so divine,
That our Faces and Graces both equally shine :
Then still let the Bumper round Christendom pass.
For Paradise lost may be found in a Glass.

Just as my Friend had ended his Sonnet m came tlie
iiltle Lord of tlie tipphng Tenement, about the Height of
a Xine-pin, with his Ilead in a Hat of such capacious Di-
nirnf>ions, that his Body was as much drown'd under the
disproportion^ Brims of this unconscionable Custor, as a
/V-/;/;v under the Umbrage of a Giant's Bon-grace^ or a^NIouse
crejit inlo a . . . pan. He was button'd into a plain Yest-
iiK-nt tliat toucli'd no Part of his Body but his Shoulders;
hi.-5 Coat being so large, and his Carcase so little, that it
hung about him like a Maulkin upon a Cross-stick in a
Country pease-field : His Arms hung dangling Hke a Mob's
T':fh/ mounted upon a Red-Herring on St. David's Bay,
and liis Legs so slender, they bid defiance to any Parish
Stocks.

He waited a little while the Motion of the Spirit, and
wlien he had compos'd his Countenance, and put himself
iiito a fit Posture for Reproof, he brealcs out into the follow-
ing Oration, Pro>/, Friend, forbear tids prophanc Hollowing and
JLnAing in my House ; tlic wicked Noise thou makest among my
ioha- Friends is neither pleasing to them nor me; and since 1
Jwd the Wuie is too pou'erful for tlaj Inward Man, I must needs



A Jx)ndon Tavmi in 1699. 211

till thee, I will draw the no 'uxoi't of it: I therefore d<.^ ire th-e to
pay for what thou hast had, and depart u\y House ; for I do not
like thy Ways, nor does any body here approve of thy rantinq
Doings.

AVe were not mucli siirpriz'd jit this Piece of fanatical
Cirility, it being no more than %vhat we expected ; but tlie
Manner of his Delivciy rendered hisAVords so very diverting,
that we could not forbear laughing him into such a Passion,
that the Looks of the little Saint discover'd as great a Dted
in his Heart, as a pious Disciple of his Bigness could be
well possess'd ^\nth : Then, according to his Pcqucst, we
paid our Reckoning, and left him in the Condition of
Vinegar and Crab's-Eyes mix'd ; that is, upon a great
Ferment.

From thence (pursuant to my Friend's Inclinations) wc
adjourn'd to the Sign of the Angel in Fencharch-street.



212 Thomas Jarmci/, Prorincml Oouncillor.

TirOALAS JAX.XEY, PROVINCJAL COUXCILLOE.

BY MILKS WHITE, JR., BALTIMORE, MD.

. Thomas Januey, the second son of Thomas ' and EKza-
beth (Worthington) Junney, was born at Styall, in the town-
ship of Pownall Foe, parish of ^Vilmslow, Macclesfield Hun-
dred, county Cheshire, England, in 1633, and, according
to the church records of "WilmsloNr parish, was baptized 11
January, 1634. Among the numbers of the rural population
of Midland England v.'ho in the middle of the seventeenth
century found, in the religion preached by George Fox, the
spinlual rest and strength they longed for ^'ere Thomas
and Elizabeth Janney and their six children. Concerning
their son Thomas, the subject of this article, we are told
that,2

"Whilst still young, the Lord was graciouslv pleased to visit him
with the regenerating intluence of his Holy Spirit, through which, as he
bowed in obedience thereto, the work of sanctiilcation was commenced
and carried on in him. He was convinced of the Truth s.s held by
Friends, (at the first preaching thereof in Cheshire), about the year
1654, he being in the twenty-first year of his age." "The next year
he received a gift in the ministry, preaching the gospel of Christ freely,
and travelled into many parts of England, and also in Ireland, and had
a fervent and sound testimony for truth, and his conversation and course
of life accorded with his doctrine," and the Lord blessed his labours
of love. "He sufiered imprisonments and fines for his faithful testimony
.against tithes and for his attendance of religious meetings, but none
of these things moved him. His chief concern appeared to be that the
blessed Truth might prosper in the earth, and that the name of the Lord
might be magnified. He was an example of great meekness, combined
with ardent zeal ; and thus his labours for the good of others being
sweetened by divine love, were eminently successful in reclaiming



^ For an account of Thomas Janney' s English ance.stors, see "The
Quaker Janneys of Cheshire" in Publicafions So. Hist. Assoc, vol, %

' The Friend, vol. xxvii. p. 340 ; Pief>j Promoted, ed. 1789, vol. i.
p. 228.



Thomas Jannq/, Procincial CnmciUor. 213

oirer.dcrs. His zeal did not cause him to reprove with asperity, neither
did Jiis love lead hiui to pass by offences against the Truth. His love
led him to reprove error for the good of the erring and the benefit of
others, and his zeal taught him th&t his Master's work couid only 1<>
done in his ^ilatter's Spirit."

The ftill extent to wliicli be siiifered imprisonment j^.tkI



Online LibraryJohn Collins WarrenGenealogy of Warren, with some historical sketches → online text (page 16 of 39)