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John Collins Warren.

Genealogy of Warren, with some historical sketches online

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The foremost men of science and letters are found among
the long hst of names that constitute its roll of members.



834 The American Fhilosop/dcal Sociefi/, 174S-1903.

Beginning \vith Franklin and Rittenhouse and Kinnersley
and the great names of our early colonial history, it added
those of the most illustrious English and Continental
students and scholars. After the Revolution it showed the
gratitude due our French allies by electing the most distin-
guished Frenchmen who had served in the War of Ameri-
can Lidepondence, La Fayette and Rochambeau and their
companions in arms and the early diplomatic representatives
of France, and the great philosophers and men of science
and letters, and that tie is still kept alive by the many
distinguished Frenchmen elected from time to time. Every
country has since then supplied its quota, and Germany and
Italy and Russia and South America and Australia and
Canada are well represented. Every great American found
wortliy of the honor has gladly accepted it.

The local representation at its annual meetings included
many famous Philadelphia men of science, and at its last
annual meeting every university and college, every scientific
society, and every learned body of the country was well
represented by the members. Philadelphia can point with
pride to such men as S. Weir Mitchell and Joseph Wharton,
George F. Baer and Alexander J. Cassatt, Hampton Carson
and Governor Pennypacker, Horace Howard Furness, —
three generations of that honored name were at one time on
its roll, — and, indeed, heredity has often been noted in the
Baches, the descendants of FrankHu, the Biddies, the Cad-
waladers, the Pattersons, the Haupts, the Leas, the derricks,
the Morrises, the Rawles, the Fishers, the Sellers, the Wis-
tars, vv'hile science and art and letters have given many of
their best fruits in the present active members, so that the
American Philosophical Society still maintains its position
alike fi'om age and merit.

The broad and cathoHc nature of the American Philo-
sophical Society is well shown by the various branches of
science and literature represented in its officers and in
universities and colleges represented by those who read
papers at its annual meeting and by those who discussed



' The American Philosophical Socicfi^', 17^3-1903. 335

tlicm. The Patron of the Society is the Governor of Penn-
pvlvania, ex orHcio, — an ofhce as old as the Society itself;
tlie present incumbent is the Hon. Samuel W. Pennypacker,
a Trustee of the University of Pennsylvania ; the Presirient
is Yice-Provost Edgar F. Smith, Harrison Professor of
Chemistry in the University of Pennsylvania; tlie Vice-
Presidents are Professor George F. Barker, Emeritus Profes-
soi' of Physics in the University' of Pennsylvania ; Professor
S. P. Langley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution ot
Washington, I). C, and a distinguished astronomer: and
Professor W. B. Scott, Professor of Geology at Princeton
University. The Secretaries are Dr. I. Minis Hays, who is
also the Librarian; Professor E. G. Conklin, a noted Biolo-
gist; Professor Arthur "\Y. Goodspeed, Professor of Physics
and head of the Pandal Morgan Physical Laboratory; and
Professor Morris Jastrow, Jr., Professor of Assyriology and
Librarian of the University of Pennsylvania. On the long
list of those who read papers at the annual meeting there
were representatives of Cornell, of Lafayette, of Johns Hop-
kins, of Lehigh, of the Royal Society of London, of the Car-
negie Listitute, of the Pockefeller Institute, of Ilaverford,
of the University of Pennsylvania, of Princeton, of Columbia,
of Brown, of Bryn ]Mawr, of Harvard ; and among those who
discussed the papers, a noteworthy representative of science
was Joseph Wharton, the founder of the Wharton School
of the L'niversity and President of the Board of Trustees of
Swarthmore. He showed an intimate knowledge of various
branches of science and of numerous fields of learning not
often combined in a successful man of business, who is at
the same time a poet and a manufacturer. The presence
of representatives of the Central High School of Philadel-
phia and of other kindred institutions showed that the
American Philosophical Society keeps in touch with all
modern learning and rewards by membership attainment
in every branch of useful knowledge. The life of such a
Society, covering a period of over a hundred and sixty
years, from 1743 to 1903, may well gain renewed vigor by



33G The American Pldlosophical Socidy, 1743-1903.

the large co-oi'-oration of scholars aud studoDts in its con-
tinued and energetic activity.

The Bi-Centonnial of the birthday of Franklin i^ to be
celebrated by tlie American Philosophical Society in such a
way as io enlist, it is to be hoped, substantial aid for a
Franklin Memorial Hall, in which this Society, encouraged
by liberal endowment, may carry on the work so well
planned and begun by Franklin. The long record of its
many-sided activity in the broad field of useful knowledge
is the best tribiue to Frankhn, and it is characteristic of his
own long and useful career. His portrait and that of each
of his successors in the office of President hanij on its
walls, as a constant inspiration to their fellow-members to
be up and doing. ^Vhat the Society has done in the past
and is doing now, is the best reason for anticipating a long
life of increasing activity and usefulness and for a recogni-
tion of its claim for a share of the generous flood of gifts
for scientific research.



James L'jgan as a Piv/. 337



JA3IES LOGAX AS A POET.

BY AMELIA MOTT GUMMF.RE.

The literary tastes of James Logan, and tlie collections
of the Loganian Library are too well known to need ex-
planation to Pennsylvanians. The following Latin poem,
however, recently found among some of Logan's unpul>-
lished correspondence, is a good example of the case with
which the cultivated gentleman of his generation could
handle the classics. It was written upon the death of a
favorite little daughter, wlio died in infancy. There is a
tender paternal touch which lends charm to the sentiment,
and the critic must be reminded that the poem was written
as a relief to emotion, and not for the purposes of the
scholar.

James Logan was not a man of extraordinary attain-
ments, although he was well educated and accomplished.
Li his day a knovrledge of the classics was included in
every system of education, ^vlembers of Parhament fell
into Latin when English foiled to express their feelings.
An apt classical quotation was at once appreciated and ap-
plaiided. We fear that the days of Parliamentarian Latin
are over; and as for the classics among our own members
of Congress, the very thought calls forth a smile. This
rather clever little poem and its versified English transla-
tion by a young classical scholar may interest students ot
Pennsylvania history.

Sis licet in teneris abrepta parent ibus annis
Vita exenipta priua quam videare frui,

At patris et matrix pleno prLecordia tangit
Ictu disccsoUd, cara puella, tuus.

Non tulit eloquii certas a'tatula vires
Ut posses animi prodere sen.'^a tui ;
VOL. XXVII.— 22



338 James Lo(j(m as a Pod.

At tulit ingcnii iam |)arturientis imago

Posset lit indubiis mille patere inodis
Blanditia^ amplexus molle^, lususque iocique,

Et siniulata ira et nou simulatus amor,
Inque patrem tencr atiectus quern vincere morbi

Aut Lethe infautis uon valuere vires.
Nulla dies unquam broc memori de poctore toilet

Parva eed affectus pignora certa tui.
Corporis exuvias iam profectura parabas

La>ta iter extremum iam sul>itura polos.
Quum dudum fixos tenuisti ius iu ocellos

Quo patri posses dicere, "Care, vale!"
Fixos discedens toi-sisti dulcis ocellos

Hisque patri visa es dicere, "Care, vale!"
Et tremula iu caram flexisti lumina matrem

Dicere quo posses, "Tu quoque, cara, vale!"
lamque valedicto ba^c Kterna lumina somno

Condis et exanimi corpore tota fugis.
Tu quixjue, cara, vale, modo nata parentibus iufans.

La^titife et luctus causa perennis eris.



ON THE DEATH OF A FAVORITE CHILD.

BY JAMES LOG AX.



Torn from a home that held thee dear
While years were tender, grief unknown.
Leaving thy parents sad and lone

To drop the silent, mindiul tear ;

Thy youth did not permit of speech
To show the workings of the mind :
Unconscious actions all combined

To prove what words could never teach.

The sweetness of a baby grace,

The sport, the jest, the anger feigned,
The love sincere that always reigned

And held dominion in thy face :

This sweet emotion, like a breeze

That fans thy father's heart and thine,
Can never yield to Death's decline

Or ravages of dire disease.



James Logan as a Pod. 339

Within our teinlor breasts there lie

The certain pledges of thj' love.

The spirit, joyl'ul, hie.s above.
To prove the soul can never die.

A benediction fi-om thy eyes

To oui-s, that said a sad farewell :

The freedom from the body's cell,
And journey to the welcome skies.

Thy days were in the early leaf —

An infent angel, bright to see :

Eternal peace! Thou' It always be
A cause of mingled joy and grief.

— lit M. G., Translator.!^



<;'-r



340 Friciids and (heir Mccdnj-IIousc^ at Ci-osswicks, N, J.

f

FEIENDS AXD THEIR MEETIXG-IIOUSES AT
CEOSSWICKS, XEW JEESEY.

'•-' ' BY JOSEPH S. MIDDLETON.

On the 16th of Sixth month, 1677, the ship "Kent"
arrived at "Nevr Castle, Deh^ware, with 230 passengers.
Among them was Thomas Foulke and other Friends. In
tlie Eleventh month of tlie same year came the ship " Wil-
ling Mind," with 70 passengers, who lauded near Salem,
l^ew Jersey. This was followed soon after by the '• Martha,"
from Hull, with about 114 passengers, who landed near
Philadelphia. The next that arrived was the " Shield,"
from Hull, which came up the river and landed at Burling-
ton in Tenth month, 1678.

A large portion of these passengers were Friends from
England, who settled in Pennsylvania and adjacent parts of
"West Xew Jersey.

Tliomas Foulke, Samuel and John Bunting, Francis
Davenport, Thomas Gilberthorpe, Thomas Lambert, "Wil-
liam Satterthwaite, William Black, Samuel Taylor, and
others, migrated eastward from the different landings and
formed a settlement among the Indians on the Cross-weeks-
ung, or divided creek (Crosswicks).

In order more clearly to comprehend the original settle-
ment, our minds must revert to the primitive condition ot
the Indian settlement, neither roads nor bridges, but paths
or trails through the woods and canoes to cross the creek.

The Friends established a crossing on the farm of Francis
Davenport, now occupied by Walter Bird, known as the
Da\'id Rulon or Job Sutterly farm. This was called " Daven-
port's crossing," or the upper ford, the lower ford being near
where the Camden and Amboy Kailroad crosses the creek
below Yardville, near the junction of Doctor's Creek mth
Crosswicks Creek.



Friciub and th.tir Mtrthi^-Iioxses of Crosswu-ks, X. J. 3 il

A forcible reminder of the Indian village or settlement is
the crooked street through the village of Crosswieks, beijig
the original trail or pathway through the forest. A lone
survivor of the original forest remains standing in the yard
in front of the meeting-house, a noble oak, with arms up-
lifted, as though saying, " I am monarch of all I survey,"
and appeahng for protection. Could it but reveal to us
what has passed beneath and around it, what history would
be unfolded !

The first record of a meeting for Divine worship by
the Society of Friends at Gross'A-icks was at the house of
Thomas Lambert in 1677. In. 1684 the meeting was held
at the house of Francis Davenport. Prior to the erection
of a meeting-house it was the custom to hold meetings for
worship in the house of some Friend in the neighborhood.

On the " •2nd of ye 8th mo., 1684," the monthly meeting
was established and held at the house of Francis Davenport.
The record is signed by John Wilford, Francis Daven-
port, and AVilliam Watson, and recorded as " Chesterfield
Monthly Meeting of Friends," by which name it is known
at the present time.

The first marriages recorded in the meeting were :

Samuel Bunting to Mary Foulke, daughter of Thomas,
1684.

Ill 1686, Samuel Taylor and Susanna Horsman.

In 1686, Anthony Woodward and Hannah Foulke.

Li 1687, liichard Harrison and Ruth Buckman.

" At a monthly meeting held at the house of Francis
Davenport, ye 7th of ye 11th mo. 1685 it was directed that
deeds of Trust for the burying ground at Chesterfield be
made from Thomas Foulke, Grantor, to Francis Davenport,
Samuel Bunting, John Bunting, Thomas Gilberthcrpc,
Roger Parke and Robert Wilson."

At the meeting in the 12th rao. the Committee reported
it executed and placed in the hands of Thomas Lambert of
JSTottingham (township).

"At a monthly meeting held at the house of Thomas



342 Friends and (heir JLrO'nij-IIousts at Crosswicks, N. J.

Lambert ye 5th of ye 1st mo. IGOl it is proposed to have a
meeting house built at ye burying ground at Chestertield.''

At the meeting in the Ctli mo. it Avas "agreed to build
the house on tlie south side of the creek, most Friends
think best to liave it at ye Grave Yard.''

"At je meeting held at Francis Davenport's ye 7th of ye
11 mo. 1601, Francis Davenport, Samuel Andrews, William
Wood, Samuel Bunting and Thomas Gilberthorpe, are ap-
pointed to treat -vN-ith carpenters about building a meeting
house at or near the Grave Yard in Chcsterlield."

"At a meeting held ye 4th of ye 10 mo 1692 they re-
ported they have let the work unto John Greene."

"At a meeting held ye 2d. of ye 12 mo. 1692 John
Wilsford Jr, Robert Murfin, Edward Eockhill, and John
Abbot were appointed to receive a Deed of Trust for land
to build the meeting house on."

This deed, dated 3rd mo. 3d, 1692, conveyed six acres of
land from Samuel Bunting and John Bunting to Robert
Murfin, John Abbot, Edward Rockliill and John Wilsford
for a consideration of ten shillings.

The first meeting recorded held in the new meeting-
house was " ye 6th. of ye 8th. mo. 1693."

" At a monthly meeting held at the meeting house in
Chesterfield ye 4th of ye 11 mo. 1693 the committee re-
ported they had settled ^\-ith John Greene about ye meet-
ing house building according to agreement, paid him £40,
and for buy work one Pound, also two shillings given him
over and above."

"There remains on hand £4. lis. Id. when all ye sub-
scriptions are paid in. Also paid for lime 6s. 8d."

" At a monthly meeting held ye 3rd of ye 1st. mo. 1697,
a committee was appointed to build a frame stable for the
accommodation of horses, 18 by 24 ft, with 6 feet posts to
be near the meeting house, to be planked on the inside three
feet high, to be v/ell clapboarded on ye outside, well shingled
^s^tll oak shingles Sc finished before ye 12th month next."

"At a monthly meeting held ye 7th. of ye 1st. mo. 1706



Frinuh and (heir Jl'edinij-IIoi'.scs a( Cros-^iricks, X. J. 343

it is considered of tlli^; meetinp: that it is necessary that a
meeting liouse be built, and pursuant thereunto, this meet-
ing appoints Francis Davenport and AVilUani "Wood to care
about the letting of i'oriy thousand bricks to be made in
order thereto. TJiey reported ye 2nd of ye 3rd mo. 1706
that they had agreed v.ith William Mott for 40,000 bricks
for 40 Pounds, and John Farnsworth for 200 bushels of
lime. At the meeting in the 11th nu^. Samuel Bunting,
Francis Davenport, "William Wood, John Tantura, Thomas
Lambert, and Robert Wilson were appointed to agree with
some carpenter for doing ye carpenter work of ye meeting
house proposed to be built."

"At a monthly meeting held ye 6th of ye l'2th mo 1706
the Committee reported they had agreed udth John Tantum
to do the carpenter work. William Wood was appointed
to give notice to workmen that Friends are ready to treat
\\dth them about ye bricklaying, &c, and Friends appointed
to make agreements are Samuel Bunting, Francis Daven-
port, John Tantum, William Wood and Thomas Lambert.
John Farnsworth promiseth to have two hundred bushels of
lime dchvered at his mother's landing, he to have four pence
per bushel for his carriage of the same."

"At a monthly meeting held ye 6th of ye 1 mo 1707,
Friends appointed to agree with workmen reported they
had agreed with them to begin about the first of ye third
month next. John Tantum and Thomas Lambert are ap-
pointed to agree for shingles to be made and brought up,
for covering of said meeting house."

There seems to be no report when the house was fin-
ished.

" At a monthly meeting held ye 2nd. of ye 8 mo 1712,
William Wood and John Tantum were appointed to pro-
cure, to be made for the use of this meeting a convenient
Carriage for the easy and decent convepng of corpse to the
burying place," which was accordingly done.

"At a monthly meeting held ye 7th of ye 1st mo., 1773,
the Treasurer produced an account of the cost of the



344 D-icnds and (heir Madng-IIouses at Crossiric^s, X. J.

stove, and erecting the same in its place, amountini:; to
£S. 4s. lOd."'

"At a monthly meeting held ye 4th of ye 2nd mo 1773
the subject of enlarging the meeting house in order to
accommodate the Quarterly Meeting considered it was
agreed to request the Quarterly Meeting to appoint a com-
mittee to confer with us on the subject." This was done
and <* a committee of the Quarterly Meeting attended the
Monthly held ye 4th of ye 3rd mo 1773; at which time
a committee was appointed to confer with them, namely,
Anthony Sykes, John Bullock, Amos Middleton, Thomas
Thorn, James Lawrie, Joseph Horner, Benjamin Clark,
Joseph Duer, Jonathan Wright, Stacy Potts, Caleb Shreve,
Amos Wright, Edward Rockhill and Samuel Satterthwait
Jr, respecting an addition to the meeting house. This
committee met several times and agreed to report their
sentiments thereon to said Quarter."

"At a monthly held ye 1st of ye 7th mo 1773. This
meeting appoints Stacy Potts, Abraham Skirm, James
Oldell, and Benjamin Clark to N^iew the meeting house at
Buckingham Pa, ascertain its expense and report to our
next meeting." At the next meeting they reported it " to
be convenient, and ye amount of cost about £750." " This
meeting concluded to build one about the like size and
appointed a committee from the difierent meetings to take
subscriptions, in order to enable us to accompUsh said
building."

"At a monthly meeting held ye 4th of ye 11 mo 1773.
Abel Middleton and Isaiah Bobbins are appointed mana-
gers to carry ou the building in the best manner they are
capable of, and Caleb Xewbold is appointed to assist them
in procuring materials. It is requested that the former
committee meet with the managers at convenient times, to
give them what assistance they can therein." The meeting
appoints Amos Middleton, Treasurer, to receive the several
collections for said purpose, and pay to the managers as
they may have need of it.



Friouh and th.ir JIidhai-Honses at Crossin'ch^ X, ./. 345

"At a monrhlv nieoting held ye Otli of ye 11th mo 1775.
The commiitt-e appointed to inspect the former siihscriju
tions for money to buihi our new meeting house, and also
consider what move \\-ill be necessary for eompletimr the
same report, thoy think it needful to raise £374; which
was referred to the next meeting."' At wliich meeting it
was directed to be done. I find no report of when the
liouse was finished.

At a PrepaTiitive meeting held the 29th of 1st mo., 1784,
a committee was appointed to collect money to build a
school-house, which was done, and a brick school-house
built near the meeting-house.

At a Preparative meeting held 24th of 2nd mo., 1785,
a committee was appointed to open a school in the back
part of the old meeting-house, with the consent of Joseph
Forsythe.

"At a monthly meeting held 5th of 10 mo. 1802. The
Friends appointed to sell the old meeting house and hay
liOuse, which at a previous meeting had been directed to be
sold and removed from the premises, reported it done, the
net amount oi^ sales being .S228.50, which was directed to
be apportioned among the School Funds, of the Prepara-
tive Meetings belonging to Chesterfield [Monthly greeting."'

When the British troops marched from Philadelphia on
their way to Monmouth, in Sixth month, 1778, a detach-
ment attempted to cross the bridge at Crosswicks. Tiie
Americans stationed on the opposite side, under General
Dickinson, in endeavoring to prevent them from cross-
ing, shot three cannon-balls into the meeting-house, two
through the roof, and one into the brick wall, the imprint
of which is yet \-isible. This last-mentioned ball is now in
the possession of Margaret B. Ellis; it measures three inches
in diameter and weighs three and one-half pounds.



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Online LibraryJohn Collins WarrenGenealogy of Warren, with some historical sketches → online text (page 26 of 39)